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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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« Reply #630 on: September 20, 2017, 01:26:08 pm »

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/pray-puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-decimates-island-worst-storm-century/
PRAY FOR PUERTO RICO: Hurricane Maria Decimates Tiny U.S. Territorial Island As Worst Storm In A Century
Maria, the second major hurricane to roar through the Caribbean this month, made landfall near Yabucoa, on the southwest of the island of 3.4 million people. Thousands of people were seeking safety in shelters. Broken windows, mangled awnings and gutters dangled haphazardly from buildings in San Juan or were ripped off entirely. Toilets bubbled noisily and belched foul air as the hurricane rumbled through the city's water and sewage lines. Up to 90 percent of the island was without electricity, El Nuevo Dia newspaper quoted Governor Ricardo Rossello as saying.

9/20/17

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the strongest storm to hit the U.S. territory in nearly 90 years, downing power to most of the island, flooding some areas and ripping windows out in the capital, San Juan.

“I would hasten my escape from the windy storm and tempest.” Isaiah 55:8 (KJV)

EDITOR’S NOTE: Texas is still digging out from Harvey, here in Florida we still don’t have power in lots of areas after that nasty woman Irma, and today tiny, little Puerto Rico was absolutely slammed by Maria. Oh, Jose is about to hit New York and Lee is coming right on the heels of Maria. Ever feel like God is sending a message?

Maria, the second major hurricane to roar through the Caribbean this month, made landfall near Yabucoa, on the southwest of the island of 3.4 million people. Thousands of people were seeking safety in shelters.

Carrying winds of 140 miles per hour (220 kph), driving high storm surges and drenching rains, Maria’s eye was located about 25 miles (40 km) west of San Juan shortly before 11 a.m. ET (1500 GMT), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

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« Reply #631 on: September 20, 2017, 08:23:45 pm »

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/destroyed-3-5-million-dark-maria-takes-power-running-water-entire-island-puerto-rico/
DESTROYED: 3.5 Million In Dark As Maria Takes Out All Power And Running Water From Entire Island Of Puerto Rico
Intense flooding was reported across the territory, particularly in San Juan, the capital, where many residential streets looked like rivers. Yennifer Álvarez Jaimes, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló's press secretary, told NBC News that all power across the island was knocked out. "Once we're able to go outside, we're going to find our island destroyed," Emergency Management Director Abner Gómez Cortés said at a news briefing. Rosselló imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew, citing flood warnings and the importance of keeping streets clear for repair and rescue teams.

9'20/17

Hurricane Maria is likely to have “destroyed” Puerto Rico, the island’s emergency director said Wednesday after the monster storm smashed ripped roofs off buildings and flooded homes across the economically strained U.S. territory.

Intense flooding was reported across the territory, particularly in San Juan, the capital, where many residential streets looked like rivers. Yennifer Álvarez Jaimes, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló’s press secretary, told NBC News that all power across the island was knocked out.

“Once we’re able to go outside, we’re going to find our island destroyed,” Emergency Management Director Abner Gómez Cortés said at a news briefing. Rosselló imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew, citing flood warnings and the importance of keeping streets clear for repair and rescue teams.

Maria, the strongest storm to hit Puerto Rico since 1928, had maximum sustained winds of 155 mph when it made landfall as a Category 4 storm near the town of Yabucoa just after 6 a.m. ET, the National Hurricane Center said. But it “appears to have taken quite a hit from the high mountains of the island,” and at 8 p.m. ET, it had weakened significantly to a Category 2 storm, moving away from Puerto Rico with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph, the agency said.

Much of the island remained under a hurricane warning late Wednesday afternoon as Maria churned just 25 miles off the northeastern coast.

“The wind threat has decreased,” the hurricane center said, but the threat of rain-gorged floods remains “devastating to catastrophic,” it said. Airports in San Juan, Aguadilla and Ponce were ordered closed until Friday at the earliest because of flooding and debris, authorities said.

“Extreme rainfall flooding may prompt numerous evacuations and rescues,” the agency said. “Rivers and tributaries may overwhelmingly overflow their banks in many places with deep moving water.”

San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz told MSNBC that the devastation in the capital was unlike any she had ever seen.

“The San Juan that we knew yesterday is no longer there,” Yulín said, adding: “We’re looking at four to six months without electricity” in Puerto Rico, home to nearly 3.5 million people.


“I’m just concerned that we may not get to everybody in time, and that is a great weight on my shoulders,” she said.

Rosanna Cerezo, a lawyer and radio host in metro San Juan, said the city was deluged. It sounded as though bombs were going off when the wind toppled trees around her house, she said.

Along the beachfront, she said, cement structures had been wrenched from their foundations as islanders scrambled for refuge. “Rooftops collapsed, windows shattered,” Cerezo said in a text message. “People are huddled in hallways, closets, bathrooms.”

Once it’s back out over open water, Maria could re-strengthen to a Category 4 storm, the National Hurricane Center said.

It was expected to move near the coasts of the Dominican Republic and the Turks & Caicos islands and then drift more eastward than had been predicted earlier in the week. That’s because it’s being pushed there by an area of high pressure parked over the eastern United States as part of the remnants of Hurricane Jose, the agency said.

Forecasters said it remained too early to know how close Maria will move to the U.S. mainland, but Domenica Davis, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel, said, “It looks like it will stay in the open waters of the Atlantic.”

President Donald Trump declared states of emergency in both territories, and the Coast Guard moved all its ships, aircraft and personnel out of harm’s way so they can quickly launch rescue missions once the storm passes, officials said.

Puerto Rico was already struggling to dig itself out of a historic financial crisis. Maria could destroy any progress the territory has made under a year-old economic rehab plan ─ and set it back further.

Maria was a Category 5 hurricane — the strongest there is — when it hit the Caribbean on Monday night, killing at least seven people on the island of Dominica and one person on Guadeloupe. At least two people were injured.

Hartley Henry, a senior adviser to Dominican Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit, said Wednesday that authorities on the island were only now getting a good picture of the destruction left in Maria’s wake.

“Until late last night, there was no means of accessing, or even communicating with, Dominicans,” Hartley said. With daylight, he said, authorities found “tremendous loss of housing and public buildings,” including severe damage to the island’s main hospital, where “patient care has been compromised.”

“The country is in a daze — no electricity, no running water — as a result of uprooted pipes in most communities, and definitely to landline or cellphone services on the island, and that will be for quite a while,” he said.

“In summary, the island has been devastated,” he said. source
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« Reply #632 on: October 07, 2017, 05:50:31 pm »

http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=98266
10/7/17
Breaking: Hurricane Nate Has Just Changed!!!

 Breaking911

@Breaking911

BREAKING NEWS: #Nate Strengthens To A Category 1 Hurricane As It Barrels Towards The Gulf Coast
10:35 PM - Oct 6, 2017
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« Reply #633 on: October 07, 2017, 10:12:45 pm »

http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=98332
10/7/17
Breaking: Gas stations running out of gasoline

The NHC now forecasts Hurricane Nate to have max sustained winds of 105 mph by landfall tonight. Surprisingly, there's no long line of evacuees leaving Hurricane Nate in Missouri (should say Mississippi). A number of gas stations have reported to be out of gas.

Reed Timmer @ReedTimmerAccu

Update: gas stations running out of gasoline in Biloxi, MS ahead of strengthening Hurricane #Nate @breakingweather
12:08 PM - Oct 7, 2017
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« Reply #634 on: October 09, 2017, 09:53:51 am »

Parking garage flooded at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Biloxi, Mississippi, during Hurricane #Nate. http://abcn.ws/2fUMcFj
https://twitter.com/ABC/status/917142704148111360?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.embedly.com%2Fwidgets%2Fcard.html%23sid%3D12fbcdf10b7c46ee80c948959d3006a8
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« Reply #635 on: December 17, 2017, 08:06:23 pm »

Weather anomalies are spreading across the world: Coldest summer in Queensland, Australia, Earliest ice formation on the Han River, South Korea, 3.5 meters of snow in Germany

The weather is going crazy around the world, breaking almost every week a new extreme event record. Here three examples of weather anomalies recorded these days around the world:

More than 1.5 meters of fresh snow and 3.5 meters (11.5 feet) of snow accumulation were recorded on The Brocken, also known as the Blocksberg, the highest peak of the Harz mountain range and also the highest peak of Northern Germany culminating at 1,141 metres (3,743 ft):

http://strangesounds.org/2017/12/weather-anomalies-are-spreading-across-the-world-coldest-summer-for-100-years-in-queensland-australia-earliest-ice-formation-in-71-years-on-the-han-river-south-korea-3-5-meters-of-snow-in-germany.html
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« Reply #636 on: June 04, 2018, 07:21:18 pm »

Experts warn of super storms and call for new category 6 for the oncoming Hurricane Season 2018

A new analysis of global hurricane data since 1980 shows the number of storms with winds over 124 mph has doubled, and those with winds over 155 mph has tripled. As the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season begins, scientists are worried that U.S. coastal communities could face more super storms with winds, storm surges and rainfall so intense that current warning categories don’t fully capture the threat. Therefore, scientists call for expanding the hurricane scale for better warnings that could save lives.

Super storms are increasing in number and strength. Satellite view of temperatures inside Hurricane Irma on September 4, 2017. Photo: NASA/NOAA GOES

This year’s forecast is about average and much more subdued than last summer’s hyperactive season turned out to be, partly due to cooler ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, as well as a nascent El Niño pattern. But that doesn’t mean an individual storm won’t blow up to exceptional strength, as Andrew did before striking Florida in 1992, an otherwise relatively quiet year.

Heat trapped by the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is raising the chances of that happening, said Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann.

A new review of global data on hurricanes shows that since 1980, the number of storms with winds stronger than 200 kilometers per hour (124 mph, or a strong Category 3) have doubled, and those with winds stronger than 250 kilometers per hour (155 mph) have tripled.



Super storms are growing more common.

The analysis, published this week by four prominent climate scientists, also shows other clear trends, including a poleward migration of the areas where storms reach peak intensity, which puts new areas at risk, including New England and even Europe.

Storms are also intensifying more quickly, with a greater chance they will drop record amounts of rain, especially if they stall out when they hit land, as Hurricane Harvey did in Houston last year.

“The weight of the evidence suggests that the 30-year-old prediction of more intense and wetter tropical cyclones is coming to pass. This is a risk that we can no longer afford to ignore,” wrote the authors—Stefan Rahmstorf of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Kerry Emanuel of MIT, Jim Kossin of NOAA and Mann.

“The current intensity scale doesn’t capture the fact that a 10 mph increase in sustained wind speeds ups the damage potential by 20 percent,” Mann said. “That’s not a subtle effect. It’s one that we can see.” Based on the spacing of Categories 1-5, there should be a Category 6 approaching peak winds of 190 mph, he said.

Creating a new warning level for unprecedented storms could help save lives. When Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest tropical cyclones on record, hit the Philippines in 2013, people died in shelters that had been designed to withstand a historic storm surge but still flooded.

2018 Atlantic Forecast and Role of Ocean Temps

This year’s Atlantic storm season didn’t wait for the official June 1 start date: Alberto became one of very few tropical or subtropical cyclones to enter the Gulf of Mexico in the month of May. The storm reached peak intensity with 65 mph winds on May 28, passing through offshore oil and gas drilling areas and forcing some coastal evacuations. It maintained subtropical circulation features all the way north to Indiana.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in its outlook for the 2018 Atlantic storm season, is projecting an average to above-average season this year, with 10-16 named storms and, five to nine hurricanes, including one to four major hurricanes.

Colorado State University, which also issues a key hurricane outlook, revised its expectations downward slightly this week. The forecasters said they now expect an average hurricane season, with 14 named storms (including Alberto), six hurricanes and two major hurricanes, with a 51 percent chance of a major hurricane making landfall somewhere in the U.S.

The CSU forecasters said their revision was partly based on cooler-than-normal ocean temperatures off the western African coast. That means there is less heat available to fuel hurricane formation in a region that spawns some of the strongest storms, including Maria and Irma in 2017, which became the two costliest Caribbean hurricanes on record.

Last year, April sea surface temperatures in the eastern tropical Atlantic, a main hurricane formation area, were about 1-4 degrees Fahrenheit above average, helping to fuel the seemingly endless chain of tropical systems spinning toward the Caribbean and East Coast.

This year, sea surface temperatures in a large part of that formation area are about 1 degree Fahrenheit cooler than average, part of a short-term cyclical ocean change driven by currents and winds.

Cooler start to Hurricane season 2018.

Long-term, sea surface temperatures in this region have warmed about 0.5 to 1 degree Celsius in the past 100 years. According to a 2008 study published in the journal Nature, warming oceans were responsible for approximately 40 percent of the increase in hurricane activity between 1996 and 2005, a particularly active hurricane period.

While this year’s lowered forecast might sound like good news, the CSU hurricane forecasters reminded coastal residents that “it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season.”

Big Concern: Preparing for More Intense Storms

When it comes to hurricanes, most of the overwhelming damage, including loss of life, is from the “very few strongest storms,” Mann said. “What matters is how many Category 3, 4, and 5 storms we get, and we’re likely to see more of those storms, and more damage and loss of life as a result.“

What happened in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria is one example. The storm resulted in the greatest estimated loss of life on record from any storm in the U.S., with estimates of over 4,600 deaths, many from lack of access to medical care in the weeks and months after the storm, according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“That’s not a coincidence,” said Mann. “We have to recognize that by some measures, dangerous climate change isn’t some far-off thing we can look to avoid. It has arrived.”

The question is how to prepare, and in many parts of the U.S., existing disaster recovery programs are resulting in infrastructure being rebuilt in harm’s way, without consideration of how global warming will intensify impacts, said Jessica Grannis, adaptation program manager with the Georgetown Climate Center in Washington, D.C.

“There are bad recovery decisions being made,” Grannis said, using the impacts of Hurricane Irene in Vermont as an example.

Flooding from the 2011 storm destroyed big sections of the state’s road system by washing out old culverts designed for a climate that no longer exists. Recovery included plans for replacing the old drainage systems with new “bottomless” culverts that can handle much more water, but the Federal Emergency Management Agency “denied them the cost of those culverts,” she said. “Disaster recovery programs push people into replacing old systems with the same thing.”

During the Obama administration, the federal government had started shifting policies to consider climate risks, but now we are “back in scenario of putting in things we know won’t be adequate,” she said.

Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said another big concern is the Trump administration removing flood safety standards “without any regard as to why they exist.”

“The damages that occurred last year strongly suggest that small investments in resilience in the past 10 years could well have saved hundreds of billions of dollars and lots of strife,” he said. “After Hurricane Katrina, the Corp of Engineers built back the levees to withstand a Category 3 hurricane, but not a Category 5 hurricane. That makes no sense to me, and in many areas the U.S. seems incapable of planning ahead for real risks.”

Whether climate change or weather engineering, Hurricane Season 2018 is anomalous. It started with Alberto, one of very few tropical or subtropical cyclones to enter the Gulf of Mexico in the month of May. And as stated above, super storms are becoming stronger and more common. So just be prepared!

http://strangesounds.org/2018/06/experts-warn-of-super-storms-and-call-for-new-category-6-for-the-oncoming-hurricane-season-2018.html
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« Reply #637 on: June 12, 2018, 08:55:57 pm »

Weather anomaly: ‘Very unusual’ 8 inches of snow in Glennallen, Alaska and June snow at Showdown and other parts of Montana

http://strangesounds.org/2018/06/weather-anomaly-very-unusual-8-inches-of-snow-in-glennallen-alaska-and-june-snow-at-showdown-and-other-parts-of-montana.html
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« Reply #638 on: July 10, 2018, 08:23:11 pm »

100 DAYS OF SPOTLESSNESS

As of today, the sun has been without sunspots for 100 days in 2018. If current trends continue, 2018 will end with a 10-year low in sunspot counts. This is a sign that Solar Minimum is approaching–even more rapidly than forecasters expected. What does this mean for us on Earth? Ironically, low solar activity boosts cosmic rays.

http://www.spaceweather.com/
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« Reply #639 on: August 06, 2018, 09:27:49 am »

What Is Causing These Record Heatwaves, Massive "Firenadoes", Giant Dust Storms And Large Earthquakes?

Major changes are happening to our planet, and the experts are groping for answers.  In recent days some have suggested that what we are witnessing is the natural progression of “man-made climate change”, but that explanation has generally been received with a lot of skepticism.  Something truly dramatic appears to be happening to the globe, and it isn’t just because the amount of carbon dioxide in the air suddenly reached some sort of magical “tipping point”.  But without a doubt, temperatures are getting warmer.  In July, Death Valley experienced “the hottest month ever recorded on the planet”.  Over in Europe, Saturday was being billed as Europe’s “hottest day ever”, and temperatures in Lisbon, Portugal were expected to top 107 degrees both Saturday and Sunday.  On the other side of the planet, the crippling drought in Australia is devastating farms “like a cancer”, and things are so hot in North Korea that the government has declared “an unprecedented natural disaster”…

    This week, the North Korean government called record-high temperatures in the country “an unprecedented natural disaster” and said that country was working together to fight the problem.

    An editorial published Thursday in Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of the ruling party, highlighted the difficulties that the long stretch of high temperatures would cause for North Korea’s agricultural sector, specifically crops such as rice and maize. The newspaper called for North Koreans to act as one and “display their patriotic zeal in the ongoing campaign for preventing damage by high temperature.”

In California, extreme heat and bone dry conditions continue to fuel some of the worst wildfires in the history of the state…

    Crews battling deadly Northern California wildfires prepare for another day of hot and dry conditions that could drive the flames into new areas and threaten more homes.

    According to Cal Fire, more than 15,000 personnel are on the lines of 18 large blazes across California on Saturday. So far, the fires since June have killed 8, burned more than 559,000 acres and damaged or destroyed over 1,800 structures. Roughly 17,000 homes continue to be threatened by these fires, and about 45,000 residents are under evacuation.

Ultimately, this may turn out to be the worst year for wildfires that California has ever seen.

Of course there have been bad years for wildfires before.  But what we haven’t seen before are “firenadoes” that pack 143 mph winds…

    On Thursday, NWS researcher combed through the wreckage left behind and determined a fire whirl — commonly known as a fire tornado — roared through the area between 7:30 p.m and 8 p.m. on July 26th.

    It was packing 143 mph winds, turning heavy-duty high tension power line towers into twisted pieces of metal, uprooting trees and ripping the bark off other trees.

When I first heard about this fire tornado, I was absolutely stunned.

I had never heard of a fire tornado anywhere near that size in the United States, and apparently the experts hadn’t either…

    “This is historic in the U.S.,” Craig Clements, director of San Jose State University’s Fire Weather Research Laboratory, told BuzzFeed News. “This might be the strongest fire-induced tornado-like circulation ever recorded.”

    Known as a pyrocumulus cloud, the ominous red weather formations usually occur over volcanic eruptions or forest fires when intensely heated air triggers an upward motion that pushes smoke and water vapor to rapidly rise. They can develop their own weather patters, including thunderstorms with severe winds which then further fan the flames.

Elsewhere in the Southwest, drought continues to intensify, and this is starting to produce absolutely enormous dust storms.

For example, check out what just happened to the city of Phoenix…

    A huge wall of dust enveloped the Phoenix metro area on Thursday in the second monsoon storm in a four-day span.

    Officials at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport said flights were delayed or held until visibility improved.

    National Weather Service (NWS) meteorologists said blowing dust in the Phoenix area brought near-zero visibility for drivers Thursday evening.

Certainly a dust storm is less destructive than a “fire tornado” in the short-term, but as we saw in the 1930s, a consistent pattern of giant dust storms can absolutely cripple a nation.

And let us not forget all of the shaking that has been happening to the crust of our planet.

On Sunday, Indonesia was shaken by a magnitude 7.0 earthquake…

    The death toll rose to 82 after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake rocked the Indonesian island of Lombok and on nearby Bali on Sunday, damaging buildings, sending terrified residents and tourists running into the streets and triggering a brief tsunami warning.

    Social media posts from the scene showed debris piled on streets and sidewalks. Hospital patients, many still in their beds, were rolled out onto streets as a safeguard against structural damage to the hospital buildings.

So why is all of this happening?

Yes, the amount of carbon dioxide in the air is increasing, and it has been increasing for a very long time.  Ultimately, the amount that humans contribute to the overall level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is marginal, and even if we took the most extreme measures possible there is very little that we could do to significantly affect the balance.

And scientists assure us that our planet once had much, much higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in the air then we do today, and our planet appeared to have thrived under those conditions.

But the narrative won’t change.  The mainstream media will continue to tell us that the Earth changes that we are witnessing are due to global warming and that if we reverse course that we can go back to how things were before.

No, we can’t go back, because the changes that are happening are way outside of our control.

Fundamental changes are happening to our planet, and this is just the beginning.  For now these Earth changes are a minor nuisance to a lot of people, but pretty soon nobody will be able to ignore them.

http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/earth-changes-accelerate-what-is-causing-these-record-heatwaves-massive-firenadoes-giant-dust-storms-and-large-earthquakes
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