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Shadow Government

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June 21, 2017, 05:50:35 pm Romans 8 says: Mark, I don't want to flood your pm box. But just wanted to say I emailed bro Scott about this issue.
April 29, 2017, 05:20:18 am Christian40 says: What i'm thinking a strike on North Korea possible on some occultic date May 1? the aftermath of WW3 will bring in the Antichrist? Yeah Mayhem in May?
April 20, 2017, 04:55:44 pm Mark says:
April 06, 2017, 09:26:29 pm Mark says: TRUMP LAUNCHES 50+ MISSILES AIMED AT SYRIA
March 05, 2017, 01:16:17 am Christian40 says: i hope the rapture is this year i encourage You to keep working for the Lord
March 05, 2017, 01:06:24 am Christian40 says: i'm glad that the summer is over in Australia the heat was making me feel crazy its a good month to be in now
February 19, 2017, 07:55:44 am Romans 8 says: The month of February just FLIES BY, doesn't it? It being a < 30 day month helps too! (Unusually warm this month too!)
January 24, 2017, 09:38:51 pm Romans 8 says:
January 16, 2017, 07:17:24 pm Romans 8 says:
October 24, 2016, 03:38:23 am Christian40 says: i'm here again i get bonus time on the Net today Smiley
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Mark
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« Reply #60 on: June 30, 2013, 05:44:51 am »

PAPER: NSA has secret data collection agreement with European countries...
http://www.salon.com/2013/06/29/nsa_reportedly_has_secret_data_collection_agreement_with_several_european_countries/

Judges in secret court upset with their portrayal... truth hurts buddy
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/secret-court-judges-upset-at-portrayal-of-collaboration-with-government/2013/06/29/ed73fb68-e01b-11e2-b94a-452948b95ca8_print.html
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« Reply #61 on: July 03, 2013, 01:23:33 pm »

U.S. Postal Service Logging All Mail for Law Enforcement

Leslie James Pickering noticed something odd in his mail last September: A handwritten card, apparently delivered by mistake, with instructions for postal workers to pay special attention to the letters and packages sent to his home.

“Show all mail to supv” — supervisor — “for copying prior to going out on the street,” read the card. It included Mr. Pickering’s name, address and the type of mail that needed to be monitored. The word “confidential” was highlighted in green.

“It was a bit of a shock to see it,” said Mr. Pickering, who owns a small bookstore in Buffalo. More than a decade ago, he was a spokesman for the Earth Liberation Front, a radical environmental group labeled eco-terrorists by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Postal officials subsequently confirmed they were indeed tracking Mr. Pickering’s mail but told him nothing else.

As the world focuses on the high-tech spying of the National Security Agency, the misplaced card offers a rare glimpse inside the seemingly low-tech but prevalent snooping of the United States Postal Service.

Mr. Pickering was targeted by a longtime surveillance system called mail covers, but that is only a forerunner of a vastly more expansive effort, the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program, in which Postal Service computers photograph the exterior of every piece of paper mail that is processed in the United States — about 160 billion pieces last year. It is not known how long the government saves the images.

Together, the two programs show that snail mail is subject to the same kind of scrutiny that the National Security Agency has given to telephone calls and e-mail.

The mail covers program, used to monitor Mr. Pickering, is more than a century old but is still considered a powerful tool. At the request of law enforcement officials, postal workers record information from the outside of letters and parcels before they are delivered. (Actually opening the mail requires a warrant.) The information is sent to whatever law enforcement agency asked for it. Tens of thousands of pieces of mail each year undergo this scrutiny.

The Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program was created after the anthrax attacks in late 2001 that killed five people, including two postal workers. Highly secret, it seeped into public view last month when the F.B.I. cited it in its investigation of ricin-laced letters sent to President Obama and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. It enables the Postal Service to retroactively track mail correspondence at the request of law enforcement. No one disputes that it is sweeping.

“In the past, mail covers were used when you had a reason to suspect someone of a crime,” said Mark D. Rasch, the former director of the Justice Department’s computer crime unit, who worked on several fraud cases using mail covers. “Now it seems to be ‘Let’s record everyone’s mail so in the future we might go back and see who you were communicating with.’ Essentially you’ve added mail covers on millions of Americans.”

Bruce Schneier, a computer security expert and an author, said whether it was a postal worker taking down information or a computer taking images, the program was still an invasion of privacy.

“Basically they are doing the same thing as the other programs, collecting the information on the outside of your mail, the metadata, if you will, of names, addresses, return addresses and postmark locations, which gives the government a pretty good map of your contacts, even if they aren’t reading the contents,” he said.

But law enforcement officials said mail covers and the automatic mail tracking program are invaluable, even in an era of smartphones and e-mail.

In a criminal complaint filed June 7 in Federal District Court in Eastern Texas, the F.B.I. said a postal investigator tracing the ricin letters was able to narrow the search to Shannon Guess Richardson, an actress in New Boston, Tex., by examining information from the front and back images of 60 pieces of mail scanned immediately before and after the tainted letters sent to Mr. Obama and Mr. Bloomberg showing return addresses near her home. Ms. Richardson had originally accused her husband of mailing the letters, but investigators determined that he was at work during the time they were mailed.

In 2007, the F.B.I., the Internal Revenue Service and the local police in Charlotte, N.C., used information gleaned from the mail cover program to arrest Sallie Wamsley-Saxon and her husband, Donald, charging both with running a prostitution ring that took in $3 million over six years. Prosecutors said it was one of the largest and most successful such operations in the country. Investigators also used mail covers to help track banking activity and other businesses the couple operated under different names.

Other agencies, including the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services, have used mail covers to track drug smugglers and Medicare fraud.

rest: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/04/us/monitoring-of-snail-mail.html?_r=1&
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« Reply #62 on: July 03, 2013, 04:31:35 pm »

Quote
Bruce Schneier, a computer security expert and an author, said whether it was a postal worker taking down information or a computer taking images, the program was still an invasion of privacy.

“Basically they are doing the same thing as the other programs, collecting the information on the outside of your mail, the metadata, if you will, of names, addresses, return addresses and postmark locations, which gives the government a pretty good map of your contacts, even if they aren’t reading the contents,” he said.

Excellent observation. Only a geek would make a "metadata" reference! But it's a good one, because that is what the whole "metadata" thing is about in web page design. It's more of a general term referring to "data" that relates to a given bit of information, such as size location, etc., and all that metadata is then "crawled" by "spiders" that go out on the internet looking for specific types of metadata, such as stuff relating to log cabins, etc. The designer sets the parameters of the data desired to be located and later collated with other openly available "metadata".

You simply gather whatever IS openly available, then process it, and out comes results, statistics, "the numbers".

On the surface, it's all circumstantial information, just numbers publicly available, but when you start putting "2 and 2 together", you start getting details pop up that narrows down things. If you know a person, and you find a web search says that person lives on a given street, and you go to that street when you visit them, then the data saying he lives at that location is defined as fact setting it's default to "yes" or "1", till other information overrides it. It's an algorithm thing. They are looking based on probabilities and averages based on known data available.
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« Reply #63 on: July 10, 2013, 07:23:35 am »

The NSA Has Inserted Its Code Into Android OS, Or Three Quarters Of All Smartphones

Over a decade ago, it was discovered that the NSA embedded backdoor access into Windows 95, and likely into virtually all other subsequent internet connected, desktop-based operating systems. However, with the passage of time, more and more people went "mobile", and as a result the NSA had to adapt. And adapt they have: as Bloomberg reports, "The NSA is quietly writing code for Google’s Android OS."

Is it ironic that the same "don't be evil" Google which went to such great lengths in the aftermath of the Snowden scandal to wash its hands of snooping on its customers and even filed a request with the secretive FISA court asking permission to disclose more information about the government’s data requests, is embedding NSA code into its mobile operating system, which according to IDC runs on three-quarters of all smartphones shipped in the first quarter? Yes, yes it is.

Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano confirms that the company has already inserted some of the NSA’s programming in Android OS. "All Android code and contributors are publicly available for review at source.android.com." Scigliano says, declining to comment further.

From Bloomberg:

Through its open-source Android project, Google has agreed to incorporate code, first developed by the agency in 2011, into future versions of its mobile operating system, which according to market researcher IDC runs on three-quarters of the smartphones shipped globally in the first quarter. NSA officials say their code, known as Security Enhancements for Android, isolates apps to prevent hackers and marketers from gaining access to personal or corporate data stored on a device. Eventually all new phones, tablets, televisions, cars, and other devices that rely on Android will include NSA code, agency spokeswoman Vanee’ Vines said in an e-mailed statement. NSA researcher Stephen Smalley, who works on the program, says, “Our goal is to raise the bar in the security of commodity mobile devices.”

See, there's no need to worry: the reason the NSA is generously providing the source code for every Google-based smartphone is for your own security. Oh but it's open-sourced, so someone else will intercept any and all attempts at malice. We forgot.

The story continues:

In a 2011 presentation obtained by Bloomberg Businessweek, Smalley listed among the benefits of the program that it’s “normally invisible to users.” The program’s top goal, according to that presentation: “Improve our understanding of Android security.”

Well one wouldn't want their bug to be visible to users now, would one...

Vines wouldn’t say whether the agency’s work on Android and other software is part of or helps with Prism. “The source code is publicly available for anyone to use, and that includes the ability to review the code line by line,” she said in her statement. Most of the NSA’s suggested additions to the operating system can already be found buried in Google’s latest release—on newer devices including Sony’s Xperia Z, HTC’s One, and Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy S4. Although the features are not turned on by default, according to agency documentation, future versions will be. In May the Pentagon approved the use of smartphones and tablets that run Samsung’s mobile enterprise software, Knox, which also includes NSA programming, the company wrote in a June white paper. Sony, HTC, and Samsung declined to comment.

Apple appears to be immune from this unprecedented breach of customer loyalty, if only for now, although open-sourced Linux may not be as lucky:

“Apple (AAPL) does not accept source code from any government agencies for any of our operating systems or other products,” says Kristin Huguet, a spokeswoman for the company. It’s not known if any other proprietary operating systems are using NSA code. SE for Android is an offshoot of a long-running NSA project called Security-Enhanced Linux. That code was integrated a decade ago into the main version of the open-source operating system, the server platform of choice for Internet leaders including Google, Facebook (FB), and Yahoo! (YHOO). Jeff Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, says the NSA didn’t add any obvious means of eavesdropping. “This code was peer-reviewed by a lot of people,” he says.

But that's not all:

The NSA developed a separate Android project because Google’s mobile OS required markedly different programming, according to Smalley’s 2011 presentation. Brian Honan, an information technology consultant in Dublin, says his clients in European governments and multinational corporations are worried about how vulnerable their data are when dealing with U.S. companies. The information security world had been preoccupied with Chinese hacking until recently, Honan says. “With Prism, the same accusations can be laid against the U.S. government.”

In short: the (big brother supervised) fun never stops in Stasi 2.0 world. Just buy your 100 P/E stocks, eat your burgers, watch your Dancing With The Stars, pay your taxes, and engage in as much internet contact with other internet-addicted organisms as possible and all shall be well.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-07-09/nsa-has-inserted-its-code-android-os-bugging-three-quarters-all-smartphones
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« Reply #64 on: July 10, 2013, 12:19:33 pm »

The NSA slide you haven’t seen

Recent debate over U.S. government surveillance has focused on the information that American technology companies secretly provide to the National Security Agency. But that is only one of the ways the NSA eavesdrops on international communications.

A classified NSA slide obtained by The Washington Post and published here for the first time lists “Two Types of Collection.”

One is PRISM, the NSA program that collects information from technology companies, which was first revealed in reports by the Post and Britain’s Guardian newspaper last month. The slide also shows a separate category labeled “Upstream,” described as accessing “communications on fiber cables and infrastructure as data flows past.”

The interaction between Upstream and PRISM — which could be considered “downstream” collection because the data is already processed by tech companies — is not entirely clear from the slide. In addition, its description of PRISM as “collection directly from the servers” of technology giants such as Google, Microsoft and Facebook has been disputed by many of the companies involved. (They say access to user data is legal and limited).

However PRISM works, the NSA slide makes clear that the two collection methods operate in parallel, instructing analysts that “You Should Use Both.” Arrows point to both “Upstream” and “PRISM.”

The overall heading of the slide is “FAA 702 Operations” – a reference to a 2008 law that enabled collection on U.S. soil of communications of foreigners thought to be overseas without an individual warrant from a court, including when the foreigners are communicating with someone in the United States. The law says the collection may be for a foreign intelligence purpose, which includes terrorism, nuclear weapons proliferation or cyber-security.

The slide also shows a crude map of the undersea cable network that carries data from either side of North America and onto the rest of the world. As a story in Sunday’s Post made clear, these undersea cables are essential to worldwide data flows – and to the surveillance capabilities of the U.S. government and its allies.

This slide bears many resemblances to one published by the Guardian on June 8, shortly after the initial disclosures about PRISM. But the Guardian’s slide shows an undersea cable map of most of the world. The one obtained by the Post shows mainly sections of North America. It is not clear why the slides vary in this way.

Both slides have circles attached to arrows suggesting possible collection points, but they cover areas too broad to discern where NSA accesses fiber-optic cable networks. The slides also list code names under the Upstream program.

The Post version lists Fairview, Stormbrew, Blarney and Oakstar but does not describe any of them. The Guardian slide lists Fairview and Blarney but has two others blacked out.

The Post has previously reported that Blarney gathers up metadata – describing who is speaking to whom and through what networks and devices – as data flows through the Internet’s backbone.

For Sunday’s story, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a statement defending its collection methods as crucial to protecting national security.

“As always,” the statement said, “the Intelligence and law enforcement communities will continue to work with all members of Congress to ensure the proper balance of privacy and protection for American citizens.”
 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/the-nsa-slide-you-havent-seen/2013/07/10/32801426-e8e6-11e2-aa9f-c03a72e2d342_story.html
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« Reply #65 on: July 10, 2013, 02:59:05 pm »

Notice when Microsoft sold out to PRISM. That date comes up time and again. It's not coincidence, it's a pattern.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/politics/prism-collection-documents/

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« Reply #66 on: July 19, 2013, 02:14:36 pm »

USDA Grants $149,074 to Study Food Shopping Patterns with GPS

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has awarded a $149,074 grant to study food shopping patterns that may form the basis of future shopping "interventions.”

The USDA award went to the University of Kentucky in April for the study titled, “Adolescent and Parent Food Activity Patterns as Drivers of Food Choice and Behaviors."

According to the grant abstract, “There is limited research understanding how adolescents and their parents move within their daily lives which may influence their food choices and ultimately diet behavior."

The project will examine the influences on food shopping patterns, or as the proposal put it: "The overall goal of the proposed project is to examine the drivers of food shopping patterns, behaviors and food purchasing choices within the food activity space among adolescents and their parents.”

Some of the families involved in the study will be given GPS data recorders so researchers can conduct an "objective measure of the food environment."

The study's primary director Prof. Alison Gustafson tells CNSNews.com, “A lot of the work is on proximal deterrents -- things that are close to you that would bring you to a store. For example, shopping venues that are in a person’s travel pattern – in their daily route, they may pass certain types of food establishments.

“The GPS will help us map out a travel pattern, the geographic space and the number of food venues in this space. As well as the type -- grocery stores, gas stations or super centers,” Gustafson said.

The study also will examine the shopping habits of adolescents traveling with and without a parent.
 
Butcher Freddie Quina cuts meat at Super Cao Nguyen in Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
 
“Are shopping habits different for an adolescent when they are with a parent or with a friend? My hypothesis is that there will be a difference,” Gustafson said.

http://cnsnews.com/news/article/usda-grants-149074-study-food-shopping-patterns-gps

“Although neighborhood-level efforts are paramount for food system sustainability, at the micro-level, where residents procure food, interventions are also needed,” the grant says.

“Such that examining behaviors and perceptions of the locations where families purchase food for consumption can aid in developing trainings and key materials that will most directly influence purchasing behavior. Lastly, the ultimate goal of the project is to develop and submit an integrated grant that will lead to improved diet quality among families.”

Gustafson explains, “The intervention that we will likely write another grant for, is so you change their shopping habits.  We will be working with food stores, adolescents and parents on how to change their choice to healthier snacks and foods.”

“In an ideal world everyone would always have access to healthy food, but since that’s not possible, we may say to parents, ‘You can’t change where you live but you could change how you shop.’”

For example, a change in one's daily travel routine could produce changes in shopping behavior:  “Maybe if someone drove a half mile the other way, there is a grocery store with healthier options than the food venues they routinely pass by,” Gustafson says.

Part of the study will focus on designing a food shopping curriculum:  “We’ll be working with stores and families in a 10-week session," Gustafson said.

 - See more at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/usda-grants-149074-study-food-shopping-patterns-gps#sthash.0gP1p1mu.dpuf
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« Reply #67 on: August 02, 2013, 06:13:12 am »

Type The Wrong Thing Into A Search Engine And The Secret Police Will Come Knocking On Your Door

The control freaks are out of control.  Once upon a time America was “the land of the free”, but now it has become “the land of the bureaucrats”, and these bureaucrats are absolutely obsessed with watching, tracking, monitoring and controlling virtually everything that you do.  Last month, I wrote about how the Obama administration forced a small-time magician out in Missouri to submit a 32 page disaster plan for the little rabbit that he uses in his magic shows for kids.  A lot of people thought that story was quite humorous, but the examples in this article are not so funny.  In recent days we have learned that the government is monitoring just about everything that we do on the Internet, and we have also learned that a couple of innocent Google searches can result in armed government agents pounding on your front door.  If you do not believe this, read on…
 
Thanks to Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian, we now know about XKeyscore, an NSA program that collects “nearly everything that a user does on the Internet“…
 

A top secret National Security Agency program allows analysts to search with no prior authorization through vast databases containing emails, online chats and the browsing histories of millions of individuals, according to documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden.
 
According to the documents that Greenwald has been given, NSA agents can use XKeyscore to continually intercept and analyze “an individual’s internet activity”…
 

XKeyscore, the documents boast, is the NSA’s “widest reaching” system developing intelligence from computer networks – what the agency calls Digital Network Intelligence (DNI). One presentation claims the program covers “nearly everything a typical user does on the internet”, including the content of emails, websites visited and searches, as well as their metadata.
 
Analysts can also use XKeyscore and other NSA systems to obtain ongoing “real-time” interception of an individual’s internet activity.
 
So if you type “the wrong thing” into a search engine, the feds could literally show up on your doorstep.  One married couple up in New York recently found this out the hard way…
 

Michele Catalano was looking for information online about pressure cookers. Her husband, in the same time frame, was Googling backpacks. Wednesday morning, six men from a joint terrorism task force showed up at their house to see if they were terrorists. Which begs the question: How’d the government know what they were Googling?
 
Yes, exactly how did the government know what they were putting into Google?
 
Sadly, I think that we all know the answer to that question.
 
And when the agents got to their home, they didn’t realize their mistake and leave.  Instead, they peppered the couple with questions.  The following is how Michele Catalano described the experience…
 

[T]hey were peppering my husband with questions. Where is he from? Where are his parents from? They asked about me, where was I, where do I work, where do my parents live. Do you have any bombs, they asked. Do you own a pressure cooker? My husband said no, but we have a rice cooker. Can you make a bomb with that? My husband said no, my wife uses it to make quinoa. What the hell is quinoa, they asked. …
 
Have you ever looked up how to make a pressure cooker bomb? My husband, ever the oppositional kind, asked them if they themselves weren’t curious as to how a pressure cooker bomb works, if they ever looked it up. Two of them admitted they did.
 
Is this really what America is going to be like from now on?
 
We type the wrong thing into Google and the secret police come knocking on our doors?
 
Where will all of this end?
 
In Saudi Arabia, one man that set up a website that the authorities did not like was recently sentenced to seven years in prison and 600 lashes…
 

The editor of a Saudi Arabian social website has been sentenced to seven years in prison and 600 lashes for founding an Internet forum that violates Islamic values and propagates liberal thought, Saudi media reported on Tuesday.
 
Raif Badawi, who started the ‘Free Saudi Liberals’ website to discuss the role of religion in Saudi Arabia, has been held since June 2012 on charges of cyber crime and disobeying his father – a crime in the conservative kingdom and top U.S. ally.
 
That may sound extreme, but we are heading down a similar path.  People are going to start becoming afraid to express themselves on the Internet out of fear that they will get a visit from armed goons just like the Catalanos did.
 
This is not what America is supposed to be like.  We are supposed to be a nation that respects privacy, liberty and freedom.  Instead, our nation is rapidly being transformed into a heavily armed police state surveillance grid that is a paradise for control freaks.
 
And it is not just the Internet that we all need to be worried about.  An article by Lee Bellinger described some more ways that “the police state” is expanding…
 

Grants to local governments for “FBI Mobile,” a portable biometric data collection system first deployed by the military to create IDs for urban-war-zone residents.
 
Covert naked-body scanners for checking out the general public on U.S. streets, a product being developed by Rapiscan Systems.
 
A fleet of roving backscatter scanning vans for expansion to all forms of ground travel.
 
Military-developed, next-generation Taser systems capable of stunning and incapacitating large numbers of protesters.
 
Active Denial System (ADS) “Pain Ray” for use here at home.
 
Shockwave Area Denial System, which can taser citizens within 100-meter ranges.
 
Laser Blinding Dazzler system, which causes temporary blindness in protestors.
 
Mass-deployed sedatives to incapacitate crowds.
 
Screaming Microwave system and ear-splitting noise machines for crowd control throughout the U.S.
 
For even more on this, please see my previous article entitled “10 Ways That The Iron Grip Of The Big Brother Prison Grid Is Tightening On All Of Our Lives“.
 
In this type of an environment, even a helpless baby deer becomes a national security threat…
 

“It was like a SWAT team. Nine DNR agents and four deputy sheriffs, and they were all armed to the teeth,” animal shelter employee Ray Schulze told WISN-TV.
 
Two weeks ago, Schulze was working in the barn at the Society of St. Francis in Kenosha, Wis., when a swarm of squad cars screeched up and officers scrambled onto the property with a search warrant.
 
Were they hunting down an armed robber or escaped prisoner? Conducting a drug raid?
 
Incredibly, they were gunning for a 2-week-old baby fawn.
 
Can you guess what happened to the 2-week-old baby deer?
 
They killed it – just like they are killing our liberties and our freedoms.
 
What in the world is happening to America?

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/type-the-wrong-thing-into-a-search-engine-and-the-secret-police-will-come-knocking-on-your-door
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« Reply #68 on: August 02, 2013, 03:58:45 pm »

Quote
We type the wrong thing into Google and the secret police come knocking on our doors?

I think it wise people assume that is the case.
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« Reply #69 on: August 02, 2013, 04:07:09 pm »

I think it wise people assume that is the case.

I dont know if i really buy that story as is, im thinking there is a little more to it. Just imagine what my search quires look like in a day. From multiple devices on multiple ip addresses. I type some crazy stuff, and no ones showed up yet.
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« Reply #70 on: August 02, 2013, 04:40:42 pm »

The operative word my friend is "yet".

Just think how law enforcement builds a case. They let the suspect go about their business till they have what they deem enough evidence to go after somebody. Also, the system needs time to get fully set up and running before they basically spring the trap. In the mean time, people are building a digital trail of evidence. We all are. But by faith we stand, knowing that nothing can separate us from God.

The thing is, what we stand for, while it opposes Caesar and his carnal world, we aren't telling people to protest and actively fight the government for change, etc. We exhort people to come out from the world and to stop living like the world, knowing that only Jesus Christ can change the world. If they want to arrest me because I say that the US is doomed for the evil they have done and will answer to God, fine, so be it, but it's true, and I will stand by that by the grace of God.

I care that people get saved from their sins they have committed against our Father, but really, I could care less what the world says about what I believe. God willing, I'm about pleasing God, not men.
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« Reply #71 on: August 02, 2013, 04:55:57 pm »

The thing is, what we stand for, while it opposes Caesar and his carnal world, we aren't telling people to protest and actively fight the government for change, etc. We exhort people to come out from the world and to stop living like the world, knowing that only Jesus Christ can change the world. If they want to arrest me because I say that the US is doomed for the evil they have done and will answer to God, fine, so be it, but it's true, and I will stand by that by the grace of God.

I care that people get saved from their sins they have committed against our Father, but really, I could care less what the world says about what I believe. God willing, I'm about pleasing God, not men.

Yep, and that's been the whole agenda of Alex Jones and the "truth" movement - to be frank, they're doing nothing more than trying to stir everyone up into a frenzy. I don't know if Alex, David Icke, Jeff Rense, Mike Rivero, Lindsey Williams, Steve Quayle, etc are doing it on purpose or not(although I think they are), but nonetheless you can't deny these very men are living luxurious lifestyles, while they're trying to whip their flock into a frenzy.

And yes, we have the word of God, the King James bible, right by our sides in in our hearts, so there's nothing to fear. Thank you Jesus!
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« Reply #72 on: August 02, 2013, 05:34:37 pm »

47  The LORD liveth; and blessed [be] my rock; and exalted be the God of the rock of my salvation.
48  It [is] God that avengeth me, and that bringeth down the people under me,
49   And that bringeth me forth from mine enemies: thou also hast lifted me up on high above them that rose up against me: thou hast delivered me from the violent man.
50  Therefore I will give thanks unto thee, O LORD, among the heathen, and I will sing praises unto thy name.
2 Samuel 22:47-50 (KJB)
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« Reply #73 on: August 07, 2013, 08:44:32 am »

Court to feds: Explain Marine's Facebook-postings arrest

A federal judge in Richmond, Va., has refused to dismiss from a lawsuit several FBI and Secret Service agents as well as local police officers who arrested a military veteran based on an opinion from a counselor who had never met him that he might be a danger.
 
The officers had confronted the veteran, Brandon Raub, after he expressed criticism of the U.S. government on a social networking page.

They arrested Raub and kept him in custody for an evaluation based on the long-distance opinion from Michael Campbell, a psychotherapist hired by the local county. But when the case came before a judge, his ruling found the concerns raised by the officers were “so devoid of any factual allegations that it could not be reasonably expected to give rise to a case or controversy.”
 
Raub then sued the officers for taking him into custody.
 
The latest ruling rejected a request by the officers to end the case.
 
“Brandon Raub’s case exposes the seedy underbelly of a governmental system that continues to target military veterans for expressing their discontent over America’s rapid transition to a police state,” said John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute.
 
“While such targeting of veterans and dissidents is problematic enough, for any government official to suggest that they shouldn’t be held accountable for violating a citizen’s rights on the grounds that they were unaware of the Constitution’s prohibitions makes a mockery of our so-called system of representative government. Thankfully, Judge Hudson has recognized this imbalance and ensured that Brandon Raub will get his day in court,” he said.
 
The decision came from U.S. District Judge Henry Hudson, who essentially said there is not enough information at this point in the case to dismiss the law enforcement defendants. He ordered limited discovery.
 
The Rutherford Institute called the decision a victory for free speech and the right to be free from wrongful arrest.
 
Raub, a decorated Marine, had been taken into custody by “a swarm” of FBI, Secret Service agents and local police and forcibly detained in a psychiatric ward for a week because of controversial song lyrics and political views posted on his Facebook page, Rutherford reported.
 
Hudson said the Rutherford Institute, which is representing Raub, had alleged sufficient facts to indicate that the involuntary commitment violated his rights under the U.S. Constitution’s First and Fourth Amendments.
 
Institute attorneys had filed the civil rights lawsuit in federal court on behalf of Raub, alleging that his seizure and detention were the result of a federal government program code-named “Operation Vigilant Eagle” that involves the systematic surveillance of military veterans who express views critical of the government.
 
The complaint alleges that the attempt to label Raub as “mentally ill” and his subsequent involuntary commitment was a pretext designed to silence speech critical of the government.
 
It was Aug. 16, 2012, when Chesterfield police, Secret Service and FBI agents arrived at Raub’s home, asking to speak with him about his Facebook posts. Like many Facebook users, Raub, a Marine who has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, uses his Facebook page to post song lyrics and air his political opinions.
 
Without providing any explanation, levying any charges against Raub or reading him his rights, law enforcement officials handcuffed Raub and transported him to police headquarters, then to John Randolph Medical Center, where he was held against his will.
 
The Institute reported in a hearing on Aug. 20, government officials pointed to Raub’s Facebook posts as the reason for his incarceration. While Raub stated that the Facebook posts were being read out of context, a special justice ordered Raub be held up to 30 more days for psychological evaluation and treatment.
 
But Circuit Court Judge Allan Sharrett ordered Raub’s immediate release a short time later, and the lawsuit was initiated.

Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2013/08/court-to-feds-explain-marines-facebook-postings-arrest/#Bl5Oi8ZKgYir76fF.99
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« Reply #74 on: August 07, 2013, 02:08:05 pm »

What are the odds this will be discussed on the evening news? I'd say about zero.
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« Reply #75 on: August 12, 2013, 07:36:02 am »

How you're tracked digitally all day (and what you can do about it)

Our daily habits — when we wake up, how we get to work, what we like to watch when we get home — are being tracked by dozens of interconnected systems, from cell carriers to traffic cameras. Together, they could form a picture of your day in disturbingly high fidelity.

It's not just high-priority targets and would-be terrorists that leave a digital trail as they go about their business — millions of Americans each produce gigabytes of data associated with themselves just by walking down the street, browsing the Internet, and using their mobile phone. PRISM and XKeyscore may be in the news, but we've been tracked by other means for a long time.

As a demonstration, TODAY followed NBC News producer Robin Oelkers during a normal weekday, noting the many times when his ordinary actions placed him on the grid.

It began as soon as he woke up, checking emails and Facebook on his phone or laptop while getting ready for work — any number of servers took note that his account began a session between 7:30 and 8 a.m.

By logging in with his home Internet connection, Robin's IP address and its location are also automatically recorded at any site he uses.

Meanwhile, in order to have a signal, his phone must be in contact with at least one cell tower, but may be monitored by several in case as he begins to move. These towers can be used to calculate his position to within a city block or two.

"Your mobile phone is basically a tracking device," said Nick Thompson, editor of NewYorker.com, in an interview that aired Thursday. "(It's) taking information about where you are, and sending it to lots and lots of companies."

When it comes to tracking, you don't have to log in via a Web browser or set up your phone a certain way to tell the world to start following your trail. Recently, Apple was caught keeping records of every wireless network iPhones encountered. And several phone makers were found in 2012 to be including a secret back door on their phones capable of reporting every touch, every byte, and every conversation to anyone with the right software.

Leaving the house, Robin enters the view of the public, and therefore the view of any number of traffic and security cameras. Many of these cameras will passively record his license plate, using special software to convert the image into numbers and letters. The make, model, and color of his car is also recorded in some situations.

Other cameras capture his face and appearance, associating him with locations and routes. Such tools are invaluable to police tracking down a fugitive, but in the meantime Robin's face and license may be stored for days, years, or even indefinitely, depending on local laws or business practices.

Of course, all this indirect surveillance is redundant when Robin's car has been tracking his position constantly with its GPS system. Depending on how new the car is, that route information might be backed up to the cloud for easy retrieval, or even collated (anonymously) with other cars' paths to help analyze traffic patterns.

After parking (in view of several cameras), Robin may stop by Starbucks to grab a coffee. Swiping his rewards card, he adds this purchase to a long list of data points describing his preferences and shopping habits. Such data may be kept internal at Starbucks for inventory and promotional purposes.

At work, he mixes his daily duties on the computer with a bit of personal browsing. Even though they may be inconsequential to his work, the traffic logs are saved, and a lawsuit or internal complaint could make them relevant in a heartbeat.

"The company can not only see it, but they probably store that," said Thompson. "They probably store it for legal reasons for a long period of time."

Back at home, Robin relaxes on the couch to watch a movie with the kids. Somewhere, whether he's using a cable box or a TiVo or an Apple TV, some server takes note that he has selected another episode of a certain show, while others sit in his queue unwatched. His personal profile is updated and recommended shows changed. And his viewing habits, while tracked separately, are added to those of others for the streaming service's reports and feedback.


What can you do about all this tracking?
For cellphone stuff, information must be sent if you want your phone and apps to work. But you can learn about your local laws regarding how long such data is kept and under what circumstances it can be requested.


When using the Web, you can use your browser's Do Not Track option (also called "privacy" or "incognito" mode) and opt to use secure HTTPS versions of sites such as Facebook and Gmail. You can even install some basic privacy software like HTTPS Everywhere and Ghostery, to further minimize your trail's inevitable breadcrumbs.   

When you're on the move, make sure GPS and Wi-Fi are only on when you need them to be. (As an added bonus, this saves cellphone battery life.) And check the options screens of your most-used apps to see if there's anything fishy you should be opting out of.

Out on the road, avoiding traffic cams is pretty much impossible (though it doesn't hurt to know what they look like and where they are.) When shopping, using cash and avoiding rewards cards and other incentive programs will keep you off of the marketer's grids (but often at a cost of a few bucks per shopping trip).

As for enjoying the online on-demand movies and music that have become so convenient, you will have to submit to some form of tracking, though be reasonable and avoid, say, the Facebook sharing options on your Spotify or Netflix streams. Also, using a service like MaskMe would let you hide your real name, email and credit card from prying eyes, but not without some mild inconvenience.

The best thing to do is to be vigilant, and recognize all the ways increasingly shadowy marketers and government agencies are keeping their eye on you — you know, just in case. More information, such as congress members to contact or resources to tap can be found at, among other places, the Electronic Frontier Foundation or ACLU's DotRights.

http://www.today.com/tech/how-youre-tracked-digitally-all-day-what-you-can-do-6C10810402
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« Reply #76 on: September 09, 2013, 06:55:40 am »

Uh-Oh. The Gov Wants To Sequence The DNA Of ALL Infants Born In The US

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has begun an initiative to discover the viability of sequencing American infant’s DNA through the “heel stick” blood drawn screening conducted on newborns in hospitals to determine the propensity toward life-threatening diseases. This scheme will cost $25 million over 5 years to understand each individual genetic code in lieu of having DNA routinely mapped and stored in a medical record. Whether this study would have value has not been established. Experts warn that there are ethical questions surrounding such an endeavor. Using genetic information to direct infant healthcare is a major concern. The National Institute of Child health and Human Development (NICHHD) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) are collaborating to fund this initiative. This program will analyze DNA from newborns to be sequenced by...

rest: http://www.occupycorporatism.com/gov-wants-to-sequence-dna-of-all-infants-born-in-us/

This is very dangerous. With this information, they can now accuse any one of any crime. Of course you did it, we have your DNA.
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« Reply #77 on: September 09, 2013, 03:46:03 pm »

Dangerous, and just pure wickedness.
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« Reply #78 on: September 13, 2013, 02:23:43 pm »

CFPB's data-mining on consumer credit cards challenged in heated House hearing

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau officials are seeking to monitor four out of every five U.S. consumer credit card transactions this year — up to 42 billion transactions – through a controversial data-mining program, according to documents obtained by the Washington Examiner.
 
A CFPB strategic planning document for fiscal years 2013-17 describes the “markets monitoring” program through which officials aim to monitor 80 percent of all credit card transactions in 2013.
 
The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 1.16 billion consumer credit cards were in use in 2012 for an estimated 52.6 billion transactions. If CFPB officials reach their stated "performance goal," they would collect data on 42 billion transactions made with 933 million credit cards used by American consumers.
 
In addition, CFPB officials hope to monitor up to 95 percent of all mortgage transactions, according to the planning document.

“This is one step closer to a Big Brother form of government where they know everything about us,” said Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Wis.
 
At a Wednesday hearing before the House Financial Services Committee chaired by Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, CFPB Director Richard Cordray defended the data-mining practice and said his agency is monitoring credit card usage at 110 banks, including Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Capital One, Discover and American Express.
 
In a related development, Rep. Spencer Bachus, Hensarling’s predecessor on the House Financial Services Committee, told the Examiner he believes CFPB violated at least two federal laws by using the impartial U.S. Trustee Program to gather bankruptcy data as part of the data-mining campaign.
 
The Examiner reported Monday that bankruptcy experts are concerned that CFPB is undermining the trustee program's independence and impartiality. The trustee program is the federal government’s main administrative agency for handling bankruptcy cases.
 
Bachus also told the Examiner after Wednesday’s hearing that a key House subcommittee is planning hearings on possible CFPB abuse of the bankruptcy trustee.
 
“The bankruptcy and anti-trust subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee is investigating this as we speak, and we anticipate a notice of a hearing on this in the near future,” Bachus said.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act, which established CFPB, bars the bureau from collecting personally identifiable financial information on consumers and prohibits it from regulating practicing attorneys.
 
Bachus said Cordray “exceeded his authority” and violated both provisions if he tried to use the trustee program to obtain files from a company that maintains a document archive for thousands of bankruptcy case attorneys.
 
“He [Cordray] basically said to me, ‘We needed to do this. This was something we thought we ought to do.’ He never said, ‘OK, it probably violates two provisions of the law,’ a very clear 'Do not do this,' ” Bachus said.
 
Bachus said CFPB may also have violated the Fourth Amendment, which entitles Americans to be free from government interference or intrusion in dealing with their legal representation.
 
“They are challenging through their actions, one of the most basic freedoms guaranteed by our forefathers and that is the right to counsel,” he said. “It’s just nuts.”
 
At Wednesday’s hearing, Cordray refused to answer questions from committee members about CFPB’s relationship with the trustee program.
 
“We don’t typically comment on the details of enforcement matters,” he said, though he acknowledged that the bureau is "working with a number of different agencies, including the Justice Department, to carry out our responsibilities and we will try to do that.” The trustee program is part of the Department of Justice.
 
The disclosures capped a day of often heated exchanges between Cordray and Republican members of the financial services committee. Nearly all of the panel’s Republicans attended the hearing, but only a handful of Democrats.
 
Democrats praised Cordray, whose appointment by President Obama was ruled improper by a federal court earlier this year because it was done while the Senate was in recess. He was finally confirmed in July after Obama agreed to resubmit the nomination following the court ruling.
 
Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., for example, commended Cordray for “how well" he had "worked with a lot of stakeholders and [his] careful leadership of this young agency.”
 
But the hearing was dominated by charges of an agency operating beyond its legal authority, rife with conflicts of interest, and mismanagement.
 
Hensarling opened the hearing by noting that CFPB “is designed to operate outside the usual system of checks and balances that applies to every other government agency.”
 
Rep. Patrick McHenry, a North Carolina Republican, questioned a $5 million contract that CFPB had awarded to a company co-founded by the head of the bureau's Office of Research. He called it a serious case of “conflicts of interest.”
 
But it was Duffy's confrontation with Cordray over the bureau's credit card data-mining case that caused the most fireworks.
 
“Why don’t you just level with us?” Duffy told Cordray after the CFPB leader repeatedly refused to say how many credit cards are being reviewed by his agency.
 
“We’ve been asking these questions over and over and over again. You come in and stonewall, you try to explain, but never do we get answer. Never does America get answers,” Duffy told Cordray.
 
When Duffy compared CFPB data-mining to the National Security Agency’s surveillance program, Cordray angrily replied that “there is no comparison between the NSA and the CFPB.”
 
“Oh, there is,” Duffy retorted.
 
Duffy was able to extract from Cordray the names of five major banks of 110 that issue credit cards.
 
Duffy said CFPB was trying to gain access to nearly 1 billion credit card users in 2013.
 
“The agency has never given us a number of how many Americans have been surveilled. However, we’ve seen in their disclosures they are collecting 80 percent of credit cards in America, 1.16 billion credit cards, which means that they are collecting information on just under a billion credit cards in America. That’s a scary number,” Duffy said.
 
The CFPB strategic plan shows that in 2012, the bureau was able to gain access to 77 percent of all credit cards and hoped to increase that to 80 percent in 2013. By 2014, the agency also hopes to monitor up to 95 percent of all mortgage transactions.

http://washingtonexaminer.com/cfpbs-data-mining-on-consumer-credit-cards-challenged-in-heated-house-hearing/article/2535726
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« Reply #79 on: September 28, 2013, 11:50:36 am »

N.S.A. Examines Social Networks of U.S. Citizens

Since 2010, the National Security Agency has been exploiting its huge collections of data to create sophisticated graphs of some Americans’ social connections that can identify their associates, their locations at certain times, their traveling companions and other personal information, according to newly disclosed documents and interviews with officials.

The spy agency began allowing the analysis of phone call and e-mail logs in November 2010 to examine Americans’ networks of associations for foreign intelligence purposes after N.S.A. officials lifted restrictions on the practice, according to documents provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor.

The policy shift was intended to help the agency “discover and track” connections between intelligence targets overseas and people in the United States, according to an N.S.A. memorandum from January 2011. The agency was authorized to conduct “large-scale graph analysis on very large sets of communications metadata without having to check foreignness” of every e-mail address, phone number or other identifier, the document said. Because of concerns about infringing on the privacy of American citizens, the computer analysis of such data had previously been permitted only for foreigners.

The agency can augment the communications data with material from public, commercial and other sources, including bank codes, insurance information, Facebook profiles, passenger manifests, voter registration rolls and GPS location information, as well as property records and unspecified tax data, according to the documents. They do not indicate any restrictions on the use of such “enrichment” data, and several former senior Obama administration officials said the agency drew on it for both Americans and foreigners.

N.S.A. officials declined to say how many Americans have been caught up in the effort, including people involved in no wrongdoing. The documents do not describe what has resulted from the scrutiny, which links phone numbers and e-mails in a “contact chain” tied directly or indirectly to a person or organization overseas that is of foreign intelligence interest.

The new disclosures add to the growing body of knowledge in recent months about the N.S.A.’s access to and use of private information concerning Americans, prompting lawmakers in Washington to call for reining in the agency and President Obama to order an examination of its surveillance policies. Almost everything about the agency’s operations is hidden, and the decision to revise the limits concerning Americans was made in secret, without review by the nation’s intelligence court or any public debate. As far back as 2006, a Justice Department memo warned of the potential for the “misuse” of such information without adequate safeguards.

An agency spokeswoman, asked about the analyses of Americans’ data, said, “All data queries must include a foreign intelligence justification, period.”

“All of N.S.A.’s work has a foreign intelligence purpose,” the spokeswoman added. “Our activities are centered on counterterrorism, counterproliferation and cybersecurity.”

The legal underpinning of the policy change, she said, was a 1979 Supreme Court ruling that Americans could have no expectation of privacy about what numbers they had called. Based on that ruling, the Justice Department and the Pentagon decided that it was permissible to create contact chains using Americans’ “metadata,” which includes the timing, location and other details of calls and e-mails, but not their content. The agency is not required to seek warrants for the analyses from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

N.S.A. officials declined to identify which phone and e-mail databases are used to create the social network diagrams, and the documents provided by Mr. Snowden do not specify them. The agency did say that the large database of Americans’ domestic phone call records, which was revealed by Mr. Snowden in June and caused bipartisan alarm in Washington, was excluded. (N.S.A. officials have previously acknowledged that the agency has done limited analysis in that database, collected under provisions of the Patriot Act, exclusively for people who might be linked to terrorism suspects.)

But the agency has multiple collection programs and databases, the former officials said, adding that the social networking analyses relied on both domestic and international metadata. They spoke only on the condition of anonymity because the information was classified.

rest 3 pages: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/29/us/nsa-examines-social-networks-of-us-citizens.html?ref=us&_r=1&
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« Reply #80 on: November 10, 2013, 05:07:36 am »

Las Vegas Installs “Intellistreets” Light Fixtures Capable Of Recording Conversations

The Las Vegas Public Works Department has begun testing a newly installed street light system around City Hall with wide-ranging capabilities including audio and video recording.

According to the Michigan based “Illuminating Concepts,” the system’s main benefits include “energy management, security and entertainment.” The Las Vegas setup includes such features as emergency notification flashers, playable music and a sound announcement system, all controlled from an Ipad.
 
“Actually, there’s a server that’s housed by the company that’s providing this product and we’re communicating with just a wireless, wi-fi connection,” Neil Rohleder of the Public Works Department told My News 3.
 
The company’s lights, which also offer a “Homeland Security” feature, received major backlash in 2011 following reports of the system’s federally-funded roll out across the country. The feature allows for emergency government announcements which will likely include such slogans as “See Something, Say Something” as well as other irrationally fear-based messages already seen in Wal Mart’s DHS-run “telescreens.”
 
Local privacy advocate Daphne Lee has begun speaking out against the system, pointing to the ever-increasing surveillance dragnet cast over everyday innocent Americans.
 
“This technology, you know is taking us to a place where, you know, you’ll essentially be monitored from the moment you leave your home till the moment you get home,” said Lee.
 
The Public Works Department claims they have no plans to use the system’s surveillance cameras… for now, leading many to believe the plan is already well underway as city-wide implementation is discussed.
 
“Right now our intention is not to have any cameras or recording devices…it’s just to provide output out there, not to get any feed or video feed coming back,” said Public Works Director, Jorge Servantes.
 
In light of the TrapWire system, a sophisticated program that uses advanced facial recognition software through regular CCTV surveillance cameras across the country, the likelihood of the city’s cameras being covertly used by the federal government, or with permission, remains a likely outcome.
 
Talking street lights have already been implemented in parts of Europe for a number of years. Apartment residents in North London were shocked to discover cameras ordering them to stay away from their communal garden, warning them that their photograph was being taken for entering a “restricted area.”
 
“At what point do we say this is the land of the free? People have a right to a reasonable amount of privacy,” Lee added.
 
As new NSA revelations widen the general public’s understanding of just how pervasive the surveillance state has become, the real question lies in whether or not the public will demand accountability as well as their privacy rights.
 
Originally appeared at Story Leak.

http://www.infowars.com/las-vegas-installs-intellistreets-light-fixtures-capable-of-recording-conversations/
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« Reply #81 on: November 10, 2013, 05:29:03 am »

Quote
includes such features as emergency notification flashers, playable music and a sound announcement system, all controlled from an Ipad.

Other features, being they can connect video cameras and microphones for recording. I really don't think the issue even gets that far. Seems the issue is in why is that city spending money on such a thing, or taking federal dollars for it? Unfortunately, the answer I think is it's government's attitude of late to "partner" with "private industry" on "projects" for the "community", so city councils look for things to spend money on, then award "contracts" to private contractors for various work projects, all in the name of "supporting the economy" through paying American small business for government needs.

The way the government handles it's budgets, it's not designed for saving. It's designed for spending. If there is still funds in the budget before the budget year is over, you spend it till there is nothing left before the year is out, that way next year's budget won't get cut by the amount you didn't spend the previous year. The result of that mentality can be seen at the many government surplus auctions held all over the country year round.
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« Reply #82 on: November 12, 2013, 12:27:51 pm »

DHS Funds Installation of White Boxes That Can Track Population of Entire City

Federal agency, police refuse to explain mesh network planned for “citywide deployment” in Seattle

Strange new off-white boxes popping up in downtown Seattle use wi-fi networks that can record the last 1,000 locations of a person using their cellphone’s MAC address, but the Department of Homeland Security – which funded the network to the tune of $2.7 million dollars – has refused to address the nightmare privacy implications of a system that could lead to the permanent tracking of an entire city’s population.

A report by The Stranger, a weekly Seattle newspaper, exposes how the boxes, which are attached to utility poles and include vertical antennae, can track cellphones even if they are not connected to the system’s wi-fi network.

Aruba – the company that provided the boxes to the Seattle Police Department – brags in its technical literature about how the boxes can keep track of “rogue” or “unassociated” devices, in other words your cellphone even if you have refused to let the system access your device’s wi-fi component.

    The user’s guide for one of Aruba’s recent software products states: “The wireless network has a wealth of information about unassociated and associated devices.” That software includes “a location engine that calculates associated and unassociated device location every 30 seconds by default… The last 1,000 historical locations are stored for each MAC address.”

When reporters Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley asked the Seattle Police Department and the Department of Homeland Security to explain what the boxes were for, the DHS refused to comment and Seattle Police detective Monty Moss would only state that the department “is not comfortable answering policy questions when we do not yet have a policy.”

    Detective Moss also added that the mesh network would not be used for “surveillance purposes… without City Council’s approval and the appropriate court authorization.” Note that he didn’t say the mesh network couldn’t be used for the surveillance functions we asked about, only that it wouldn’t—at least until certain people in power say it can. That’s the equivalent of a “trust us” and a handshake.

The justification for the mesh network is that it will allow police, firefighters and other first responders to communicate as well as stream surveillance video on a private uncluttered network during an emergency.

However, the system is, “adept at seeing all the devices that move through their coverage area and visually mapping the locations of those devices in real time for the system administrators’ convenience.” The SPD has also indicated that it plans “citywide deployment” of the network, opening the door for mass unfettered surveillance of Seattle’s 634,000 residents.

Seattle council member Bruce Harrell justified the mesh network being used for surveillance purposes by making reference to the Boston bombings. “While I understand that a lot of people have concerns about the government having access to this information, when we have large public gatherings like the situation like in Boston and something bad happens, the first thing we want to know is how are we using technology to capture that information,” Harrell told KIRO-TV.

“We are being told that such measures will help police “solve more crime”. We are being told that such measures will “keep people safe”. But what about our privacy? Doesn’t that count for something? What about the Fourth Amendment? Are our most cherished liberties and freedoms going to be thrown into the trash just because we live “in a more dangerous world”?” asks Michael Snyder.

As we have highlighted, this is just one of several examples of Big Brother spying apparatus being installed on the streets with barely a whimper of protest in comparison to the outrage that was prompted by the revelations of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Hi-tech street lights called Intellistreets that are linked via a ubiquitous wi-fi network and can record conversations are now popping up in major cities across the United States.

According to the company behind them, Intellistreets lighting systems can analyze voices, act as surveillance cameras and make loudspeaker security announcements. They also have the capability to track people who wear RFID tags. The fact that the lights are all linked back to a central data hub via a wi-fi network also mean they have the same capability to track people via their cellphone’s MAC address.

A separate network of sensors installed in at least 70 major U.S. cities called ShotSpotter, ostensibly designed to alert authorities to gunshot locations, also have the ability to record street conversations using microphones, according to a 2012 New York Times article. This led the ACLU to warn that the technology could represent a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment if misused.

As we detailed in a lengthy report yesterday, when these technologies are combined with the fact that virtually every new consumer item can be linked to the internet (and therefore tracked and wiretapped), this represents a surveillance grid that makes NSA wiretapping of phone calls and emails look antiquated in comparison.

video: http://www.infowars.com/dhs-funds-installation-of-white-boxes-that-can-track-population-of-entire-city/
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« Reply #83 on: November 12, 2013, 01:31:26 pm »

Quote
Aruba – the company that provided the boxes to the Seattle Police Department – brags in its technical literature about how the boxes can keep track of “rogue” or “unassociated” devices, in other words your cellphone even if you have refused to let the system access your device’s wi-fi component.

Not sure what they mean by "rogue" or "unassociated" devices, but I suspect they mean devices that are not linked to a specific owner, hacked/"throwaway" phones maybe.

Anyway, all cell phones must connect to a "tower" to work. The phones has to send out, or receive a signal from those towers, but they use a different network than WIFI, which is really a computer feature. WIFI is a localized means of devices communicating over shorter distances. You don't need a network for WIFI to work as it's just two devices interacting directly, a "smart" phone and a WIFI "hub", that is connected to a network router, or directly to an internet connection, but the phone is making a connection to a hub before it gets online.

When they say they even if refuse WIFI connections, it still works, so that tells me that the only way that it possible is by them intercepting your phones WIFI signal between the phone and a hub. I suspect the phone user can only block internet connections, but not "turn off"(a type of "firewall") your phones WIFI signal transmission, which I suspect transmits continuously. If that's the case, I can see how they do it.

The only solution is to either not have a smart phone, with WIFI or GPS, or carry the phones in a shielded case. You'll still be tracked each time you use it though, but they won't be able to track the phone when not in use like now.

While we have liberty to use this world, there is a limit to what is edifying or expedient.
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« Reply #84 on: November 22, 2013, 06:57:15 am »

Monday, November 25, 2013
THE 666 SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM, Part 1
http://srcwm.webcastcenter.com/src/src_112513.wma

Host: Noah Hutchings
Guest: John McTernan

The startling revelations of NSA spying on innocent Americans through their phones and computers in the name of "security" have shocked many in our country. But the NSA didn't stop with spying on Americans. This government agency has also been caught spying on the citizens and leaders of our friendly allies like Spain and Germany. Many wonder where it will all end. John McTernan believes 21st century technology will be used to expand the current government spy agencies to impose the surveillance system used by the Antichrist during the Tribulation period.

Bible in the News: TBA


Tuesday, November 26, 2013
THE 666 SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM, Part 2
http://srcwm.webcastcenter.com/src/src_112513.wma

Host: Noah Hutchings
Guest: John McTernan

The startling revelations of NSA spying on innocent Americans through their phones and computers in the name of "security" have shocked many in our country. But the NSA didn't stop with spying on Americans. This government agency has also been caught spying on the citizens and leaders of our friendly allies like Spain and Germany. Many wonder where it will all end. John McTernan believes 21st century technology will be used to expand the current government spy agencies to impose the surveillance system used by the Antichrist during the Tribulation period.

Bible in the News: TBA


Tuesday, November 26, 2013
THE 666 SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM, Part 2

 
Host: Noah Hutchings
Guest: John McTernan

The startling revelations of NSA spying on innocent Americans through their phones and computers in the name of "security" have shocked many in our country. But the NSA didn't stop with spying on Americans. This government agency has also been caught spying on the citizens and leaders of our friendly allies like Spain and Germany. Many wonder where it will all end. John McTernan believes 21st century technology will be used to expand the current government spy agencies to impose the surveillance system used by the Antichrist during the Tribulation period.

Bible in the News: TBA
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« Reply #85 on: November 22, 2013, 12:04:28 pm »

If people were to simply stop using anything with an internet connection, their digital system would collapse.

A dial-up land line doesn't seem so bad now, does it?  Wink
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« Reply #86 on: November 27, 2013, 08:07:43 am »

NSA Monitored P0rn Habits To Discredit ‘Radicalizers’
 
Latest revelations from Snowden leaks

 

The National Security Agency has been spying on online sexual activity – including visits to ****ography websites – as part of a proposed plan to discredit a handful of people the agency believes are “radicalizing” others, according to a new report.
 
The Huffington Post reports on the latest revelations from leaker and former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, which indicates the NSA has spied on six targets, all Muslims, whom the agency believes are radicalizing others through incendiary speeches. According to the latest leaked document, the NSA listed vulnerabilities that could be exploited to discredit the individuals, including “viewing sexually explicit material online” and “using sexually explicit persuasive language when communicating with inexperienced young girls.”
 
None of the six individuals identified in the document is accused of being involved in terrorist plots, and the agency believes that all reside outside of the U.S.
 
The NSA document cited in the report was dated Oct. 3, 2012. It is the latest in a series of leaked classified documents obtained by Snowden, a former NSA contractor, who has since fled the United States and is living under temporary asylum in Russia.


Read more: http://tinyurl.com/o9webga
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« Reply #87 on: November 29, 2013, 11:48:44 am »

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/11/marco-rubio-on-edward-snowden-a-traitor-who-sparked-conspiracy-theories/281755/
Marco Rubio on Edward Snowden: A 'Traitor' Who Sparked 'Conspiracy Theories'

The Florida Republican's dubious commentary on America's most famous whistleblower

11/22/13

This week in Washington, Senator Marco Rubio accused a fellow American of treason. Edward Snowden drew the Republican's ire by informing hundreds of millions of innocent people that the NSA is spying on them.

"We must respond to the valid concerns of Americans, who are alarmed by reports regarding their civil liberties," Rubio said in a speech at AEI.  "But we must also distinguish these reasonable concerns from conspiracy theories sparked by Edward Snowden. This man is a traitor who has sought assistance and refuge from some of the world's most notorious violators of liberty and human rights."

Anyone familiar with the Snowden story will understand why Rubio's comments are misleading. Americans are concerned about their civil liberties because of the accurate information the former Booz Allen Hamilton contractor leaked. He isn't responsible for any conspiracy theories, except in the sense that a conspiracy is "an agreement to perform together an illegal, wrongful, or subversive act," and he exposed NSA and GCHQ cooperation on such acts. Finally, Snowden didn't exactly choose Vladimir Putin's Russia. His plan was to pass through en route to a different country, but while he was there, the Obama Administration yanked his passport. As a result of that brilliant strategy, they stranded a man with lots of secrets in Russia rather than, say, Ecuador.

Here is the next thing Rubio said:

Quote
Our intelligence programs need to be carefully monitored and controlled. But we do need them, because terrorists don't use carrier pigeons to communicate. They use cell phones and the Internet, adapting the latest technologies to aid their malign intent. We need to be prepared to intercept the messages of those who mean us harm while not interfering in the affairs of ordinary citizens.

In what sense does collecting information on virtually all phone calls, hacking Google, mapping social networks, and tapping the Internet backbone not interfere with ordinary citizens? "Those of us tasked with providing oversight to these programs, starting with the president, need to be honest with the American people about the daily threats that we face," Rubio said. "We must explain why these programs, in a limited and carefully managed form, are necessary to protect the security of all Americans."

But Senators Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, who are much, much better informed about NSA surveillance, insist that "we have yet to see any evidence that the bulk phone records collection program has provided any otherwise unobtainable intelligence," and believe much of what the NSA does is not necessary to protect our security.

One can agree or disagree with Snowden's actions. But it is mighty strange to label as a traitor someone who acted to inform his countrymen and protect their liberties.
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« Reply #88 on: November 29, 2013, 12:29:37 pm »

Aside from details, I'd say Russian already knew most of what Snowden has leaked, especially about the US spying on other countries, etc. All the countries do it in some way. So I don't think the US was/is spying on people is any great leak of state secrets. There are other stories to these leaks that has people in Washington mad at Snowden, and no question what he hasn't released yet is more of a concern.

Traitor? Not by any definition.

Whistleblower? Most definitely.

And the author is correct, as has been presented. Snowden didn't appear to choose Russia. He basically had no choice, because the US did pull his passport, legally stranding him wherever he was at that time, which happened to be Russia. Did the US pull his passport at that time because he was in Russia, to make him look like he chose Russia? Maybe. It does seem like the US had choice as to when they made his passport invalid.

Edward Snowden is not a traitor to the United States. He's a victim like the rest of the public.
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« Reply #89 on: December 02, 2013, 05:54:32 am »

32 Privacy Destroying Technologies That Are Systematically Transforming America Into A Giant Prison

If you live in the United States, you live in a high tech surveillance grid that is becoming more oppressive with each passing day.  In America today, the control freaks that run things are completely obsessed with watching, tracking, monitoring and recording virtually everything that we do.  If we continue on the path that we are currently on, we will be heading into a future where there will be absolutely no privacy of any kind.  In fact, many would argue that we are essentially there already.  Many people speak of this as being the “Information Age“, but most Americans don’t really stop and think about what that really means.  Most of the information that is considered to be so “valuable” is actually about all of us.  Businesses want to know as much about all of us as possible so that they can sell us stuff.  Government officials want to know as much about all of us as possible so that they can make sure that we are not doing anything that they don’t like.  There is a constant hunger for even more information, and so the surveillance technologies just continue to become even more advanced and the Big Brother control grid being constructed all around us just continues to become even more pervasive.  Even though you may not be consciously aware of it, the truth is that it is surrounding you right now even as you read this.  We live in a society where liberty and freedom are literally being strangled to death, but most Americans don’t seem to care.
 
Do you know who else gets watched, tracked and monitored 24 hours a day?
 
Prisoners do.
 
Surveillance is a form of control, and at this point we are little more than inmates inside a gigantic Big Brother surveillance grid.
 
Posted below is a list of 32 privacy destroying technologies that are systematically transforming America into a giant prison.  Following each item, there is a short excerpt from a news report about that particular technology.  If you want to read the entire article where the excerpt came from, just click the link to find the source.  Individually, each of these technologies is deeply troubling.  But when you step back and take a look at them all collectively, it is absolutely horrifying…
 
#1 Spying On Us Through Our Televisions: Put simply, our TVs have started spying on us.
 
Last week, there was a high-profile case in point. An IT consultant called Jason Huntley, who lives in a village near Hull, uncovered evidence that a flat-screen television, which had been sitting in his living room since the summer, was secretly invading his family’s privacy.
 
He began investigating the £400 LG device after noticing that its home screen appeared to be showing him ‘targeted’ adverts — for cars, and Knorr stock cubes — based on programmes he’d just been watching.
 
Huntley decided to monitor information that the so-called smart TV — which connects to the internet — was sending and receiving. He did this by using his laptop effectively as a bridge between his television and the internet receiver, so the laptop was able to show all the data being sucked out of his set.
 
He soon discovered that details of not just every show he watched but every button he pressed on his remote control were being sent back to LG’s corporate headquarters in South Korea.
 
#2 Next Generation Facial Recognition Technology: In a single second, law enforcement agents can match a suspect against millions upon millions of profiles in vast detailed databases stored on the cloud. It’s all done using facial recognition, and in Southern California it’s already occurring.
 
Imagine the police taking a picture: any picture of a person, anywhere, and matching it on the spot in less than a second to a personalized profile, scanning millions upon millions of entries from within vast, intricate databases stored on the cloud.
 
#3 Your Next Password Might Be Your Eye: You can use your phone to figure out your heart rate, track how much you walk, and even measure your sex life. But the powerful sensors inside smartphones can do more than keep you updated on your health: They can also turn your body into a password.
 
EyeVerify is a small Kansas City–based security company. Its core product is biometric eyescan software for smartphones. Every person has a unique pattern of blood vessels in their eyes. These blood vessels contrast with the whites of the eyes so clearly that they can always be read, even when there’s a lack of light. The best part? Those blood-vessel patterns can be photographed by phones and turned into unique data signatures which can be used to replace or supplement traditional passwords. “We turn a picture of your eye into a key that protects your digital identity,” says EyeVerify CEO Toby Rush.
 
#4 “Pre-Crime” Surveillance Cameras: Hundreds of pre-crime surveillance cameras are to be installed in San Francisco’s subway system that will analyze “suspicious behavior” and alert guards to potential criminal or terrorist activity – before any crime has been committed.
 
“Manufacturers BRS Labs said it has installed the cameras at tourist attractions, government buildings and military bases in the U.S. In its latest project BRS Labs is to install its devices on the transport system in San Francisco, which includes buses, trams and subways,” reports the Daily Mail.
 
The cameras are programmed with a list of behaviors considered “normal”. Anything that deviates from usual activity is classified as suspicious and guards are immediately alerted via text message or a phone call.
 
Equipped with the ability to track up to 150 suspects at a time, the cameras build up a “memory” of suspicious behavior to determine what constitutes potential criminal activity.
 
A total of 288 cameras will be installed across 12 transport hubs.
 
#5 New Software That Will Store And Analyze Millions Of Our Voices: ‘Voice Grid Nation’ is a system that uses advanced algorithms to match identities to voices. Brought to the US by Russia’s Speech Technology Center, it claims to be capable of allowing police, federal agencies and other law enforcement personnel to build up a huge database containing up to several million voices.
 
When authorities intercept a call they’ve deemed ‘hinky’, the recording is entered into the VoiceGrid program, which (probably) buzzes and whirrs and spits out a match. In five seconds, the program can scan through 10,000 voices, and it only needs 3 seconds for speech analysis. All that, combined with 100 simultaneous searches and the storage capacity of 2 million samples, gives SpeechPro, as the company is known in the US, the right to claim a 90% success rate.
 
#6 A Device That Captures Your Fingerprints From 20 Feet Away: Gaining access to your gym or office building could soon be as simple as waving a hand at the front door. A Hunsville, Ala.-based company called IDair is developing a system that can scan and identify a fingerprint from nearly 20 feet away. Coupled with other biometrics, it could soon allow security systems to grant or deny access from a distance, without requiring users to stop and scan a fingerprint, swipe an ID card, or otherwise lose a moment dealing with technology.
 
Currently IDair’s primary customer is the military, but the startup wants to open up commercially to any business or enterprise that wants to put a layer of security between its facilities and the larger world. A gym chain is already beta testing the system (no more using your roommate’s gym ID to get in a free workout), and IDair’s founder says that at some point his technology could enable purchases to be made biometrically, using fingerprints and irises as unique identifiers rather than credit card numbers and data embedded in magnetic strips or RFID chips.
 
#7 Molecular Scanners That Can Secretly Scan You From 164 Feet Away: Within the next year or two, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will instantly know everything about your body, clothes, and luggage with a new laser-based molecular scanner fired from 164 feet (50 meters) away. From traces of drugs or gun powder on your clothes to what you had for breakfast to the adrenaline level in your body—agents will be able to get any information they want without even touching you.
 
And without you knowing it.
 
The technology is so incredibly effective that, in November 2011, its inventors were subcontracted by In-Q-Tel to work with the US Department of Homeland Security. In-Q-Tel is a company founded “in February 1999 by a group of private citizens at the request of the Director of the CIA and with the support of the U.S. Congress.” According to In-Q-Tel, they are the bridge between the Agency and new technology companies.
 
Their plan is to install this molecular-level scanning in airports and border crossings all across the United States.
 
#8 Mobile Backscatter Vans: American cops are set to join the US military in deploying American Science & Engineering’s Z Backscatter Vans, or mobile backscatter radiation x-rays. These are what TSA officials call “the amazing radioactive genital viewer,” now seen in airports around America, ionizing the private parts of children, the elderly, and you (yes you).
 
These pornoscannerwagons will look like regular anonymous vans, and will cruise America’s streets, indiscriminately peering through the cars (and clothes) of anyone in range of its mighty isotope-cannon. But don’t worry, it’s not a violation of privacy. As AS&E’s vice president of marketing Joe Reiss sez, “From a privacy standpoint, I’m hard-pressed to see what the concern or objection could be.”
 
#9 RFID Microchips In Our Schools: Upon arriving in the morning, according to the Associated Press, each student at the CCC-George Miller preschool will don a jersey with a stitched in RFID chip. As the kids go about the business of learning, sensors in the school will record their movements, collecting attendance for both classes and meals. Officials from the school have claimed they’re only recording information they’re required to provide while receiving  federal funds for their Headstart program.
 
#10 Palm Scanning Devices In Our Schools: Puyallup School District says by the end of the year, every lunchroom will have palm scanning devices that will allow students to pay for their lunch with a wave of a hand.
 
“Efficiency is another reason for implementing this. The accuracy of the scanner reduces human error, reduces fraud, the ability for students to share numbers allows parents to know the money that they’re spending is being spent on their child’s lunch,” said Brian Fox, spokesperson for Puyallup School District.
 
The district says the devices will be in all 32 schools by the end of the school year.
 
#11 Iris Scanning Devices In Our Schools: Kids lose their school IDs but they don’t often lose their eyeballs.
 
That’s one of the reasons why a growing number of schools are replacing traditional identification cards with iris scanners. By the fall, several schools — ranging from elementary schools to colleges — will be rolling out various iris scanning security methods.
 
#12 Implantable Medical Laboratory-On-A-Chip: French researchers are zeroing in on a tiny, chip-based medical laboratory test device designed to be implanted under the skin. This miniature blood laboratory may revolutionize healthcare by continuously monitoring high-risk, chronically ill patients.
 
This ground-breaking work is being done by developers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), or Swiss Institute of Technology, in Lausanne, Switzerland. The implantable lab-testing device is linked to the user’s cell phone and can send alerts to doctors before symptoms are evident.
 
#13 Smart Phone Eye Scanners: A patent application filed by Samsung seems to indicate that next-generation Galaxy smartphones might feature biometric authentication as an alternative to PINs or passwords.
 
Unlike arch-rival Apple’s Touch ID, however, the South Korean technology giant won’t be scanning users’ fingerprints. Instead, the patent – spotted by blog Patent Bolt – describes a novel iris scanning technique.
 
According to Samsung, the non-contact nature of eye scanning means handset owners “do not feel uncomfortable” with the technology, while at the same time the iris offers more unique patterns than the fingerprint does.
 
#14 Cell Phone Tower “Stingrays”: You make a call on your cellphone thinking the only thing standing between you and the recipient of your call is your carrier’s cellphone tower. In fact, that tower your phone is connecting to just might be a boobytrap set up by law enforcement to ensnare your phone signals and maybe even the content of your calls.
 
So-called stingrays are one of the new high-tech tools that authorities are using to track and identify you. The devices, about the size of a suitcase, spoof a legitimate cellphone tower in order to trick nearby cellphones and other wireless communication devices into connecting to the tower, as they would to a real cellphone tower.
 
The government maintains that the stingrays don’t violate Fourth Amendment rights, since Americans don’t have a legitimate expectation of privacy for data sent from their mobile phones and other wireless devices to a cell tower.
 
#15 Using Your Cell Phone Microphone As A “Roving Bug”: The FBI appears to have begun using a novel form of electronic surveillance in criminal investigations: remotely activating a mobile phone’s microphone and using it to eavesdrop on nearby conversations.
 
The technique is called a “roving bug,” and was approved by top U.S. Department of Justice officials for use against members of a New York organized crime family who were wary of conventional surveillance techniques such as tailing a suspect or wiretapping him.
 
#16 The Government Is Using Our Cell Phones To Track Our Movements: One of the biggest changes is the ability to track your physical location. I’m sorry I came in at the end of the previous talk. I heard them talk about surveying cell phones with a drone, in a wide area — this is something that is done routinely now. I can tell you that everybody that attended an Occupy Wall Street protest, and didn’t turn their cell phone off, or put it — and sometimes even if they did — the identity of that cell phone has been logged, and everybody who was at that demonstration, whether they were arrested, not arrested, whether their photos were ID’d, whether an informant pointed them out, it’s known they were there anyway. This is routine.
 
#17 Police Using “Extraction Devices” To Take Our Cell Phone Data: The Michigan State Police have a handful of portable machines called “extraction devices” that have the potential to download personal information from motorists they pull over, and the ACLU would like to know more about them.
 
The devices, sold by a company called Cellebrite, can download text messages, photos, video, and even GPS data from most brands of cell phones. The handheld machines have various interfaces to work with different models and can even bypass security passwords and access some information.
 
#18 Automated License Plate Readers: More than 250 cameras in the District and its suburbs scan license plates in real time, helping police pinpoint stolen cars and fleeing killers. But the program quietly has expanded beyond what anyone had imagined even a few years ago.
 
With virtually no public debate, police agencies have begun storing the information from the cameras, building databases that document the travels of millions of vehicles.
 
Nowhere is that more prevalent than in the District, which has more than one plate-reader per square mile, the highest concentration in the nation. Police in the Washington suburbs have dozens of them as well, and local agencies plan to add many more in coming months, creating a comprehensive dragnet that will include all the approaches into the District.
 
#19 Street Lights That Can Record Private Conversations: Federally-funded high-tech street lights now being installed in American cities are not only set to aid the DHS in making “security announcements” and acting as talking surveillance cameras, they are also capable of “recording conversations,” bringing the potential privacy threat posed by ‘Intellistreets’ to a whole new level.
 
#20 Spying On Us Through Our Video Game Systems: Users of the new Xbox One are complaining that Kinect is monitoring their Skype conversations for swearing and then punishing them with account bans. Microsoft has admitted it is punishing gamers for bad language but denied that it is snooping on private Skype chats.
 
#21 Data Mining: The company fits into a category called database marketing. It started in 1969 as an outfit called Demographics Inc., using phone books and other notably low-tech tools, as well as one computer, to amass information on voters and consumers for direct marketing. Almost 40 years later, Acxiom has detailed entries for more than 190 million people and 126 million households in the U.S., and about 500 million active consumers worldwide. More than 23,000 servers in Conway, just north of Little Rock, collect and analyze more than 50 trillion data ‘transactions’ a year.
 
#22 A New Technology Called “Coin” Is Being Called “The Future Of Money”: The future of money has arrived, and it’s called Coin.
 
It looks like a credit card. It’s the size of a credit card. It swipes in credit card machines. But it holds the information of up to eight of your debit, credit, rewards, or gift cards. And you can switch between cards by simply pressing a button.
 
The new product, launched recently, promises to change the way consumers spend money in a secure and efficient way.
 
#23 A National Database Of All Financial Transactions: The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is looking to create a “Google Earth” of every financial transaction of every American, Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) warned today in a Senate speech opposing confirmation of Richard Cordray as CFPB director.
 
“This bill (creating the CFPB) was supposed to be about regulating Wall Street. Instead, it’s creating a Google Earth on every financial transaction. That’s right: the government will be able to see every detail of your finances. Your permission – not needed,” Sen. Enzi said.
 
#24 The Coming National DNA Database: A national DNA database is coming.  Barack Obama has already said that he wants one.  A major Supreme Court decision last month paved the way for one.  The DNA of those that commit “serious crimes” is already being routinely collected all over the nation.  Some states (such as New Jersey) are now passing laws that will require DNA collection from those charged with committing “low level crimes”.  And a law that was passed under George W. Bush allows the federal government to screen the DNA of all newborn babies in the United States.  So how long will it be before we are all required to give DNA samples to the authorities?
 
#25 The Systematic Recording Of Talk Radio Programs: Next time you call a talk radio station, beware: The FBI may be listening.
 
According to WMAL.com, “The FBI has awarded a $524,927 contract to a Virginia company to record as much radio news and talk programming as it can find on the Internet. … The FBI says it is not playing Big Brother by policing the airwaves, but rather seeking access to what airs as potential evidence.”
 
#26 The FBI’s Next Generation Identification System: The US Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun rolling out its new $1 billion biometric Next Generation Identification (NGI) system. In essence, NGI is a nationwide database of mugshots, iris scans, DNA records, voice samples, and other biometrics, that will help the FBI identify and catch criminals — but it is how this biometric data is captured, through a nationwide network of cameras and photo databases, that is raising the eyebrows of privacy advocates.
 
Until now, the FBI relied on IAFIS, a national fingerprint database that has long been due an overhaul. Over the last few months, the FBI has been pilot testing a facial recognition system — and soon, detectives will also be able to search the system for other biometrics such as DNA records and iris scans.
 
#27 Trapwire: “You are being watched.  The government has a secret system – a machine – that spies on you every hour of every day.”  That is how each episode of “Person of Interest” on CBS begins.  Most Americans that have watched the show just assume that such a surveillance network is completely fictional and that the government would never watch us like that.  Sadly, most Americans are wrong.  Shocking new details have emerged this week which prove that a creepy nationwide network of spy cameras is being rolled out across the United States.  Reportedly, these new spy cameras are “more accurate than modern facial recognition technology”, and every few seconds they send back data from cities and major landmarks all over the United States to a centralized processing center where it is analyzed.  The authorities believe that the world has become such a dangerous place that the only way to keep us all safe is to watch what everyone does all the time.  But the truth is that instead of “saving America”, all of these repressive surveillance technologies are slowly killing our liberties and our freedoms.  America is being transformed into an Orwellian prison camp right in front of our eyes, and very few people are even objecting to it.
 
#28 Spyware That Monitors The Behavior Of Government Workers: When the Food and Drug Administration started spying on a group of agency scientists, it installed monitoring software on their laptop computers to capture their communications.
 
The software, sold by SpectorSoft of Vero Beach, Fla., could do more than vacuum up the scientists’ e-mails as they complained to lawmakers and others about medical devices they thought were dangerous. It could be programmed to intercept a tweet or Facebook post. It could snap screen shots of their computers. It could even track an employee’s keystrokes, retrieve files from hard drives or search for keywords.
 
#29 Political Campaign Databases: If you voted this election season, President Obama almost certainly has a file on you. His vast campaign database includes information on voters’ magazine subscriptions, car registrations, housing values and hunting licenses, along with scores estimating how likely they were to cast ballots for his reelection.
 
#30 Spying On Us Through Our Appliances: Spies will no longer have to plant bugs in your home – the rise of ‘connected’ gadgets controlled by apps will mean that people ‘bug’ their own homes, says CIA director David Petraeus.
 
The CIA claims it will be able to ‘read’ these devices via the internet – and perhaps even via radio waves from outside the home.
 
Everything from remote controls to clock radios can now be controlled via apps – and chip company ARM recently unveiled low-powered, cheaper chips which will be used in everything from fridges and ovens to doorbells.
 
The resultant chorus of ‘connected’ gadgets will be able to be read like a book – and even remote-controlled, according to CIA CIA Director David Petraeus, according to a recent report by Wired’s ‘Danger Room’ blog.
 
#31 Unmanned Aerial Drones: Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency is using aerial drones to spy on farmers in Nebraska and Iowa. The surveillance came under scrutiny last week when Nebraska’s congressional delegation sent a joint letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson.
 
On Friday, EPA officialdom in “Region 7” responded to the letter.
 
“Courts, including the Supreme Court, have found similar types of flights to be legal (for example to take aerial photographs of a chemical manufacturing facility) and EPA would use such flights in appropriate instances to protect people and the environment from violations of the Clean Water Act,” the agency said in response to the letter.
 
#32 NSA Snooping: Speaking to a raucous audience via Skype on Friday, Greenwald said the NSA’s “brand-new technology” gives it the power to “redirect into its own repositories one billion cell phone calls every single day.”
 
“But what we’re really talking about here is a globalized system that prevents any form of electronic communication from taking place without its being stored and monitored by the National Security Agency,” Greenwald said. “It doesn’t mean that they’re listening to every call; it means they’re storing every call and have the capability to listen to them at any time, and it does mean that they’re collecting millions upon millions upon millions of our phone and email records.”
 
Greenwald added that the NSA technology is “designed to destroy all privacy. And what’s incredibly menacing about it is that it’s all taking place in the dark with no accountability and virtually no safeguards.”
 
—–
 
Every single day, the NSA intercepts and permanently stores close to 2 billion emails and phone calls in addition to a whole host of other data.
 
So where does all of that data go?
 
Well, the NSA recently completely construction of the largest data center in the history of the world out in Utah.  It will reportedly have the capability of storing 5 zettabytes of data.  That is an amount of data that is almost incomprehensible.
 
This data center has approximately a million square feet of storage space, it cost nearly 2 billion dollars to build, and it is going to take about 40 million dollars a year just to pay for the energy needed to run it.
 
Without a doubt, we have become a surveillance society.
 
And if the American people don’t object now, this will just be the tip of the iceberg.
 
If we continue down this same path, what is coming will be far more horrifying than anything that George Orwell ever dreamed of.

http://thetruthwins.com/archives/32-privacy-destroying-technologies-that-are-systematically-transforming-america-into-a-giant-prison
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What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
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