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Crazy Weather Headlines!

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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« Reply #510 on: June 04, 2014, 11:48:20 am »

Hail, tornadoes reported as storms cross Midwest
Baseball-sized hail pummels Nebraska, Iowa, as storms roll across Midwest; tornadoes reported

6/4/14
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/hail-tornadoes-reported-storms-cross-111418605.html

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) -- Baseball-sized hail pummeled homes and cars in Nebraska and Iowa on Tuesday as powerful thunderstorms moved through a swath of Midwest states, also causing severe flooding and prompting reports of tornadoes.

The National Weather Service said reports of extensive hail damage and flooding trickled in as storms pushed into Nebraska and moved into neighboring Iowa, where winds of up to 85 mph were recorded. Up to 4 inches of rain was expected in parts those states, which were the hardest hit. The storm also tracked across parts of Kansas, Missouri, South Dakota and Illinois.

"This is one of these days we can't let our guard down," said Bill Bunting, forecast operations chief at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

Bunting said several trained spotters reported tornadoes in central and southwest Iowa, and at least one report came in from southwest Kansas. Reports will not be confirmed until damage can be assessed Wednesday morning.

Becky Kern, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Valley, Nebraska, said the system has involved a "training" of thunderstorms, which involves a series of thunderstorms following one after another. The system will move to the southeast early Wednesday, toward parts of Missouri and Illinois, she said.

"It looks like the threat has pushed further south into northern Missouri, the strongest of the storms," she said.

Heavy rain and flooding were reported in the Omaha area of Nebraska, where dozens of residents were evacuated from low-lying homes on the northeast side of the city. The Eppley Airfield airport closed for several hours.

"It's just completely flooded these areas, and these homes are now filling up with water in their basement areas, so we're pulling people out," said Omaha police spokesman James Shade, noting a 95-year-old woman in a wheelchair was rescued.

Police also used boats to assist dozens of drivers stranded in floodwaters around the city. Shade said many cars remain stuck on those flooded streets.

Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad issued Tuesday night a proclamation of disaster emergency for Pottawattamie County in the western part of the state, which will allow officials to use state resources to respond to the effects of the storms.

In the northeast Nebraska cities of Norfolk and Blair, residents reported shattered windows in homes and vehicles after baseball-sized hail passed through. The weather service received reports of two motels with roofs torn in western Iowa's Missouri Valley.

On Interstate 29 north of Council Bluffs in western Iowa, more than 25 vehicles had their windows shattered by hail, said Terry Landsvork, an observation program leader for the National Weather Service in Valley, Nebraska.

"They were driving along Interstate 29, had no place to go, and whether they were driving or pulled over, they just didn't escape the hail," he said.

The storms impacted primary elections in Iowa and South Dakota. Officials in Pottawattamie and Montgomery counties in Iowa, where polls closed at 9 p.m. CDT, reported closing some precincts temporarily due to poor weather.

"It's nasty here. You can't imagine," said Pottawattamie County Auditor Mary Jo Drake. "It's as black as the ace of spades."

In South Dakota, where polls closed at 8 p.m. CDT, a morning thunderstorm forced Senate candidate Mike Rounds, who was flying to Rapid City, to land in Pierre.

The severe weather threat arrives amid an unusually quiet late spring, with far fewer documented tornados in May than in many recent years. Bunting said the main concern Tuesday night was widespread straight-line winds.

"As we like to say, it doesn't have to rotate to be dangerous," he said.
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« Reply #511 on: June 04, 2014, 03:32:29 pm »

Tornado Threats, Destructive Winds: Severe Storms Threaten Millions
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/tornado-threats-destructive-winds-severe-storms-threaten-millions-n122091

More than 35 million Americans could face destructive winds Wednesday as a dense pattern of severe storms pelted Nebraska with baseball-sized hail before spreading across the Midwest.

Tornadoes are possible across a broad swath of the Midwest and parts of the Mississippi River Valley, the Weather Channel’s lead forecaster Kevin Roth said.

One tornado was confirmed by spotters on the ground in Ord, Nebraska late Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service said. The Weather Channel said it had reports of 11 other unconfirmed tornadoes – 7 more in Nebraska, two in Kansas, one in Iowa and one in western Wyoming.

A gustnado — a low-level, rolling cloud accompanying a thunderstorm — also was recorded in Seward, Nebraska late Tuesday.

Across that state, storms uprooted trees, pummeled homes, blew off roofs, shattered windshields and dented car hoods. Ninety percent of the state was affected by severe weather, Roth said.

Over the span of eight minutes starting at around 5 p.m. local time (6 p.m. ET), the NWS recorded 1.08 inches of rain at the Omaha airport, which closed due to risk of flash flooding on the airfield. The airport reopened hours later.

Across the Plains and the Midwest, the line of wind damage stretched for hundreds of miles – although the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center had yet to declare that a derecho had occurred. “Certainly it meets the criteria for a derecho,” said Roth.

The huge weather system responsible for this week’s storms was spreading south and east Wednesday, bringing gusts of up to 70 mph for many across the Midwest, the Ohio Valley and as far as Tennessee and western Kentucky.

MSNBC meteorologist Bill Karins said that the threat of wind and hail damage on Wednesday will likely only be half as bad as Tuesday, but could be over a much more populated area — with about 20 million people being threatened in those areas.

The Deep South and Southeast could also see heat-related severe thunderstorms later Wednesday, Roth said.

However, the milder thunderstorms that drenched Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York on Tuesday evening were expected to have dried out by Wednesday.

This week's severe weather arrives amid an unusually quiet late spring, with fewer documented tornadoes in May than in previous years.
— Alastair Jamieson and Becky Bratu
First published June 4th 2014, 3:28 am
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« Reply #512 on: June 05, 2014, 08:38:12 am »

Colorado Lashed by Hail, Reported Tornadoes, 111MPH Winds
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/colorado-lashed-hail-reported-tornadoes-111mph-winds-n123226

Colorado was recovering Thursday from a powerful overnight storm that brought at least two reported tornadoes and pounded some areas with heavy rain and hail up to two inches in diameter.

Wind gusts of up to 111 mph were reported, bringing down trees and power lines near the town of Hugo in eastern Colorado, police said.

The wild weather was part of a dense pattern of severe thunderstorms that has seen destructive winds and tornado alerts right across the Plains, Midwest and Ohio Valley this week.

Scattered severe thunderstorms were forecast Thursday across a huge area stretching from the Colorado all the way to the Carolinas, the Weather Channel said.

The biggest threat of further damage was in a line from south-central Kansas through the Ozarks into parts of the Mid-South – including Wichita, Kansas; Joplin, Missouri; and Memphis, Tennessee.

In Hugo, Colorado there were minor injuries when a semi was blown over on a highway east of the town, according to Cpt. Clint Tweden of the Lincoln County Sheriff's department. Two people were taken to a local hospital but were treated and released, he said.

In the same area, a family barn collapsed, trapping two cars.

“We had people out with chainsaws helping to clear roadways,” Joy L. Hemby, chief marshal at the Hugo Marshal Office told Denver’s 9News.

Tornado sirens sounded as the severe weather moved into the area late Wednesday, moving east across Denver towards western Kansas.

One tornado was spotted near Hugo at about 10:30 p.m. Wednesday local time (12.30 a.m. Thursday ET) and another was seen near Arriba 20 minutes later, 9News reported.

However, Hemby said neither of the tornado sightings had been confirmed.

Some areas, including Limon, Colorado were hammered by hailstones.

The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office lost power but said there were no reports of extensive damage, 9News reported.

Alastair Jamieson, Tricia Culligan and Jacquellena Carrero
First published June 5th 2014, 2:04 am
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« Reply #513 on: June 17, 2014, 11:53:20 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/tornadoes-flatten-tiny-rural-nebraska-town-2-dead-133421047.html
Tornadoes flatten tiny rural Nebraska town; 2 dead
6/17/14

PILGER, Neb. (AP) — A storm packing rare dual tornadoes tore through a tiny farming town in northeast Nebraska, killing two people, crumpling grain bins like discarded soda cans and flattening dozens of homes.

Pilger's 350 residents evacuated their homes after the powerful twisters slammed the area Monday afternoon. Nebraska State Patrol closed all roads into town.

"More than half of the town is gone — absolutely gone," Stanton County Commissioner Jerry Weatherholt said. "The co-op is gone, the grain bins are gone, and it looks like almost every house in town has some damage. It's a complete mess."

Larry Nelson, 73, has lived in Pilger, about 80 miles northwest of Omaha, for 23 years. He rode out the storm in his neighbor's basement, emerging later to find his home completely gone.

"I'm grateful I was over there," Nelson said.

Another resident, Trey Wisniewski, said first his weather radio alerted him, then the power went out and the tornado sirens started to sound. The sky went black and he and his wife took their pets into the basement.

"My wife was holding our animals and I was holding on to my wife. We could feel the suction try to pull is out of there," said Wisniewski, 43. "It wasn't raining. It was raining debris."

Stanton County Sheriff Mike Unger estimated that 50 to 75 percent of Pilger was heavily damaged or destroyed and the school was likely beyond repair.

The storm was part of a larger system that tracked across the nation's midsection Monday. More storms are forecast for Tuesday, stretching from eastern Montana to New York, but the system likely won't be as powerful as on Monday, said Steve Corfidi, lead forecaster at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

The greatest risk for tornadoes will be in the Dakotas, eastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming. Hail is expected west of the Mississippi River, while damaging winds could down some trees in upstate New York, Corfidi said.

Stanton County Sheriff's deputy Josh Bennett said a 5-year-old girl was killed in Pilger on Monday. Bennett did not identify the child further or provide details about her death.

Unger said Tuesday that a motorist also died in a single-vehicle accident just east of Pilger as the storm pounded the area. State patrol confirmed that a male driver died in Cuming County.

At least 19 people were taken to hospitals.

The National Weather Service said the two twisters touched down within roughly a mile of each other. Crews planned to examine the area Tuesday to determine the intensity of the unusual twin tornadoes, said Barbara Mayes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Valley.

"It's less common for two tornadoes to track together for so long, especially with that same intensity," she said. "By no means is it unprecedented. But we don't see it often."


Residents were poised to return Tuesday morning to survey the damage and gather valuables. Sheriffs said law enforcement would escort residents to their properties.

Jodi Richey, a spokeswoman for Faith Regional Health Services in nearby Norfolk, said 16 people were treated there. Some were in critical condition but others were treated and released.

Providence Medical Center in Wayne treated three tornado victims, including two who had lacerations, said hospital spokeswoman Sandy Bartling. Two were released Monday evening, and the third was in stable condition.

Authorities said the first tornado touched down around 3:45 p.m. and downed several power lines before it leveled a farmhouse. The second tornado was spotted southwest of Pilger, according to the Stanton County Sheriff's Office. Shortly afterward, the town suffered a "direct hit" that leveled several buildings, including the Fire Department building.

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman declared a state of emergency, and the National Guard was preparing to assist local emergency responders and help with the cleanup. Heineman and officials with the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency were expected to arrive Tuesday morning. A shelter for displaced residents was established at Wisner-Pilger Jr.-Sr. High School in nearby Wisner.

Tornadoes also caused damage in Cuming and Wayne counties, the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency said in a news release. Meteorologists also tracked a reported tornado near the town of Burwell, in central Nebraska.
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« Reply #514 on: June 18, 2014, 10:43:46 am »

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/tornado-hovers-hour-nebraska-again-hit-twisters-n134231
6/18/14
Tornado Hovers for Hour as Nebraska is Again Hit by Twisters
By Gil Aegerter and Cassandra Vinograd

Slow-moving tornadoes loomed over the plains of northeastern Nebraska overnight, touching down just 40 miles from where nearly simultaneous twisters leveled the town of Pilger a day earlier.

The National Weather Service issued a tornado warning at 9:19 p.m. local time (10:19 p.m. ET) on Tuesday for the areas around Coleridge and Laurel, which it said were threatened by separate tornadoes that were moving southeast.

For nearly an hour on Tuesday, meteorologists said it appeared that the tornado hovered in place. At 9:38 p.m. (10:38 p.m. ET), the weather service tweeted that the twister was still north of Laurel, moving very slowly southeast as darkness fell on the region.

The area is about 40 miles north of Pilger, Nebraska, which was smacked Monday night by twin tornadoes that killed two people.

There were no immediate reports of injuries linked to Tuesday night's severe weather.

Forecasters warned that the area could take yet another beating later on Wednesday.

The National Weather Service issued tornado warnings to last into the early morning for parts of Iowa, southern Minnesota, southeast South Dakota and northeast Nebraska.

On Wednesday, a cold front pushing out into the Northern Plains could threaten to bring flash floods and severe weather to the region, it said.

The Weather Channel’s lead forecaster Kevin Roth said that "a fairly large area" is under the risk of severe weather for Wednesday - from the Dakotas and Nebraska eastward to Philadelphia.

"The primary threat is wind and hail but there is a decent tornado threat today in North and South Dakota and northeast Nebraska - again," he said.

For northeast Nebraska to get hit "day after day" by tornadoes is "kind of unusual," Roth said.

"The good news for them is if they get through tonight and the first half of tomorrow, it looks like the front will want to push east. Friday looks better."
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« Reply #515 on: June 24, 2014, 08:02:29 pm »

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/tornado-damages-homes-indianapolis-24286187
Storm Damages Homes in Indianapolis, Outskirts
INDIANAPOLIS — Jun 24, 2014, 3:19 PM ET

A tornado-producing storm that hit central Indiana on Tuesday damaged several homes in Indianapolis and its outskirts, downed power lines and uprooted trees, authorities said.

It was one of several thunderstorms that sprang up in southwestern Indiana near Terre Haute and moved northeast toward Indianapolis, becoming more severe along the way. No injuries were reported. National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Ryan said the tornado struck in the afternoon in Hendricks County just southwest of Indianapolis and caused extensive damage to at least three homes.

The storm hit as 20 people were receiving chimney sweeping training in Plainfield, about 15 miles southwest of Indianapolis. Tom Spalding, a spokesman for the Chimney Safety Institute of America, said weather alerts were sent to the trainees' cellphones and what looked like a funnel cloud appeared in the distance.

"I didn't realize what I was looking at, frankly," said Spalding, who used his phone to snap a photo of the dark cloud. "I saw a big, grayish, ugly blob — very violent-looking, very dark — move across the sky."


The strong winds and heavy rain headed into Indianapolis, damaging houses on the city's west side and uprooting several trees, including some that fell on cars.

Wayne Township Fire Capt. Mike Pruitt said three to four homes received roof damage and several others had siding taken off or windows knocked out.

"We were fortunate that a lot of people had gone to work and the people that were home had received extensive warnings," Pruitt said, referring to the lack of injuries.

The city of Indianapolis opened an operations center to organize its response to the storm, Homeland Security Director Gary Coons said.

"Something hit here. Whether it was straight-line winds or a tornado, something with a lot of wind hit here," Coons told WRTV. "We're just trying to assess and see how much damage there is."

Indianapolis Power and Light Co. reported more than 1,700 customers without service after the storm struck in a second straight day of storm-related outages in the city. Duke Energy reported nearly 800 customers without power in Greenwood, a southern suburb.

Heavy rain accompanying the storms prompted the weather service to issue flash flood warnings for much of central Indiana.

In Cloverdale, about 40 miles southwest of Indianapolis, 2 to 4 inches of water flowed across state Route 42, the weather service said.
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« Reply #516 on: June 27, 2014, 03:12:23 pm »

Jeremiah 30:23  Behold, the whirlwind of the LORD goeth forth with fury, a continuing whirlwind: it shall fall with pain upon the head of the wicked.
Jer 30:24  The fierce anger of the LORD shall not return, until he have done it, and until he have performed the intents of his heart: in the latter days ye shall consider it.


http://local.msn.com/severe-storms-tornadoes-to-ramp-up-in-central-us-friday-1
Severe storms, tornadoes to ramp up in central US Friday

The first week of summer will end on a stormy note in the Plains with the threat for severe weather reaching all the way from Texas to southern Canada.

6/27/14

The first week of summer will end on a stormy note in the Plains with the threat for severe weather reaching all the way from Texas to southern Canada.

As thunderstorms ramp up Friday afternoon, they will begin to produce damaging winds and large hail with the most vigorous storms spinning up tornadoes.

The added threat of tornadoes will result in storms late in the day Friday into Friday evening being more dangerous than those that developed over the region on Wednesday and Thursday.

Due to the timing of these storms, anyone in the Plains during the evening should prepare for the storms and know where to seek shelter if one strikes.

Storms can have major impacts on those traveling across the region not only during the afternoon and evening, but also into Friday night.

This includes any evening commutes along I-94, I-90, I-29, I-80 and I-70.

Wind gusts produced by these storms may be strong enough to topple over high profile vehicles, such as tractor trailers.
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« Reply #517 on: July 01, 2014, 04:45:18 pm »

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/first-hurricane-season-could-spoil-july-fourth-east-coast-n145166
7/1/14
First Hurricane of the Season Could Spoil July Fourth for East Coast

The first tropical storm of the season has formed just in time to wreck the Fourth of July. A tropical depression swirling Tuesday over Miami and the Bahamas was upgraded to a tropical storm and given the name Arthur. It’s projected to strengthen — and some forecast models have it sweeping straight up the Atlantic coast as the holiday approaches.

Some models even have it reaching hurricane force. A tropical storm watch is already in place for part of the Atlantic coast of Florida and could be extended Tuesday. It’s too early to tell where the storm will be for the holiday Friday, but fireworks plans could be shelved from Cape Cod to the mid-Atlantic coast.
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« Reply #518 on: July 07, 2014, 01:06:07 pm »

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/super-typhoon-neoguri-aims-japan-u-s-air-base-wary-n149441
Super Typhoon Neoguri Aims at Japan; U.S. Air Base Wary of Winds

Japan was bracing for destructive winds and huge waves as a powerful super typhoon described as a "once in decades storm" churned Monday toward the southern islands of Okinawa after sparing the Philippines. Typhoon Neoguri was already gusting at more than 150 mph and may pick up still more power as it moves north, growing into an "extremely intense" storm by Tuesday, the Japan Meteorological Agency said. It was expected to rake the southern Okinawa island chain with heavy rain and powerful winds before making landfall on Kyushu, Japan's westernmost main island.

The storm was not expected to be as strong as Typhoon Haiyan, which killed thousands in the Philippines last year. The JMA said Monday night that it planned to issue an emergency high sea warning for Okinawa island, host to three-quarters of U.S. military facilities in Japan. The commander at Kadena Air Base, one of the largest U.S. military establishments on Okinawa, earlier warned that damaging winds were expected by early Tuesday. "I can't stress enough how dangerous this typhoon may be when it hits Okinawa," Brigadier General James Hecker wrote on the base's Facebook page on Sunday. "This is not just another typhoon."
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« Reply #519 on: July 10, 2014, 11:13:01 am »

Polar vortex arrives for mid-July

Many of the cold weather outbreaks this past winter were attributed to something called a Polar Vortex. This is where a flow pattern establishes in the upper atmosphere that draws cold arctic air down across the Canadian Prairies and down into the American mid-west and the Great Lakes region. The summer-time version of the Polar Vortex is about to arrive next week, bringing unusually cold air to the Great Lakes and much of central North America.

Climatologically the middle part of July is usually the warmest time of year in Northern Ontario. Temperatures typically climb into the mid 20s during the warmest time of the day, while overnight lows remain above +10°C.

So this Polar Vortex couldn’t arrive at a worse time. Instead of warm summer-like conditions it will feel more like fall. Temperatures are likely to be 5-10°C below normal. This will keep daytime highs buried in the teens with overnight lows in the single digits. This cold air is expected to move as far south as Texas where record low temperatures could be broken.

When you average the temperatures we have seen for the first 9 days of July we are already 3°C below normal. Adding on this upcoming cold outbreak will likely cause the entire month to end up below average. This would mean that six of the first seven months of 2014 have brought below normal temperatures in Northern Ontario - with only June being near normal.

When you compare the climatological factors at play, it is interesting to note that we can compare 2014 to previous years. 2002 and 2009 had many factors similar to this current year and if that trend continues it could mean good news for August. In those years the hottest weather waited until that last month of summer to arrive – let’s hope that’s the case again this year.

So enjoy the warmer temperatures expected later this week because it appears we are in for an unseasonably cold run for next week.

http://www.local2.ca/ssm/viewarticle.php?id=15416
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« Reply #520 on: July 10, 2014, 01:16:53 pm »

Quote
When you average the temperatures we have seen for the first 9 days of July we are already 3°C below normal. Adding on this upcoming cold outbreak will likely cause the entire month to end up below average. This would mean that six of the first seven months of 2014 have brought below normal temperatures in Northern Ontario - with only June being near normal.

It's very hot in North Texas now, but nonetheless June was NOT a hot month here! Honestly, it was rather a relief on our part.
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« Reply #521 on: July 12, 2014, 08:25:01 pm »

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/lightning-kills-man-rockies-second-death-two-days-n154441
Lightning Kills Man in Rockies, Second Death in Two Days
7/12/14

Lightning fatally struck in Rocky Mountain National Park Saturday for the second time in as many days, killing one person and injuring three others near where another woman died in a lightning strike Friday, a park official said.

Four people were struck by lightning at 3:30 p.m. Saturday in the Rainbow Curve area along Trail Ridge Road about 11,000 feet up, and one man died on the way to a nearby medical center, Rocky Mountain National Park said in a statement. On Friday, Rebecca R. Teilhet, 42, from Yellow Springs, Ohio, was killed and seven others were hurt when lightning struck on the Ute Crossing Trail at roughly 11,400 feet up, the park said.

People walk near the Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colo., in 2003. Lightning struck near Trail Ridge Road Saturday, killing one and injuring three, in the second deadly strike in that area in two days. A lightning strike Friday killed a woman and hurt seven others.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/lightning-kills-man-rockies-second-death-two-days-n154441#
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« Reply #522 on: July 28, 2014, 06:45:29 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/boston-area-hit-violent-storm-possible-tornado-145158727.html
Rare tornado touches down outside Boston, no deaths reported
7/28/14

BOSTON (Reuters) - Police and emergency crews in the city of Revere, Massachusetts, outside Boston scrambled to clean up after a rare tornado touched down on Monday, downing power lines, damaging homes and overturning at least one car.

The National Weather Service confirmed that a tornado touched down during a storm that brought heavy rains, lightning and flooding to Boston and many of its northern suburbs. State emergency management officials said they were not aware of injuries or fatalities from the storm.

"We are in the process of evaluating the aftermath of the severe storm that passed through Revere this morning," Revere Mayor Dan Rizzo said on his official Twitter page.

Revere police reported extensive damage to homes and trees after the violent weather. Boston and cities to its northeast reported extensive street flooding from the storm, which dropped rain at the rate of 1.5 to 2 inches (3.8 to 5 cm) per hour, the National Weather Service said.
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« Reply #523 on: August 15, 2014, 02:28:16 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/communities-across-us-recover-floods-060314605.html
Communities across US recover after floods
8/14/14

NORTH BABYLON, N.Y. (AP) — Communities across the U.S. are drying out after unusually heavy rains swamped highways, flooded basements and were blamed for at least four deaths.

Long Island residents were urged to remain off the road Wednesday as a round-the-clock recovery continued after a record 13.26 inches of rain fell between midnight and 9:30 a.m.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder issued a disaster declaration for the Detroit area after rain sent mud cascading down embankments, closing stretches of freeways all of Tuesday and part of Wednesday.

Officials at a Nebraska hospital said Wednesday its public cafeteria could stay shuttered for months after it was inundated by floodwater over the weekend.

The latest iteration of wild weather hit the northeast Tuesday night and lingered through Wednesday. A slow-moving system, powered by tropical moisture and clouds soaring far higher than in usual summer storms, lashed communities from Maryland to New England.

The hardest hit areas, Long Island's Suffolk County and the towns of Islip and Brookhaven there, declared states of emergency after what County Executive Steve Bellone called an "unprecedented" deluge.

"It's not just how much rain fell, it's how fast it fell," Accuweather senior meteorologist Jack Boston said, calling the storm a once every 50 years event. "We're talking about billions and billions of gallons of water and it all has to go somewhere."

Parts of the heavily traveled Montauk Highway on Long Island's South Shore were undermined and buckled. Service on a branch of the Long Island Rail Road was suspended as crews repaired track beds washed out by the storm.

The storm formed Tuesday south of Baltimore, according to Accuweather's Boston, and hit that city with its highest rainfall total in 81 years. Roads were flooded, forcing several water rescues, and a sinkhole formed on an Anne Arundel County street.

From there it swept across New Jersey — following a track similar to a typical winter storm — and dumped nearly 9 inches of rain in Millville, where a woman suffered broken ribs and a punctured lung when the walls of her basement collapsed due to flooding.

Rain fell at a rate of up to 2 inches per hour in Rhode Island, stalling cars and sweeping manhole covers away.

Volunteer firefighters on Long Island used trucks that stand high off the ground and that normally are used for brush fires to rescue stranded drivers.

Officials said a man died when a tractor-trailer hit his slow-moving SUV at the height of the storm on the Long Island Expressway.

On the Southern State Parkway in North Babylon, firefighters encountered about 50 vehicles either stuck in the rising waters or pulled off to an elevated apron on the side of the highway.

"We had occupants climbing out of windows because they couldn't open their doors," said Lt. Timothy Harrington, the first firefighter on the scene. "Some of the water was over the vehicles' roofs. I've never seen anything like this before."

The storm's effects still were being felt Thursday morning in Maine. More than 7,000 customers were without power around daybreak.

In Portland, where the National Weather Service said more than 6 inches of rain fell, police urged motorists to stay off the streets because drivers were getting stuck in high water. And in the City of South Portland, police handled more than 60 flooding-related calls and had to rescue several people from stranded vehicles.
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« Reply #524 on: August 22, 2014, 02:30:36 am »

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-08-15/california-s-record-heat-is-like-nothing-you-ve-ever-seen-yet.html?cmpid=yhoo
8/15/14
California’s Record Heat Is Like Nothing You’ve Ever Seen... Yet

If hot thermometers actually exploded like they do in cartoons, there would be a lot of mercury to clean up in California right now.

The California heat this year is like nothing ever seen, with records that go back to 1895. The chart below shows average year-to-date temperatures in the state from January through July for each year. The orange line shows the trend rising 0.2 degrees Fahrenheit per decade.



The sharp spike on the far right of the chart is the unbearable heat of 2014. That’s not just a new record; it’s a chart-busting 1.4 degrees higher than the previous record. It’s an exclamation point at the end of a long declarative sentence.

The high temperatures have contributed to one of the worst droughts in California's history. The water reserves in the state’s topsoil and subsoil are nearly depleted, and 70 percent of the state’s pastures are rated “very poor to poor,” according to the USDA. By one measure, which takes into account both rainfall and heat, this is the worst drought ever. (See the chart below.)

While the temperatures are extreme, they’re not entirely unexpected. The orange trend line above is consistent with rising temperatures across the globe. Average surface temperatures on Earth have warmed roughly 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit since 1880, according to NASA. The eastern half of the U.S. has had an unusually cool 2014, but it's a lone exception compared to the rest of the planet.

The International Panel on Climate Change, which includes more than 1,300 scientists, forecasts temperatures to rise 2.5 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit over the next century. That puts California's record heat well within the range of what’s to come, turning this “hot weather” into, simply, “weather.”

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« Reply #525 on: August 25, 2014, 10:10:02 am »

http://local.msn.com/hurricane-marie-grows-stronger-in-mexican-pacific-1
8/25/14
Hurricane Marie grows stronger in Mexican Pacific

Powerful Hurricane Marie was kicked high swells along Mexico's northern Pacific coast on Monday, even as it weakened slightly to a Category 4 storm. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said it would likely raise waves along Southern California later in the week.


MEXICO CITY — Powerful Hurricane Marie was kicked high swells along Mexico's northern Pacific coast on Monday, even as it weakened slightly to a Category 4 storm. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said it would likely raise waves along Southern California later in the week.

The Miami-based Hurricane Center in Miami said that Marie had sustained winds of up to 145 mph (230 kph) and was located about 465 miles (7505 kilometers) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. It said the storm was moving west-northwest at 12 mph (19 kph).

Swells provoked by the storm were affecting much of Mexico's Pacific coast and the Hurricane Center warned of dangerous surf and rip current conditions. The state of Baja California Sur urged people to be on alert.

Hurricane-force winds extended up to 60 miles (95 kilometers) away from the storm's center, with tropical storm-force winds reaching out to 310 miles (500 kilometers).
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« Reply #526 on: August 26, 2014, 02:58:06 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/hurricane-churns-towards-bermuda-impact-us-190956214.html
Hurricane churns towards Bermuda, to impact US
8/26/14

Miami (AFP) - A strengthening Hurricane Cristobal had Bermuda in its sights Tuesday, US meteorologists said, warning of heavy rain, high winds and life-threatening rip currents in Florida and beyond.

The storm, which has dumped rain on the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands, killing one person, was packing maximum sustained winds of 75 miles (120 kilometers) per hour, the Miami-based National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest forecast, at 1800 GMT.

A tropical storm watch was already in effect for Bermuda, forecasters said, meaning inclement conditions were possible in the next 24-36 hours.

"The center of Cristobal is expected to pass northwest of Bermuda on Wednesday," the NHC said.

It added: "Swells generated by Cristobal are affecting portions of the United States coast from central Florida northward to North Carolina and will spread northwards later this week."

Cristobal, a category one hurricane, is the third hurricane of the Atlantic storm season.

It comes hot on the heels of Hurricane Marie, which briefly reached the highest possible category five destructive power but was weakening in the Pacific off Mexico.

Now a category two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, Marie's crashing waves over the weekend caused a fishing vessel to capsize, with three of its occupants still missing and presumed dead.
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« Reply #527 on: August 26, 2014, 07:33:03 pm »

http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/25/1097-record-low-temperatures-broken-so-far-in-august/
8/25/14
Winter Is Coming: 1,097 Record Low Temperatures Broken So Far In August

It’s been a cool summer so far for many across the U.S. as 1,097 record low temperatures were set in August, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) temperature data.

NOAA reports that 1,097 “low maximum” temperature records were broken between Aug. 1 and Aug. 23 at locations across the country this year. This means that these temperatures on the day they were recorded were the coolest on record.

After a particularly long and frigid winter, summer for much of the U.S. has been cooler than normal, according to NOAA data. The average temperature for July was just 73.3 degrees Fahrenheit — 0.3 degrees below the 20th century average. The average maximum temperature was 85.8 degrees Fahrenheit, or 0.9 degrees below average.

“Below-average temperatures stretched from the Midwest, through the Mississippi River Valley, and into parts of the Southeast, where 13 states had one of their 10 coolest July’s on record. Arkansas and Indiana each had their coolest July on record,” NOAA noted in its July climate release.

“There were more than twice as many record cool temperatures during July (5,508) than record warm temperatures (2,605), with most of the cool temperature records (3,333) being cool daytime temperatures and most of the warm temperature records (1,882) being warm nighttime temperatures,” NOAA added.

But the whole country did not experience such a cool summer. The West Coast saw above average temperatures and California is in the midst of drought. NOAA says that “the Intermountain West to the Pacific Coast. Six states had one of their 10 warmest July’s on record, but no state was record warm for the month.”

Even with the warm weather and dryness, wildfires have been lower as well this season. Only about 2.9 million acres have been burned this year, according to government data — well below the 5.8 million acre yearly average for the nine years.

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center projects that parts of the South and Northeast will experience above normal temperatures this fall. The West Coast will also see a warmer fall while the Midwest and some Mountain states get hit with below normal temperatures.


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« Reply #528 on: September 06, 2014, 07:21:32 pm »

http://news.msn.com/us/storms-cut-power-to-more-than-600000-in-michigan-illinois
Storms cut power to more than 600,000 in Michigan, Illinois
9/6/14

Sept 6 (Reuters) - More than 600,000 electric customers in Michigan and Illinois lost power at the height of storms that brought heavy winds and lightning, ripping up trees, downing power lines and leaving at least two people dead, officials said on Saturday.

An Illinois woman died Saturday of injuries she sustained when she was struck by a falling tree and a Michigan man was electrocuted after touching a power line, local media said.

Molly Glynn, 46, died at NorthShore Evanston Hospital on Saturday, hospital spokeswoman Colette Urban said. She had been brought to the hospital in critical condition on Friday.

She was struck by a falling tree Friday afternoon while riding a bicycle on a forest preserve trail, Cook County Sheriff's office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari said.


Glynn was a long-time actress in Chicago, appearing at the Steppenwolf and other theaters, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Commonwealth Edison, an Exelon Corp unit, reported more than 174,000 customers lost power in Illinois in Friday's storms. About 62,000 were without power Saturday and ComEd said it hoped to restore power by Sunday night.

In southeastern Michigan, about 312,000 DTE Energy Co customers were without power Saturday afternoon after wind gusts of more than 75 miles per hour (120 km per hour) and lightning downed more than 2,000 power lines on Friday night, DTE Energy spokesman Scott Simons said.

About 375,000 customers lost power at the height of the outages on Friday, the 10th highest total DTE has recorded, Simons said.

DTE expects the vast majority of customers to be restored by late Monday, though some may not have power until Wednesday.

DTE crews are being assisted in the repairs by more than 600 line workers from utilities in Ohio, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, New York and Tennessee, Simons said.

DTE urged caution around downed power lines. The Detroit News reported that a Warren, Michigan, man was electrocuted after coming into contact with a downed line.

Consumers Energy reported that 77,000 of its customers across southern Michigan had lost power on Friday. That number had dropped to 46,000 by midday Saturday and it expected to restore power to most customers by Sunday night, it said.
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« Reply #529 on: September 08, 2014, 11:51:36 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/heavy-rain-snarls-morning-commute-phoenix-area-125827596.html
9/8/14
Cars engulfed as rain sets record for Phoenix

PHOENIX (AP) — The remnants of Hurricane Norbert pushed into the desert Southwest and swamped Phoenix with record rainfall for a single day, turning freeways into small lakes and sending rescuers scrambling to get drivers out of inundated cars.

At least two people died in the flooding, including a woman who was swept away in her car by rushing water and became trapped against a bridge. In addition, a 76-year-old woman drowned in floodwaters.

By Monday evening, floodwaters were threatening up to 100 homes in suburban Mesa after retention basins and channels along the U.S. 60 freeway reached or exceeded capacity, allowing water to flow into some neighborhoods, city officials said.

Crews were working to disconnect power to submerged transformers, provide sandbags to threatened homes and pump water from affected areas. A temporary shelter was being set up at a recreation center for those choosing to voluntarily evacuate.

The flooding was caused by heavy thunderstorms and showers associated with Norbert after it was downgraded to a tropical depression.

Storms also hit Nevada, where 190 people from an Indian reservation were evacuated Monday and officials feared riverbanks could overflow after 4 inches of rain fell in a two-hour period in the small town of Moapa, northeast of Las Vegas.

Erin Neff of the Clark County Regional Flood Control District said authorities were keeping an eye on the Virgin River, which was at 9 feet and floods at 11 feet.

Tribal police warned that the waters of the Muddy River, which feeds the Virgin River, were close to breaching a dam on the Moapa River Reservation.

In Phoenix, sections of the two main east-west and north-south freeways through Phoenix — Interstates 10 and 17 — were closed during the morning commute, snarling traffic across the metro area.

Cars and SUVs sat in water up to their hoods on Interstate 10, while dozens of motorists parked on its wide, banked borders to stay clear of the water. A state Department of Public Safety officer used the roof of his SUV to carry three stranded motorists from a flooded area of I-10.

Joseph Friend was driving onto the freeway at 43rd Avenue about 4:15 a.m. when a passing big rig ruined his day.

"A big tidal wave just came up and totally took me out, came over the hood of my truck," Friend said.


With water filling his vehicle, he climbed out and walked up the freeway embankment to wait it out. His pickup truck was barely visible at the peak of the flooding.

Other drivers were stranded in the median. After the highway was shut down, a woman on top of her car in the median called for help, so Friend waded out and led her to safety.

"She was asking for help and nobody went out there, so I went out there and helped her out," Friend said. "I was already soaked anyway."

By late morning, the water on I-10 had receded, allowing trucks to take away several dozen vehicles that had been swamped and stranded.

The National Weather Service recorded 3.29 inches of rain at the Phoenix airport, by far the most precipitation ever received in one day in the city. The previous record was 2.91 inches in 1939.

Other Phoenix metro areas received staggering amounts of rain for the desert. Chandler recorded 5.63 inches, while Mesa had 4.41 inches.

Phoenix sometimes receives heavy rain and wind during the summer months, the result of monsoon storms in the Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The past six years have produced a highly erratic pattern as the city has gone from huge rainfall one summer to scant precipitation the next, said meteorologist Charlotte Dewey.

For example, Phoenix received 5.7 inches of rain during the summer storm season in 2008, followed by less than an inch the next summer. The 2011 summer was marked by little rain and towering dust clouds that enveloped the city, while this season has produced record rain. Monday's single-day rainfall totals eclipsed the average total precipitation for the entire summer.

The freeways became submerged after pumping stations could not keep up with the downpour, the Department of Transportation said. Sections of Interstates 10 and 17 were closed most of the day.

In Tucson, nearly 2 inches of rain in a short period turned normally dry washes into raging torrents. A woman was found dead after her car was swept about two blocks by water 10 to 15 feet deep then wedged and submerged against a bridge, Tucson Fire Department spokesman Barrett Baker said.

"This is the worst thing in the world for us," Baker said. "We talk all summer really about the dangers of washes."

Rescuers with the Northwest Fire District, a Pima County department, needed 30 minutes to reach a man in a car and pull him from the passenger side, which was shielded against the fastest-flowing water.

The rescue was "as close as it gets before we lose somebody," spokesman Adam Goldberg said.

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer declared a state of emergency because of the flooding and told non-essential state workers to stay home.

Scattered electricity outages were reported, with more than 10,000 customers affected. Numerous street closures were reported in cities across the area.
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« Reply #530 on: September 13, 2014, 12:28:43 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/early-snow-surprises-parts-west-south-dakota-170938592.html
9/12/14
Rare snowstorm slams Rockies states, South Dakota

It's still summer, but a snowstorm blanketed parts of Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana and Colorado, setting early snowfall records in some places, covering lawns and flower gardens and providing a preview of what is to come.

The snowstorm dumped up to 20 inches of snow in parts of Wyoming on Wednesday and Thursday and sent overnight temperatures plummeting into the 20s in some areas.

While snow in September is rare, it isn't unusual for local residents used to wild swings in the weather.

"I don't mind it; it is what it is," said Deann Meyer of Buffalo, Wyoming, where up to 10 inches of snow fell. "It's going to be 80 next week. That's what the weather says. Of course, that could change."

Still, it was the earliest snowfall on record for parts of Wyoming and southwest South Dakota. Temperatures hovered around freezing in Denver, forcing many gardeners to wrap their plants for protection.

Hard frosts were reported in western Montana. Kalispell reported a record low of 23 degrees Friday morning while Missoula's record low was 25, compared with 28 in 1988.

Chuck Baker, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Riverton, Wyoming, said the blast of wintry weather originated in the northern reaches of Canada. "It was pretty potent for this time of year," Baker said.

The heavy, wet snow snapped off tree branches and caused power outages in Buffalo and the surrounding area.

Some roads and highways had slick spots Friday morning. Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park in Montana was closed temporarily earlier in the week, but otherwise travel was not hampered.

The National Weather Service reported 20 inches of snow falling in the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming.

Eight inches fell in Custer, South Dakota.

The 3 to 5 inches that fell in Cody, a busy summer tourist town in northwest Wyoming, is the earliest recorded snowfall there since records were kept in 1915. The previous recorded earliest snowfall in Cody was Sept. 12, 1970.

Just under an inch fell in the Rapid City, South Dakota, area, breaking the previous record set on Sept. 13, 1970, for the earliest snowfall.

Boulder, Colorado, also received snow — a year after being hit by a devastating flood from heavy rain.
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« Reply #531 on: September 23, 2014, 10:35:31 pm »

http://theweek.com/article/index/268461/what-is-driving-the-increasingly-weird-behavior-of-the-polar-jet-stream
What is driving the increasingly weird behavior of the polar jet stream?
If you guessed climate change, you might be right

9/23/14

A big link between climate change and severe weather may be lurking 30,000 feet above your head. More and more scientists are interested in the links among the increasingly weird behavior of the polar jet stream and the disappearance of ice and snow in the Arctic and other extreme weather trends. The linkage is suggestive, though not proven, but if true would clearly demonstrate that what happens in the Arctic affects more than just polar bears.

What's happening to the polar jet stream

One of the biggest drivers of weather in North America is the polar jet stream, a ribbon of high-speed winds that flows east from Alaska, across the U.S. and Canada, and over the Atlantic Ocean towards Europe. The jet stream alters weather conditions below it by moving warm and cold air masses around, allowing weather systems to migrate across land and sea. The jet stream's path undergoes some natural variation, but has gotten downright loopy in recent years, according to scientists.

"I've been doing meteorology for 30 years, and the jet stream the last three years has done stuff I've never seen," Jeff Masters, meteorologist at Weather Underground, said in 2013. "The fact that the jet stream is unusual could be an indicator of something. I'm not saying we know what it is."

Rutgers University atmospheric scientist Jennifer Francis thinks there is a clear climate change factor in the jet stream's wobbliness: the warming of the Arctic. Temperatures are rising in the Arctic regions faster than anywhere else in the world, an effect called "Arctic amplification" that may be due to the fact that as sea ice melts it exposes darker water that absorbs more heat then the reflective ice. As the Arctic warms more quickly than other regions, this lessens the temperature gradient between the equator and the North Pole, a key factor governing the behavior of the polar jet stream.

How? A weakening temperature gradient slows the jet stream, which has the effect of making it wavier — or so goes the theory. Francis compares the situation to a river flowing down a mountain and out towards the coast. While it's moving quickly down an incline, the river takes a more straightforward route; when it slows, as the base of the mountain shallows approaching the coast, the river naturally adopts a more wandering path. Similarly, a slower jet stream is more likely to be wavy, with more peaks ("ridges") and dips ("troughs").

How a wavier jet stream equals wilder weather

And a wavier jet stream has historically been associated with extreme weather. In one study published in Nature Climate Change in June 2014, University of Exeter mathematician James Screen and University of Melbourne earth scientist Ian Simmonds combed through historical weather data going back to 1979 and focused on 40 extreme weather events, from heavy rainfall to droughts, cold snaps, and heat waves. In general, they found that large waves in the jet stream tend to coincide with such events.

Jet stream waviness has also been linked to all sorts of extreme weather events in recent years. Francis has argued that the left hook that Hurricane Sandy took (sending it towards New Jersey) was due to a blocking ridge. And the 2013-2014 winter, which was unusually warm in Alaska, unusually dry in California, and unusually cold across the Midwest and East Coast, occurred as the jet stream stayed in a holding pattern, in a shape that had a big ridge to the west and a deep trough to the east.

"It's a great example of the kind of pattern we expect to see more often," Francis says.

Why there's complexity, uncertainty, and chaos

Not every scientist is on board with the theorized connection between the jet stream and extreme weather. Colorado State University atmospheric scientist Elizabeth Barnes took a look at jet stream waviness between 1980 and 2011, and proposed that the increased waviness that Francis and other scientists were seeing is "likely an artifact of the methodology" they used.

Barnes' analysis of the data showed no wide trends in jet stream speed or increased episodes of blocking ridges over that 30-year period. But Francis and other scientists point out that the extreme type of Arctic melting we're seeing today has only kicked into gear within the last decade, so looking at data going back thirty years might muffle the signal of the changes that are currently happening.

"I'm pretty much on the middle ground here," says NOAA scientist James Overland. "We've seen more severe weather in the mid-latitudes" — the zones between the tropics and the polar regions — "in the last 5 years or so, and we also know that the Arctic is changing and warming up quite a bit. But the uncertainties are in understanding the mechanisms that tie the two together. The timescale is very short, [making it harder to] totally prove that there is a connection… and weather is very chaotic to start with, so it's hard to isolate what the Arctic contribution would be."

Even if the changing jet stream is found to influence weather trends, individual weather events don't typically stem from a single cause. In an unusual 2010 snowstorm that buried Washington, DC under three feet of powder, for example, there was cold Arctic air ferried south by a dip in the jet stream, but there was also an El Nino event bringing moisture laterally, across the southern U.S. "It was the two acting together," Overland says. "If you'd just had one or the other it wouldn't have been so extreme."

Overland doesn't really see a consensus emerging in the next few years; the problem isn't just a lack of data, but in the differences between computer models and climate scientists' own interpretations. The jet stream might not end up being the smoking gun; there are other proposed mechanisms that tie climate change and wild weather together. Still, "we believe that we're going towards a nearly sea ice-free Arctic in the next 10-20 years," says Overland. "The question now is: Do you wait for more perfect information, or do we act on incomplete information?"
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« Reply #532 on: September 27, 2014, 09:32:09 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/southwest-storms-knock-over-trees-drench-phoenix-230128384.html
Southwest storms knock over trees, drench Phoenix
9/27/14

PHOENIX (AP) — Intense storms swept through the Southwest on Saturday, snapping trees and shrouding metropolitan Phoenix in cascading showers while also bringing flooding to parts of Nevada.

The skies above downtown Phoenix were completely gray in the afternoon as strong winds, thunder and rain hit the region. The outside visibility of buildings was almost entirely obscured by rain and clouds.

The storm forced authorities to close a section of Interstate 17 for more than hour due to flooding. Flight departures and landings resumed about 3:30 p.m. after they were halted for an hour at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. But airport spokeswoman Julie Rodriguez said delays are expected into the evening. More than 40 flights scheduled to land in Phoenix were diverted to other airports, she said.

"The wind caused some damage to the roof of Terminal 2 in the baggage claim area and in some of the gate areas. However, all three terminals at Sky Harbor are operational," Rodriguez said in a statement.

Branches and debris littered streets around the city and at least one traffic light was knocked over. Some trees were toppled by the ensuing wind. The Salt River Project utility said that about 31,000 customers were without power as of Saturday afternoon.

Most of the outages were in west Phoenix and suburbs west of Phoenix, with smaller clusters reported in Scottsdale, Mesa and Tempe. Utility officials estimated that power would be restored sometime Saturday afternoon.

Phoenix Fire Capt. Benjamin Santillan said firefighters were helping to locate a hiker in south Phoenix stranded by a washed away trail. The woman was hiking with her dog when the rain hit. Santillan said she was able to find her way to a road and crews were using her cellphone signal to find her.

Crews, meanwhile, have been responding to multiple calls around the city of trees falling on vehicles and small electrical-related fires.

National Weather Service meteorologist Valerie Meyers said a record-breaking 1.6 inches of rain has been reported so far. That total surpassed the 1.46 inches reported on this date in 1903. While the storm was starting to clear out in some parts of the city, there would still be lingering showers and isolated thunderstorms into the evening east of Phoenix, Meyers said.

The weather was a mix of Phoenix's first fall storm and leftover monsoon moisture, National Weather Service meteorologist Marvin Percha said.

In southeast Nevada's rural Moapa Valley, heavy rains brought flooding but authorities say that despite a river cresting at a record high, the damage wasn't as bad as what was caused by high waters in the area earlier in the month.

Clark County Deputy Fire Chief Jon Klassen said the only evacuations occurred in the tiny town of Warm Springs, but he didn't know how many people or homes were affected. Roads to the town were flooded and inaccessible.

David Aguilar said an inch of silt came into his Moapa Valley house along the Muddy River.

"All of a sudden, I heard the sound of water," he told the Las Vegas Review-Journal, adding a water pipe also broke, complicating cleanup efforts.

Other residents say the flood left mud and debris in yards, inundated sheds and other exterior buildings and damaged vehicles.

There were also reports of storm problems in Las Vegas, as well as a power outage in Henderson.

Las Vegas Fire and Rescue spokesman Tim Szymanski said a townhouse was heavily damaged after being hit by lightning, but no one was hurt. He said firefighters also responded to two calls of minor flooding, one at a residence and another at a business.

Authorities responded to cars stuck on Interstate 15, but no one was trapped and the cars were unoccupied, Klassen said.

Interstate 15 just south of Mesquite reopened after flooding closed it in both directions Saturday morning, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation. But southbound travel was reduced to one lane.

In northern Arizona, Flagstaff residents also saw showers, thunder and lightning Saturday. More than an inch of rain fell in isolated areas south of Prescott by the afternoon, meteorologist Megan Schwitzer said. The Weather Service also said that nickel-sized hail was reported near Yarnell.
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« Reply #533 on: October 03, 2014, 07:01:50 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/triple-digit-fall-temperatures-roasting-california-074252159.html
Triple-digit fall temperatures roasting California
10/3/14

LOS ANGELES (AP) — While people in some other parts of the country are watching the leaves turn a kaleidoscope of fall colors as they contemplate unpacking winter clothes, California is roasting under an autumn heat wave.

As high temperatures were ranging from the low 100s in Southern California to the 90s in the normally more temperate San Francisco Bay Area on Friday, National Weather Service forecasters warned it was just a warm-up for what lies ahead this weekend.

"We're looking for it to peak tomorrow," said Stuart Seto of the National Weather Service, adding that some high-temperature records could fall Saturday. In the coastal city of Santa Maria, three hours north of Los Angeles, Friday's 100-degree reading tied a record for the date set in 1985.

SO WHY IS IT SO HOT, ANYWAY?

Blame the Santa Ana Winds, those chameleon-like gusts that start out icy cold in the Great Basin region of Utah and Nevada, but by the time they race across deserts and down mountain canyons and arrive in Southern California they are hot as ... well, you know.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO OTHER AREAS?

Usually during a heat wave Southern Californians can tell themselves, "Well, it's hotter in Arizona and Death Valley." Not this time. By mid-afternoon Friday, it was 99 in Long Beach, the same as the temperature in Death Valley, California, which calls itself the hottest place on the planet. It was 95 in Phoenix.

SO JUST HOW UNUSUAL IS THIS?

Unusual but not unprecedented. Although temperatures for this time of year are normally in the high 70s, it reached 108 in Los Angeles on Oct. 3, 1987, and again the next day. "It's hot but not record-breaking hot," says Seto. Not yet, anyway. LA's Woodland Hills neighborhood could surpass 108 degrees Saturday.

HOW ARE AUTHORITIES RESPONDING?

Los Angeles County is opening dozens of cooling centers at places like libraries and community centers. The Long Beach Unified School District sent its 76,000 students home an hour early on Thursday and Friday to get them out of class before the hottest part of the day. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is urging people to set thermostats at 78 degrees. With wildfire danger high across much of the state, the Los Angeles County Fire Department has beefed up many of its firefighting crews from three to four people and stationed extra equipment in strategic locations. "We've got wind, heat, the perfect combination, everything in alignment for a potential brushfire," fire Capt. Rich Moody said Friday as he and his crew patrolled a Southern California hillside.

HOW ARE SOME PEOPLE HANDLING THE HEAT?

Perry Mann, who dresses as a pirate and poses for pictures with tourists on Hollywood Boulevard may have come up with the most innovative solution. On Thursday he packed his body with frozen water bottles and greeted people by telling them, "I'm frozen in ice from the Antarctic." When the ice melted, he drank it. When it ran out, he went home.

WHILE CALIFORNIA BAKES, WHAT IS GOING ON ELSEWHERE?

As Los Angeles County lifeguards prepared for hundreds of thousands of people to storm the beaches — "It should be like a summer weekend," said Chief Lifeguard Steve Moseley — New York's Fall Foliage report predicted that autumn leaves in the Adirondack and Catskill mountains could be at their most spectacular this weekend. Meanwhile, in Madison, Wisconsin, temperatures were in freefall. They dropped from highs in the 80s last week to the 50s on Friday, with a forecast for sleet or snow by Saturday
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« Reply #534 on: November 08, 2014, 04:40:52 pm »

   Arctic Blast via 'Polar Vortex' to Chill 42 States...

-30 Wyoming...


http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/polar-vortex-42-states/37049255
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« Reply #535 on: November 27, 2014, 10:52:10 am »

https://gma.yahoo.com/hundreds-thousands-without-power-due-east-coast-storm-093757541--abc-news-topstories.html
Hundreds of Thousands Without Power Due to East Coast Storm
11/27/14

More than 350,000 electric customers from Maine to Virginia were without power this morning, after a storm dumped a sloppy mix of rain and snow along the East Coast.

New Hampshire residents experienced the heaviest level of outages, with more than 180,000 electric customers there reported without power this morning. More than 78,000 customers in Maine lost power, along with 55,000 customers in New York.

The storm system grounded hundreds of flights and turned highways hazardous along the congested Washington-to-Boston corridor Wednesday, fouling up transportation on one of the busiest travel days of the year. Further travel issues are expected today.

The snow piled up from North Carolina to Maine, bringing down branches and power lines. Marin Murray, a spokesman with Public Service Company of New Hampshire, said the snow’s consistency – wet and heavy – along with little wind has contributed to the power outages.

“We do anticipate, unfortunately, that some of our customers will not have power likely for a couple of days,” Murray told ABC News. “It’s going to take that long to restore power to all of customers, unfortunately.”

Sara Willingham of Concord, New Hampshire, lost power at her home.

“I think all my food now is going to need to be thrown out,” she said.

Amid the heavy snowfall, some hospitals were forced to rely on backup generators.

Residents in the Midwest also experienced wintry weather Wednesday. The whipping winds in Des Moines, Iowa, sent snow sideways, and cars off the road.

Some travelers tried to change their plans and catch earlier flights to beat the storm Wednesday, and major airlines waived their rebooking fees. But most planes were already filled.

Numerous traffic accidents were reported across the Northeast Wednesday, where by midafternoon the line between rain and snow ran roughly along Interstate 95, the chief route between Washington and Boston.

Schools and businesses also closed in some areas, and state government offices let workers go home early.

Pat Green and her husband drove from Saugerties, New York, Wednesday to the Albany airport for the first leg of their trip to San Francisco. She said the drive on the New York State Thruway was "a little hairy," but they made it.

"It was snowing so hard you couldn't see the car ahead of you," she said. "We slowed down so we were fine. We also give ourselves a lot of extra time."
An estimated 41.3 million travelers are expected to hit the nation's highways between Wednesday and Sunday, a 4.3 percent increase over last year, according to AAA.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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« Reply #536 on: November 28, 2014, 05:50:49 am »

Brisbane hit by golf ball-sized hail storms

THE army has been deployed and a massive clean-up operation will begin in Brisbane today after the city was smashed by hailstones the size of golf balls and destructive gusts up to 140km/h.

Queensland Premier Campbell Newman called on the Australian Defence Force to help clean up after the storms, labelled as “catastrophic” and the worst to hit Brisbane in 30 years.

Soldiers have been out in force since 2.30am to help mop up the damage as 70,000 homes remain without power and more than a dozen schools remained closed, the Courier Mail reported.

“I always believe in trying to amass the maximum resources as soon as possible,” Mr Campbell said, standing before a damaged church in Woolloongabba, two kilometres south-east of Brisbane CBD last night.

rest: http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/brisbane-hit-by-golf-ball-sized-hail-storms/story-e6frflp0-1227137381983
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« Reply #537 on: December 07, 2014, 10:06:10 am »

Study: California Drought Worst in 1200 Years

This week's statewide rains have made little impact in relieving California's extreme drought. In fact, according to a new scientific study, this drought is the worst that California has experienced in 1200 years. Researchers studying tree rings concluded that "the current event is the most severe drought in the last 1200 years, with single year (2014) and accumulated moisture deficits worse than any previous continuous span of dry years."

The study, published as a research letter in the journal of the American Geophysical Union, was written by Daniel Griffin of the University of Minnesota and Kevin J Anchukaitis of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. By measuring tree rings from nearly 300 blue oaks, and comparing those measurements with data from older trees such as giant sequoias, scientists were able to generate estimates of rainfall for centuries.

As the San Jose Mercury News reported: "The researchers took core samples, which don't harm the living trees, of oaks as old as 500 years and oak logs dating back more than 700 years, the University of Minnesota's Griffin said. And they sanded down the wood with extremely fine-grain sandpaper, magnifying the rings 40 times under a microscope and measuring them to within one one-thousandth of a millimeter." The scientists then used similar data in the North American Drought Atlas to calculate temperature and rainfall conditions.

"Although there are 37 times over the past 1,200 years when there were three-year dry periods in California, no period had as little rainfall and as hot of temperatures as 2012-14, the scientists concluded," the Mercury News reported.

Meanwhile, Californians still hope that this week's storms herald the beginning of a recovery.

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-California/2014/12/05/Study-California-Drought-Worst-in-1200-Years
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« Reply #538 on: December 13, 2014, 07:02:41 am »

Indonesia landslide: Many missing in Java

At least 17 people have died and more than 90 are missing after a landslide on Indonesia's main island of Java. Heavy rain caused the landslide near Jemblung village in central Java. Rescuers have been searching for survivors but a lack of heavy equipment is hampering efforts, with many forced to dig with their bare hands.   

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-30459175
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« Reply #539 on: January 19, 2015, 05:23:46 pm »

Any of this a coincidence?

http://news.yahoo.com/pope-set-emotional-day-philippine-typhoon-survivors-213841285.html
Pope flees Philippine storm, cuts short typhoon mercy trip
1/17/15

Pope Francis was forced Saturday to flee a fierce storm in the Philippines that killed a papal volunteer, cutting short a mercy mission to weeping survivors of a catastrophic super typhoon.

Wearing a yellow plastic poncho to protect him from intense rain, Francis delivered an emotional mass to about 200,000 people in the typhoon-ravaged central Philippine city of Tacloban.

However, plans to spend the entire day in Tacloban and nearby areas that were devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan 14 months ago were ruined by another storm, forcing him to fly back to Manila at lunchtime.

"So I apologise to you all. I'm sad about this, truly saddened," the 78-year-old pontiff told thousands of people who had gathered at one church shortly before he raced back to the airport.

The pope's plane made the 90-minute flight back to the Philippine capital of Manila safely.

But highlighting the dangers of the storm, a papal volunteer at the morning mass died as steel scaffolding collapsed on her, a church spokesman said.

A plane carrying three of President Benigno Aquino's aides then overshot the runway on take-off at Tacloban and nosedived into mud, 30 minutes after Pope Francis's plane flew back to Manila. No-one was badly injured.

Philippine aviation authorities confirmed that the storm's strong crosswinds had blown the plane off the tarmac.

- Emotional mass -

The trip to Tacloban and surrounding areas was one of the top reasons for the pope making a five-day visit to the Philippines, the Catholic Church's Asian stronghold, where he is a highly revered figure.

Haiyan, the most powerful storm ever recorded on land, left 7,350 people dead or missing in November 2013 as it devastated fishing and farming towns that were already among the Philippines' poorest.

The pope celebrated a truncated but still deeply emotional mass for survivors at Tacloban's airport, after receiving a joyous welcome from a crowd that police estimated at about 200,000 people.

"Long live the pope," the crowd chanted as he walked off the plane to be immediately buffeted by strong winds and heavy rain.

His welcome echoed the rapturous reception that millions gave the pontiff during the first two days of his trip to the Philippines.

Most of the people in the crowd at Tacloban wore thin plastic ponchos handed out by organisers, and the pope also put one on before walking on to a nearby stage to celebrate mass in heavy rain.

"I would like to tell you something close to my heart," the pope said as many in the crowd clutched crucifixes and cried.

"When I saw in Rome that catastrophe, I felt I had to be here. And on those very days, I decided to come here. I'm here to be with you."

He acknowledged the enduring pain experienced by the survivors.

"Some of you have lost part of your families. All I can do is keep silent. And I walk with you all with my silent heart," he said.

The pope declared Jesus would never let them down, and many in the crowd said the pontiff's words had indeed lifted their spirits.

- Deadly storms -

"I can't explain how I feel. I am filled with gratitude. Never in my life did I think that I'd see a pope," 68-year-old housewife Virginia Torres told AFP, wiping tears and raindrops from her face after the pontiff left the mass venue.

Torres, whose house two hours' drive from Tacloban was wiped out by tsunami-like storm surges, said the pope's address had given her "renewed hope" even while filling her again with pain.

The Philippines endures an average of about 20 major storms or typhoons a year, many of them deadly.

But Haiyan was the strongest ever recorded on land, with winds of 315 kilometres (195 miles) per hour.

Tropical Storm Mekkhala, with gusts of up to 130 kilometres (80 miles) per hour, was the first this year.

The eye of the storm was just 50 kilometres away when the pope's plane took off for Manila, a local weather agency forecaster told AFP.

The storm is forecast to follow the pope west across the Philippines and hit Manila on Sunday, when a crowd of up to six million people is expected to hear him celebrate mass at a park.

Mekkhala would bring strong winds and rain to Manila on Sunday, weather agency forecaster Manny Mendoza told AFP.

"Those banners and tarpaulins on the road may go flying, umbrellas will be blown away, scaffolding could be blown down," Mendoza said.

"Let's hope it weakens."

If as big as expected, the crowd would surpass the previous record for a papal gathering of five million during a mass by John Paul II at the same venue in 1995.

The Philippines has long been the Church's bastion in Asia, with Catholics accounting for 80 percent of the former Spanish colony's population.
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