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January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
September 11, 2017, 03:40:40 am Christian40 says: those in america should better repent or things will only get worse
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« Reply #570 on: October 01, 2015, 11:02:47 am »

Extreme lightning storms are increasing around our planet.
So does the number of lightning fatalities around the world. Climate change? Well nobody knows actually.

Yesterday, 19 people were killed in multiple lightning-strikes in five Andhra Pradesh districts. Moreover 8 lost their lives in Nabarangpur district in south Odisha, India. Always in the same region, three persons were struck dead by lightning in separate incidents at Sattenapalli mandal on Friday.

In Africa, lightning killed seven people and injured six others during a football game in Kween District, Uganda. Meanwhile, lightning strikes killed at least ten people and while over 30 others were injured in Western and Northern provinces of Rwanda.

This guy from Seneca, SC – you know the Seneca Booms – was hit by lightning eleven times and is not dead yet. Pretty resistant , isn’t it?

And these two girls were killed by lightning while swimming in the sea in Mexico just when a sudden build up in front of them.

The number of death by lightning has considerably increased in the USA too. In July 2015, the number of lightning deaths in the U.S. reached 22. This number is well above the five-year average of 13.4 by this point in the year.

So what’s going on? Are deadly lightning strikes due to poor infrastructures or the increased planetary chaos…

http://strangesounds.org/2015/09/deadly-lightning-strikes-are-increasing-around-the-world-and-nobody-knows-why.html

Can't believe I missed this! Thank you for posting this - I remember seeing end times videos recently showing constant-violent lightning storms in various areas.
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« Reply #571 on: October 03, 2015, 07:00:31 am »

Guatemala mudslide leaves hundreds missing

Rescue workers in Guatemala are digging through rubble from a mudslide that hit a village not far from the capital, in search of hundreds missing. At least 26 bodies have so far been recovered from the village of El Cambray Dos, rescue services say. Heavy rains swept a torrent of boulders and mud onto houses on Thursday, 15km (nine miles) east of Guatemala City. 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-34431285
 
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« Reply #572 on: October 05, 2015, 10:22:49 pm »

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« Reply #573 on: October 17, 2015, 03:22:31 pm »

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« Reply #574 on: October 23, 2015, 06:32:00 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/why-did-hurricane-patricia-become-monster-quickly-202419311.html
Why did Hurricane Patricia become a monster so quickly?
10/23/15

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hurricane Patricia zoomed from tropical storm to record-beater in 30 hours flat like a jet-fueled sports car.

Why? The Pacific storm had just the right ingredients.

Plenty of warm water provided the energy what meteorologists call explosive intensification. The air was much moister than usual, adding yet more fuel. And at the same time, upper-level crosswinds — called shear — that restrain a hurricane from strengthening were missing for much of Thursday, meteorologists said.

"I was really astounded," said MIT meteorology professor Kerry Emanuel. "It was over the juiciest part of the eastern Pacific."

El Nino's fingerprints are all over this, meteorologists agreed. And while it fits perfectly into climate scientists' theories of what a warming world will be like, they say global warming can't quite be blamed — yet.

At 10 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Patricia was a tropical storm off Mexico with 65 mph winds that forecasters expected to intensify rapidly. In fact, one forecast gave it a 97 percent chance of getting stronger fast.

But it strengthened so quickly that many were surprised, said Robert Rogers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division.

By 4 a.m. EDT Friday Patricia's winds were a record for hurricanes: 200 mph.

"Incredible. You don't see many like this," said former hurricane hunter meteorologist Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private Weather Underground. "In fact in the Western Hemisphere, we've never seen anything like this."

In the Eastern Hemisphere, satellite estimates measured Typhoon Nancy at 215 mph in 1961 and Typhoon Violet at 205 mph also in 1961, but satellite measurements aren't as precise, Masters said. (Hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones are all the same thing with different names.)

Super Typhoon Haiyan that devastated the Philippines in 2013 was measured at 195 mph via satellite. However, most storms don't have accurate measurements because most don't get planes flown into them unless they are a threat, Emanuel said.

He's part of an experiment with the U.S. Navy, dropping measuring devices from planes into Patricia for the past three days.

Worldwide, this is the ninth Category 5 storm this year, which is tied for the second most on record, Masters said. Normal years are around five to six. A Category 5 storm has winds of 157 mph or higher.

The eastern and northern Pacific regions have had more tropical storms than usual this season; the Atlantic has had less.

That's a classic signature of the weather pattern called El Nino — with warmer waters to feed storms and favorable winds in the Pacific and unfavorable winds in the Atlantic, Masters and others said.

Patricia is being fueled by near-record warm 87-degree Pacific waters at the surface that ran warm unusually deep.

Climate science theory says that as the world warms, the most extreme storms will get even stronger and wetter. Patricia's record strength is "consistent with what we say" but there are too few examples to make a scientifically accurate connection, Emanuel said.

Patricia and Haiyan from 2013 may be "warning signs that, hey this could be the future," Masters said.
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« Reply #575 on: October 23, 2015, 07:01:56 pm »

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« Reply #576 on: October 31, 2015, 03:55:47 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/search-2-missing-central-texas-floods-continue-053527845.html
10/31/15
Storms, tornadoes lash Texas; death toll rises to 5

HOUSTON (AP) — Another band of strong storms and heavy rain spawned three tornadoes and dangerous flooding in east Texas on Saturday, with the death toll rising to five after Houston police found two bodies.

It's the second day of turbulent weather in the state, where at least three people died Friday in flood waters in central Texas. Another person is still missing in the Austin area. The storms and suspected tornadoes, which forecasters say were caused by an upper-level disturbance from Mexico, socked an already-sodden swath of Texas that was still drying out from the remnants of Hurricane Patricia.

In the Houston area, up to 8 inches of rain fell since Friday night, though it had mostly stopped by early Saturday afternoon. The water, however, flooded streets and freeway frontage roads and caused bayous to spill over their banks. The Houston Fire Department said it had responded to more than 90 water rescues by midmorning Saturday, and some public light-rail and bus transportation was suspended.

Houston police discovered the two bodies that are believed to be weather-related deaths, one in a flooded ditch and another in a wooded area where there had been high water, according to city spokesman Michael Walter.

As the storms moved east Saturday, National Weather Service meteorologist Patrick Blood said a tornado went through Brazoria County near Alvin about 5 a.m., injuring at least two people and damaging about 25 mobile homes in the community that's 30 miles south of Houston.

Thirty minutes later, a tornado hit the Houston suburb of Friendswood, where about 30 homes had minor damage and the roof of one home was ripped off. Homeowner David McCullough, 70, said he and his wife were at their ranch when the storm hit and got the call from a neighbor.

"I feel like it's a blessing that we weren't here," he said as friends and family members helped them try to salvage personal items, pictures and documents from their home of 32 years. "It's just stuff and it can be replaced. Had we been here, it could have been very bad."

Between 10 and 30 homes were damaged by a tornado in a subdivision in eastern Harris County at about 7 a.m. Saturday, Blood said.

Austin, San Antonio and surrounding areas were first hit Friday. Three people died when they were swept away by flood waters; a woman is still missing after waters reached her home in the Austin area.

The third death was confirmed Saturday morning, when officials found the body of a man whose vehicle was swept away Friday southeast of Austin, Travis County Emergency Services spokeswoman Lisa Block. Other passengers in the vehicle were able to escape, but the man did not.

More than 16 inches of rain soaked one neighborhood on Friday and Austin Bergstrom International Airport suspended all flights after a half-foot of water flooded the air traffic control tower; 40 flights were canceled there on Saturday.

Meanwhile, a lazy creek cutting through Texas wine country, a popular getaway spot, swelled into a rushing torrent, sending eight members of a vacationing church group scrambling to a second floor before they were rescued by the National Guard. Similar conditions in May caused devastating flooding on the Blanco River that swept homes from foundations and killed families who were carried downstream. This time, the river swelled to about 26 feet in Wimberley, nearly twice the flood stage.

More than 70 people spent Friday night at shelters because of the flooding in Central Texas. Hundreds of high-water crossings were closed Saturday in Hays County, and some residents in southeast Travis County, near Austin, were asked to move to higher ground because of residual flooding.
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« Reply #577 on: October 31, 2015, 07:00:44 pm »

https://www.rt.com/news/320187-desert-rainfall-arabian-peninsula/
Years’ worth of rain in 48 hours: Monster cyclone threatens Yemen & Oman with floods, landslides
10/30/15

A large tropical cyclone coming from the Indian Ocean promises record rainfall in the otherwise arid deserts of the Arabian Peninsula. Meteorologists predict about eight years’ worth of rain in the coastal areas of Oman and Yemen within two days.

The cyclone dubbed Chapala formed in the Arabian Sea and now winds are moving at speeds about 175km/h, the US Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reports. Chapala has been rated a Category 4 hurricane, which could be raised to Category 5. It is spinning westward through the northern Indian Ocean.

Chapala is expected to become a super-cyclonic storm in the next 24 hours, with sustained winds of up to 230km/h. The storm intensified very quickly over the 24-hour period from Thursday to Friday.

“Heavy rain, thunderstorms, leading to flash floods over Al Wusta and Dhofar [governates] are expected starting Saturday evening,” the Public Authority of Civil Defense and Ambulance (PACDA) in Oman warned.

The US meteorologist Eric Holthaus said regions in Yemen and Oman that typically collect only 100-130 millimeters of rain a year will get eight times this quantity of rainfall in a matter of just 48 hours, which guarantees flooding.

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« Reply #578 on: November 10, 2015, 02:31:52 pm »

http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2015/11/10/forecasters-say-severe-weather-could-affect-63-million-people-this-week/?intcmp=hplnws
11/10/15
Forecasters say severe weather could affect 63 million people this week

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. –  Forecasters are warning 63 million people in the central U.S. to have an eye out for bad weather this week as colliding air masses threaten to generate high winds and possibly tornadoes.

The threat Wednesday stretches from San Antonio to Chicago to Cincinnati. It appeared Monday that Missouri, southern Illinois and northern Arkansas would face the greatest severe weather threat, but the Storm Prediction Center cautioned that people throughout the Midwest should be prepared to take action should the forecast change.

"It's going to be a large area, depending on how much unstable air develops," said Bill Bunting, the operations chief at the Norman, Oklahoma-based forecasting center. He said that while the jet stream and upper-level disturbances were aligning in the atmosphere to aid storm development, another key ingredient — moist Gulf air flooding into the Midwest — was the great unknown.

"It's not a given. We have concerns about the amount of low-level moisture that will be in place. That's a common challenge in November forecasting," Bunting said.

A series of cold fronts have pushed humid air well south, but should it return Tuesday and Wednesday the result could be very bad weather.

While seeking out forecasts was advisable, there's another way for non-scientists to know if something is up: "Wednesday morning, if there are low clouds streaming northward rapidly, Wednesday will be a day you can expect severe thunderstorm and tornado watches," Bunting said. "If less moisture is in place, you may have showers and a narrow squall line. Nothing is off the table."

Temperatures Monday across the Midwest were a few degrees above normal but could reach unseasonable temperatures by Wednesday — 10 to 15 degrees above normal, and approaching or exceeding 70 as far north as central Missouri.

November storms aren't unusual; Illinois had eight deaths in tornadoes in November 2013. So far this year, there have been 10 deaths from tornadoes, but none since May. Seven occurred in mobile homes.

Since the May 2013 tornado at Moore, Oklahoma, killed 24 people, including seven school children, the nation's has had 77 deaths from tornadoes. The worst was a storm that killed 16 west and north of Little Rock in April 2014.
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« Reply #579 on: November 11, 2015, 01:52:41 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/storm-bring-blizzard-conditions-rockies-plains-070637128.html
Storm dumps snow on Rockies, tornado threat in Midwest
11/11/15

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A storm system that dropped a foot of snow in the Rockies was making travel hazardous as it headed east on Wednesday, menacing the Plains with heavy snow and threatening turbulent weather — even tornadoes — in parts of the Midwest.

The system was expected to affect more than 36.5 million people from Colorado through Ohio and from Texas north through Michigan. The National Weather Service issued tornado watches for most of the day in parts of Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri and Iowa.

The storm left Denver covered in 5 inches of snow on Wednesday, and Colorado highway patrol troopers reported several crashes north of the city on windy, icy Interstate 25 near the Wyoming border. Wyoming authorities also shut down large sections of roadways.

The Nebraska State Patrol reported several minor accidents involving vehicles sliding off icy or slushy roadways, but no injuries have been reported.

Alan Salyards said truckers coming through his Flying J Travel Plaza near Big Springs, a Nebraska town along the Colorado boarder, didn't seem especially concerned. He said plow trucks were working all morning to keep the roads passable.

"The drivers are just doing their normal thing," he said.

At Denver International Airport, spokesman Heath Montgomery said airlines canceled about 50 flights in anticipation of the bad weather — out of the airport's 1,500 daily flights — and ground crews kept up with the snowfall. No major delays were reported.

The back side of the fast-moving system will run into more cold air over Kansas and Nebraska, leaving behind up to 8 inches of snow in some spots, said Jared Guyer, a forecaster with the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center.

As the system spreads east, its southern portion will run into warmer, humid air and raise the potential for severe thunderstorms and even tornadoes, he said.

"It's definitely a chance of severe weather, a severe weather risk no doubt worth paying attention to," he said.

A winter storm warning or blizzard warning was in effect through Wednesday for parts of Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas. Sustained winds of 30 to 40 mph were expected, with gust up to 55 or even 60 mph.

The weather service cited the potential for white-out conditions and urged people to stay home.

At Pi Kappa Cino Coffee in Sterling, a town in far northeast Colorado, workers were checking their heaters and stocking up on coffee Tuesday to handle the first significant snowfall of the season.

"We always try to keep prepared for the winter, keeping extra water on hand and checking the heaters," owner Patricia Prescott said. "Business normally picks up because everyone wants our warm drinks."
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« Reply #580 on: November 12, 2015, 10:50:03 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/storm-bring-blizzard-conditions-rockies-plains-070637128.html
Storm brings winds, reports of tornadoes in Midwest
11/11/15


DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A fast-moving storm system dropped both snow and rain over portions of the Midwest on Wednesday, packing strong winds that flipped semitrailers, damaged industrial park buildings and downed power lines in parts of Iowa and Nebraska.

National Weather Service officials said the system, which began Tuesday around Utah and moved eastward into the country's midsection, dumped more than a foot of snow on the Rockies before creating conditions ripe for tornadoes. But they said the weather wasn't quite as warm as it could have been, so the threat decreased.

"Probably the worst has passed," said Stephen Corfidi, a meteorologist at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

By Wednesday night, remnants of the system were reported in eastern Iowa, northeast Missouri and western Illinois. Winds between 25 and 35 mph were expected into early Thursday, with wind gusts of up to 60 mph in some spots.

Corfidi called the system a "classic mid-November storm."

"Basically there's a warm side and a cold side to these systems, and the unifying threat is a very strong wind field all the way around it," he said.

"So on the cold side, you have a chance for snow or freezing precipitation accompanied by very strong winds and occasionally blizzard conditions. ... On the warm side, the thunderstorms that grow in the strong wind environment tend to rotate. And if they rotate long enough, and if the moisture is great enough, they can produce tornadoes.

"So usually you kind of get a one-two punch with this type of event."

Portions of Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas saw blizzard-like conditions. Some of those same states and others were hit with thunderstorms as well.

Authorities on Wednesday received reports of damage to buildings in southwest Iowa, flipped semitrailers on Interstate 80 in western Iowa and power outages in central Iowa.

"The driver says all he remembers is a dark cloud," Iowa State Patrol Sgt. Mike Wesack said about a semitrailer that flipped just west of Avoca. "Next thing he knows, (the vehicle) was on its side on the (other) lane."

Kara Kelly, a regional spokeswoman with the American Red Cross Serving Greater Iowa, said the agency was assisting residents in Melrose, Knoxville and Des Moines in central and southern Iowa.

Officials were investigating several possible tornadoes in Iowa and severe weather with similar potential in Nebraska, but they said the reports could not be verified until survey teams examined any damage.

At one point, a tornado watch including sections of Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri had been issued. Weather officials eventually downgraded the threat and issued various severe weather warnings for south-central Iowa and northern Missouri. The system was expected to bring high winds to portions of Illinois and Wisconsin during the overnight hours.

The system had been expected to affect more than 36.5 million people from Colorado through Ohio, and from Texas north through Michigan. It dropped up to about 5 inches in parts of the Denver area on Wednesday, and Colorado highway patrol troopers reported several crashes north of the city on windy, icy Interstate 25 near the Wyoming border before the sun came out. Wyoming authorities also shut down large sections of roadways.

The Nebraska State Patrol reported several minor accidents involving vehicles sliding off icy or slushy roadways, but no injuries were reported.

Alan Salyards said truckers coming through his Flying J Travel Plaza near Big Springs, a Nebraska town along the Colorado border, didn't seem especially concerned. He said plow trucks were working all morning to keep the roads passable.

"The drivers are just doing their normal thing," he said.
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« Reply #581 on: December 03, 2015, 12:32:18 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/indian-army-battles-deadly-flooding-rescue-survivors-054630627--finance.html
India army on war footing to rescue survivors as flood toll nears 270
12/3/15

CHENNAI, India (Reuters) - The Indian military evacuated more than 2,000 residents stranded in the southern state of Tamil Nadu on Thursday as the death toll from flooding rose to 269 after the heaviest cloudburst in over a century.

Forecasts of more rain over the next 48 hours forced the army to work on a war footing to rescue survivors trapped in inundated parts of Chennai.

India's fourth most populous city saw only slight rains on Thursday, but water levels had not receded since a day earlier, when a massive release of water from a brimming reservoir swamped low-lying areas of the city.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who has blamed climate change for the deluge, traveled to Chennai to get a first-hand view of a rescue effort that has so far been halting.

"The government will stand by the people of Tamil Nadu in their hour of need," Modi told reporters, promising $150 million for rehabilitation and reconstruction.

Even as the weather cleared, waters rose in many residential areas, fed by spills from 35 lakes that have risen to dangerous levels.

After auto manufacturers and IT outsourcing firms suspended operations on Wednesday, state-run Chennai Petroleum shut down its 210,000-barrels-per-day oil refinery due to heavy flooding. The cloudburst earlier this week dumped as much as 345 mm (14 inches) of rain over 24 hours.

"We live in a city expecting that we will have access to basic facilities. But today, we have no drinking water, no fresh food and no control over our lives," said Sudha Raman Murthy, a mother of two teenage daughters.

RESURRECTING A CITY

Soldiers set up 25 temporary shelters and community kitchens and installed portable toilets. "We will have to resurrect an entire city," said Abhijit Shaw, an army officer who was setting up a makeshift maternity ward in a government building.

Floods cut off more than three million people from basic services and hampered rescue efforts by the army, which has so far evacuated 18,000 people from rooftops and outlying villages.

City authorities were deploying bulldozers and bags of concrete to repair collapsed roads and bridges.

Train services and flights to Chennai, capital of Tamil Nadu, were washed out and the navy has pressed fishing boats into service to evacuate people from the worst-hit suburbs to temples, schools and wedding halls.

A senior federal official said more than 1,000 people had been critically injured and were rushed to government hospitals by paramilitary forces.

Additional rainfall of 100 mm to 200 mm (4 inches to 8 inches) was predicted from Thursday through Sunday, keeping the situation critical for several more days.

The federal government also pledged an additional $141 million in immediate relief and began to assess losses to life and property. Assocham, an industry lobby, estimated that financial losses from the floods could exceed $2.25 billion.

Experts said haphazard construction, faulty drainage and a build-up of garbage had contributed to the disaster.

"Chennai is stinking and it is shocking to see how it has collapsed in the last 48 hours," said Anant Raghav, 56, a professor at the University of Madras.

More than 5,000 houses were under water with many people still trapped on rooftops, while others crowded in relief camps.

About 30 families have been sleeping rough under a flyover in central Chennai for the last week, after their huts and small concrete houses were washed away.

Seema Agarwal, from the central district of Alwarpet, said she had seen many angry people queuing at bus stops to leave town.

"There are people who haven't eaten for days," she said. "They have seen their possessions float away from the house. Food, clothes - all gone."

(Additional reporting by Abhiram Nandakumar in Bengaluru, Mayank Bhardwaj, Manoj Kumar, Aditi Shah, Nidhi Verma in New Delhi, Writing by Rupam Jain Nair,; Editing by Douglas Busvine and Clarence Fernandez)
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« Reply #582 on: December 23, 2015, 07:17:03 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/threat-tornadoes-across-south-2-days-christmas-141406512.html
Winter tornadoes touch down in Mississippi, Indiana
Tornadoes touch down in Mississippi, Indiana as 'dangerous' storms sweep through, killing 1

12/23/15

ATLANTA (AP) -- Forecasters warned of a "particularly dangerous situation" as a storm system swept across the country on Wednesday, and officials said they feared Christmas yard decorations would become projectiles.

Tornadoes touched down in Mississippi and Indiana, the National Weather Service said. The spring-like storms damaged buildings and knocked down trees, and thousands of people were without power in Indiana and Arkansas.

A tree blew over onto a house in Arkansas, killing an 18-year-old woman and trapping a 1-year-old child inside, authorities said. Rescuers pulled the toddler safely from the home.

In northwest Mississippi, a tornado damaged or destroyed at least 20 homes. Clarksdale Mayor Bill Luckett said the only confirmed casualty was a dog killed by storm debris. Planes at a small airport overturned and an unknown number of people were injured.

"I'm looking at some horrific damage right now," the mayor said. "Sheet metal is wrapped around trees; there are overturned airplanes; a building is just destroyed."

Television images showed the tornado appeared to be on the ground for more than 10 minutes. Interstate 55 was closed in both directions as the tornado approached, the Mississippi Highway Patrol said.

After an EF-1 tornado struck the south Indianapolis suburb of Greenwood, television stations showed pictures of damage including a portion of a roof blown off a veterinary office.

The biggest threat for tornadoes was in a region of 3.7 million people in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and parts of Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky, according to the national Storm Prediction Center in Oklahoma. The center issued a "particularly dangerous situation" alert for the first time since June 2014, when two massive EF4 twisters devastated a rural Nebraska town, killing two people.

The greatest risk for a few "intense, long-tracked tornadoes" will be through Wednesday night.

About 120 miles east of the tornado, Brandi Holland, a convenience store clerk in Tupelo, Mississippi, said people were reminded of a tornado that damaged or destroyed more than 2,000 homes and businesses in April 2014.

"They're opening all our tornado shelters because they say there's an 80 percent chance of a tornado today," Holland said.

Elsewhere, skiers on the slopes out West got a fresh taste of powder and most people in the Northeast enjoyed spring-like temperatures as they finished up last-minute Christmas shopping.

"It's too warm for me. I don't like it. I prefer the cold in the winter, in December. Gives you more of that Christmas feel," said Daniel Flores, a concierge from the Bronx, his light jacket zipped open as he shopped in Manhattan with his three children.

Only about half of the nation, mostly in the West, should expect the possibility of a white Christmas.

In the small coastal town of Loxley, Alabama, Mandy Wilson watched the angry gray sky and told drivers to be careful as she worked a cash register at Love's Travel Stop.

"It's very ugly; it's very scary," Wilson said. "There's an 18-wheeler turned over on I-10. There's water standing really bad. It's a really interesting way to spend Christmas Eve eve."

In parts of Georgia, including Atlanta, a flood watch was posted through Friday evening as more than 4 inches was expected, the National Weather Service said.

The threat of severe weather just before Christmas is unusual, but not unprecedented, said Greg Carbin, a meteorologist at the national Storm Prediction Center.

Twisters hit southeast Mississippi exactly a year ago, killing five people and injuring dozens of others. On Christmas Day in 2012, a storm system spawned several tornadoes, damaging homes from Texas to Alabama.

Emergency officials in Tennessee worried that powerful winds could turn holiday yard decorations into projectiles, the same way gusts can fling patio furniture in springtime storms, said Marty Clements, director of the Madison County Emergency Management Agency in Jackson, the state's largest city between Memphis and Nashville.

"If you go through these neighborhoods, there are a lot of people very proud of what they've put out and they've got stuff everywhere — all these ornaments and deer and everything else," Clements said. "They're not manufactured to withstand that kind of wind speed, so they become almost like little missiles."

Two tornadoes hit central Louisiana on Monday, injuring a man whose travel trailer flipped over. The Lake Charles office of the National Weather service said both were EF-1 twisters with peak winds of 95 mph. The tornadoes uprooted trees, damaged homes and cars.

In Arkansas, Pope County Sheriff Shane Jones said the 18-year-old woman was killed when a tree crashed into her bedroom. The woman and her 1 ½-year-old sister were sleeping in a bedroom of the house near Atkins about 65 miles northwest of Little Rock, when winds uprooted the tree that crashed through the roof.

"It's terrible that this happened, especially at Christmas," Jones said.

Forecasters said by Wednesday night, the severe weather threat could shift east into the southern Appalachian Mountain region.

Once the strong storms clear out, warm temperatures were expected. Highs in Atlanta and Charlotte, North Carolina, on Christmas Eve were forecast to be in the mid-70s.
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« Reply #583 on: December 26, 2015, 01:59:24 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/christmas-storm-woes-continue-tornado-hits-alabama-074201621.html
Christmas storm woes continue as tornado hits Alabama
12/26/15

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A tornado touched down in north-central Alabama, including part of Birmingham, in the latest wave of severe weather that's hammered the South during Christmas week.

The funnel was spotted by witnesses outside the city about 5 p.m. Friday. An hour later the National Weather service confirmed that first responders were on the scene along Jefferson Avenue, a working class neighborhood less than 10 miles from downtown Birmingham.

Lt. Sean Edwards, a Birmingham police spokesman, said trees are down and people were trapped inside damaged houses, adding that several people were taken to hospitals for treatment of minor injuries, but further details were not immediately available.

Ruthie Green went door-to-door in a coat and a bicycle helmet to check on neighbors after the storm and swept debris from her front porch as more emergency responders arrived in the neighborhood.

"I been listening to the news all day so I was kind of preparing," Green said. When the tornado warning came up on her iPad, Green said she ran to a closet.

"Then I heard the big roaring, it didn't last more than three minutes," Green said. "I just laid down and just kept praying."

U.S. Facing Upside-down Holiday Weather PatternPlay videoU.S. Facing Upside-down Holiday Weather Pattern
Green said she was unsure of whether any neighbors had been injured or killed down the block where several homes were destroyed.

"We probably won't know anything until daylight comes," she said. "I'm hoping that everybody got out all right."

"Details are still sketchy," said Jason Holmes, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

Elsewhere in the region, where the weather had calmed, dozens of people faced Christmas having lost their homes and possessions. But many they said they were thankful to see another Christmas.

Tony Goodwin ducked into a storm shelter with seven others as a storm pounded Tennessee and other states in the southeastern U.S. He emerged to find his house in Linden had been knocked off its foundation and hurled down a hill by high winds.

Goodwin's neighbors weren't so fortunate. Two people in one home were killed.

"It makes you thankful to be alive with your family," he said.

Unseasonably warm weather helped spawn torrential rain and deadly tornadoes that by Friday had left at least 15 people dead and dozens of families homeless.

On Friday, parts of Mississippi remained under a flood warning. Weather forecasters from the National Weather Service warned that a strong storm crossing the central part of the state could produce hail and winds of more than 40 mph. The storm was bringing with it the risk of falling trees, downed power lines and flash flooding, officials said.

But that didn't stop some from spending their Christmas giving rather than receiving.

Nicholas Garbacz, disaster program manager for the American Red Cross of North Mississippi, said members of the Marine Corps brought donated toys to a center in Holly Springs for children whose families were hit hard by the storms. Two of the seven people killed in Mississippi were from the Holly Springs area.

Dozens of children and their families showed up Friday morning to pick up a toy or other items they might need to recover from the storm, Garbacz said.

More severe weather was also in store for parts of Georgia and Tennessee that were again being pounded with rain. Residents were warned to brace for flash flooding and possible tornadoes.

Among the dead were eight people from Mississippi, including a 7-year-old boy who perished while riding in a car that was swept up and tossed by storm winds.

Six people were killed in Tennessee, including three who were found in a car submerged in a creek, according to the Columbia Police Department. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency said the victims were a 19-year-old female and two 22-year-old males.

One person died in Arkansas, and dozens of homes were damaged or destroyed.

As the rain continued to fall, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley on Friday issued an emergency declaration that covers any part of the state experiencing flash flooding. Officials in southeast Alabama are particularly concerned, as Pea River is approaching record-levels near the town of Elba, which has a history of severe flooding.

Dozens of people were injured in earlier storms, some seriously, said Greg Flynn, spokesman for the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency.

The agency said in a statement Friday night that there were reports of another death and another person missing.

"This increases the number of deaths to eight, and the number of missing persons to two," according to the statement.

Search teams combed damaged homes and businesses for people still missing, a hunt made complicated because so many had left for the holidays.

Peak tornado season in the South is in the spring, but such storms can happen at any time. Exactly a year ago, tornadoes hit Mississippi, killing five people and injuring dozens.

Barbara Perkins was told Thursday by an insurance agent that her storm-damaged home in Falkner, Mississippi, was a complete loss. But Perkins — who survived the storm hunkered down inside a closet with her husband — said she was happy just to be alive. Two neighbors had died in the storm that swept across the southeastern U.S. earlier this week.

"You kind of stop and realize what Christmas is all about," Perkins said.
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« Reply #584 on: December 26, 2015, 10:59:38 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/christmas-storm-woes-continue-tornado-hits-alabama-074201621.html
12/26/15
Tornadoes sweep through Dallas area; significant damage

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Tornadoes swept through the Dallas area after dark on Saturday evening causing significant damage while a blizzard was blanketing parts of New Mexico and West Texas with snow, the latest in the nation's freakish winter weather pattern that sent temperatures plunging to near zero wind chill in the western Plains even as numerous record highs are forecast for the eastern U.S.

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The Texas tornadoes shifted the national focus away from the Southeast where days of tumultuous weather including tornadoes left 18 people dead over the Christmas holiday period.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Anthony Bain in Fort Worth said two or possibly three tornadoes touched down in the Dallas area although the full extent of damage would not be known until daylight Sunday.

WFAA television in Dallas showed video of damage to homes, a church and vehicles stretching from Garland, about 20 miles northeast of Dallas to Glenn Heights, 20 miles south of the city.

The emergency manager of Ellis county south of Dallas, Stephanie Parker, posted on twitter: "We have destroyed and damaged homes. Please do not get out on the roads if you do not have to."

The twisters — accompanied by torrential rain, wind and some hail — were part of a weather system that could produce major flooding from north Texas through eastern Oklahoma, eastern Kansas, western Arkansas and parts of Missouri.

View galleryTornadoes rip through the Southeast
Vehicles and debris are scattered in an area near Linden, Tenn., Thursday, Dec. 24, 2015. Several pe …
The severe weather snarled air traffic in the Dallas area. The Dallas Mavericks NBA game was delayed by 30 minutes because of the storm.

On the other side of Texas and including much of New Mexico, a snowstorm accompanied by plunging temperatures was expected to leave up to 16 inches of snow through Sunday evening, according to NWS meteorologist Brendon Rubin-Oster in College Park, Maryland.

"It's going to be quite dangerous for anyone exposed to these elements," Rubin-Oster said.

Snow fell as the Sun Bowl college football game between Miami and Washington State Saturday afternoon and El Paso was forecast to get 6 to 8 inches of snow overnight.

Meanwhile, two more deaths linked to weather were reported Saturday in Mississippi, bringing that state's death toll from severe weather over Christmas to 10. Late Saturday, one death was reported in Alabama.

View gallerySoutheast storm death toll rises to 18
Lightning illuminates a house after a tornado touched down in Jefferson County, Ala., damaging seve …
Flash flooding closed roads across Alabama and trapped motorists in rapidly rising waters.

Ranager Tyler and his son waded into flood water Christmas night and used rope to pull an 11-year-old boy out after his family's car was swept away near Pinson, about 15 miles northeast of Birmingham.

"The little boy was hanging on to the back of the car," Tyler said Saturday.

The family's car was overcome with flood water and ended up in a ditch near Tyler's Pinson home. The rushing water separated the family as they got out of the car, he said. The boy was later reunited with his family.

Mississippi Emergency Management Agency spokesman Greg Flynn said 56 injuries were reported. In a statement, Flynn said preliminary damage estimates show 241 homes were destroyed or severely damaged.

U.S. Facing Upside-down Holiday Weather PatternPlay videoU.S. Facing Upside-down Holiday Weather Pattern
More than 400 homes in total were affected, he said. Severe storms are forecast for Sunday night through Monday as a strong cold front pushes through. Tornadoes are possible, and residents are asked to remain alert.

The flooding is the result of heavy downpours that have thrashed the southeastern U.S. since Wednesday, bringing record rainfalls in some areas. Four inches of rain walloped the city of Mobile, Alabama, on Wednesday — smashing the previous record of 2.2 inches set in 1990.

Six people were killed in Tennessee, including three who were found in a car submerged in a creek, according to the Columbia Police Department. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency said Saturday that authorities were monitoring areas for possible flooding.

One person died in Arkansas, and dozens of homes were damaged or destroyed.

One bit of good news for the battered Southeast was a forecast for calmer weather on Sunday. Temperatures in the eastern third of the country could set numerous records Sunday, Rubin-Oster said. Washington, D.C. could see a record daily temperature of 73 degrees Sunday, New York City 65 —which would break a record of more than 50 years —and Orlando, Florida could tie a record of 86 set in 1921.
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« Reply #585 on: December 27, 2015, 07:10:40 pm »

https://www.rt.com/news/327175-heavy-flooding-latin-america/
Flooding ‘worst in 15 years’ forces over 160,000 flee in Latin America (VIDEOS, PHOTOS)
Published time: 27 Dec, 2015 07:24

Over 160,000 people in Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, and Argentina have fled their homes as heavy summer rains have caused three major Latin American rivers to rise. The flooding – the worst seen in 15 years – has taken several lives in four countries.
A heavy El Nino has caused three large Latin American rivers to swell, forcing an estimated 160,000 people to flee for their lives, according to La Nacion.

In Paraguay – the worst affected country – the major Paraguay River has risen to within just 30 centimeters of the top of its banks, and a state of emergency has been declared in the capital city of Asuncion and seven regions by President Horacio Cartes. Some 130,000 people are reported to have evacuated their homes across the country, with several killed by fallen trees. There is no official death toll available so far.

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« Reply #586 on: December 27, 2015, 07:28:24 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/tornado-flood-deaths-reach-18-u-more-storms-001059650--finance.html
Christmastime storms, tornadoes kill at least 41 in U.S
12/27/15

DALLAS (Reuters) - Storms hit southern and central U.S. states over the Christmas holiday, unleashing floods and tornadoes that killed at least 41 people, flattened buildings and snarled transportation for millions during a busy travel time.

At least 11 people were killed in the Dallas area over the weekend by tornadoes, including one packing winds of up to 200 miles per hour (322 km per hour). The twister hit the city of Garland, killing eight people and blowing vehicles off highways.

"A tornado of that strength is very rare in a metropolitan area," National Weather Service meteorologist Matt Bishop said in a telephone interview. Powerful tornadoes are a staple of spring and summer in central states but occur less frequently in winter, according to U.S. weather data

"It is total devastation," Garland Police spokesman Lieutenant Pedro Barineau said. "It is a very difficult time to be struck by such a horrible storm the day after Christmas."


Three other deaths were reported in the Dallas metropolitan area, the United States' fourth most populous with about 7 million residents. Scores of people were injured in the region, officials said.

Three tornadoes were reported in Arkansas on Sunday, the weather service said, but there were no initial reports of significant injuries or damage. The service has issued tornado watches and warnings for areas in that state, as well as in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.

A tornado watch means a storm is likely, while a warning means a storm or storms have been sighted.

In Illinois and Missouri, flash flooding killed at least 11 people, officials and local media reported on Sunday.

Six adults drowned when they drove their cars into flooded waterways in Missouri's Pulaski County, said county Sheriff Ron Long.

In neighboring Illinois, Salem-based radio station WJBD reported a family of three adults and two children was driving near the village of Patoka, 85 miles (137 km)east of St. Louis, Missouri, when their car was washed away by floodwaters.

The storms came on the heels of tornadoes that hit two days before Christmas, killing at least 18 people, including 10 in Mississippi.

In Alabama's Coffee County, the body of a man who went missing during those storms was found on Sunday, officials told local media.

In Texas, Governor Greg Abbott said his office had declared Dallas County and three nearby counties disaster areas. He also warned people to be wary of snow in western parts of the state and rivers spilling their banks in other places.

"If you do not need to be on the road, please stay off the road," he said at a news conference.

The weather service issued severe weather advisories for large parts of the central United States, including a blizzard warning for parts of New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas and a flash flood watch stretching from Texas to Indiana.

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez declared a state of emergency for the entire state due to a winter storm expected to dump up to 2 feet of snow in eastern parts of the state.

The bad weather forced the cancellation of nearly 1,300 flights in the nation as of 4:30 p.m. EST on Sunday, according to tracking service FlightAware.com. About half of the canceled flights were in Dallas, a major U.S. flight hub.

(Reporting by Lisa Maria Garza and Jon Herskovitz; Additonal reporting by Marice Richter in Dallas and Curtis Skinner in San Francisco; Writing by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)
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« Reply #587 on: December 29, 2015, 09:07:07 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/rare-winter-flood-threatens-homes-closes-interstates-163234918.html
Rare winter flood threatens Missouri, Illinois levees
12/29/15

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A rare winter flood pushed swollen rivers and streams to virtually unheard-of heights Tuesday, sparking widespread evacuations and the transfer of inmates from an Illinois state prison as Missouri's governor activated the National Guard to help divert traffic away from submerged roads.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said water from the rising Mississippi River and its tributaries threatened to spill over 19 federal levees, putting hundreds of homes in jeopardy.

Record flooding was projected in some Mississippi River towns after several days of torrential rain that caused sewage to flow unfiltered into waterways.

The Meramec River near St. Louis was expected to get to more than 3 feet above the previous record by late this week.

At least 18 deaths in Missouri and Illinois were blamed on flooding, mostly involving vehicles that drove onto swamped roadways.

The river on Tuesday spilled over the top of the levee at West Alton, Missouri, about 20 miles north of St. Louis. Mayor William Richter ordered any of the town's approximate 520 residents who had not already evacuated to get out of harm's way.

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« Reply #588 on: December 31, 2015, 11:27:01 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/19-levees-illinois-missouri-monitored-flooding-065705057.html
Rescue crews assist with evacuations in Midwest flooding
12/30/15

ST. LOUIS (AP) — As swollen rivers and streams pushed to heights not seen in nearly a quarter-century, officials in Missouri and Illinois helped residents get to higher ground Wednesday amid fears that already dire conditions could worsen as floodwaters began spilling over federal levees protecting communities and farmland.

In Eureka, southwest of St. Louis, firefighters and their boats have been in high demand since Tuesday, accounting for roughly four dozen rescues of people in their homes, businesses or vehicles. Television news footage showed at least one home there drifting in the swollen river Wednesday, when firefighters rescued by boat a man and a dog as floodwaters lapped at the eaves of the house roof on which they'd been trapped for a night.

"Our crews are getting dispatched to another rescue now," Scott Barthelmass, a Eureka Fire Protection District spokesman, said mid-afternoon Wednesday as the swollen Meramec River there was cresting. "I think you're seeing people who are desperate or impatient, putting themselves in predicaments."

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Wednesday that nine levees had been topped by water. Most of those earthen barriers were meant to protect farmland rather than populated areas and another was along now-deserted, manmade Chouteau Island near St. Louis on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River.

Nearly a dozen other levees considered at risk for "possible significant distress," were holding as of Wednesday evening, but people were moving out just in case. Michael Pennise, mayor of the St. Louis suburb of Valley Park, ordered mandatory evacuations for 350 to 400 homes and dozens of businesses in the section of town near the fast-rising Meramec River.

At least 20 deaths over several days in Missouri and Illinois were blamed on flooding, mostly involving vehicles that drove onto swamped roadways, and at least two people were still missing Wednesday.

And search teams went out for a third day in hopes of finding a country music singer from Arkansas who disappeared while duck hunting in a flooded area in northern Oklahoma. The floodwaters there also destroyed a leftover film set used in the 2003 remake of "Where the Red Fern Grows."

A 24-mile stretch of Interstate 44 was closed at Valley Park southwest of St. Louis due to Meramec River flooding and officials were preparing for the possible closure overnight of Interstate 55 nearby. The closures forced traffic onto other nearby roads, creating gridlock in the St. Louis region. Officials said the highway will likely remain closed through at least Friday. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has activated the National Guard to assist with security in evacuated areas and to help keep road closure sites clear.

Valley Park City Attorney Tim Engelmeyer called the governor's office to send troops to help in the evacuated area of the about 7,000-person town. He was also watching computer projections of the crest — expected to be about 3 feet higher than the record of 40 feet on Thursday — knowing that an unexpected upgrade could be enough to send water over the levee.

"We're so close," he said. "We're talking about a potential 6-inch difference."

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« Reply #589 on: January 01, 2016, 10:24:50 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/southern-states-brace-surging-mississippi-river-flooding-010122033.html
1/1/16
Southern states brace for surging Mississippi River flooding

Reuters) - Residents of southern states along the Mississippi River are bracing for the flooding that has swamped communities from the Ohio River Valley to eastern Oklahoma over the last week, causing thousands of evacuations and killing at least 31 people.

Officials in Louisiana are checking levees daily, and Exxon Mobil Corp has decided to shut its 340,571 barrel-per-day refined products terminal in Memphis, Tennessee, as floodwaters threatened to inundate the facility just south of the city's downtown.

"All that water's coming south and we have to be ready for it," Louisiana Lieutenant Governor-Elect Billy Nungesser told CNN. "It's a serious concern. It's early in the season. We usually don't see this until much later."

Workers in southwestern Tennessee were preparing sandbags on Friday in hopes of limiting damage from the Mississippi when it crests at Memphis next week, state emergency management officials said. Officials were also examining levees, to make sure they would hold.

"We're moving things up high and we've got our generators out and got some extra water," said Dotty Kirkendoll, a clerk at Riverside Park Marina on McKellar Lake, which feeds off the Mississippi.

Flooding in the U.S. Midwest typically occurs in the spring as snowmelt swells rivers. Freezing temperatures that have followed the rare winter flooding have added to regional woes.

Most of the deaths in Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and Arkansas have been caused by people driving into flooded areas after days of downpours. The dead included a central Illinois teenager whose body was recovered on Friday near where a truck in which he was riding was found the day before. Another teen from the truck was still missing.

Authorities also continued searching on Friday for country singer Craig Strickland, who had gone duck hunting on an Oklahoma lake during stormy conditions. His friend, Chase Morland, was found dead on Monday.

Twelve Illinois counties have been declared disaster areas, and Governor Bruce Rauner on Friday ordered Illinois National Guard troops into flooded areas in the southern part of the state to mitigate flood damage and help with evacuation efforts.

The Mississippi is expected to crest at Thebes, in southern Illinois, at 47.5 feet (14 meters) on Sunday, more than 1.5 feet above the 1995 record, the National Weather Service (NWS) said.

Flood warnings were also in effect on Friday for parts of Texas, Oklahoma, the Carolinas, Alabama and Kentucky, the NWS said, while major flooding was occurring on the Arkansas River and its tributaries in that state.

Dozens have died in U.S. storms, which also brought unusual winter tornadoes and were part of a wild worldwide weather system over the Christmas holiday period that also saw severe flooding in Britain.

More than 100,000 people were forced to evacuate their homes in areas bordering Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil and Argentina after floods due to heavy summer rains caused by El Niño, authorities have said.

Global weather dominated conversation on social media over the holiday season after the international climate deal in Paris.

Particularly hard hit in the United States in recent days has been Missouri, which has suffered historic flooding.

Close to St. Louis on Friday, the Mississippi, the second-longest river in the United States, was falling after reaching near-record heights, the NWS said.

The Meramec River, which meanders near St. Louis and empties into the Mississippi, broke height records on Thursday, sending a deluge of water over its banks and forcing the closure of two major highways.

Interstates 55 and 44 reopened on Friday, but many other roads remained closed in the St. Louis area, state officials said, causing extreme traffic congestion.

Thousands of people evacuated from their homes earlier in the week were waiting to return to their communities and begin the process of cleaning up. Hundreds of structures have been damaged or destroyed, local officials said.

(Reporting by Victoria Cavaliere in Los Angeles; Additional reporting by Daniel Wallis in Denver, Erwin Seba in Houston, and Justin Madden and Mary Wisniewski in Chicago; Editing by Bernard Orr and Tom Brown)
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« Reply #590 on: January 14, 2016, 03:56:51 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/hurricane-alex-2016-forecast-storm-175848641.html
Hurricane Alex 2016: Forecast, Storm Tracker, Path and Updates
1/14/16

The National Hurricane Center upgraded eastern Atlantic ocean subtropical storm Alex to hurricane status Thursday as it heads toward the coast of Azores, Portugal. The center has issued a five-day hurricane warning and tropical storm warnings for various regions of the Azores islands as Hurricane Alex moves north-northeast toward land at 20 mph.

"The Azores Meteorological Service has issued a hurricane warning for the islands of Faial, Pico, Sao Jorge, Graciosa and Terceira in the central Azores, and a tropical storm warning for the island of Sao Miguel and Santa Maria in the eastern Azores," the National Hurricane Center wrote in its public advisory for Alex, currently located 490 miles off the coast of Azores.


Alex is the first January hurricane to form since 1938 and only the fourth January hurricane on record since 1851, CNN reported. 

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« Reply #591 on: January 17, 2016, 10:21:13 pm »

https://gma.yahoo.com/1-killed-suspected-tornadoes-hit-florida-gulf-coast-132711954--abc-news-topstories.html#
2 Killed as Suspected Tornadoes Hit Florida Gulf Coast
1/17/16

At least two people were killed as severe storms brought suspected tornadoes to Florida's Gulf Coast.

Both deaths were in Manatee County, sheriff's office spokesman Dave Bristow said. At least three tornadoes were reported in the region Sunday.

In nearby Sarasota County, some homes were damaged but there were no reports of major injuries, according to a county spokesman.

One family in Sarasota whose home was destroyed had to be removed from the wreckage by firefighters, but they only suffered minor injuries.

Of the 350 properties inspected, fewer than 45 sustained damage, according to Sarasota County Emergency Management. The damage is estimated at more than $3 million.
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« Reply #592 on: January 23, 2016, 06:55:14 pm »

http://gizmodo.com/why-the-full-moon-could-make-this-weekends-blizzard-eve-1754301233
Why the Full Moon Could Make This Weekend's Blizzard More Destructive
1/22/16

All signs are pointing toward a record blizzard hitting the D.C. Metro area this weekend, and the snowpocalypse chaos is already setting in. To make the impending meteorological blockbuster even more ominous, Jonas is going to coincide with a full moon. Quick, sacrifice a goat!

Now, the Moon gets blamed for a lot of things that it really has nothing to do with (births, werewolves, murderous rages), and we’re not trying to disparage Earth’s nearest neighbor. But one Earthly matter the Moon does influence is the tides. As Gizmodo’s Ria Misra pointed out yesterday, a full moon means higher coastal tides. Pair that with hurricane-level wind speeds this weekend, and we could be in for some serious flooding.

The tides are caused by the combined gravitational tug of the Sun and the Moon on the Earth. Full moons occur when the Sun, Moon and Earth are perfectly aligned, with the Earth in between. When this happens, it causes a strong gravitational tug-of-war and the most extreme tides of the month—the highest highs and the lowest lows. High tide during a full moon is typically one to two feet higher than it is during other parts of the lunar cycle.

Normally, the monthly ebb and flow of the tides does us no harm, but when a full moon happens to coincide with blustery conditions, things can get a bit messy. We saw an extreme example of this last September, when climactic and astronomical forces combined to bring us a supermoon and a tropical storm (Hurricane Joaquin) at the same time. (A supermoon occurs when the Moon is full at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth.) The result was some pretty epic flooding on both sides of the Atlantic.

This time around, we’ve only got a regular full moon to contend with, but winter storm Jonas is promising fierce winds, with top speeds up to 40 to 50 miles per hour along the Delaware and Jersey shores. According to Bob Henson, a meteorologist and blogger with Weather Underground, we saw a similar scenario play out over a decade ago, when the President’s Day II storm struck the northeast.

“This is not too different from the 2003 storm, which also happened during a full moon,” Henson said, noting that the storms had slightly different tracks but were of similar magnitude. The 2003 storm caused between 8 and 9 feet of flooding along the Jersey shore—which lines up very closely with the National Weather Service predictions for this weekend.

Why the Full Moon Could Make This Weekend's Blizzard More Destructive

GFS weather prediction model for Saturday, January 23rd. Via GFS/Levi Cowan

There is a silver lining: the flooding this weekend could be even worse if the alignment of the storm and the tides was slightly different. “This weekend, the morning high tide is higher,” Henson said. “The full moon is adding about two feet to the morning tide and a foot to the afternoon. That’s a good thing because the highest storm surge will probably be Saturday night.”

The Moon will rise around 5 pm Saturday and will be full by 8:46 pm. If you have any ceremonial rituals to keep the Moon from messing with your life, now would be a good time to do them.
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« Reply #593 on: January 25, 2016, 03:30:10 pm »

https://www.rt.com/news/330095-death-toll-rises-across-east/
Death toll rises across East Asia after freak cold snap
Published time: 25 Jan, 2016 18:26

Dozens of fatalities have been reported across Taiwan, Japan, and China due to relatively severe weather conditions that suddenly hit the region over the weekend.
At least 57 people are believed to have died in Taiwan since Saturday as a result of a rare cold snap sweeping through East Asia.

Taiwan’s Central News Agency reports fatalities may have already reached 85.

The majority of those deaths were reported in the capital Taipei, as well as New Taipei city and Taoyuan in northern Taiwan.

Temperatures in Taiwan's capital of Taipei plunged to a 16-year low of 4 degrees Celsius (39 Fahrenheit), killing 57...

Posted by ‎משה זאב‎ on Monday, January 25, 2016
Temperatures have fallen dramatically, to a 16-year low of 4 °C (39° F). While such temperatures may seem relatively mild to those from colder climes, it’s a sharp fall from Taiwan’s average January temperature of 16° C.

Taiwan has a subtropical climate so most homes don’t have central heating.

“In our experience, it’s not the actual temperature, but the sudden drop that’s too sudden for people’s circulatory systems,’’ said a city official quoted by AP news agency.

Many of those who died were elderly people suffering from heart trouble and shortness of breath.

The New Taipei City Police Department found one man dead on the street on Sunday, but most of the big freeze’s victims were discovered indoors, according to the Taipei Times.

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« Reply #594 on: February 04, 2016, 08:44:49 pm »

First ever recorded snow 300km south of Hanoi, Vietnam

The province of Nghe An in Vietnam recorded its first snowfall ever with records stretching back to 1650.
Snow blanketed Vietnam and Laos the last week of January 2016 breaking hundreds of cold and snow records.

rest: http://strangesounds.org/2016/02/first-ever-recorded-snow-hanoi-vietnam-january-2016.html
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« Reply #595 on: February 16, 2016, 10:11:53 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/snow-sleet-rain-hit-mid-atlantic-northeast-062357033.html
Tornados in South, snow, sleet in East; record heat in West
2/16/16

CENTURY, Fla. (AP) -- A treacherous mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain turned morning commutes to icy misery Tuesday for many returning from a long holiday weekend in the Northeast, a day after suspected twisters tore through parts of the South.

At least three deaths were reported on slick roads, all in Virginia, and motorists battled hazardous road conditions over a wide area from the Mid-Atlantic states through Pennsylvania to northern New England.

In the West, California and Arizona braced for more record warm temperatures after basking in the high 80s and low 90s on Monday. Millions along the East Coast, meanwhile, were still shivering from a deep freeze.

In Washington, the federal government was opening three hours late after freezing rain coated the capital city in ice — atop the several inches of snow that fell Monday. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which sets leave for 300,000 federal workers, said employees also could opt for unscheduled leave or telework.

Messy snow, sleet and freezing rain made driving hazardous around the Northeast. Separate tractor-trailer crashes within miles of each other shut the Thruway in upstate New York near Albany for a while Tuesday morning. Authorities later reopened most lanes.

In northeastern Pennsylvania, a crash involving several cars and tractor-trailers is caused a pileup that closed Interstate 81 before dawn Tuesday. Only minor injuries were reported. Roads in the area were icy after recent snow turned to freezing rain.

Buffalo's public works department called in extra crews to remove fresh overnight snowfall. The National Weather Service said accumulations could range from 2 to 4 inches in the Hudson Valley to 18 inches between Rochester and Buffalo.

In the South, suspected tornados associated with the big storm system turned several homes to rubble Monday in the northwest corner of Florida's Panhandle and in Mississippi. Authorities say more than a dozen homes were destroyed in both states. There were no immediate reports of any deaths or serious injuries from the reported twisters.

One of three apparent twisters swept through Century, a rural town in the northwest Florida Panhandle, destroying or significantly damaging about 10 homes, Escambia County spokeswoman Joy Tsubooka said.

Donald Pugh was at home in Century when the funnel tore through his neighborhood of small wood-frame houses and mobile homes, downing trees. Pugh told The Associated Press that he and other neighbors used a chain saw to free a 94-year-old woman, stuck under a twisted metal door and other debris of her home.

"It took us quite a while," he said. "She was telling us where she was and that she was OK," Pugh added.

The woman was taken to a hospital as a precaution.

In Mississippi, windows were blown out of cars and two gymnasiums and a library were damaged Monday at a K-12 school in Wesson where children were in attendance when heavy thunderstorms and a possible tornado crossed at least 19 counties. No students were hurt.

In Virginia, State Police said they responded to at least three fatal crashes on icy roads, a fraction of nearly 100 crashes reported statewide. Two utility companies reported thousands of people without power early Tuesday.

Police say a Virginia trooper and two other people were on the median of Route 288 in Chesterfield County near Richmond when they were hit by a vehicle Monday evening, throwing one person into a nearby firefighter. Police said that person was pronounced dead and the trooper and the second person were taken to a hospital with serious injuries.

In Virginia's Fauquier County, police said, a 63-year-old man was killed Monday when his SUV hit a snow plow. In Loudoun County, a woman was killed Monday night when her car rear-ended a backhoe, according to police.

In several Northeastern cities — including New York, Boston and Hartford, Connecticut — temperatures had dipped Sunday below zero, falling to minus 40 on Mount Washington in New Hampshire. Many communities were expecting warmer temperatures to follow.

In the West, Arizona and California were baking in the heat: It was 89 on Monday in downtown Los Angeles, breaking 1977's record of 88. The National Weather Service forecast that Phoenix would hit highs of 89 Tuesday and 92 Wednesday, above the previous records of 84 and 88 degrees, respectively.

In Orange County, Santa Ana hit 94, well above the 89 recorded in 1977.

In Phoenix, Arizona, the fire department issued hot weather safety tips — such as not leaving children or pets unattended in vehicles, staying hydrated, and scheduling outdoor activities in the cooler morning and evening hours.
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« Reply #596 on: February 23, 2016, 01:33:42 pm »

http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/significant-tornado-outbreak-looms-for-louisiana-to-florida-georgia/ar-BBpMnmO?ocid=spartandhp
Significant tornado outbreak looms for Louisiana to Florida, Georgia
2/23/16

A significant outbreak of tornadoes is expected across the southern United States into Wednesday, and severe weather could strike areas as far north as the mid-Atlantic by midweek.

The same winter storm set to spread disruptive snow into the Midwest and push drenching rain across the Northeast's Interstate-95 corridor threatens to ignite severe weather in a dozen states.

The first sporadic severe thunderstorms ignited over central Texas with a few incidents of large hail and strong wind gusts during Monday night. However, the outbreak will grow in size and magnitude into Tuesday night.

Following severe thunderstorms and perhaps a couple of isolated tornadoes near the upper Texas coast into Tuesday midday, a very dangerous situation will unfold across much of the central Gulf Coast states.

"There is the potential for not only a severe weather outbreak, but also a significant number of tornadoes from Louisiana to western Georgia and the Florida Panhandle on Tuesday," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Henry Margusity.

Some of the tornadoes may be strong and on the ground for more than a few minutes.

The risk of tornadoes, along with damaging wind gusts and large hail, will extend into the nighttime hours, adding to the danger.

The threat of severe weather will expand northward and southward as it pushes toward the Atlantic Coast beyond Tuesday night.

Severe thunderstorms will push northeastward across the Carolinas and southern Virginia and southward through the Florida Peninsula on Wednesday.

The greatest threat from the storms will be from damaging wind gusts, hail and flash flooding.

"A few tornadoes will still be possible on Wednesday," AccuWeather Enterprise Solutions Storm Warning Meteorologist Alex Avalos said. "The tornado threat should be confined to more of eastern North Carolina and the Chesapeake Bay area of Virginia during Wednesday."

The severe weather risk will extend northward to Washington, D.C., and Baltimore Wednesday evening.

Farther northeast, a band of drenching rain with strong winds at the coast will push through the rest of the I-95 corridor in the Northeast Wednesday night into Thursday morning.

People in the alerted areas will need to monitor the weather closely for rapidly changing conditions and have a plan of action should severe weather strike the local area.

Even in the absence of severe weather, residents are reminded to seek shelter as soon as thunder is heard. Stay ahead of violent thunderstorms with AccuWeather MinuteCast®.

The passage of a cold front will sweep away the severe weather danger and open the door for drier, less volatile air to filter later in the week.
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« Reply #597 on: February 23, 2016, 09:14:51 pm »

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/at-least-3-dead-as-storms-tornadoes-rip-through-gulf-states/ar-BBpSXPV?ocid=spartandhp
2/23/16

KENNER, La. (AP) — Tornadoes and severe weather ripped through southern Louisiana and Mississippi on Tuesday, mangling trailers at an RV park, ripping off roofs from buildings and killing at least three people in both states, authorities said.

One of the most hard-hit areas appeared to be a recreational vehicle park in the town of Convent, in southern Louisiana. Two people were killed there, said St. James Parish Sheriff Willy Martin, speaking on local television. Authorities were still looking for people believed to be trapped under the debris, Martin said.

Thirty people were injured, and seven of them were in critical condition, he said.

"We never had anything like this; we never had this many people injured in one event, and so much destruction in one event," Martin told WVUE news. "We won't stop searching until we're satisfied we've searched every pile."

In Mississippi, officials are still sorting through reports of damage to some buildings, but Vann Byrd of the Lamar County Emergency Management Agency said one person died in a mobile home west of Purvis.

The reported tornadoes are part of a line of severe weather and storms that has ripped through the region.

At least seven tornadoes hit southeast Louisiana and southwest Mississippi, said Ken Graham, the meteorologist in charge for the National Weather Service's southeast Louisiana office.

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« Reply #598 on: March 13, 2016, 07:59:20 pm »

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2016/03/13/More-dead-in-Deep-South-flooding-water-levels-to-rise/2171457882698/
3/13/16
More dead in Deep South flooding; water levels to rise
By Amy R. Connolly   |   Updated March 13, 2016 at 12:51 PM

HATTIESBURG , Miss., March 13 (UPI) -- Parts of the Deep South are bracing for more rain Sunday and flooding later this week after six people died in historic flooding that has also destroyed homes and washed out roads.

At least three people died in Louisiana, one in Texas and one in Oklahoma. Two fishermen were reported missing in Mississippi. More than 24 inches of rain has fallen in some of the hardest-hit areas of Mississippi, Louisiana and Oklahoma.

Mississippi officials said 95 homes have major damage and nearly 300 have minor damage in 41 counties. The flooding is the worst since 2012, when Hurricane Issac dumped more than 24 inches of rain in the area.

In Louisiana, the Governor's Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness said nearly 5,000 homes have been damaged by flooding. Thousands have been forced from their homes.

"Our first goal is to help our local partners through the response phase of this event," GOHSEP Director James Waskom said. "We will begin to transition into the recovery phase as conditions improve. We have been working with [Federal Emergency Management Agency] for the past several days in an effort to streamline the disaster assessment process that will ultimately determine what level of federal support will be available for individuals, parishes and state agencies dealing with flood."

Forecasters said the nasty weather will continue Sunday through the Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas areas, with the possibility of large hail, strong winds and tornadoes late Sunday.

The National Weather Service said the flooding won't end for days. The Big SunFlower River, a main tributary of the Yazoo River in Mississippi, is expected to crest at 28.5 feet on Wednesday.
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« Reply #599 on: March 23, 2016, 04:55:45 pm »

Blizzard shuts down Denver airport, closes highways
http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/blizzard-shuts-down-denver-airport-closes-highways/ar-BBqPsDE?ocid=spartandhp
3/23/16

DENVER (AP) — A powerful spring blizzard stranded travelers at Denver's airport and shut down hundreds of miles of highway in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska as it spread into the Midwest on Wednesday.

Snow blown by gusts up to around 50 mph made it unsafe for planes to land or take off at Denver International Airport, leading officials to close it around midday. The closure came hours after long flight delays caused by power outages at the airport's fuel depot and deicing supply and the cancellation of about a third of the airport's daily flights.

The road to the airport was also impassable because of blowing snow so passengers already at the airport were told to stay there until it was safe to drive again.

Hundreds of people with suitcases and duffel bags stood or lay around the terminals and there were long lines to get into airport bars. Some travelers leaned against walls, bags strewn at their feet, as others charged their phones.

Meg Stocker was heading to San Jose, California for work when her plane had to turn back to the gate.

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