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Electronic skin tattoo has medical, gaming, spy uses

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January 11, 2018, 06:31:04 am teppezuhodd says: That is the best technology we have now
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
September 11, 2017, 03:40:40 am Christian40 says: those in america should better repent or things will only get worse
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Author Topic: Electronic skin tattoo has medical, gaming, spy uses  (Read 3333 times)
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« on: August 11, 2011, 08:42:02 pm »

Electronic skin tattoo has medical, gaming, spy uses

A hair-thin electronic patch that adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo could transform medical sensing, computer gaming and even spy operations, according to a US study published Thursday.



The micro-electronics technology, called an epidermal electronic system (EES), was developed by an international team of researchers from the United States, China and Singapore, and is described in the journal Science.

"It's a technology that blurs the distinction between electronics and biology," said co-author John Rogers, a professor in materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

"Our goal was to develop an electronic technology that could integrate with the skin in a way that is mechanically and physiologically invisible to the user."

The patch could be used instead of bulky electrodes to monitor brain, heart and muscle tissue activity and when placed on the throat it allowed users to operate a voice-activated video game with better than 90 percent accuracy.

"This type of device might provide utility for those who suffer from certain diseases of the larynx," said Rogers. "It could also form the basis of a sub-vocal communication capability, suitable for covert or other uses."

The wireless device is nearly weightless and requires so little power it can fuel itself with miniature solar collectors or by picking up stray or transmitted electromagnetic radiation, the study said.

Less than 50-microns thick -- slightly thinner than a human hair -- the devices are able to adhere to the skin without glue or sticky material.

"Forces called van der Waals interactions dominate the adhesion at the molecular level, so the electronic tattoos adhere to the skin without any glues and stay in place for hours," said the study.

Northwestern University engineer Yonggang Huang said the patch was "as soft as the human skin."

Rogers and Huang have been working together on the technology for the past six years. They have already designed flexible electronics for hemispherical camera sensors and are now focused on adding battery power and other energy options.

The devices might find future uses in patients with sleep apnea, babies who need neonatal care and for making electronic bandages to help skin heal from wounds and burns.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.6e1e2ad90e2d94b12b6258b7e9c5b33d.611&show_article=1
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2011, 04:07:39 am »



“And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13: 16, 17
A hair-thin electronic patch that adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo could transform medical sensing, computer gaming and even spy operations, according to a US study published Thursday.

The micro-electronics technology, called an epidermal electronic system (EES), was developed by an international team of researchers from the United States, China and Singapore, and is described in the journal Science.
 ”It’s a technology that blurs the distinction between electronics and biology,” said co-author John Rogers, a professor in materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ”Our goal was to develop an electronic technology that could integrate with the skin in a way that is mechanically and physiologically invisible to the user.”
The patch could be used instead of bulky electrodes to monitor brain, heart and muscle tissue activity and when placed on the throat it allowed users to operate a voice-activated video game with better than 90 percent accuracy.
“This type of device might provide utility for those who suffer from certain diseases of the larynx,” said Rogers. “It could also form the basis of a sub-vocal communication capability, suitable for covert or other uses.”
The wireless device is nearly weightless and requires so little power it can fuel itself with miniature solar collectors or by picking up stray or transmitted electromagnetic radiation, the study said.
Less than 50-microns thick — slightly thinner than a human hair — the devices are able to adhere to the skin without glue or sticky material.

“Forces called van der Waals interactions dominate the adhesion at the molecular level, so the electronic tattoos adhere to the skin without any glues and stay in place for hours,” said the study.
Northwestern University engineer Yonggang Huang said the patch was “as soft as the human skin.”
Rogers and Huang have been working together on the technology for the past six years. They have already designed flexible electronics for hemispherical camera sensors and are now focused on adding battery power and other energy options. The devices might find future uses in patients with sleep apnea, babies who need neonatal care and for making electronic bandages to help skin heal from wounds and burns.

From:
http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/blog/?p=6035
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2011, 04:35:22 am »

(NaturalNews) Being microchipped is now being spun as a method of protecting the health of hospital patients. To help mask the practice of this bodily invasion with a trendy, high-tech appearance, microchipping sensors are being referred to as "electronic tattoos" that can attach to human skin and stretch and move without breaking.

Supposedly the comparisons of this hair-thin electronic patch-like chip to an electronic tattoo are being made because of how it adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo using only water.

The small chip is less than 50 micrometers thick, which is thinner in diameter than a human hair. It is being marketed as a "safe" and easy way to temporarily monitor the heart and brain in patients while replacing bulky medical equipment currently being used in hospitals.

This device uses micro-electronics technology called an epidermal electronic system (EES) and is said to be a development that will "transform" medical sensing technology, computer gaming and even spy operations, according to a study published last week.

The hair-thin chip was developed by an international team of researchers from the United States, China and Singapore and is described in the Journal of Science.

The proven link between animal microchipping and cancer

Pet microchips have become increasingly common over the past few years. These chips are marked with a small barcode that can be scanned just like the tags on grocery items.

This seems to suggest that microchips are meant to turn the wearer into an object that can be tracked and catalogued. Once inserted in an animal, the chip stays there for the entirety of its lifetime and can be used to identify the pet if it should be found on the street or turned into a shelter. The subdermal chips are often recommended by vets and animal care experts as a way to ensure lost pets find their way home again.

But research suggests that despite their proclaimed usefulness, pet microchips may cause cancer. Multiple studies have clearly linked pet microchips with increased incidence of cancer and tumors in mice and rats.

In the past, public disclosure of these suggested links between microchipping and cancer in animals stirred widespread concern over the safety of implantable microchips in living beings. The animal microchip study findings that created such an uproar were so persuasive that Dr. Robert Benezra, head of the Cancer Biology Genetics Program at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, was quoted in an article about microchipping as saying, "There's no way in the world, having read this information, that I would have one of those chips implanted in my skin, or in one of my family members."

A 2001 study found that 1% of rats with implanted microchips developed cancerous tumors near the chip location. At least a dozen animal studies have been done between 1990 and 2007 and most concluded that microchips significantly increased the risk of cancer at the microchip site.

Soon we'll all have "cool electronic tattoos!"

All the electronic parts of the new EES chip are built out of wavy, snake-like components which allow them to be stretched and squeezed. They also contain tiny solar cells which can generate power or get energy from electromagnetic radiation. The sensor is mounted on to a water-soluble sheet of plastic and attached to the body by brushing the surface with water - hence the comparison to a temporary tattoo.

This new device being implanted in hospital patients certainly looks and acts like a microchip - yet it is persistently being referred to as an "electronic tattoo" in order to make the concept appear harmless, friendly - even trendy!
Invasive microchips - is the cost worth the convenience?
Scientists claim the supposed advantage of the EES chips is their ability to cut back on the bevy of wires, gel-coated sticky pads and monitors that are currently relied on to keep track of the vital signs of hospital patients. Apparently these traditional forms of bulky equipment and monitors are overly "distressing" to patients.

It appears scientists believe these new microchips are convenient enough that they outweigh the potential risks.

In test trials, the microchip was purposefully attached to the throat of a human and used to detect differences in words such as up, down, left, right, go and stop. Researchers used these functions to control a simple computer game.

Is the convenience of not having to manually operate equipment great enough to justify the implantation of an electronic sensor beneath the skin of humans? Would you trust a microchip to monitor your bodily functions without causing health hazards in the process?

The future of America: microchipped zombies

Researchers believe the technology could be used to replace traditional wires and cables, but this sounds remarkably like an excuse used to cover up the real truth: that this new microchipping method is a way to ensure all of us are eventually microchipped and able to be tracked and monitored. Soon, everyone will be required to wear chips or "tattoos" that prove they got their vaccinations, to link to health records, credit history and social security records.

If the government can require Americans to carry microchipped documents including your work, financial and health records, it seems it is only a matter of time before these chips will be implanted for the sake of "convenience" or "security." According to them, all of this is being done "for our own good."

From:
http://www.naturalnews.com/033427_electronic_tattoos_microchipped.html
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2011, 07:57:59 am »

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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2011, 04:23:28 am »

Next evolution: Embedded chips for cyber connectivity
Government-funded research produces electronics you wear


Federally funded research at the University of Illinois has produced a microchip that can be put on skin like a temporary tattoo and is successful in linking the physical world and the cyberworld in stunning new ways, according to a university announcement.

"We think this could be an important conceptual advance in wearable electronics, to achieve something that is almost unnoticeable to the wearer," said university electrical and computer engineering professor Todd Coleman.

Coleman helped lead the multi-disciplinary team that worked on the project that is being touted for its uses in medical monitoring as well as treatment of disorders that require links to computers.

"The researchers found that, when applied to the skin of the throat, the sensors could distinguish muscle movement for simple speech," the university report said. "The researchers have even used the electronic patches to control a video game, demonstrating the potential for human-computer interfacing."

Coleman said the technology "can connect you to the physical world and the cyberworld in a very natural way that feels very comfortable."

The development recalls a recent WND report about the area of study called "transhumanism," a term often used synonymously with "human enhancement."

Basically, it's a sort of regenesis, altering human bodies – genetically, mechanically or both – to make them better than they've been for thousands of years, affording them Superman-style abilities in both brains and brawn.

Futurists describe it as being "posthuman," the next step in what they believe to be the evolutionary process.

According to the University of Illinois, "Skin-mounted electronics have many biomedical applications, including EEG and EMG sensors to monitor nerve and muscle activity. One major advantage of skin-like circuits is that they don't require conductive gel, tape, skin-penetrating pins or bulky wires, which can be uncomfortable for the user and limit coupling efficiency. They are much more comfortable and less cumbersome than traditional electrodes and give the wearers complete freedom of movement."

The report said the technology will allow a more accurate understanding of how the human brain functions.

"If we want to understand brain function in a natural environment, that's completely incompatible with EEG studies in a laboratory," said Coleman, who has since moved to the University of California at San Diego. "The best way to do this is to record neural signals in natural settings, with devices that are invisible to the user."

The report said the skin-mounted electronics also could be used for patients with neurological disorders, connecting them to computers.

The research was discussed in the Aug. 12 issue of the journal Science.

The new product is a circuit that bends, wrinkles and stretches with the skin, yet maintains the full functions of the sensors, LEDs, transistors, radio frequency capacitors, antennas and other components.

"We threw everything in our bag of tricks onto that platform, and then added a few other new ideas on top of those, to show that we could make it work," Rogers said in the university report.

The chips are applied in a method similar to affixing a temporary tattoo.

Rogers collaborated with Northwestern University engineering professor Yonggang Huang to develop what they call filamentary serpentine, in which circuits are made up of squiggled wires. The circuits are mounted on a flexible surface.

"The blurring of electronics and biology is really the key point here," Huang said in the report. "All established forms of electronics are hard, rigid. Biology is soft, elastic. It's two different worlds. This is a way to truly integrate them."

The scientists' next goals, they said, are to integrate various electronics into a system and add Wi-Fi capability.

"The vision is to exploit these concepts in systems that have self-contained, integrated functionality, perhaps ultimately working in a therapeutic fashion with closed feedback control based on integrated sensors, in a coordinated manner with the body itself," Rogers said.

Read more: Next evolution: Embedded chips for cyber connectivity http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=346993#ixzz1Z35kUfdV
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« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2011, 04:58:33 am »

Quote
The scientists' next goals, they said, are to integrate various electronics into a system and add Wi-Fi capability.

"The vision is to exploit these concepts in systems that have self-contained, integrated functionality, perhaps ultimately working in a therapeutic fashion with closed feedback control based on integrated sensors, in a coordinated manner with the body itself," Rogers said.

Wi-Fi? Well, I expect they would. I really think that their logic in electronic security is actually forcing designers of these products to keep "improving" the technology, which is to make it faster, smaller, cheaper, and safe. These devices may be smaller and faster, and no doubt cheaper, but are they safer? Technology-wise? Nope. Not when you introduce any connectability to the device, such as RFID/Wi-Fi. It in fact becomes less secure because it allows a much larger number of people that could theoretically access that device via the wireless connection. Geeks would be wardriving people instead of hotspots!

So from a technology perspective, you need to design a solution to the ability of others to access that device and it's data, because it is presumed that the person wearing the device is in fact the person that was issued the device to wear. But a patch can be taken off and put back on, so that's a security isssue they will be forced to deal with in the logical manner that technology security is based on.

They WILL ask "How can we prevent people from stealing other people's patches so we can trust that a patch is on the correct person, for identity purposes?" Their logic is pitched that one wouldn't want to give a person some medication that they shouldn't get and that could happen if a person has on a device that is not theirs.

I wouldn't be surprised if they use HIPPA laws as a reason for "increased security" on such devices. Toss in some banking laws as a reason to make them more "secure" for wireless bank transactions, and they then can make all kinds of pitches on how the patches aren't secure enough, but show the technology works, and as a result they have "a new and better "patch" that can't be stolen or tampered with, thus protecting the person's privacy from identity theft".

The "natural" progression of security is placing the device inside a person. In their mindset, it would be the logical resolution to a security threat.
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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2012, 10:43:06 am »

Breakthrough: Electronic circuits that are integrated with your skin

A team of engineers today announced a discovery that could change the world of electronics forever. Called an "epidermal electronic system" (EES), it's basically an electronic circuit mounted on your skin, designed to stretch, flex, and twist — and to take input from the movements of your body.

EES is a leap forward for wearable technologies, and has potential applications ranging from medical diagnostics to video game control and accelerated wound-healing. Engineers John Rogers and Todd Coleman, who worked on the discovery, tell io9 it's a huge step towards erasing the divide that separates machine and human.

Coleman and Rogers say they developed EES to forego the hard and rigid electronic "wafer" format of traditional electronics in favor of a softer, more dynamic platform.

To accomplish this, their team brought together scientists from several labs to develop "filamentary serpentine" (threadlike and squiggly) circuitry. When this circuitry is mounted on a thin, rubber substrate with elastic properties similar to skin, the result is a flexible patch that can bend and twist, or expand and contract, all without affecting electronic performance.

This video demonstrates the resilience of the EES patch, and how easily it can be applied. The patch (comprised of the circuitry and rubber substrate) is first mounted on a thin sheet of water-soluble plastic, then applied to the skin with water like a temporary tattoo.

How Will We Wear Our Second Skin?
So what can an EES really do for us? The short answer is: a lot. In the paper describing their new technology, published in this week's issue of Science, the researchers illustrated the adaptability of their concept by demonstrating functionality in a wide array of electronic components, including biometric sensors, LEDs, transistors, radio frequency capacitors, wireless antennas, and even conductive coils and solar cells for power.

We asked Rogers what he thought were the most promising applications for the new technology. He said medicine was the most compelling:

Our paper demonstrates our ability to monitor ECG (as a monitor of heart disease and metabolism), EMG (as a measure of, among other things, gait during walking) and EEG (as a measure of cognitive state and awareness).

We have also shown that these same devices can stimulate muscle tissue to induce contractions. When combined with sensing/monitoring, such modes of use could be valuable in physical rehabilitation. We also have interest in sleep monitoring (for sleep apnea), and neo-natal care (monitoring premature babies, in particular).

According to Rogers, the electronic skin has already been shown to monitor patients' health measurements as effectively as conventional state-of-the-art electrodes that require bulky pads, straps, and irritating adhesive gels. "The fidelity of the measurement is equal to the best existing technology that is out there today, but in a very unique skin-like form," he explained.

What's more, the electronic skin's unique properties allow it to do things that existing biometric sensors simply can't touch. Todd Coleman, who co-led the project with Rogers, told io9 how an EES could be applied to a person's throat to serve as a communication aid:

Within the realm of biomedical applications, one can imagine providing benefits to patients with muscular or neurological disorders like ALS. For example, in the Science article, our research group used the device…to control a computer strategy game with muscles in the throat by speaking the commands.

In principle, the same function could have been achieved by simply mouthing commands rather than speaking them out loud. As such, this capability could be provided to ALS patients so that they could "speak" through an epidermal electronics system that is un-noticeable to them, and invisible to other observers.

Eroding the Distinction Between Machine and Human
Outside the context of biomedicine, the EES's inconspicuous nature opens up a whole world of possibilities. The patches are already barely noticeable, but when mounted directly onto a temporary tattoo, for example, any evidence of electronic circuitry disappears. Coleman said:

[This technology] provides a huge conceptual advance in wedding the biological world to the cyber world in a manner that is very natural. In some sense, the boundary between the electronics world and the biological world is becoming increasingly amorphous. The ramifications of this are mind-blowing, to say the least.

I envision endless applications that extend beyond biomedical applications. For example, we could use the exact same technology – and specifically its discrete tattoo-like appearance – to perform covert military operations where an agent could communicate to the command station with these electric signals without ever speaking a word.

Coleman's statement touches on what is perhaps this most important thing about today's announcement, namely the precedent it sets for future technologies that aim to combine the organismal with the synthetic.

"The blurring of electronics and biology is really the key point here," said Northwestern University's Yonggang Huang, with whom Rogers and Coleman collaborated. "All established forms of electronics are hard, rigid. Biology is soft, elastic. It's two different worlds. This is a way to truly integrate them."

Looking to the future, Rogers echoes his colleague's sentiments. Describing what he envisions for his research group in the coming years, he said:

We would like to expand the functionality such that the devices not only seamlessly integrate with the human body in a mechanical sense, but that they also communicate and interact with the tissue in modes that go beyond electrons and photons (the ‘currency' of semiconductor device technologies), to the level of fluids and biomolecules (i.e. the ‘currency' of biology). We are hoping, in this way, to blur the distinction between electronics and the human body, in ways that can advance human health.

VIDS AND PICKS: http://io9.com/5830071/breakthrough-electronic-circuits-that-are-integrated-into-your-skin
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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2012, 08:24:45 pm »

This is interesting...maybe the RFID chip won't be the MOB after all...but was nothing more than a testing ground to get reaction from the masses and/or part of the Hegelian Dialect played out by the NWO.(ie-one "Law and Order: Special Victims Unit" episode had a plot where an abusive husband secretly implanted an RFID chip on his wife, and she went on to get cancer)

Yeah, the MOB could be something very subtle like in the OP.
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 05:11:43 am »

Is it just me or has tattooing become more popular in the last few years than ever before? Just stay clear of electronic skin tattoos and RFID chips and You will be okay.
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« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2012, 08:16:44 am »

Is it just me or has tattooing become more popular in the last few years than ever before? Just stay clear of electronic skin tattoos and RFID chips and You will be okay.

Yes, it seems like everywhere I go, at least someone(whether in line, or in the aisle, or passing by in the shopping mall, driving by, etc) has a tattoo. Back when I was a kid, I don't recall parents having tattoos. Now? Yeah, even with parents it seems to be the norm. But yeah, it seems like you see plenty of them every time you pass by people.

Also, is it just me, or is having a tattoo a form of idolatry?
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« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2012, 08:29:21 am »

This company has successfully put RFID in the ink itself. They say it’s only for “lab rats”.

Lev 19:28  Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you: I am the LORD.

Quote
RFID Tattoo: Somark of the Beast
Posted by Nic on Oct 27, 2008

ST. LOUIS, Mo., September 9, 2008 - SOMARK Innovations, Inc. has released a technology white paper' on its RFID ink tattoo platform technology. The paper outlines the technology's capabilities regarding features such as data density, detection range and available substrates. Additionally, the company is proud to name Greg Horowitt, Managing Director of T2 Venture Capital and Executive Director of Global CONNECT at University of California San Diego, to the SOMARK advisory board.

"To date, we have received more than two hundred and fifty customer inquiries and website hits from ninety-seven countries, said Mark C. Pydynowski, SOMARK President. "Considering interest regarding our technology's capabilities for applications ranging from animal identification to priceless art and wine bottles, we thought a comprehensive reference would be very useful.

The capabilities paper provides details on the system components such as the tattoo, applicator, readers and middleware. Additionally, it includes comprehensive substrate compatibility, tattoo size, data capacities, environmental compliance and a listing of the company's issued patents.

The white paper continues:

There are two ways SOMARK ink can be read. The first involves a handheld reader that only works when the surface of the reader is in direct contact with the tattoo. This method of reading is quick, easy and inexpensive. The second method of reading is more involved and expensive, but allows for remote reading of the tattoo similar to the way RFID tattoos are read through the use of a panel reader. This remote detection method is ideal for fixed-position automated reading of SOMARK tattoos and is more compatible with metal-laden environments than traditional RFID readers because of the fundamental differences in the way the readers work. Distances of up to 5' have been demonstrated in the lab for this type of reading using frequencies of 10GHz and above using a prototype panel reader. SOMARK ink is responsive to all frequencies and is not tuned to a specific frequency; however the frequency chosen does affect how much data can be stored in a tattoo. Both reading methods require some level of tattoo-to-reader orientation. Just like standard barcodes, the tattoo and reader are not required to be perfectly aligned, but the reader cannot decode the tattoo if it is looking at the edge of the tattoo; just like you can't read writing on a piece of paper if you can only see the edge of the paper and not the surface.

http://www.rap-con.com/signs/rfid-tattoo-somark-beast
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« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2012, 01:19:56 am »

Yes, it seems like everywhere I go, at least someone(whether in line, or in the aisle, or passing by in the shopping mall, driving by, etc) has a tattoo. Back when I was a kid, I don't recall parents having tattoos. Now? Yeah, even with parents it seems to be the norm. But yeah, it seems like you see plenty of them every time you pass by people.

Also, is it just me, or is having a tattoo a form of idolatry?

Well i think it is for some people, idolatry is a broad term which can include many things, i see tattooing as a form of defiance against God, God did not create us with tattoos, so to tattoo yourself is to poison oneself as well as make a statement that your own skin is not good enough, it needs to be "transformed" like new age people say.

Lev 19:28  Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you: I am the LORD.

If a Christian gets a tattoo they break this commandment by the LORD
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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2013, 01:05:34 pm »

Digital Tattoo Advocates Say The Mark Of The Beast Is Going To Be Way Cooler Than They First Imagined. It Will Function By Using Mind Control!

Call it “cerebral cord-cutting.” That’s essentially what Dr. Todd Coleman and fellow researchers at the University of California San Diego are up to, creating “electronic tattoos” capable of interfacing with your brain and wirelessly conveying your thoughts as commands to remote systems and devices. Using what he describes as an “ultrathin conformal” design, Coleman has been developing “foldable, stretchable electrode arrays” that can non-invasively pick up neural signals, EEG-style. Unlike a traditional EEG, which might involve a spaghetti-dinner’s worth of scalp-placed cabling and conductive gel, Coleman’s solution amounts to a tiny piece of pliable skin-like material less than the thickness of a human hair and houses “epidermal electronic” circuitry powered by solar cells or antennae, which also allow it to communicate wirelessly. That’s it up top, a stylin’ body mark that wouldn’t be out of place in a Neal Stephenson or William Gibson novel.

http://techland.time.com/2013/02/22/finally-tattoos-that-let-you-control-objects-with-your-mind/
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« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2013, 03:27:58 pm »

Well i think it is for some people, idolatry is a broad term which can include many things, i see tattooing as a form of defiance against God, God did not create us with tattoos, so to tattoo yourself is to poison oneself as well as make a statement that your own skin is not good enough, it needs to be "transformed" like new age people say.

Lev 19:28  Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you: I am the LORD.

If a Christian gets a tattoo they break this commandment by the LORD

We already broke ALL the commandments! That is the whole point of our Lord Jesus meeting the demands of the law for us.

We are no longer under the law, but under grace...

"For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace." Romans 6:14 (KJB)

If a Christian gets a tattoo, all that happens is they do something that isn't edifying or expedient, but it is not held against us as a sin. We are forgiven, thank you Jesus.

Saying a believer is sinning for "printing marks" is to put them back under the law, which Jesus freed us from.

"For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death." Romans 8:2 (KJB)

"All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but all things edify not." 1 Corinthians 10:23 (KJB)
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« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2013, 10:33:51 pm »

If a Christian gets a tattoo, all that happens is they do something that isn't edifying or expedient

Why are you defending tattooing? it is a non-Christian thing to do since Leviticus says this:

Lev 19:28 Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you: I am the LORD.

If a Christian gets a tattoo they break this commandment by the LORD that is the way it is.

A lot of Christians when confronted with Leviticus 19:28, scream, "Hey dude, that’s not for today. Man, that’s the Old Testament. I’m under the New Testament".

Did you know that "bestiality" (sicko, perverted, sex with an animal) was ONLY forbidden in the Old Testament Levitical Law? Only in Leviticus 18:23 and Leviticus 20:15-16. Dude, only in the Old Testament Law. Does that mean a Holy God NOW – under the New Testament, approves of bestiality?

By the way, have you ever read Leviticus 19:29? The verse immediately AFTER the "it’s not for me" Leviticus 19:28?

Leviticus 19:29 Do not prostitute thy daughter, to cause her to be a ****; lest the land fall to whoredom, and the land become full of wickedness.
 
This is the only place in the Bible that God directly forbids someone to prostitute their daughter. And since, it’s ONLY in the Old Testament Levitical Law (and "hey, dude, we’re NOT under the law") – it MUST be ok by the Lord for a parent to cause their daughter to prostitute.

Same line of reasoning as the "it’s ONLY in the Old Testament-tattoo-bearer-wearer". Same reasoning. . . Same disobedience. . .

There are many other "moral laws’ that are ONLY forbidden in the Old Testament, such as the human sacrifice of children. No where in the New Testament is this forbidden. Does that mean that NOW under the New Testament, God Almighty endorses throwing babies into the fire as a human sacrifice?

Leviticus 18:21 And thou shalt not let any of thy seed pass through the fire to Molech, neither shalt thou profane the name of thy God: I am the LORD. 

If you are truly born again the Holy Spirit of God dwells within in (John 14:17, Romans 8:9, 11) and your body is the temple of God. 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 makes this very clear.

1 Corinthians 6:19-20
19 What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?
20 For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's.

In 1 Corinthians 3, the Lord clearly and sternly warns against defiling your body – the temple of God. If any man defiles the temple of God – HIM SHALL GOD DESTROY!

1 Corinthians 3:16-17
16 Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?
17 If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.
   
If you are truly a Christian and still have doubts about whether the tattoo is the perfect will of God, go back through this article with an open Bible and an open hear. Prayerfully, look up the verses. And before you start, pray and ask the Holy Spirit to "guide you into all truth" (John 16:13).

2 Peter 3:17-18
17 Ye therefore, beloved, seeing ye know these things before, beware lest ye also, being led away with the error of the wicked, fall from your own stedfastness.
18 But grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and for ever. Amen.
 
Friend, God loves you and desires more than anything you love and obey Him. He desires first of all obedience unto salvation by receiving the Lord Jesus Christ (John 1:12). And after salvation, His will for you is to serve and love Him with all you heart, body, mind and soul.

You won’t regret it!

http://www.psalm118.org/bible.html

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« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2013, 03:12:09 am »

Quote
Why are you defending tattooing? it is a non-Christian thing to do since Leviticus says this:

Lev 19:28 Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you: I am the LORD.

If a Christian gets a tattoo they break this commandment by the LORD that is the way it is.

Okay, we have a problem, a big problem!

First, I'm not defending tattoos. If you had asked, or rathter understood scripture, you'd know I do not support tattoos. I have none myself, nor do I have any piercings, just in case you got that part wrong too.

You have been swayed by churchianity false doctrines, and it's now showing.

Of course tattoos were against the Levitical law. But for you to say they aren't under the New Testament? What kind of argument is that? Oh, that's right, it's not even your argument. It comes from that website you posted the link to. In fact, your argument IS from that site!

Tattooing is not approved of in the New Testament either. While we are no longer under the law, we still have the Spirit in us, which is the law, and thus we are compelled and exhorted to keep the commandments, but our flesh does not allow us to be perfect in not breaking the commandments, but that's okay because Jesus forgave us of our sins. We who are free, are free from the law of sin and death.

So, are you saying we are still required to meet the demands of the law, and if so, how might we do that? By trying to not sin? By not breaking the commandments? Are you perfect? No, you are "perfected in Christ", but there is no way on this earth that ANY man can keep the law. The ONLY way is by Jesus Christ, who for gave us and no longer holds us to the letter of the law like men try to do, and how you are trying to do now.

What you are saying is putting men back under the law by telling people it's a sin. Yes, technically it is under the law, but that sin is not held against us if we in fact do break it. Tribulation and chastisement, sure, for being less than edifying with our actions, but we DO NOT risk salvation just because a person has a moment of vain fleshly desires and marks his flesh.

I can't believe we are having this discussion! Now I'm seriously questioning your stance. Are you who you say you are?

Seriously, if you don't understand this concept, we may need to rethink things here.

4  Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace.
5  For we through the Spirit wait for the hope of righteousness by faith.
6  For in Jesus Christ neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision; but faith which worketh by love.
Galatians 5:4-6 (KJB)
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« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2013, 09:29:43 pm »

Quote
we DO NOT risk salvation just because a person has a moment of vain fleshly desires and marks his flesh.

i know that, but it is still wrong for a Christian to get a tattoo, it is not a salvation issue for a Christian, it is a sin issue, a Christian getting a tattoo will bring chastisement and punishment upon himself.

Romans 6:1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

Romans 6:12 Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof.

Romans 6:15 What then? shall we sin, because we are not under the law, but under grace? God forbid.

Romans 6:23 For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
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« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2013, 05:41:40 am »

While by the law it is a sin, it's not counted towards a believer as sin, as we are not under the law. It is under the law of grace as not expedient or edifying. As I agreed, it is not something a person should do, of course.

If it was as simple as not sinning, then Jesus would not have had Paul write about the war between the flesh and Spirit in Romans 7...

20  Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
21  I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.
22  For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
23  But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24  O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?
25  I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.
Romans 7:20-25 (KJB)


The whole point of Jesus is that we cannot stop sinning, thus worthy of death, because of the fleshly body. And that is why we must become a "new creature". "All things are become new".

So for a believer, the moral of the story is simply if you don't want tribulation, it's better to not make markings or printings in your flesh. By not having them you avoid a bunch of questions and hassles you wouldn't have if didn't have them.

"All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any." 1 Corinthians 6:12 (KJB)

"For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only [use] not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another." Galatians 5:13 (KJB)
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« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2013, 10:26:35 am »

Heb 12:5  And ye have forgotten the exhortation which speaketh unto you as unto children, My son, despise not thou the chastening of the Lord, nor faint when thou art rebuked of him:
Heb 12:6  For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth.
Heb 12:7  If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not?
Heb 12:8  But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons.
Heb 12:9  Furthermore we have had fathers of our flesh which corrected us, and we gave them reverence: shall we not much rather be in subjection unto the Father of spirits, and live?
Heb 12:10  For they verily for a few days chastened us after their own pleasure; but he for our profit, that we might be partakers of his holiness.
Heb 12:11  Now no chastening for the present seemeth to be joyous, but grievous: nevertheless afterward it yieldeth the peaceable fruit of righteousness unto them which are exercised thereby.


Thank you Jesus!
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« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2013, 10:32:11 am »

Anyhow, back to the OP discussion - I'm not saing this is "amazing" or anything, but isn't it a big marvel nonetheless over how our modern-day technology has really exploded in DEPTH like this?

Back in 1984 when I was a young boy, I thought those EXTREMELY SIMPLY Commodore 64 PCs were a BIG DEAL. And if memory serves, very simple blank PC screens and Atari video games were THE technology trend of the 80's.

Now fast-forward to our present day, there is just so many of this stuff that boggles the mind.

Dan_12:4  But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.

Rev_22:10  And he saith unto me, Seal not the sayings of the prophecy of this book: for the time is at hand.
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« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2013, 04:13:38 am »

Hey BA, I hear ya. I grew up with electronics. Went to electronics school when I was 18, fresh out of high school, in 1981 when I went into the Navy. Repairing computers and such back then was nothing like today. Back then, there were no home computers. No desktops, laptops, nothing. It was all main frames back then. And video games? Just what was at the video arcades, and Commodore just released the VIC-20, and Sega is test marketing the SG-1000 home console in Japan. Donkey Kong is released in 1981, along with Silas Warner's Castle Wolfenstein, the classic FPS game, one of the original shooter games.
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« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2013, 04:17:21 am »

Scannable 666 Tattoos Coming Soon

FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin? The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10. The development takes wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor that could be used to measure hydration, activity, and even infant temperature. It bonds to the skin, somewhat like a temporary tattoo, flexing and bending in sync with your skin the way you wish a Band-Aid would. How? Researchers at the University of Illinois, Dalian University of Technology in China, and the University of California at San Diego made it really, really small.

http://www.wired.com/design/2013/02/skin-printed-electrodes

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« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2013, 05:22:56 am »

The hi-tech tattoo that could replace ALL your passwords: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to identify us

The Moto X is expected to launch later this year and will be 'more contextually aware than other phones'
The Biostamp electronic tattoo is made of silicon and contains an electrical circuit, antennae and sensors that bend and move with the wearer's body
Proteus Digital Health's 'vitamin authentication pill' is powered by acid in the wearer's stomach and creates an 18-bit signal picked up by mobile phone
Motorola is trialling the technologies as authentication alternatives to non-secure traditional passwords


Motorola has announced it is looking at alternatives to traditional passwords in a bid to make logging into online sites, or accessing mobile phones, more secure.

Among the ideas discussed at the D11 conference in California on Wednesday were electronic tattoos and authentication pills that people swallow.

The tattoos, developed by Massachusetts-based engineering firm MC10, contain flexible electronic circuits that are attached to the wearer's skin using a rubber stamp.

HOW DOES THE MC10 ELECTRONIC TATTOO WORK?

A researcher at the University of Illinois used standard CMOS semiconductor computer chip technologies to create the Biostamp.

It uses high-performance silicon and can stretch up to 200 per cent.

The Biostamp can monitor temperature, hydration and strain, among other medical statistics

The first prototypes were stuck on using an plaster-style patches.

More recent prototypes are applied directly to the skin using a rubber stamp.

It can then be covered with spray-on bandage to make it more durable and waterproof enough to wash.

The MC10 Biostamp is said to last up to two weeks before it starts to come loose.

MC10 originally designed the tattoos, called Biostamps, to help medical teams measure the health of their patients either remotely, or without the need for large expensive machinery.

Motorola claims that the circuits, which also contain antennae and built-in sensors, could be adapted to work with mobile phones and tablets.

The mobile devices could then be used to confirm the owner's identity and log them in to accounts automatically.

This would prevent thieves and other people from being able to access a phone, or individual apps on the device, if it is stolen or lost.

Another idea presented during the keynote talk at the Wall Street Journal conference with head of Motorola Dennis Woodside and senior vice president for advanced technology and products, Regina Dugan, was a swallowable pill.

The Proteus Digital Health pill has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration and was given European regulatory approval in 2010.

HOW DOES THE PROTEUS DIGITAL HEALTH PILL WORK?

The Proteus Digital Health pill contains a computer chip and a switch.

Once swallowed, the acid in the wearer's  stomach causes electrolytes to turn the switch on and off.

This creates an 18-bit ECG-like signal that can be picked up by mobile devices and authentication hardware to verify the wearer is the correct owner of the device or account.

It can also monitor heart rate.

The pill was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration in 2012 after getting European regulatory approval in 2010.

Motorola's Regina Dugan called it the 'vitamin authentication pill' and said the pills can be taken every day for 30 days, if necessary, without any problems. 

It contains a computer chip that can be powered like a battery using the acid in the wearer's stomach.

Once swallowed the 'vitamin authentication pill' creates an 18-bit ECG-like signal inside the wearer's body that can be picked up by mobile devices and authentication hardware outside.

This could be used verify the wearer is the correct owner of the device or account.

Dugan continued that the pill could be taken every day for 30 days, if necessary, without any problems.

Woodside added Motorola would not be shipping these 'right away' but they have 'tested it authenticating a phone, and it works.'

He continued: 'Having the boldness to think differently about problems that everybody has every day is really important for Motorola now.'

Dugan, who used to be head of the US Pentagon's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency, explained that each signal emitted by the pill could be unique to each user.

Both these ideas move away from traditional passwords and towards technology that turns the user into a physical authentication token.

Explaining the reasons behind the plans, Dugan said: 'Authentication is irritating. In fact its so irritating only about half the people do it.

'Despite the fact there is a lot of information about you on your smartphone, which makes you far more prone to identity theft.

'After 40 years of advances in computation, we're still authenticating the same way we did years ago - passwords.

SSWORDS ARE NO LONGER SECURE

A team of hackers, commissioned by technology website Ars Technica, recently managed to crack more than 14,800 supposedly random passwords - from a list of 16,449  - as part of a hacking experiment.

The success rate for each hacker ranged from 62 per cent to 90 per cent, and the hacker who cracked 90 per cent of hashed passwords did so in less than an hour using a computer cluster.

The hackers also managed to crack 16-character passwords including 'qeadzcwrsfxv1331'.

Earlier this month PayPal's chief security officer, Michael Barrett said he wants to see a mixture of online passwords with hardware-based identification such as finger print scanning becoming more common.

Talking at the IT conference Interop in Las Vegas at the start of May, Barrett said: 'Passwords, when used ubiquitously everywhere at Internet-scale are starting to fail us.

'Users pick poor passwords and then they'll reuse them everywhere.

'That has the effect of reducing the security of their most secure account to the security of the least secure place they visit on the internet.'

'In fact it's worse, the average users does it 39 times a day and it takes them 2.3 seconds every time they do it.

'Power users will do it up to 100 times a day.

'So what are we doing about it? Well [Motorola] is thinking of a whole variety of options for how to do better at authentication such as near-term things including tokens or fobs that have NFC or bluetooth.

'But you can also think about a means of authentication you can wear on your skin every day, say an electronic tattoo or a vitamin pill'.

During the talk, Woodside also unveiled Motorola's plans to launch a new handset.

Motorola was bought by Google 2011, which owns the Android operating system.

The new phone, called the Moto X, will be built  in Texas and Woodside said he was 'pretty confident in the products we're going to be shipping in the fall'.

Woodside added that the Moto X would benefit from Motorola's expertise in managing ultra-low power sensors -- such as in accelerometers and gyroscopes -- that can sense usage contexts and turn off certain components when not required, to save power.

He added that it will interact in different ways to other handsets and said the camera would 'fire up in a way not seen before' calling the handset 'more contextually aware' than other phones.

Motorola's engineers have also come up with processors that will help save power, but didn't elaborate further.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2333203/Moto-X-Motorola-reveals-plans-ink-pills-replace-ALL-passwords.html?printingPage=true
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« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2013, 04:29:33 am »

Quote
'Users pick poor passwords and then they'll reuse them everywhere.

Then that is the fault of the user! It's none of their business what users do with their passwords.

But, that is the base mentality being pushed, to make people be the way certain people insist they ought to be. And those same people will find that their security efforts will fall short and they will then go back and design another "more secure" method, ultimately leading to a method that people will be mandated to use.
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« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2013, 08:26:11 am »

Will Electronic Tattoos Replace Internet Passwords And All Other Forms Of Identification?

Would you wear an electronic tattoo if you couldn’t log on to the Internet without one?  That may sound crazy to many of you, but the technology for such a system already exists.  RFID tattoos have existed for quite some time, and they are already being used on animals.  But now an entirely new generation of electronic tattoos are being developed that can monitor your vital signs, interact with your mobile phone and even communicate directly with your mind.  These new electronic tattoos are thinner than a human hair, and they are going to fundamentally transform the way that we think about human identification.  Right now, the Internet is being absolutely plagued by hackers and identity theft has become a multi-billion dollar enterprise.  It is becoming increasingly difficult to determine if someone is actually who they say that they are.  And as even more of our commerce gets conducted through the Internet, identity security is going to be absolutely critical.  Without a doubt, there will continue to be a push for more secure forms of identification than we have today.  But there is also a very dark side to this kind of technology.  What if someday a tyrannical government decides to make a permanent electronic tattoo for identification purposes mandatory for all citizens?  What if you are not able to buy, sell, get a job, have a bank account or log on to the Internet without “proper identification”?  What if the price for receiving your tattoo is to swear absolute allegiance to that tyrannical government?  The truth is that technology is always a double-edged sword.  It always brings with it the promise of progress, but it also always has a dark side that could potentially be abused.
 
The latest generation of electronic tattoos is quite remarkable.  They are called “Biostamps”, and they were originally developed for medical purposes.  However, as a recent Daily Mail article detailed, Motorola believes that these Biostamps could potentially replace passwords and make the Internet a much more secure place…
 
MC10 originally designed the tattoos, called Biostamps, to help medical teams measure the health of their patients either remotely, or without the need for large expensive machinery.
 
Motorola claims that the circuits, which also contain antennae and built-in sensors, could be adapted to work with mobile phones and tablets.
 
The mobile devices could then be used to confirm the owner’s identity and log them in to accounts automatically.
 
This would prevent thieves and other people from being able to access a phone, or individual apps on the device, if it is stolen or lost.
 
These Biostamps are extremely, extremely thin.  As I mentioned above, they are actually thinner than a human hair.  The following description of Biostamps was taken from a Wired Magazine article…
 
The development takes wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor that could be used to measure hydration, activity, and even infant temperature. It bonds to the skin, somewhat like a temporary tattoo, flexing and bending in sync with your skin the way you wish a Band-Aid would. How? Researchers at the University of Illinois, Dalian University of Technology in China, and the University of California at San Diego made it really, really small.
 
With a thickness of 0.8 micrometers at the widest — around one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair — the thin mesh of silicon actually nestles in to the grooves and creases in your skin, even the ones too small to see. Being small helps, but it’s also important that the silicon is laid out in a serpentine pattern and bonded to a soft rubber substrate, allowing the stiff material to flex, a little bit like an accordion.
 
But why would such technology be needed on the Internet?
 
After all, don’t our passwords work just fine?
 
Actually, we are rapidly getting to the point where passwords are a joke.  Hackers are becoming so sophisticated that they can crack even very long passwords with ease…
 

A team of hackers, commissioned by technology website Ars Technica, recently managed to crack more than 14,800 supposedly random passwords – from a list of 16,449 – as part of a hacking experiment.
 
The success rate for each hacker ranged from 62 percent to 90 percent, and the hacker who cracked 90 percent of hashed passwords did so in less than an hour using a computer cluster.
 
The hackers also managed to crack 16-character passwords including ‘qeadzcwrsfxv1331′.
 
Were you alarmed when you read that?
 
I know that I was.
 
Obviously we need a better system.
 
But personally I never plan to wear an electronic tattoo.  That crosses the line in a big way.
 
Unfortunately, this kind of technology is going to be heavily pushed in the years ahead.  According to Wired magazine, even the U.S. military is devoting resources to developing electronic tattoo technology…
 
In its ongoing quest to measure every aspect of U.S. troops’ physiology, Pentagon researchers are looking to develop a durable, unobtrusive device that can track the body’s physical response to stress. Military scientists believe that using the device — preferably a tattoo — to track heart-rate, temperature or bio-electric response during various training situations will help them crack the code of combat fatigue.
 
Another significant trend is the development of electronic devices that we can control directly with our minds.  In the past, such technology was the stuff of science fiction novels, but now even the New York Times is writing about it…
 

Soon, we might interact with our smartphones and computers simply by using our minds. In a couple of years, we could be turning on the lights at home just by thinking about it, or sending an e-mail from our smartphone without even pulling the device from our pocket. Farther into the future, your robot assistant will appear by your side with a glass of lemonade simply because it knows you are thirsty.
 
Researchers in Samsung’s Emerging Technology Lab are testing tablets that can be controlled by your brain, using a cap that resembles a ski hat studded with monitoring electrodes, the MIT Technology Review, the science and technology journal of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, reported this month.
 
The technology, often called a brain computer interface, was conceived to enable people with paralysis and other disabilities to interact with computers or control robotic arms, all by simply thinking about such actions. Before long, these technologies could well be in consumer electronics, too.
 
So what if you could combine the two trends discussed above?
 
What if an electronic tattoo would allow you to operate your tablet computer, send an email, fly a drone or even “speak” telepathically using only your mind?
 
Actually, researchers are already working on such technologies.  The following comes from a recent article by Charles Q. Choi…
 

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.
 
His team is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.
 
“We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun,” Coleman says.
 
The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.
 
The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.
 
You can read that rest of that article right here.  Some of the things that our scientists are working on right now are absolutely mind blowing.
 
We live at a time when technology is advancing at an exponential rate.  Sometimes I have a very hard time believing some of the technological advances that I am writing about.  The world is going to look very, very different ten years from now.
 
But will the changes be for the better?
 
Technology is advancing at a faster pace than we have ever seen before, but at the same time the world is becoming an increasingly unstable place.
 
Could technology that enables us to interact with our environment using our minds actually be turned around and used to control our minds by a future tyrannical government?
 
Could technology that helps us identify one another on the Internet someday be used to brand us all like cattle and force all of humanity into a dark system of control and enslavement?
 
Don’t think that such a dystopian society can never exist in our modern world.  Freedoms and liberties are being taken away from people all over the globe right now even though things are still relatively stable.
 
So what is going to happen when the world goes crazy someday and the planet is absolutely ravaged by economic collapse, pandemics, crime, rioting, natural disasters and war?
 
That is something to think about.

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/will-electronic-tattoos-replace-internet-passwords-and-all-other-forms-of-identification
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« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2013, 11:28:10 am »

2Cor 10:4  (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds;)
2Co 10:5  Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ;
2Co 10:6  And having in a readiness to revenge all disobedience, when your obedience is fulfilled.

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« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2014, 07:03:16 am »

The Freaky, Bioelectric Future of Tattoos

America loves tattoos. From tribal designs to tramp stamps, this country can't get enough ink. Last month, a Pew study showed that tattoos grace the bodies of nearly 40 percent of Americans under 40, a massive number of customers in a $1.65 billion industry. Like any industry, however, the tattoo industry must innovate.

But what on Earth does tattoo innovation look like? What are we going to do next? Make them light up, or monitor our health, or turn into computers? What is the future of tattoos?

Everyone from neurologists to biohackers is reinventing the very idea of the tattoo. With the right technology, tattoos can do a lot more than just look beautiful or badass. They can become digital devices as useful and complex as the smartphone that bounces around in your pocket. It sounds wildly futuristic, but the technology already exists.
History

Before wading too deep into the future of tattoos, it's useful to understand where the custom comes from—and it sort of comes from everywhere. Ancient cultures, from Africa to the British Isles to the South Pacific, practiced some form of tattooing, often for ceremonial purposes. Even cavemen did it.

The Freaky, Bioelectric Future of Tattoos

One of the earliest known examples of tattooing was found on Ötzi, a Neolithic man mummified in the Swiss Alps and uncovered in 1991. Ötzi's well preserved skin shows signs of tattooing in several places, including dots on his back, knee, and ankle, locations that suggests they were given as a form of healing, a more artistic form of acupuncture. Ancient Egyptians also used tattoos as a form of medicine, but the body art took on a more cultural role elsewhere.

Tattoos took on a new meaning when the British began exploring the world. The name "tattoo" can actually be traced back to a series of journeys through the Pacific that Captain James Cook made in the late 18th century. There, his sailors learned of the Tahitian art of tatau, a ritual involving ink and needle, and many returned to England with their own tattoos. Over the years, tattoos became associated with sailors, who reintroduced the art to Europe and, eventually, to the United States.
High Tech Ink

Modern tattooing has evolved beyond the crude methods of the British Navy—but not by much. In 1891, New York tattooist Samuel O'Reilly patented the modern two-coil electromagnetic tattoo needle, borrowing the design from Thomas Edison's electric pen. The basic concept behind the device is still what powers tattoo machines today. What's improved dramatically, however, is the ink that goes along with it.

Traditionally, tattoo ink was made of anything from soot to metal salts. As health concerns cropped up around the use of potentially toxic substances as a pigment, natural vegetable-based organic pigments have come into fashion. That doesn't mean that chemicals are out of the picture. It's possible, for instance, to use ferromagnetic ink in tattoos, ink that responds to electromagnetic fields. A couple years ago, Nokia patented a technology that would enable the ink in a tattoo to interact with a device through magnetism. With this technology, your phone could ring and you could literally feel it through your tattoo.

Then there are the more visual innovations. The 90s rave scene helped spawn an ongoing trend of using ultraviolet and glow-in-the-dark ink for tattoos, for example. Often invisible in the daytime, these designs light up under blacklights in the club. Think of them as Tron tats. It's worth noting, however, that the health risks of these radioactive-looking tattoos remain unclear.

The Freaky, Bioelectric Future of TattoosExpand

The other major innovation in tattoo ink relates to permanence. You see, sometimes people get permanent tattoos—then later regret them and want them removed.

While it's possible to remove permanent tattoos, the process is painful and leaves scars. Or at least it did before scientists from Harvard, Brown, and Duke teamed up to create Freedom-2 ink, a removable ink that stored the dye in microscopic capsules that can be easily eradicated with a laser. So it's entirely possible in the 21st-century to get a tattoo made of vegetables that glows and can be removed almost painlessly. Progress!
Tattoos as Gadgets

The future of tattoos doesn't really lie in the ink, on the other hand. A new era of tattoos essentially reinvents the very definition of the art by pushing the boundaries of technology. Think of putting ink in your skin as analog, and you can start to get an idea of what a digital tattoo can do. Some will amaze you.

In the future, tattoos will do things. If you imagine a sort of post-ink tattoo, you can comprehend the emerging field of bio-hacking. This term refers to a practice that's part body modification, part computer hacking, and all kinds of crazy. Artist Anthony Antonellis is one of the true pioneers of the movement. Last year, he stunned the geek world when he implanted an RFID chip in his hand that could store and transmit one kilobyte of information through a tiny antennae. He started out with a simple animated gif (below).

The Freaky, Bioelectric Future of Tattoos

It makes you think: Is that rotating rainbow the tattoo? Or is it the RFID chip Antonellis is carrying around in his hand? Or both?

The animated gif tattoo brings to mind Rich Lee, a 30-something salesman from Utah who implanted sound-transmitting magnets in his ears. The magnets are powered by a coil apparatus that includes a little amplifier and battery pack and plugs into Lee's Walkman (or whatever). The coil creates an electromagnetic field that vibrates the magnets in his ears and creates sound. Lee says the quality is akin to a cheap pair of earbuds—a pair of earbuds he wears at all times. It sounds like a pretty crazy rig, but it sure is a conversation starter at parties.
Gadgets as Tattoos

Now, I know what you're thinking: Putting magnets in your ears or a chip in your hand doesn't really seem like a tattoo. After all, aren't you supposed to see tattoos? Well, remember that the future of tattoos is most likely going to be a post-ink enterprise. In some cases, ink will become ephemeral, like the data for an animated gif floating in the ether. In other cases, though, the ink is actually a gadget itself.

The Freaky, Bioelectric Future of Tattoos

Take LED tattoos. Instead of ink injection, this form of tattooing involves implanting LED displays under the skin. More specifically, LED tattoos are made up of silicon electronics less than 250 nanometers thick, built onto water soluble, biocompatible silk substrates. When injected with saline, the silk substrates conform to fit the surrounding tissue and eventually dissolve completely, leaving only the silicon circuitry. The body won't reject the electronics which can be used to power LEDs that act as photonic tattoos.

This is not science fiction. The University of Pennsylvania's Brian Litt, a neurologist and bioengineer, is perfecting a form of this technology that could be used to build futuristic medical devices—say, a tattoo that gives diabetics information about their blood sugar level. (The idea that futuristic tattoos might serve a medical purpose sure brings us full circle back to Ötzi and his arthritis treatment, huh?)

However, the technology could also power next generation body art, like animated tattoos that make you look like a mutant. Philips imagined what that might look like in this (rather sexual) video from 2008:



Until Then...

The tattoos of the future inevitably have to work with the technology of today. We're probably a few years away from the Philips fantasy up there, but creative tattooists are figuring out ways around the limitations. Karl Marc, a tattoo artist from Paris, says he created the world's first animated tattoo that makes use of a QR code and a smartphone. The code basically activates software on the phone that makes the tattoo move when seen through the phone's camera. It's legitimately cool.



Then there's the temporary approach. Things get very tricky when you start putting foreign bodies—ink, silicon, or otherwise—into the body. But if you're just putting the electronics on top of the skin, well, that changes the game.

Materials scientist John Rogers is doing some pretty incredible work with flexible electronics that stick to your skin like a temporary tattoo. These so-called "epidural electronics" can do anything from monitoring your body's vital signs to alerting you when you're starting to get a sunburn. Rogers and his company MC10 are currently trying to figure out ways to get the electronics to communicate with other devices like smartphones so that they can start building apps.

Google isn't far behind them. This year, the company's Motorola division patented a device that looks like a neck tattoo. Like Rogers' technology, this device is attached directly to the skin where it picks up vibrations from the vocal cords creating a microphone with virtually no interference. It's hard to tell if they filed the patent because they wanted to win some attention or because they actually want to build and sell the thing. But it's still cool to imagine.

Along those lines, don't expect to be able to walk into your local parlor and ask for a digital tattoo any time too soon. While the technology exists to make some pretty incredible stuff, it's still very specialized and incredibly expensive. It'll take some time for the demand to increase enough so that industry offers up the supply. Because remember: body art is a business. And businesses need incentives to change course.

http://gizmodo.com/the-freaky-bioelectric-future-of-tattoos-1494169250
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« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2014, 07:59:41 am »

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« Reply #28 on: January 12, 2015, 03:14:01 am »


cicret = 6 letters




"With the Cicret Bracelet, you can make your skin your new touchscreen. Read your mails, play your favorite games, answer your calls, check the weather, find your way…Do whatever you want on your arm.

More infos at www.cicret.com."
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« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2015, 07:27:37 pm »

WITCHCRAFT
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