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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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« Reply #480 on: February 18, 2014, 09:29:41 pm »

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/18/japan-snow-idUSL3N0LN2D820140218
2/18/14
Second Japan snow storm leaves thousands stranded as toll rises to 23

Feb 18 (Reuters) - Snow-choked roads cut off thousands on Tuesday as parts of Japan struggled to dig out from its second storm in a week, with the death toll rising to at least 23.

Train services were suspended in some areas after the Valentine's Day storm dumped more than a metre of snow in parts of central Japan and blanketed the capital with record snow for the second weekend in a row, snarling airline traffic and slowing production at some Japanese automakers.

The freak storm dumped more than 1.1 metres of snow in Yamanashi prefecture in central Japan, the most in more than a century of record-keeping, and lesser amounts across a wide swathe of the eastern and northeastern parts of the nation. Tokyo was hit by 27 cm (10.6 inches).

By Tuesday, least 23 people had died, including some killed in traffic accidents or by being caught under snow that fell from roofs. Several died in cars stuck in the snow, apparently from carbon monoxide poisoning as they ran their car engines to keep warm.

At the peak of the storm, thousands of households lost power and hundreds of flights were cancelled. Train services were disrupted and highways closed, with some of the nation's main arteries jammed with cars, some for days.

Toyota Motor Corp resumed operations at three plants in central Japan on Tuesday after suspending them a day earlier due to disruption in the supply of parts, but the outlook was unclear for another Toyota plant. Other carmakers suffered similar disruptions.

In neighbouring South Korea, ten people attending a party for new university students were killed on Monday in southern Gyeongju when a building at a mountain resort collapsed under the weight of snow. (Additional reporting by Nobuhiro Kubo and Chang-ran Kim, editing by Nick Macfie)
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« Reply #481 on: February 19, 2014, 08:05:22 am »

The Drought In Brazil Has Gotten So Bad That 142 Cities Are Now Rationing Water

Did you know that the drought in Brazil is so bad that some neighborhoods are only being allowed to get water once every three days? At this point, 142 Brazilian cities are rationing water and there does not appear to be much hope that this crippling drought is going to end any time soon. 

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/the-drought-in-brazil-has-gotten-so-bad-that-142-cities-are-now-rationing-water
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« Reply #482 on: February 19, 2014, 03:50:51 pm »

The Drought In Brazil Has Gotten So Bad That 142 Cities Are Now Rationing Water

Did you know that the drought in Brazil is so bad that some neighborhoods are only being allowed to get water once every three days? At this point, 142 Brazilian cities are rationing water and there does not appear to be much hope that this crippling drought is going to end any time soon. 

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/the-drought-in-brazil-has-gotten-so-bad-that-142-cities-are-now-rationing-water

Famines in diverse places...
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« Reply #483 on: February 22, 2014, 09:22:13 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/storms-39-changed-coastline-forever-39-141102636.html
2/21/14

Storms 'have changed coastline forever'

London (AFP) - The huge storms and powerful winds that have battered the coast of Britain in recent weeks have caused years' worth of erosion and damage, authorities said on Friday.

On some stretches of coast, the extreme weather has stripped away sand from stretches of beaches to reveal ancient forests, leaving the stumps of 6,000-year-old oaks protruding.

The National Trust, which manages much of the country's most scenic coastline, said the storms have caused problems that it did not expect to have to deal with for years.

Cliffs have crumbled, beaches and sand dunes have been eroded, heavy seas have breached defences and shorelines and harbours have been damaged.

At Birling Gap on the Sussex coast, a popular tourist spot, the speed of erosion has been "breathtaking", according to Jane Cecil, the National Trust general manager for the area.

"We've had about seven years of erosion in just two months. As a result of this loss of coastline, we are having to act now and take down the sun lounge and ice cream parlour, safeguarding the integrity of the rest of the building.

"We have to think long term," she said.

On the west coast Wales, the remains of oak trees dating back to the Bronze Age have been revealed as the sand has been stripped away.

The tree stumps on the beach between Borth and Ynyslas are said by some to be the origins of the legend of "Cantre'r Gwaelod", which according to myth was a kingdom now submerged under the waters of Cardigan Bay.

Meanwhile, as the mopping-up operation continues after widespread flooding in southwest and southeast England, a group of experts said the damage was preventable.

Some of the damage from the recent floods could have been prevented if the correct water management techniques had been used, they said.

The experts from 15 organisations urged Prime Minister David Cameron to convene a conference bringing together government departments and the embattled Environment Agency -- whose initial response to the floods drew heavy criticism -- to put in place measures to prevent a repeat of the floods.

The experts said sustainable drainage systems should be fitted on existing and new buildings and that buildings and land that cannot be properly protected should be made resilient to withstand flooding.

All new housing on flood plains should be resilient when built, they said.

In a sign of how the floods have re-shaped the political agenda, the main opposition Labour Party pledged that investment in flood defences would be a priority if it wins next year's general election.

The Met Office national weather service has said Britain suffered its wettest winter in records dating back more than a century.
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« Reply #484 on: March 02, 2014, 05:27:43 pm »

I don't know if it's the weather control mod system, but nonetheless DFW got hit with freezing rain and some snow today...

http://news.yahoo.com/massive-storm-system-takes-aim-winter-weary-midwest-172728804--finance.html
Massive storm system takes aim at winter-weary Midwest, East
3/2/14

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A massive winter storm system packing cold air, snow and freezing rain was pummeling the central United States on Sunday and headed for the East Coast, sending temperatures plummeting and causing major delays for weekend travelers.

Rainfall and snow associated with the system will stretch over 1,500 miles, from southeastern Colorado to southern Massachusetts, meteorologists said.

The storm "is going to be a real mess," said Bruce Sullivan, a senior meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Silver Spring, Maryland.

"The main system is injecting a lot of moisture and cold air out over the Southern Plains," he said. "It's going to bring quite a bit of precipitation."


Heavy snow could fall on an area from eastern Kansas to Pennsylvania, with the Mid-Atlantic, including parts of Maryland and Washington D.C., getting up to 12 inches before the system dissipates on Monday.

More than 1,500 flights were canceled and another 2,880 were delayed as of mid-afternoon on Sunday, according to the airline tracking site FlightAware.com.

"Ripple-effect flight delays and cancellations are likely to reach nationwide," said AccuWeather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

The storm could also further deplete salt supplies used to de-ice roads and highways, already at critical lows after a snowy winter in the Northeast.

SNOW EMERGENCY

Boston and New York City should see only light snowfall, but lingering freezing rain could complicate Monday morning's rush hour for commuters.

By Sunday afternoon, up to nine inches of snow had already fallen on parts of Indiana.

More than 40,000 homes in northeast Ohio were without power due to downed transmission lines, according to Chad Self, a spokesman for utility provider First Energy.

Most customers should have power restored by late Monday, the utility said.

Margie Gibson, 60, of Perry, 40 miles northeast of Cleveland, said power at her home was intermittent throughout the day.

"The power keeps popping on and off every half-hour. It goes off and comes right back on. I have no idea why," she said.

Central Arkansas, Tennessee and Kentucky were also at risk for heavy ice conditions and power outages, according to AccuWeather.

Though temperatures will not be as frigid as during some other storm systems this winter, when the so-called polar vortex pushed Arctic air across large swaths of the county, the cold air will blanket areas as far south as Texas and North Carolina.

Temperatures in the city of Lubbock, Texas, in the northwestern part of the state, were around 80F (26C) on Saturday but by Sunday morning were a bone-chilling 18F (minus 7C), NWS's Sullivan said.

Forecasters urged motorists to use caution as slick roads and fast-moving bands of snow can lead to traffic accidents.

In southwest Missouri, slick conditions were blamed in the death early Sunday of a 13-year-old girl when the driver of the Ford Explorer she was riding in went off the highway and overturned.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol report two adults and another child in the vehicle suffered serious injuries, and nobody in the car was wearing a seatbelt.

On Saturday in Colorado, a heavy dump of snow midday led to a 104-vehicle pileup in Denver, leaving one woman dead and 30 other people hospitalized, police and local media said.

(Reporting by Victoria Cavaliere, additional reporting by Kim Palmer in Cleveland, and Kevin Murphy in Kansas City; Editing by Ellen Wulfhorst, Sophie Hares and Chris Reese)
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« Reply #485 on: March 05, 2014, 12:40:36 pm »

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11214174
'Once-in-a-century' storm finally eases(New Zealand)
3/5/14

Rain is finally starting to ease following the once-in-a-century storm that forced the evacuation of homes, caused slips and cut power to thousands of people across Canterbury.

The squall is blazing up the country, bringing gale force winds to the lower North Island.

Residents are being urged to avoid travel if possible while the Christchurch City Council scrambles to clear debris-strewn roads and help with stormwater drainage.

"Our people will be out there again tonight and the community can play their part by checking on their friends and neighbours just like they did during the earthquakes,'' Mayor Lianne Dalziel said.

The Fire Service has been inundated with calls from residents reporting damage to their homes and flooding.

They received 187 flooding-related callouts between 6am and 4pm southern fire communications shift manager Brent Dunn said.

"There was very heavy surface flooding - a lot of areas we couldn't even get to, just because it was so deep, the rivers were overflowing. It's just been a very busy day.''

MetService said 160mm of rain had fallen on Lyttelton in the past 24 hours.

Police have evacuated 19 households from three streets after a landslip above a fuel storage area at the port.

Homes in parts of Cressy Terrace, Park Terrace and Brittan Terrace were evacuated this afternoon and cordons are in place.

The evacuations were precautionary and in response to the possibility of further slips in the area.

The slip occurred earlier today below Brittan Terrace, with a cliff face collapsing into a bulk storage tank, police said.

Emergency services were confident there was no danger to residents, with the wind dispersing any lingering fumes.

An evacuation centre had been established at the council service centre in London St.

About 3500 Orion customers remained without power this afternoon, with the majority expected to stay disconnected overnight, the electricity company said.

The company had been unable to access the electricity network to restore power and the situation could remain for the next few days.

Chief executive Rob Jamieson said flooding and road closures were why engineers could not reach the power network.

"Quite simply, we cannot get to many parts of our network to repair those power lines that were damaged yesterday by falling trees.

"Coupled with rising flood waters affecting substations and kiosks, this storm is proving unique due to its ongoing and multiple impact nature
.''

The majority of customers without power were around Banks Peninsula, with most of the peninsula affected. Some pockets of Christchurch and surrounding areas were also experiencing outages.

The city's airport was open, but there was a backlog of travellers with delays to some flights because of the storm affecting other parts of the country.

People were urged to contact their airline to check on flights.

KiwiRail said they were also clearing a backlog after ferry crossings were suspended yesterday because of high waves through the Cook Strait.

A spokeswoman said crossings resumed at 2pm today and they were trying to clear the extra passengers from yesterday.

Meanwhile, the storm has bustled north and Wellington was buffeted with gusts in exposed areas reaching 119km/h.

MetService spokesman John Law said the city had winds of up to 100km/h through the day.

Wind warnings were in force for Wellington, the Wairarapa and coastal Hawkes Bay.

The Insurance Council of New Zealand said residents affected directly as a result of storm or flood damage over the past couple of days should contact their insurers to have damage assessed.

If residents had to remove damaged goods from their homes or dispose of material, for instance, due to contamination that posed a risk to health, they should take photos to help inform the assessments, chief executive Tim Grafton said.

By the numbers

* About 3500 customers remain without power

* The Fire Service received 187 flooding calls;

* 160mm of rain fell in Lyttelton

* Wind gusts in exposed Wellington areas reached 119km/h


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« Reply #486 on: March 27, 2014, 03:06:50 pm »

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tornadoes-touch-down-near-sacramento-california/
Rare tornadoes touch down in Northern California
3/27/14

SAN FRANCISCO -- Tornadoes touched down during storms in Northern California, including one twister near Sacramento that damaged a dozen homes and left a path of debris about 300 yards long.

Twelve houses suffered roof damage and six reported fence damage when a tornado hit near Roseville in Placer County shortly after 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, Division Chief Kathy Finney of the city's fire department told the Merced Sun-Star. No injuries were reported and no residents were displaced.

The path of debris extended up to 300 yards, with a width of 10 to 20 yards, the newspaper reported.

A tornado also touched down in Ordbend, in Glenn County, the National Weather Service said. There were reports of at least four twisters, which are rare for California.

"I left this 15 years ago in the Midwest, and here we are with damage to our house from a tornado," Roseville resident Mark Thompson told CBS Sacramento station KOVR-TV.

Northern and Central California were drenched and wind-whipped by wild weather that brought thunderstorms and hail.

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« Reply #487 on: April 03, 2014, 06:21:32 pm »

Witnessing the whole thing now - it is hailing really, REALLY bad for several minutes now! Never, NEVER in my lifetime have I seen
ANYTHING like this before!

Ultimately, we ain't seen nothin' yet!

Revelation 16:21  And there fell upon men a great hail out of heaven, every stone about the weight of a talent: and men blasphemed God because of the plague of the hail; for the plague thereof was exceeding great.
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« Reply #488 on: April 04, 2014, 11:55:20 am »

Hail, rain pummel several Midwest, Southern states
4/4/14
http://news.yahoo.com/hail-rain-pummel-several-midwest-southern-states-044042914.html

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Thunderstorms were crawling across a large swath of the Midwest and South on Thursday, spawning suspected tornadoes in Missouri and Texas, and slamming several states with large hail and heavy rain that prompted a handful of water rescues.

Four people were injured in Texas when a suspected tornado destroyed a farmhouse and a mobile home Thursday night near Merit, about 40 miles northeast of Dallas. Hunt County Sheriff Randy Meeks said the injuries weren't life-threatening, though he didn't have details.

Storms pummeled the North Texas college city of Denton with hail as large as baseballs, leading to reports of broken windows and other damage. The National Weather Service in Tulsa noted reports of hail up to the size of ping pong balls and strong wind gusts.

Arkansas saw smaller hail, and falling tree limbs knocked out power in western parts of the state.

The heaviest rainfall was tapering off around midnight, though flash-flood warnings will remain in effect through daybreak in eastern Missouri, southern Illinois and Indiana, and western Kentucky because of runoff from the torrential rains, according to the National Weather Service.

No injuries resulted from the twister that hit University City just west of St. Louis shortly before 5:30 a.m., damaging about 100 homes in winds that reached up to 110 mph, weather service meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said.

That system also carried heavy rain. Up to 5 inches fell in parts of Missouri, prompting flash flooding that damaged dozens of homes and forced at least two water rescues.

In University City, a densely populated area, the city opened a shelter for evacuees. Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency.

Rainfall was heavy over much of Missouri and western Illinois. The National Weather Service said portions of Johnson County, Mo., had more than 5 inches of rain, causing flash flooding that forced evacuation of some homes in the Warrensburg area. Highway T in Johnson County was closed after rushing water washed out three culverts.

At least two drivers had to be rescued from water that swamped their cars. Even a three-person rescue team was briefly imperiled when flood debris clogged their jet skis. They eventually floated to safety.

Heavy rains also flooded some roads in Indiana, and conservation officers said they had rescued at least eight people.
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« Reply #489 on: April 04, 2014, 01:57:43 pm »

Tornadoes Reported from Texas to Illinois in Three-Hour Span
4/4/14
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/tornadoes-reported-texas-illinois-three-hour-span-n71601

Tornadoes were reported from Texas to Illinois late Thursday with the region also battered by high winds and baseball-sized hail.

Meteorologists received eight reports of twisters touching down during a three-hour period, according to the National Weather Service.

Hundreds of buildings were damaged and least four people were injured, The Weather Channel reported.

"What was supposed to be a tornado outbreak turned out to be not quite an outbreak, but there were still a few reported tornadoes," said Matt Crowther, senior meteorologist at The Weather Channel. "There have been eight reports but there could have been more than that."

A tree crushed this car and garage in Belleville, Ill., on Thursday.

Four of the twisters hit northeast Texas between 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. local time Thursday. The last of these reportedly took a barn off its foundation and tore down several trees about five miles northwest of Mount Vernon. Three twisters reportedly hit in Missouri and another was suspected in the southern tip of Illinois.

Earlier Thursday, there was a pre-dawn EF-1 tornado in a neighborhood of St Louis, Mo., which damaged around 100 homes but left no injuries, according to The Associated Press.

The hail storm hit a swath of the central U.S. including Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Kansas.

There were also high winds, including gusts of 80 mph near Denton, Texas. These were expected to continue throughout Friday but the tornado threat was "very low," Crowther said.
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« Reply #490 on: April 09, 2014, 02:30:03 pm »

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« Reply #491 on: April 16, 2014, 09:53:15 am »

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/14/us/mississippi-severe-weather/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
4/15/14
Severe weather blasts southern Mississippi, ransacks trailer park

CNN) -- A powerful thunderstorm roared through southern Mississippi on Monday evening, injuring two people and causing extensive damage to a trailer park in Gautier, Mississippi, authorities said.

There were "20-25 camper trailers damaged from what appears to be straight line winds that blew" in the Gulf Coast community, according to Troy Earl Ross, the president of the Jackson County Board of Supervisors. A number of people have been displaced from their homes in the trailer park that houses seasonal workers.

County Sheriff Charles Britt said one person had to be rescued by cutting through the floor of a trailer that had been flipped by the winds.

The severe weather made for a rough day, according to Gautier Mayor Gordon Gollott.

"It started raining at noon, streets are flooded everywhere," he said. Then around 7:30 p.m., the "wind picked up. Then it just busted wide open. It was a scare here."
 

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« Reply #492 on: April 24, 2014, 01:23:27 pm »

Tornados have been awfully quiet this year thus far, after big outbreaks in recent years...

http://news.yahoo.com/forecasters-already-predicting-massive-tornado-outbreak-weekend-151627265.html
4/24/14
Forecasters Are Already Predicting a Massive Tornado Outbreak This Weekend

Spring 2014 has been a quiet tornado season thus far, but that's about to change this weekend, if the predicted forecasts that meteorologists are looking at hold true. Weather experts say conditions are lining up for a series of powerful tornadoes to hit an area ranging between Tennessee and Texas from Saturday through Monday. The National Weather Service predicts a "significant multi-day severe event" in the South plains on Sunday, moving into the Mississippi Valley on Monday.

The extreme warnings stem from an interaction between an East-moving low-pressure system over the Rockies mixing with wetness from the Gulf of Mexico. That will cause the creation of supercell thunderstorms, Slate's Eric Holthaus explains, all kept in place in the South-Southwest by a high-pressure system in Canada. That makes the area ripe for a "big severe threat" this weekend, according to The Weather Channel, an extra level on top of today's "severe threat."

Holthaus notes that the best historical comparisons to a weather pattern like this point to some of the worst tornado outbreaks in U.S. history. That includes the April 26, 1991, stretch of tornadoes from Texas to Iowa that caused a billion dollars in damage and included a rare F5-strength tornado. For those in need of a refresher, here are FEMA's guidelines for how to prepare for tornadoes.

 RELATED: Men Are Here to Stay, Thanks to the Y Chromosome's Indestructible Genes

This article was originally published at http://www.thewire.com/national/2014/04/forecasters-are-already-predicting-a-massive-tornado-outbreak-this-weekend/361156/
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« Reply #493 on: April 26, 2014, 06:09:42 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/eastern-nc-tornadoes-damage-homes-injure-dozen-205504512.html
Eastern NC tornadoes damage homes, injure a dozen
4/26/14

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. (AP) — Residents, meteorologists and emergency officials in eastern North Carolina were surveying the damage Saturday from multiple tornadoes that damaged more than 200 homes the previous day and sent more than a dozen people to the emergency room.

Meteorologists said Saturday that tornadoes with winds of more than 111 mph touched down in Pitt and Beaufort counties on Friday, and they were continuing to investigate storm damage.

Elsewhere, Texas, Oklahoma and other states in the Plains and Midwest were bracing for severe storms expected to start Saturday and continue overnight. There, the main threat will be large hail and damaging wind gusts.

In North Carolina, Beaufort County Emergency Management Director John Pack said 16 people were taken to the emergency room when the storms passed through around 7:25 p.m. Friday.

Pack said 200 homes were either heavily damaged or destroyed. Pictures on news websites showed residents salvaging items from crushed mobile homes, along with snapped trees and a mangled utility pole in eastern North Carolina.

"You can track the tornado by the damage." Pack said. "It left a lot damage behind in its approximately five to 10 minutes on the ground."

Pack said the storm appeared to be about 300 yards wide and was on the ground for 10 miles. He said the line of damage started in the west-northwest portion of the county and traveled to the northeast.

At one point, Pack said, 8,000 people were without power, but most had been restored by Saturday.

Pack also said two major farming operations in the county sustained damages, but he didn't have further details.

In Halifax County, Antonio Richardson said the roof was blown off his home on Friday afternoon. He said he and a friend took shelter under his mobile home.

"It peeled back my roof, just like you would a banana," Richardson told WRAL-TV in Raleigh.
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« Reply #494 on: April 27, 2014, 10:31:24 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/tornadoes-strike-central-us-killing-2-oklahoma-000342088.html
Tornadoes strike central US, killing 2 in Oklahoma
4/27/14

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Forecasters say a large tornado that touched down west of Little Rock, Ark., has damaged property along a 30-mile route and remains on the ground.

Television footage shows damaged vehicles along a road north of state capital Sunday and trees that were stripped of their leaves and small branches along Interstate 40 between the suburbs of Maumelle and Mayflower.

There were no immediate reports of injuries.

Forecasters issued tornado emergencies for Maumelle, Morgan, Saltillo and Vilonia after storm spotters confirmed a twister on the ground.

The storm formed about 10 miles west of Little Rock and crossed the Arkansas River northwest of the city.
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« Reply #495 on: April 28, 2014, 08:57:42 am »

http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2014/04/28/tornadoes-leave-at-least-5-dead-in-oklahoma-arkansas/
4/28/14
Tornadoes kill at least 18 as storms pummel Plains, Midwest, and South

At least 18 people were killed Sunday by three separate tornadoes spawned by a powerful storm system that moved through the central and southern United States.

The Arkansas Department of Emergency Management confirmed early Monday that at least sixteen people died in Little Rock, Ark., when a twister carved an 80-mile path of destruction through suburbs north of the state capital.

An Oklahoma county sheriff's dispatcher reported that one person had died in the town of Quapaw, near the state's borders with Kansas and Missouri. Fox News has also confirmed that another person died when a tornado hit Keokuk County, Iowa.

The Arkansas tornado touched down about 10 miles west of Little Rock at around 7 p.m. local time and moved northeastward for at least 30 miles, the National Weather Service reported. It missed the state capital but passed through or near several of its suburbs, causing widespread damage in the communities of Mayflower and Vilonia.

According to the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management, ten of the deaths occurred in Faulkner County, where Mayflower and Vilonia are located. Five more occurred in Pulaski County, and one occurred in White County.

The tornado, which grew to be a half-mile wide, turned buildings into rubble and stripped the leaves and smaller branches off of trees.

"There's just really nothing there anymore. We're probably going to have to start all over again," Vilonia Schools Superintendent Frank Mitchell said early Monday after surveying what had been a $14 million intermediate school set to open this fall. Because the tornado struck after nightfall, the full extent of the damage would be impossible to asses until after sunrise Monday.

The twister shredded cars, trucks and 18-wheelers stuck along Interstate 40 north of Little Rock. After the storm passed, tractor-trailer rigs tried to navigate through the damage to continue their journeys, while gawkers held smartphones to their windows to offer a grim glimpse of the destruction.

State troopers went vehicle-to-vehicle to check on motorists and said with genuine surprise that no one was killed.

"About 30 vehicles -- large trucks, sedans, pickup trucks -- were going through there when the funnel cloud passed over," said Bill Sadler, a spokesman for the Arkansas State Police.

Karla Ault, a Vilonia High School volleyball coach, said she sheltered in the school gymnasium as the storm approached. After it passed, her husband told her their home was gone -- reduced to the slab on which it had sat.

"I'm just kind of numb. It's just shock that you lost everything. You don't understand everything you have until you realize that all I've got now is just what I have on," Ault said.

 The National Weather Service in North Little Rock said it was virtually certain that the Mayflower and Vilonia storm would be rated as the nation's strongest twister to date this year.

"It has the potential to be EF3 or greater," said meteorologist Jeff Hood. EF3 storms have winds greater than 136 mph. "Based on some of the footage we've seen from Mayflower and where it crossed Interstate 40, things were wrecked in a very significant way."


From communities west of Little Rock to others well north of the capital, emergency workers and volunteers were going door-to-door checking for victims.

"It turned pitch black," said Mark Ausbrooks, who was at his parents' home in Mayflower when the storm arrived. "I ran and got pillows to put over our heads and ... all hell broke loose."

"My parents' home, it's gone completely," he said.

Becky Naylor, of Mayflower, said she and her family went to their storm cellar after hearing that tornado debris was falling in nearby Morgan. Naylor, 57, said there were between 20 and 22 people in the cellar and they were "packed like sardines."

"Everyone is welcome to come into it," she said. "In fact, people were pulling off the highways and were just running in."

She said the men held the cellar doors shut while the tornado's winds tried to rip them open.

"It sounded like a constant rolling, roaring sound," she said. "Trees were really bending and the light poles were actually shaking and moving. That's before we shut the door and we've only shut the door to the storm cellar two times."

The White House issued a statement in which President Barack Obama promised that the federal government would help in the recovery and praised the heroic efforts of first-responders and neighbors.

"Your country will be there to help you recover and rebuild as long as it takes," Obama said.

The Arkansas tornado was one of several that touched down Sunday as a large storm system moved through parts of the Plains, Midwest and South.

Less than two hours before the Arkansas tornado struck, a twister hit the small northeastern Oklahoma community of Quapaw, killing at least one person and injuring six others, Ottawa County sheriff's dispatcher Kelli Soechs said. Earlier Sunday, another Ottawa County sheriff's dispatcher reported that two people were killed. Soechs declined to explain the discrepancy.

Five of the six injured in Quapaw were treated and released from Baptist Regional Health Center in Miami, Okla., said hospital spokeswoman Kristie Wallace. The sixth, who was in fair condition with a broken bone, was kept overnight, she said.

Ottawa County Emergency Management director Joe Dan Morgan said Quapaw, which has about 900 residents, was heavily damaged by the tornado.

"Looks like about half of town got extensive damage as well as the fire department," Morgan said.

After hitting Quapaw, the tornado moved northward into Kansas and struck Baxter Springs, a city of about 4,200 residents about 5 miles away. Cherokee County, Kan., sheriff's dispatcher Josh Harvey said the tornado that hit Baxter Springs injured several people and caused extensive damage, but that no deaths had been reported. He said first responders were going from house to house checking on residents' wellbeing.

Tornadoes also touched down Sunday in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Tornado warnings, which indicate the greatest threat of a strike, were also in effect for parts of southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas as of 9 p.m. CDT.

One of Sunday's twisters touched down northwest of Joplin, Mo., where a massive tornado in May 2011 killed 161 people, injured many others and leveled a large swath of the city. Sunday's twister didn't hit Joplin.

The first reported tornado Sunday touched down in a rural area in central in Nebraska. The weather service said it remained on the ground for only a short time, and there were no immediate reports of damage.

Forecasters warned that areas that weren't hit by tornadoes were still at risk of damage from hail and powerful straight-line winds. Forecasters warned of hail stones as big as baseballs and wind gusts that could reach hurricane-force -- 75 mph or higher.

Gusts of up to 60 mph were registered during a storm that hit southeastern Iowa on Sunday that damaged several buildings, including a barn that injured someone when it was blown over.

Earlier Sunday afternoon, a strong line of storms moved through west-central Missouri, bringing winds that reached 70 mph hour near Chillicothe, Mo., that toppled some trees.

The Missouri Highway Patrol also reported a tractor-trailer was blown onto its side on Interstate 70 about 30 miles east of Kansas City about 1 p.m. No one was injured. The weather service received a report from Plattsburg, Mo., where an anemometer measured 58 mph before it blew away. Golf ball-sized hail was reported at Overland Park, Kan., and Trimble, Mo.

Severe thunderstorm watches covered portions of Iowa, Illinois and Missouri through Sunday night. The primary threats were damaging wind gusts and large hail.

To the southeast, northern Louisiana and Mississippi were bracing for severe storms along with the possibility of flash flooding. The predictions prompted Barksdale Air Force Base near Bossier City, La., to cancel its air show on Sunday. The National Weather Service said northern Alabama could see rain and flash flooding, while central and northern Georgia could see storms and heavy rain.

Sunday was the third anniversary of a 122-tornado day, which struck parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia and killed 316 people.

Meanwhile, runners in Oklahoma City took shelter early Sunday as hail and high winds delayed the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon by 105 minutes to let a severe thunderstorm pass through.

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« Reply #496 on: April 28, 2014, 06:20:35 pm »

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/deadly-tornado-outbreak/second-round-twisters-creates-havoc-mississippi-n91146
Second Round of Twisters Creates Havoc in Mississippi

A major tornado caused serious damage and several injuries in the Tupelo area Monday afternoon, authorities said, as millions of people in the Deep South braced for the second punch of a storm system that killed 16 people in the region over the weekend.

"We're very fortunate that we have no reports of deaths in our city," Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton told The Weather Channel shortly after the twister — one of at least five confirmed to have hit the state Monday — touched ground in the city and tracked northward.

A tornado ripped through Tupelo, Miss., on Monday afternoon.

Shelton said later that there was "significant property damage," along with unconfirmed reports of some non-life-threatening injuries. The city was under a 9 p.m. (10 p.m. ET) curfew as emergency crews went door to door to assess damage and potential injuries.

"Please say a prayer for all those affected and our law enforcement officials," Shelton said.

The state Emergency Management Agency said it couldn't immediately confirm reports of "mass casualties," saying travel conditions and visibility remained too poor for its crews to make any assessments.

NBC station WTVA of Tupelo reported that the worst major damage was near Barnes Crossing Mall a couple of miles north of downtown. Managers said the mall itself wasn't hit, but Tupelo police told NBC News at least six other area businesses were rendered "structurally unsound."

Forecasters for The Weather Channel said debris fields on radar and the large wedge shape of the storm indicated that the damage could be serious around Tupelo, home to about 35,000 people.

WTVA was live on the air and had to be evacuated when the tornado — described by the National Weather Service as "large and violent" — hit the ground, leaving viewers to watch the news team scramble off their screens
.

A tornado near the town of Louisville extensively damaged Winston County Community Hospital and injured an undetermined number of people, said Temika Triplett, a spokeswoman for the Winston County Emergency Management Agency.

There were no immediate reports of deaths at the hospital, Triplett told NBC News.

Another tornado touched down at the intersection of state Highways 78 and 45, closing the intersection, the Lee County Sheriff's Office said, and yet another was confirmed near Yazoo Cit, — where a twister estimated at 170 mph killed 10 people four years ago. There were no early estimates of damage there.

Tornado warnings dotted central Mississippi late Monday afternoon and extended into northeast Alabama, the National Weather Service said, warning of the potential for quarter-size hail and serious tornado and wind damage. School districts in Alabama let their students out early, and Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency.

A broader swath of the middle of the country was at risk for some form of severe weather, as far north as Iowa, as far south as New Orleans and as far east as Charlotte, N.C. A jetliner flying the Memphis Grizzlies from Tennessee to Oklahoma City for an NBA playoff game was diverted to Tulsa because of the dangerous weather, the team said.

The storm system, which spawned tornadoes on Sunday that killed at least 16 people in Arkansas, Iowa and Oklahoma, is expected to be a three-day event. The risk of severe storms for Wednesday extends to Virginia and the Carolina coast.

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« Reply #497 on: April 28, 2014, 07:06:09 pm »



« Last Edit: April 28, 2014, 07:08:18 pm by BornAgain2 » Report Spam   Logged
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« Reply #498 on: April 28, 2014, 11:07:18 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/tornadoes-cause-damage-injuries-miss-ala-001045835.html
Tornadoes cause damage, injuries in Miss., Ala.
4/28/14

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) — At least three tornadoes flattened homes and businesses, flipped trucks over on highways and bent telephone poles into 45-degree angles as they barreled through the South on Monday, killing at least one woman in Mississippi and unleashing severe thunderstorms, damaging hail and flash floods.

Local officials also reported six deaths in Alabama from a tornado. State emergency officials could not immediately confirm those deaths. Thousands of customers were without power in Alabama and Kentucky, where severe storms caused widespread damages.

Monday's storm system was so huge it was visible from space, photographed by weather satellites that showed tumultuous clouds arcing across much of the South. The National Weather Service posted tornado watches and warnings around Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia that were in effect through Monday night.

The system is the latest onslaught of severe weather a day after a half-mile-wide tornado carved an 80-mile path of destruction through the suburbs of Little Rock, Ark., killing at least 15. Tornadoes also killed one person each in Oklahoma and Iowa on Sunday.

Mississippi Republican Sen. Giles Ward huddled in a bathroom with his wife, four other family members and their 19-year-old dog Monday as a tornado destroyed his two-story brick house and flipped his son-in-law's SUV upside down onto the patio in Louisville, seat of Winston County and home to about 6,600 .

"For about 30 seconds, it was unbelievable," Ward said. "It's about as awful as anything we've gone through."

He estimated that 30 houses in his neighborhood, Jordan Circle, were either destroyed or heavily damaged. After the storm had passed, Ward and his family went to a neighbor's home where 19 people had waited out the tornado in a basement. He said six people were reported trapped in a basement in another home in the subdivision.

Altogether, 45 people had been injured in Louisville but no deaths had been reported, said Jack Mazurak (MAZ-er-ak), a spokesman for the Jackson-based University of Mississippi Medical Center, designated communications command post for disasters.

The tornado in Louisville caused water damage and left holes in the roof in the back of the Winston Medical Center, where the emergency room and outpatient clinic are located. There were about 15 patients in hospital rooms and eight or nine in the emergency room, where evacuations were underway, Mazurak said. No deaths were reported.

"We thought we were going to be OK then a guy came in and said, 'It's here right now,'" said Dr. Michael Henry, head of the emergency room. "Then boom ... it blew through."

Also in Mississippi, Lee County Coroner Carolyn Gillentine Green said a woman died in a traffic accident during the storm in Verona, south of Tupelo. Green said the vehicle may have hydroplaned or blown off the road.

Deborah Pugh, spokeswoman for the Northeast Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo, said the hospital received 24 patients. She was 20 had minor injuries and were expected to be treated and released. She four others were undergoing further evaluation.

In northern Alabama, Limestone County Sheriff Mike Blakeley confirmed two deaths in a mobile home park west of Athens, said city spokeswoman Holly Hollman. Hollman said Blakeley was in a meeting with county Emergency Management Agency officials and couldn't come to the phone Monday evening.

Four people were killed in a district of Limestone County southeast of Athens, said Limestone County Commissioner Bill Latimer. Latimer said he was informed of the deaths by a county foreman, but that he had not made it to the scene himself yet. Neither the governor's office nor emergency management officials could immediately confirm the deaths.

In Tupelo, a community of about 35,000 in northeastern Mississippi, every building in a two-block area south of U.S. Highway 78 had suffered damage, officials told a reporter on the scene. Some buildings had their roofs sheared off, while power lines had been knocked down completely or bent at 45-degree angles. Road crews were using heavy machinery to clear off other streets.

Residents and business owners were not the only ones seriously rattled by the tornadoes.

NBC affiliate WTVA-TV chief meteorologist Matt Laubhan in Tupelo, Miss., was reporting live on the severe weather about 3 p.m. when he realized the twister was coming close enough that maybe he and his staff should abandon the television studio
.

"This is a tornado ripping through the city of Tupelo as we speak. And this could be deadly," he said in a video widely tweeted and broadcast on YouTube.

Moments later he adds, "A damaging tornado. On the ground. Right now."

The video then showed Laubhan peeking in from the side to see if he was still live on the air before yelling to staff off-camera to get down in the basement.

"Basement, now!" he yelled, before disappearing off camera himself.

Later, the station tweeted, "We are safe here."

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency Monday in advance of the storms, which sent emergency officials rushing to put plans in place.

In Memphis, Tenn., officials declared a state of emergency in a county southwest of Nashville because of flash flooding. Authorities urged people there to seek higher ground after several homes and some business were flooded in Maury County and school leaders worried that some school buses might not be able to get schoolchildren home over swamped roads.

The threat of dangerous weather jangled nerves a day after the three-year anniversary of a historic outbreak of more than 60 tornadoes that killed more than 250 people across Alabama on April 27, 2011.

George Grabryan, director of emergency management for Florence and Lauderdale County in northwest Alabama, said 16 shelters opened before storms even moved in and people were calling nervously with questions about the weather.

"There's a lot of sensitivity up here," Grabryan said. "I've got a stack of messages here from people, many of them new to the area, wanting to know where the closest shelters are."

Elsewhere, forecasters warned Georgia residents of a threat of tornadoes in northern and central counties in coming hours.
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« Reply #499 on: April 28, 2014, 11:09:27 pm »

FYI - from last Thursday Shocked

http://news.yahoo.com/forecasters-already-predicting-massive-tornado-outbreak-weekend-151627265.html
4/24/14
Forecasters Are Already Predicting a Massive Tornado Outbreak This Weekend

Spring 2014 has been a quiet tornado season thus far, but that's about to change this weekend, if the predicted forecasts that meteorologists are looking at hold true. Weather experts say conditions are lining up for a series of powerful tornadoes to hit an area ranging between Tennessee and Texas from Saturday through Monday. The National Weather Service predicts a "significant multi-day severe event" in the South plains on Sunday, moving into the Mississippi Valley on Monday.

The extreme warnings stem from an interaction between an East-moving low-pressure system over the Rockies mixing with wetness from the Gulf of Mexico. That will cause the creation of supercell thunderstorms, Slate's Eric Holthaus explains, all kept in place in the South-Southwest by a high-pressure system in Canada. That makes the area ripe for a "big severe threat" this weekend, according to The Weather Channel, an extra level on top of today's "severe threat."

Holthaus notes that the best historical comparisons to a weather pattern like this point to some of the worst tornado outbreaks in U.S. history. That includes the April 26, 1991, stretch of tornadoes from Texas to Iowa that caused a billion dollars in damage and included a rare F5-strength tornado. For those in need of a refresher, here are FEMA's guidelines for how to prepare for tornadoes.

This article was originally published at http://www.thewire.com/national/2014/04/forecasters-are-already-predicting-a-massive-tornado-outbreak-this-weekend/361156/
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« Reply #500 on: April 29, 2014, 05:03:19 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/storms-tear-south-adding-us-death-toll-144618302.html
4/29/14
Storms tear through South, adding to U.S. death toll

LOUISVILLE, Miss. (AP) — A dangerous storm system that spawned a chain of deadly tornadoes over three days flattened homes and businesses, forced frightened residents in more than half a dozen states to take cover and left tens of thousands in the dark Tuesday.

As the storm hopscotched across a large swath of the U.S., the overall death toll was more than 30, killed Monday and Sunday in a band stretching from Oklahoma to Alabama. Forecasts showed the storm continuing to threaten residents in the Deep South Tuesday afternoon and evening, with another round of howling winds, pounding rain, flash flooding and tornado conditions possible.

Some awoke Tuesday to find their loved ones missing and their homes pulverized. In Louisville, a hardscrabble logging town hit by one of the storm's twisters, firefighters picked through the remains of mobile homes, and twenty of them linked hands to wade through debris. Rescue workers stepped gingerly over downed power lines and trees that were snapped in half and stripped of branches.

With water and roof damage, the small local hospital's emergency room was evacuated Monday.

"We thought we were going to be OK, then a guy came in and said, 'It's here right now,'" said Dr. Michael Henry, head of the ER. "Then boom ... it blew through."

Just east of the hospital, a woman died at the daycare center she'd run for seven years, according to the county coroner. One seriously injured child was evacuated from the center, said state Rep. Michael Evans, D-Louisville, who is acting as a liaison for the county. The child's condition was not known Tuesday. Evans said authorities don't think any other children were in the center during the storm.

"No other parents have shown up to say, 'My child was at the daycare.' That's why we think the day care is fine," Evans said.

In Tupelo, crews turned from search-and-rescue efforts to cleanup in parts of the northeastern Mississippi community Tuesday. The buzzing sound of chain saws cut through the otherwise still, hazy morning. Massive oak trees, knocked over like children's toys, blocked some roads.

Neighbors helped one other cut away limbs. Residents, taken aback by the damage, said they prayed that more storms wouldn't hit the city later Tuesday.

Pam Montgomery, 54, walked with her gray Scottish terrier, Ava, in the parking lot of St. Luke's United Methodist church in her neighborhood. "This does not even look like a place that I'm familiar with right now," Montgomery said. "You look down some of the streets and it doesn't even look like there is a street."

Abby Tucker, 27, described the feeling as surreal.

"You see this in movies," she said. "You don't see it in your own backyard."

In Kimberly, Ala., about 20 miles north of Birmingham, a suspected tornado hit at a crossroads before midnight Monday, tearing the A-shaped roof off the town's Church of God. On Tuesday morning, the roof sat in a solid piece beside the red brick church.

Across the street, the cinderblock walls from an old fishing supply store were scattered around the gravel parking lot. The building's metal frame remained. Down the road, the fire department was flattened.

Tim Armstrong picked up pieces of splintered trees in his backyard. Armstrong, his wife and their two young daughters were home when the storm struck. He said they were listening to weather reports on television and heard an all-clear for their area.

"Three minutes later my mother-in-law calls, says there's a tornado in Morris," a nearby town, Armstrong said. "The power went out, and we went running to the middle of the house."

They heard the wind roaring and glass shattering as a tree flew through their front door. "Once I heard that, I knew something was pretty wrong. It was fast. It was so fast."

The whole thing was over a minute later, he said.

In northern Alabama, the coroner's office confirmed two deaths in a twister that caused extensive damage west of the city of Athens, Limestone County Emergency Director Rita White. In Tuscaloosa, officials said a University of Alabama student died when he took shelter in the basement of a home near campus and a retaining wall collapsed on him.

The threat of dangerous weather jangled nerves a day after the third anniversary of a historic outbreak of more than 60 tornadoes that killed more than 250 people across Alabama on April 27, 2011.

Separately, Limestone Commissioner Bill Latimer said he received reports of four deaths in the county from one of his workers. Neither the governor's office nor state emergency officials could immediately confirm those deaths.

In southern Tennessee, two people were killed in a home when a suspected tornado hit Monday night, Lincoln County Emergency Management Director Mike Hall said. The winds destroyed several other homes as well as a middle school in the county that borders Alabama, Hall said.

The storm system is the latest onslaught of severe weather a day after a half-mile-wide tornado carved an 80-mile path of destruction through the suburbs of Little Rock, Ark., killing at least 15. Tornadoes or severe storms also killed one person each in Oklahoma and Iowa on Sunday.
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« Reply #501 on: April 30, 2014, 09:52:26 am »

24-hour rainfall totals in parts of Florida top 18 inches in Milton and 17 inches in Pensacola as of this morning - @FLClimateCenter

'Life-Threatening' Flooding Submerges Pensacola, Florida

The worst flooding in Florida in a generation — more than 2 feet of water in 26 hours, by one rain gauge — left drivers stranded overnight and into Wednesday, the latest pummeling from the monster storm system lumbering across the country.

Tornado warnings were posted in the morning in Florida, Alabama and North Carolina. The risk for tornadoes later in the day was highest from South Carolina to Washington, D.C., forecasters said.

hey said that Wednesday would probably be the last day of the severe-weather threat from the storm system, which has killed 35 people in seven states in a relentless eastward push of wind and water.

On Tuesday, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle got the worst of it. At least one person was killed, a man in Florida whose car got stuck in rising water. He called for help, but the water was moving too quickly, authorities said.

Five inches of rain fell on Pensacola, Fla., in a single hour, from 9 to 10 p.m. Tuesday — more than during the entirety of Hurricane Ivan, which rolled through in 2004, said Kevin Roth, lead meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

REST: http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/deadly-tornado-outbreak/life-threatening-flooding-submerges-pensacola-florida-n93201
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« Reply #502 on: April 30, 2014, 11:06:01 am »

Up until this week, it seemed like this country was experiencing a lot of quiet weather(which surprised everyone considering how tornado seasons have gotten progressively worse in recent years).

But then, the Illuminati minions control the weather with their HAARP et al(as this was warned last week).
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« Reply #503 on: May 01, 2014, 05:32:51 am »

Storms over the Florida Panhandle last night generated 9,000 lightning strikes in 15 minutes

https://twitter.com/weathernetwork/status/461522094564466688
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« Reply #504 on: May 01, 2014, 02:00:57 pm »

Storms over the Florida Panhandle last night generated 9,000 lightning strikes in 15 minutes

https://twitter.com/weathernetwork/status/461522094564466688

9000 in 15 minutes? Shocked
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« Reply #505 on: May 11, 2014, 08:06:36 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/tornado-damages-homes-missouri-town-no-injuries-reported-000643111.html

Tornado damages or destroys hundreds of homes in Missouri town

Reuters
By Kevin Murphy
8 hours ago
 
KANSAS CITY, Missouri (Reuters) - A tornado destroyed or damaged 200 to 300 homes in a small town east of Kansas City, Missouri, on Saturday but caused no injuries, officials reported.

The tornado touched down in Orrick, Missouri, at 5:45 p.m., damaging a school and a Baptist church, said Collin Stosberg, public information officer for the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Television news footage showed homes with roof and interior damage and others with only their shell standing. The twister flattened other buildings, felled large trees and flipped over cars and campers.

Stosberg said police who saw threatening skies and a tornado taking shape were able to sound sirens 10-to-15 minutes before the twister hit.

"It gave people time to seek shelter," Stosberg said, adding that the advance warnings likely prevented injuries.

Orrick, a town of about 820 people, lies some 30 miles northeast of downtown Kansas City.

Less than two hours later, another apparent tornado touched down about 60 miles to the east near Marshall, Missouri,

Fire Chief Tony Day said.

Two barns were flattened and trees and power lines were toppled in rural areas near the towns of Slater and Arrow Rock, but no injuries were reported.
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« Reply #506 on: May 13, 2014, 03:45:59 am »

9000 in 15 minutes? Shocked

Oh, you should go to Florida and check out those lightning storms they get. Being from there, I've seen them a lot, and they can be amazing, especially the "summer lightning", which is usually at night, like static buildup in the sky, it will spider web across the sky really bright. I actually have been woken in the past from it, it can be so bright, though mostly there's no noticeable thunder.

Like this...

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« Reply #507 on: May 21, 2014, 09:58:04 pm »

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2014/05/21/Denver-hammered-by-tornadoes-hail/9541400718671/
5/21/14
Denver hammered by tornadoes, hail
Super cell thunderstorm spawned at least four tornadoes that touched down in Denver, as well as a large amount of hail.


DENVER, May 21 (UPI) --A super cell thunderstorm dropped large amounts of hail and produced several tornadoes that swept through the Denver area Wednesday, weather officials said.

The National Weather Service reported four tornado touchdowns in Watkins, East Denver and Aurora, Colo.

"This thing is spinning up multiple tornadoes," witness Jeff Piotrowski told CNN. "There were tornadoes on the outer ring of the circulation, ... and then there's the main tornado vortex closer to the storm."

The storm system also dropped significant amounts of hail all over the Denver metro area, causing streets and yards to look like they'd been pummeled with a winter storm.

The tornado warnings prompted the closure of Denver International Airport for about an hour and a half. At least 38 flights were diverted and the airport expected delays throughout the rest of the day.


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« Reply #508 on: May 22, 2014, 04:22:41 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/more-storms-tornadoes-possible-colorado-135904900.html
5/22/14
More storms, tornadoes possible in Colorado

DENVER (AP) — More spring thunderstorms are expected Thursday along the Front Range and eastern Colorado, a day after six tornadoes touched down east of Denver.

No significant damage was reported from the twisters, and the latest round of storms isn't expected to be as extreme or as widespread as that seen Wednesday.

Three of the tornadoes touched down in and around Aurora, while the others hit north and east of Denver, including one about 13 miles from Denver International Airport.

There weren't any tornadoes in Lafayette, north of Boulder, but some residents probably got a scare when tornado sirens mistakenly sounded around 3 a.m. Thursday. Engineers are investigating whether a software error was to blame.

Hail covered roads and grass in some parts of the Denver and Colorado Springs areas, with snow plows called out to clear runways and the access road to the airport. Golf ball-sized hail piled up 4 inches near Strasburg on the plains 40 miles east of Denver, the National Weather Service said.

The storms temporarily grounded flights at the airport and forced 40 flights to be diverted Wednesday. Frontier Airlines canceled some flights after six of its planes were damaged by hail. It is waiving change fees for passengers who need to rebook their flights through Thursday.

A microburst is blamed for ripping a section of metal sheeting off the roof of Castle Rock's town pool.

Lower-level winds aren't forecast to be as strong Thursday, which means any tornadoes that form will likely be more short-lived, National Weather Service meteorologist Kari Bowen said.

The chance for afternoon thunderstorms to develop will continue through Memorial Day weekend. Besides the risk of tornadoes, heavy rain could also cause flooding if the cells hit some of the areas burned by recent wildfires.
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« Reply #509 on: June 03, 2014, 07:39:58 pm »

Baseball-Size Hail Hits Nebraska as Tornado Threat Looms
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/baseball-size-hail-hits-nebraska-tornado-threat-looms-n121751
6/3/14

Baseball-size hail came down in Nebraska Tuesday as a dense pattern of severe weather moved across several states in the Midwest.

Emergency sirens went off mid-afternoon in Omaha, Nebraska, after the National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm warning in the eastern and central parts of the state as well as in southwest Iowa. The advisory warned the weather system could bring heavy rain, winds of up to 80 mph and tennis ball-sized hail. Weather spotters in the area confirmed a tornado on the ground in central Nebraska, NWS said.

During a span of eight minutes around 5 p.m. local time (6 p.m. ET), the NWS recorded 1.08 inches of rain at the Omaha airport, which closed due to risk of flash flooding on the airfield.

Destruction across the state included uprooted trees, damage to the exterior of homes, shattered car windshields and dented hoods.

The National Weather Service has also issued a tornado watch warning that includes 11 counties In south central Iowa. The watch will remain in place until 1 a.m. local time (2 a.m. ET).

A derecho — a 200-mile long straight line of damaging wind — is most likely to occur Tuesday night and into Wednesday over parts of eastern Nebraska, eastern Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, and perhaps as far east as Illinois and Indiana, according to The Weather Channel.

The National Weather Service said considerable damage to mobile homes, roofs, windows, trees and vehicles was expected, as were power outages.

    Main Street Greeley Nebraska while the sirens were going off. @JimCantore @weatherchannel pic.twitter.com/mQwuOv9Fqw
    — Ben Callahan (@Benny_nthejetss) June 3, 2014

While Nebraska appeared to bear the brunt of Tuesday's severe weather, parts of Kansas, Iowa, Missouri and Illinois were alerted about damaging winds that could continue into Wednesday.

The severe weather threat arrives amid an unusually quiet late spring, with fewer documented tornadoes in May than in previous years.
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