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Target Syria NWO's next acquisition The Middle East- WW III - Muslim Civil War

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November 24, 2017, 07:52:34 pm tennis shoe says: What happened to BA? He seems to have vanished.
November 14, 2017, 01:43:05 am Mark says:
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Author Topic: Target Syria NWO's next acquisition The Middle East- WW III - Muslim Civil War  (Read 12120 times)
Psalm 51:17
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« on: August 18, 2011, 10:25:54 pm »

Isa 17:1  The burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap.
Isa 17:2  The cities of Aroer are forsaken: they shall be for flocks, which shall lie down, and none shall make them afraid.
Isa 17:3  The fortress also shall cease from Ephraim, and the kingdom from Damascus, and the remnant of Syria: they shall be as the glory of the children of Israel, saith the LORD of hosts
.

http://news.yahoo.com/us-allies-declare-syrias-assad-must-leave-203307751.html

8/18/11

US, allies declare that Syria's Assad must leave

WASHINGTON (AP) — Executing a global squeeze play, the United States and its European allies on Thursday demanded an end to four decades of brutal family dictatorship in Syria and underscored the tough talk with new sanctions on President Bashar Assad's government.

The unified stance isolates Assad further as he presses a military campaign against major demonstrations.

But the diplomacy left many questions unanswered, including how the demand for Assad's ouster can be backed up in the absence of any appetite for military intervention, and who inside the Syrian government or among the country's fragmented opposition might take his place.

The messages from Washington, London, Paris, Berlin and Brussels coincided with a U.N. report recommending that Syria be referred to the International Criminal Court for investigation of possible crimes against humanity, including summary executions, torturing prisoners and targeting children in the crackdown on demonstrations.

Much of Syria was quiet Thursday, although activists reported intense shooting around noon in the flashpoint city of Latakia.

Rights groups say Assad's forces have killed nearly 2,000 people since mid-March. The military assault on civilians has escalated since Ramadan began, with security forces killing hundreds and detaining thousands.

Activists said security forces killed 18 people across the country on Wednesday, the same day Assad assured U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon that military and police operations had stopped.

In Thursday's coordinated statements, President Barack Obama and the leaders of Britain, France, Germany, Canada and the European Union called for Assad to resign, saying his repression of demonstrations inspired by this spring's Arab uprisings made him unfit to lead. The new effort signals the end of the world's thin patience for Assad, once viewed as a Western-looking pragmatist who might expand freedoms at home and help achieve an Arab peace deal with Israel.

The resignation calls were the first explicit demands from the U.S. and its allies for Assad to step down, although condemnation of his actions had been growing for weeks.

Syria presented a different case than other Muslim nations swept by unrest this year. The United States used leverage from its billions of dollars in military aid to gradually ratchet up pressure on Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak to step down, and called early on for the ouster of Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi.

But Washington has very little direct influence on Syria, long a pariah state accused of sponsoring terrorism. Syria does have wider trade and other ties with Europe and the Arab world, which complicated the U.S. position, and with neighbor Iran. Iran remains one of the Assad regime's few allies, although those bonds are not deep.

In a statement released by the White House, Obama said Assad had lost all credibility as a leader and had to go.

"His calls for dialogue and reform have rung hollow while he is imprisoning, torturing and slaughtering his own people," Obama said. "We have consistently said that President Assad must lead a democratic transition or get out of the way. He has not led. For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside."

British Prime Minister David Cameron, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel issued a joint statement saying that Assad should "leave power in the greater interests of Syria and the unity of his people." European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper also joined the chorus of condemnation.

In Geneva, a high-level U.N. human rights team said that Syria's crackdown "may amount to crimes against humanity" and should be referred to the International Criminal Court. The U.N. investigators say they had found "a pattern of human rights violations that constitutes widespread or systematic attacks against the civilian population."

U.N. human rights chief Navi Pillay said Thursday she had asked the Security Council to refer Syria to the court, and the U.S. and Europeans said they would push for sanctions at the U.N.

Syria's U.N. ambassador, Bashar Ja'afari, accused the U.S. of waging a "humanitarian and diplomatic war" against his country in order to instigate further violence by sending "the wrong message to the terrorist armed groups that they are under American and Western protection."

Obama said Assad was wrong to think he could silence the voices of his people with repressive tactics similar to the ones his father, Hafez Assad, used to crush opponents in the 1980s. Obama signed an executive order that gives his administration authority to impose sweeping new sanctions on Syria intended to further isolate Assad.

The order immediately bans the import into the United States of any Syrian petroleum or petroleum products. Syria is not a huge source of oil for the U.S., but if European allies join the effort, it could significantly affect one of the government's top sources of revenue. Syrian crude oil exports go mostly to European countries such as Germany, Italy and France, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency.

Obama's order also denies Syria access to the U.S. financial system, freezing all Syrian government assets that are subject to American jurisdiction. It prohibits any U.S. citizen from engaging in transactions with Syria, investing in the country or exporting services there.

The U.S. had already hit more than 30 Syrian officials, including Assad himself and members of his inner circle, and firms with sanctions. It has also lobbied other nations to follow suit, an acknowledgment both of limited U.S. leverage and the value, as Clinton said this week, of giving Assad nowhere to run.

The administration was careful to try not to appear highhanded or meddlesome in a region where suspicion of U.S. motives is rampant. Some of the Syrian protesters demanding an end to Assad's rule also reject the idea of a new alliance with the American government. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Obama stressed that no one would impose transition in Syria.

"We understand the strong desire of the Syrian people that no foreign country should intervene in their struggle, and we respect their wishes," Clinton said at the State Department. "At the same time, we will do our part to support their aspirations for a Syria that is democratic, just and inclusive, and we will stand up for their universal rights and dignity by pressuring the regime and Assad personally."

The White House had planned to make the announcement last week but postponed it largely at the request of Syria's neighbor Turkey, which asked for more time to try to persuade Assad, and because Clinton and other officials argued it was important to build a global coalition to demand his departure.

U.S. intelligence analysts believe one possible outcome of a post-Assad era is a Lebanese style government in which Syrian political parties form along sectarian lines, with some pro-Iran, some Sunni Muslim, some Christian. One U.S. official said a positive sign is that the protesters across ethnic and religious lines appear to have maintained a cohesive, unified front. That shared experience, coupled with unseating Assad, could forge ties between disparate groups.

Another possibility is that Assad gets pushed out by members of the existing government, who use his ouster to win back the people.

Until Thursday, the administration had said Assad had lost his legitimacy and that Syria would be better off without him. But it had stopped short of demanding his departure.

In addition to the statements from Europe and Canada, Jordan's foreign minister said Thursday that his country is "angered" and "extremely worried" by the killings of civilians in Syria, and Switzerland recalled its ambassador. A day earlier, Tunisia recalled its ambassador from Syria, following the lead of several other Arab nations, including Saudi Arabia, which the U.S. has been lobbying to show displeasure with Assad.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday compared Assad to Libya's Moammar Gadhafi for refusing to heed pressure to change. Turkey has joined calls for Gadhafi to leave power, and Erdogan said he had personally spoken to Assad and sent his foreign minister to Damascus, but "despite all of this, they are continuing to strike civilians."
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2011, 07:05:45 am »

Quote
Syria has announced the discovery of a promising gas field in Homs governorate


http://blogs.aljazeera.net/liveblog/Syria

UK Foreign Secretary William Hague says Assad is 'fast losing the last shreds of his legitimacy' -

http://blogs.aljazeera.net/liveblog/Syria


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« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011, 09:00:55 am »

Syria hits point of no return amid broad isolation

http://news.yahoo.com/syria-hits-point-no-return-amid-broad-isolation-093933874.html

8/21/11

BEIRUT (AP) — When Bashar Assad inherited power in Syria in 2000, many saw him as a youthful new president in a region of aging dictators — a fresh face who could transform his father's stagnant dictatorship into a modern state ready to engage with the world.

Now, the bloody government backlash has extinguished the once-popular image of Assad as a reformer struggling against members of his late father's old guard.

With calls for his resignation last week from Washington to Tokyo, the Arab Spring has forced Assad to face the most severe isolation of his family's four-decade rule. And the events of the past five months have dashed any lingering hopes that he would change one of the most repressive states in the world.

There is little sign that the 45-year-old Assad will manage to crush the protests that are shaking his regime. But even if he does, his newfound status as a global pariah stands to devastate his country of 22 million people, undermine stability in the Middle East and affect the role of Iran, Syria's ally, on the world stage.

"Power is an aphrodisiac, and as the old saying goes, it corrupts absolutely," said David W. Lesch, an American expert on Syria who wrote a 2005 biography of Bashar Assad. "In the end, he became more of a product of his environment rather than a transformational figure who could change that environment."

The United States and several of its major allies called Thursday for Assad to give up power, a crescendo to months of mounting reproach. The messages from Washington, London, Paris, Berlin and Brussels coincided with a U.N. report recommending that Syria be referred to the International Criminal Court for investigation of possible crimes against humanity in the crackdown, including summary executions, torturing prisoners and targeting children.

Even Japan added its voice to the chorus calling for Assad to leave.

Human rights groups said Assad's forces have killed nearly 2,000 people since the uprising erupted in mid-March, touched off by the wave of revolutions sweeping the Arab world.

There is no sign that the global calls for Assad's ouster will have any immediate effect, although analysts say they could ultimately help turn the tide. The growing isolation could compel Syrians who have supported the regime to move toward the opposition, especially if the economy continues to deteriorate.

Longtime ally Iran has offered unwavering support for Damascus, but it cannot prop up the regime indefinitely.

Still, many observers predict at least several more months of bloodshed, perhaps even more brutality to prevent further attempts to replace Assad.

Both sides of the conflict remain energized. Protesters pour into the streets every Friday, defying the near-certain barrage of shelling and sniper fire. But the regime is strong as well and in no imminent danger of collapse, setting the stage for what could be a drawn-out and bloody stalemate.

The opposition has yet to bring out the middle- and upper-middle classes in Damascus and Aleppo, the two economic powerhouses, although protests have been building.

Assad, and his father before him, stacked key military posts with members of their minority Alawite sect, ensuring loyalty by melding the fate of the army and the regime. That loyalty is the Assad regime's most potent weapon.

Economic sanctions can chip away at the regime, although the new U.S. ban on Syrian oil is not a significant blow on its own. But EU officials said Friday the bloc's 27 member states were considering an embargo on oil, which could significantly slash the Damascus government's revenues.

Syria's oil exports — most of them heading to Europe — generate $7-8 million per day, said David Schenker, director of the Program on Arab Politics at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Without that revenue, Syria will quickly burn through the $17 billion in foreign reserves that the government had at the start of the uprising.

"But it could still take a year to deplete, collapsing the economy," Schenker cautioned.

It remains to be seen if Turkey, a former close ally of Syria, will also impose sanctions. Turkey is Syria's neighbor and important trade partner, and its leaders have grown increasingly frustrated with Damascus.

Although Washington has little direct influence on Syria, President Barack Obama's call for Assad to leave decisively ends the U.S. push for engagement with Damascus.

There were early signs that the attempt would end badly: A secret U.S. diplomatic cable from June 2009 portrays Assad as vain and inexperienced, and government officials in Damascus as inveterate liars.

Assad sees himself "as a sort of philosopher-king, the Pericles of Damascus," Maura Connelly, the U.S. charge d'affaires in Damascus at the time, says in the cable, which was released by WikiLeaks.

She suggests flattering Assad may be a good way to manipulate him: "Playing to Bashar's intellectual pretensions is one stratagem for gaining his confidence and acquiescence; it may be time-consuming but could well produce results."

Syria has long been viewed by the West as a potentially destabilizing force in the Middle East because of its alliance with Iran and Hezbollah guerrillas in Lebanon. Damascus also provided a home for some radical Palestinian groups.

In recent years, however, the country has been trying to emerge from years of international isolation, raising hopes that Washington could peel the country away from Tehran, Hezbollah and Hamas.

But two years of U.S. overtures to Damascus yielded few results. Now, an isolated Assad is as close to Iran as ever. Iraq is sticking by Assad as well — a move that some see as a sign of how the Iraqi government is shifting toward an alliance led by Iran as American forces get ready to leave at the end of the year.

It's a marked change in the relationship between Iran and Syria, which were deeply estranged all through the Saddam era and the insurgency.

Assad's isolation stands in stark contrast to the hopes many pinned on his leadership.

He gave up an ophthalmology career in Britain to enter Syrian politics when his brother Basil, widely regarded as his father's chosen heir, died in a 1994 car crash.

Assad, who was 34 when he took power, slowly lifted Soviet-style economic restrictions, letting in foreign banks, throwing the doors open to imports and empowering the private sector. His youth and quiet demeanor endeared him to Syrians. The tall, lanky leader with a mild disposition is said to detest being surrounded by bodyguards.

He and his wife, Asma, and their three young children, live in an apartment in the upscale Abu Rummaneh district of Damascus, as opposed to a palatial mansion like other Arab leaders.

But the "Damascus Spring" turned out to be short-lived, and Assad slipped into the autocratic ways of his father.

"I have personally seen Assad's evolution from someone who became president by accident and wanted to reform the country to someone who was battle-tested, in power, and appears to have been convinced by sycophantic praise and regime propaganda as to his own indispensable position in the country," Lesch said.

For now, though, Assad enjoys a measure of support in Syria. His main base at home includes Syrians who have benefited financially from the regime, minority groups who feel they will be targeted if the Sunni majority takes over, and others who see no clear and safe alternative to Assad.

The Syrian opposition movement is disparate and largely disorganized, without a strong leadership.

Sectarian warfare is a real, terrifying possibility in Syria, a fragile jigsaw puzzle of Middle Eastern backgrounds including Sunnis, Shiites, Alawites, Christians, Kurds, Druse, Circassians, Armenians and more. The worst-case scenario is a descent into a Lebanese-style civil war — and Assad has exploited those fears.

The Syrian government insists the unrest is being driven by terrorists and foreign extremists looking to stir up sectarian strife. On Saturday, a government-owned newspaper said the U.S. and European calls for Assad to step down finally have revealed the "face of the conspiracy" against Damascus.

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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2011, 11:08:20 am »

Syrian protesters vow to bring down Assad regime
Death of Muammar Gaddafi in Libya brings new momentum to uprising as demonstrators call for international military intervention

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/21/syrian-protesters-vow-end-assad-regime

 

Syrian protesters poured onto the streets on Friday, vowing that President Bashar al-Assad's regime will be the next to unravel after the death of the ousted Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi.

Activists said around 14 protesters were killed when security forces opened fire.

"Gaddafi is gone. Your turn is coming, Bashar!" protesters in the central city of Hama, a hotbed of resistance to the Assad regime, shouted.

The Syrian uprising has been resilient over the last seven months despite a bloody crackdown in which the UN estimates that more than 3,000 people have been killed.

Although mass demonstrations have shaken one of the most authoritarian regimes in the Middle East, the Syrian opposition has made no major gains in recent months. It holds no territory and has no clear leadership.

But the armed uprising in Libya, which drove Gaddafi from power, albeit with Nato air support, appeared to have breathed new life into the Syrian revolt.

"Our souls, our blood we sacrifice for you, Libya!" Syrian protesters chanted. Others held signs linking Assad's fate to those of other deposed Arab leaders. Tunisia's Zine El Abidine Ben Ali has been driven into exile, and Egypt's Hosni Mubarak is in jail facing charges of complicity in the deaths of more than 800 protesters during his country's uprising.

"Ben Ali fled, Mubarak is in jail, Gaddafi is killed, Assad … ?" one banner read.

The Syrian uprising has taken cues from Libya recently.Syria's opposition has formed a national council, like Libya's National Transitional Council, hoping to forge a united front against Assad that Syrians and the international community could rally behind.

In turn, Libya became the first country to recognise the Syrian National Council as the "legitimate authority" in Syria.

After the successes of armed Libyan revolutionaries, many Syrian protesters have started to see the limits of a peaceful movement. Some Syrians have called on protesters to take up arms and invited foreign military action, hoisting signs that read "Where is Nato?".

For the most part, Syrian opposition leaders have opposed foreign intervention.There has been no central call to arms by the opposition, in part because of its lack of clear leadership.

The Syrian opposition has been disparate and fragmented, with various parties vying for power as they have sought an end to more than 40 years of rule by Assad and his late father, Hafez.

There have been some clashes in border regions between Syrian forces and apparent defectors from the military, but they have not been widespread.

But growing signs of armed resistance may accelerate the cycle of violence gripping the country by giving the government a pretext to use even greater firepower against its opponents. Authorities have already used tanks, snipers and gunmen.
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2011, 08:10:37 am »

According to the Telegraph:

An insurgent army which claims to be up to 15,000 strong is being coordinated from Turkey to take on President Bashar al-Assad of Syria, which risks plunging the region into open warfare.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/8868027/15000-strong-army-gathers-to-take-on-Syria.html
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2011, 04:36:13 pm »

WARS AND RUMORS OF WARS
Is this the next U.S.-NATO armed action?
Surprise move seen as step toward military campaign


In a surprise step that could precipitate a future U.S.-NATO military campaign, the Arab League today suspended Syria and called on its army to stop killing civilians.

The League announced it will impose economic and political sanctions on Syria's government and has appealed to member states to withdraw their ambassadors.

Arab League diplomats, speaking to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity, said that if Syria does not adhere to its demands for immediate reform, the organization will work to unify Syrian opposition groups into a coalition similar to that of Libya's National Transitional Council.

A next step, the diplomats said, would be to recognize the opposition as the sole representative of the Syrian people in a move that would symbolically isolate the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Those moves mimic the diplomatic initiatives taken to isolate Muammar Gadhafi's regime before the NATO campaign in Libya.

(Story continues below)

          

Similar to Gadhafi, Assad's regime has been accused of major human-rights violations, including crimes against humanity, in clamping down on a violent insurgency targeting Assad's rule.

Mass demonstrations were held in recent weeks in Syrian-insurgent strongholds calling for the international NATO coalition in Libya to deploy in Syria.

Damascus officials claimed to WND that NATO troops are currently training in Turkey for a Turkish-led NATO invasion of Syria.

Any deployment would come under the banner of the same "Responsibility to Protect" global doctrine used to justify the U.S.-NATO airstrikes in Libya.

Responsibility to Protect, or Responsibility to Act, as cited by President Obama, is a set of principles, now backed by the United Nations, based on the idea that sovereignty is not a privilege but a responsibility that can be revoked if a country is accused of "war crimes," "genocide," "crimes against humanity" or "ethnic cleansing."

A Turkish-U.S.-NATO strike could have immediate implications for Israel.

The Syrian president warned in a recent interview with a U.K. newspaper that foreign intervention in Syria would cause an "earthquake" across the region and create another Afghanistan, while directly threatening the Jewish state.

Assad reportedly made similar comments in a meeting in early October with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmad Davutoglu. He was quoted stating, "If a crazy measure is taken against Damascus, I will need not more than six hours to transfer hundreds of rockets and missiles to the Golan Heights to fire them at Tel Aviv."

Assad also reportedly warned that "all these events will happen in three hours, but in the second three hours, Iran will attack the U.S. warships in the Persian Gulf and the U.S. and European interests will be targeted simultaneously."

George Soros-funded doctrine with White House ties

The Libya bombings have been widely regarded as a test of a military doctrine called "Responsibility to Protect."

In his address to the nation in April explaining the NATO campaign in Libya, Obama cited the doctrine as the main justification for U.S. and international airstrikes against Libya.

The Global Center for Responsibility to Protect is the world's leading champion of the military doctrine.

Know your enemy: 'Red Army' exposes the radical network that must be defeated to save the country

As WND reported, billionaire activist George Soros is a primary funder and key proponent of the Global Center for Responsibility to Protect. Several of the doctrine's main founders also sit on boards with Soros.

WND reported the committee that devised the Responsibility to Protect doctrine included Arab League Secretary General Amre Moussa as well as Palestinian legislator Hanan Ashrawi, a staunch denier of the Holocaust who long served as the deputy of late Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat.

Also, the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy has a seat on the advisory board of the 2001 commission that originally founded Responsibility to Protect. The commission is called the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty. It invented the term "responsibility to protect" while defining its guidelines.

The Carr Center is a research center concerned with human rights located at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Samantha Power, the National Security Council special adviser to Obama on human rights, was Carr's founding executive director and headed the institute at the time it advised in the founding of Responsibility to Protect.

With Power's center on the advisory board, the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty first defined the Responsibility to Protect doctrine.

Power reportedly heavily influenced Obama in consultations leading to the decision to bomb Libya.

Two of the global group's advisory board members, Ramesh Thakur and Gareth Evans, are the original founders of the doctrine, with the duo even coining the term "responsibility to protect."

As WND reported, Soros' Open Society Institute is a primary funder and key proponent of the Global Center for Responsibility to Protect. Also, Thakur and Evans sit on multiple boards with Soros.

Soros' Open Society is one of only three nongovernmental funders of the Global Center for the Responsibility to Protect. Government sponsors include Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Norway, Rwanda and the U.K.

Board members of the group include former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, former Ireland President Mary Robinson and South African activist Desmond Tutu. Robinson and Tutu have recently made solidarity visits to the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip as members of a group called The Elders, which includes former President Jimmy Carter.

Annan once famously stated, "State sovereignty, in its most basic sense, is being redefined – not least by the forces of globalization and international co-operation. States are ... instruments at the service of their peoples and not vice versa."

Soros: Right to 'penetrate nation-states'

Soros himself outlined the fundamentals of Responsibility to Protect in a 2004 Foreign Policy magazine article titled "The People's Sovereignty: How a New Twist on an Old Idea Can Protect the World's Most Vulnerable Populations."

In the article Soros said, "True sovereignty belongs to the people, who in turn delegate it to their governments."

"If governments abuse the authority entrusted to them and citizens have no opportunity to correct such abuses, outside interference is justified," Soros wrote. "By specifying that sovereignty is based on the people, the international community can penetrate nation-states' borders to protect the rights of citizens.

"In particular," he continued, "the principle of the people's sovereignty can help solve two modern challenges: the obstacles to delivering aid effectively to sovereign states, and the obstacles to global collective action dealing with states experiencing internal conflict."

More George Soros ties

"Responsibility" founders Evans and Thakur served as co-chairmen with Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corp. Charitable Foundation, on the advisory board of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty, which invented the term "responsibility to protect."

In his capacity as co-chairman, Evans also played a pivotal role in initiating the fundamental shift from sovereignty as a right to "sovereignty as responsibility."

Evans presented Responsibility to Protect at the July 23, 2009, United Nations General Assembly, which was convened to consider the principle.

Thakur is a fellow at the Center for International Governance Innovation, which is in partnership with an economic institute founded by Soros.

Soros is on the executive board of the International Crisis Group, a "crisis management organization" for which Evans serves as president-emeritus.

WND previously reported how the group has been petitioning for the U.S. to normalize ties with the Muslim Brotherhood, the main opposition in Egypt, where longtime U.S. ally Hosni Mubarak was recently toppled.

Aside from Evans and Soros, the group includes on its board Egyptian opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei, as well as other personalities who champion dialogue with Hamas, a violent offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood.

WND also reported the crisis group has petitioned for the Algerian government to cease "excessive" military activities against al-Qaida-linked groups and to allow organizations seeking to create an Islamic state to participate in the Algerian government.

Soros' own Open Society Institute has funded opposition groups across the Middle East and North Africa, including organizations involved in the current chaos.

'One World Order'

WND reported, that doctrine founder Thakur recently advocated for a "global rebalancing" and "international redistribution" to create a "New World Order."

In a piece last March in the Ottawa Citizen newspaper, "Toward a new world order," Thakur wrote, "Westerners must change lifestyles and support international redistribution."

He was referring to a United Nations-brokered international climate treaty in which he argued, "Developing countries must reorient growth in cleaner and greener directions."

In the opinion piece, Thakur then discussed recent military engagements and how the financial crisis has impacted the U.S.

"The West's bullying approach to developing nations won't work anymore – global power is shifting to Asia," he wrote.

"A much-needed global moral rebalancing is in train," he added.

Thakur continued: "Westerners have lost their previous capacity to set standards and rules of behavior for the world. Unless they recognize this reality, there is little prospect of making significant progress in deadlocked international negotiations."

Thakur contended "the demonstration of the limits to U.S. and NATO power in Iraq and Afghanistan has left many less fearful of 'superior' Western power."

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=367441
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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2011, 09:44:58 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/syrian-soldiers-killed-crisis-accelerates-205430337.html

Syrian soldiers killed as crisis accelerates

11/15/11

BEIRUT (AP) — Army defectors ambushed dozens of Syrian troops and regime forces gunned down civilians during one of the bloodiest days of the 8-month-old uprising, which appeared Tuesday to be spiraling out of President Bashar Assad's control.

Up to 90 people were killed in a gruesome wave of violence Monday, activists said. The extent of the bloodshed only came to light Tuesday, in part because corpses lying in the streets did not reach the morgue until daylight.

As the bloodshed spiked, Assad's former allies were turning on him in rapid succession — a sign of profound impatience with a leader who has failed to stem months of unrest that could explode into a regional conflagration.

Turkey, Jordan and the 22-member Arab League all signaled they were fed up with Assad's response to the uprising and were ready to pressure him to go.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday he no longer has confidence in the government led by Assad, a 46-year-old eye doctor who inherited power from his father 11 years ago.

"No regime can survive by killing or jailing," said Erdogan, who cultivated close ties with Assad before the uprising began in March. "No one can build a future over the blood of the oppressed."

Erdogan — who disrespectfully addressed Assad by his first name — warned that the brutal crackdown threatens to place him on a list of leaders who "feed on blood."

Turkey also canceled plans for oil exploration in Syria and threatened to cut electricity supplies to the country, which is burning through the $17 billion in foreign reserves the government had at the start of the uprising. Turkey provides around 7 percent of Syria's total electricity consumption.

A day earlier, Jordan's King Abdullah II said Assad should step down, the first Arab leader to publicly make such a call. And over the weekend, the 22-member Arab League took a near-unanimous vote to suspend Damascus from the regional body.

In a sign that Saudi Arabia's rulers now foresee an end to Assad's rule, the former Saudi ambassador to the United States, Prince Turki Al Faisal, told reporters in Washington that it was "inevitable" that Assad would step down.

"I think what we're seeing here and continue to see is that the drumbeat of international pressure is increasing on Assad," U.S. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said.

Despite the widespread condemnation, Assad was unlikely to put an end to the crackdown, said Fadia Kiwan, a political science professor at Beirut's St. Joseph University. The reason is simple: Assad's regime would almost certainly fall if the crackdown ends, she said.

Although activists say the anti-government protesters have remained largely peaceful, an armed insurgency has developed in recent months targeting Assad's military and security forces.

Thirty-four soldiers were killed Monday in an ambush in Daraa, the birthplace of the uprising, said Rami Abdul-Rahman, head of the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The brazen attack by army defectors suggests a new confidence among troops who have sided with the protesters and highlights the potential for an armed confrontation to escalate.

Amateur video provided by activists showed what appeared to be an army tank and other military vehicles engulfed in flames in Daraa. "God is great!" a voice cried out. "This is an armored vehicle with a machine gun from Assad's brigades. God is great!"

Other footage showed a fire at the end of an alley sending up a plume of smoke, followed by an explosion. "That's the free army!" a man shouted as gunshots rang out. "That's a sniper," another voice said. "There's a sniper at the school."

Other videos showed tanks on urban streets firing their cannons and crowds of people running from the sound of automatic gunfire.

An activist in the area said he counted the bodies of 12 civilians killed by security forces' fire. "I saw two army armored personnel carriers, totally burnt," he told The Associated Press by telephone.

A resident near the town of Khirbet Ghazaleh in Daraa province said he heard more than four hours of intense gunfire. Both witnesses asked that their names not be used for fear of government reprisals.

As many as 90 people were killed nationwide Monday, including 19 civilians whose bodies were collected from the streets of Homs and delivered to the morgue.

The U.N. estimates the regime's military crackdown has killed 3,500 people in the past eight months. November is shaping up to be the bloodiest month of the revolt, with well over 300 people killed so far.

The latest death toll was compiled by sources including British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, the Local Coordination Committees activist coalition and morgue officials.

In many ways, the violence against security forces plays directly into the regime's hands by giving it a pretext to crack down with overwhelming force, analysts say.

Assad says extremists pushing a foreign agenda to destabilize Syria are behind the unrest, not true reform-seekers aiming to open the country's autocratic political system.

Assad has responded with once-unthinkable promises of reform in one of the most authoritarian states in the Middle East. But he simultaneously unleashed the military to crush the protests with tanks, gunfire and snipers.

On Tuesday, the regime announced an amnesty for 1,180 prisoners who were arrested over the past eight months but whose "hands have not been stained by blood." Earlier this month, Assad freed 533 prisoners to mark Eid al-Adha, the Muslim feast of sacrifice.

The regime also released Kamal Labwani, 54, one of the country's most prominent detainees, according to the observatory for human rights. Labwani was serving a 12-year sentence on charges of anti-government activities after he met White House officials.

Still, the gestures ring hollow alongside the mounting death toll and amateur videos posted online every day that appear to show random gunfire and shelling.

The Syrian government has largely sealed off the country, barring most foreign journalists and preventing independent reporting. But details gathered by activist groups and witnesses, along with the amateur videos, have become key channels of information.

The bloodshed also has laid bare Syria's long-simmering sectarian tensions, with disturbing reports of Iraq-style sectarian killings.

Syria is an overwhelmingly Sunni country of 22 million, but Assad and the ruling elite belong to the minority Alawite sect. Assad, and his father before him, stacked key military posts with Alawites to meld the fates of the army and the regime — a tactic aimed at compelling the army to fight to the death to protect the Assad family dynasty.

To a large degree, the military has remained loyal. Most of the defectors appear to be lower-level Sunni conscripts, not officers. But observers say the tide could change if the military continues to be called upon to shoot unarmed protesters.

On Wednesday, the Arab League will meet in Morocco and the group is expected to formally suspend Syria. The decision has enraged Syria, which considers itself a bastion of Arab nationalism.

Syria announced on state-run TV that it would boycott the meeting.

Damascus fears the United States and its allies might use the rare Arab consensus to press for tougher sanctions at the United Nations. Veto-wielding Russia and China have so far opposed efforts at the U.N. Security Council to impose sanctions on Syria — a stance that could become harder to maintain.

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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2011, 03:31:25 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/france-recalls-ambassador-syria-161703634.html

11/16/11

[size=14]France recalls ambassador to Syria[/size]

..PARIS (Reuters) - France has recalled its ambassador from Syria after an escalation of violence there and is working with the Arab League on a new draft United Nations resolution against Damascus, Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said Wednesday.

"New violence is taking place and that has led to the closure of the missions in Aleppo and Latakia and to the recall of our ambassador to Paris," Juppe told legislators.

Pro-government Syrian crowds have attacked France's honorary consulate in Latakia and diplomatic offices in Aleppo as well as the Turkish, Saudi Arabian and United Arab Emirates embassies in Damascus.

International pressure on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to halt the bloodshed is intensifying. His military crackdown has cost more than 3,500 lives since street protests erupted in March, according to the United Nations.

Western countries have tightened sanctions and Monday Jordan's King Abdullah became the first Arab head of state to urge Assad to quit after ensuring a smooth handover.

Arab foreign ministers met in Morocco Wednesday after Syria's suspension from the Arab League took effect earlier in the day. That decision has prompted a new push for a draft resolution at the United Nations Security Council.

Last month, Russia and China blocked a Western-backed Council resolution that would have both condemned Syria for its crackdown on protesters and warned of possible sanctions.

China's position appears to be softening after it urged Damascus this week to cease violence and adopt an Arab League plan to end the impasse. The plan obliges Assad to withdraw tanks and troops from cities and towns and engage in dialogue with the opposition movement.

Juppe said that despite the failure of initial efforts last month to pass U.N. resolution, Paris, which sponsored the original measure, was working with the Arab League on a new one.

"The noose is tightening around this completely autistic regime that continues to carry out bloody repression," Juppe said. "The Syrian people will win the battle and France will do all it can to help them."

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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2011, 04:16:30 pm »

Like I said before, Syria is a bonafide issue, and they intend to fix it. It's more pressing than Iran, but can make for a distraction while Israel is dealing with Iran.

But in the context of a world government, these "rogue" leaders must be dealt with, to reign them in so to speak and play NWO ball, or they are out. Just ask Mubarak. I'd say ask Hussein or Gaddafi but they are dead, allegedly.

Iran is a unique situation for some reason. There is a reason the world governments aren't wanting to deal with them it seems. I don't think it's anything prophetic but it could be. But the world just isn't dealing with them like others. The world tends to love it friends of the moment, and the world doesn't seem to have that big of an issue with them.

I don't know, maybe it's like the parent that has a bunch of kids, all acting up, and the parent has to just go down the line, dealing with each one, and Iran is THAT child that insists on attention, even if it means getting in trouble. I see their leader as just a whiny little kid that loves the attention, and the world is dealing with others right now, while telling Iran to be quiet, that they'll deal with them shortly.
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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2011, 06:45:45 am »

Syrian Opposition Mounts as Violence Continues

The protests against Syrian President Bashar Assad keep springing up, and government-led tanks keep coming to crush them.

An estimated 3,500 civilians have died during seven months of anti-Assad demonstrations.

More alarming for the Syrian leader is that 1,500 members of his security forces are dead as well.

"As a result of the continuing acts of oppression by the Assad regime and the killing of unarmed people who are demanding their right to a free life, we declare our defection from the Baathist army. We are joining the free people in the Syrian free army," one Syrian army defector recently said.

Meanwhile, Syria's political opposition has been in Moscow, cautioning the Russians to stop supporting Assad.

Both Russia and China have opposed U.N. sanctions against Syria because of economic and military ties with Assad.

Turkey and the Arab League have taken the lead in isolating Assad. Meeting in Morocco, the Arab League is expected to confirm its vote to suspend Syria for its brutal crackdown.

Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan said from Ankara that Assad should note the "tragic end" that comes to oppressive leaders and warned he should not be a leader that "feeds on blood."

Turkey is now refusing to drill for oil in Syria and has threatened cuts in electricity to some parts of the country.

Further pressure on Assad came from U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.

"It is increasingly important now that President Assad must immediately stop killing his own people and agree to implement this agreement with the league of Arab member states," he said.

This week, Jordan's King Abdullah became the first Arab leader to call for Assad to go.

In Syria, Assad lifts his news blackout only for rallies by his supporters. If he doesn't go quietly, more defections could lead to a wider Syrian civil war.

That could boost the chances for conflict in neighboring Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel.

http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/world/2011/November/Syrian-Opposition-Mounts-as-Violence-Continues/
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2011, 05:03:04 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/raids-syria-pressure-mounts-assad-regime-084451145.html

11/17/11

Raids in Syria as pressure mounts on Assad regime

BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian troops made sweeping arrests Thursday in the restive Hama province as President Bashar Assad faces a growing challenge to his iron rule, activists said.

The raids in Hama came after Syrian army defectors attacked an army checkpoint the previous day, killing eight soldiers in that attack, according to the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

Assad is facing severe isolation stemming from his crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising, which appears to be spiraling out his control. Attacks by army defectors are growing, and world leaders are looking at possibilities for a Syrian regime without Assad.

The latest blow came from the Arab League, which on Wednesday suspended Damascus and threatened economic sanctions if the regime continues to violate an Arab-brokered peace plan.

Germany, Britain and France are pressing for a U.N. resolution that would strongly condemn Syria's human rights violations. The three European countries decided to move ahead with the General Assembly resolution after the Arab League confirmed its suspension.

"We hope it will show Assad just how isolated he is," Germany's U.N. Ambassador Peter Wittig said of the resolution.

Russia and China have stood by Damascus amid concerns that the downfall of Assad would be a severe blow to their interests in the Middle East. In October, they vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution that threatened sanctions against Syria if it didn't end its crackdown.

But on Thursday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Weimin appeared to suggest China might support a resolution in the future.

"It depends on whether these actions will help to resolve the tensions in Syria and facilitate the resolution of disputes through political dialogue," he said.

Also Thursday, Russian and European Union officials were holding talks on Syria and other issues in Moscow.

The U.N. estimates Assad's crackdown has killed more than 3,500 people since the uprising began in March.

The growing calls for Assad's ouster are a severe blow to a family dynasty that has ruled Syria for four decades — and any change to the leadership could transform some of the most enduring alliances in the Middle East and beyond.

Syria's tie to Iran is among the most important relationships in the Middle East, providing the Iranians with a foothold on Israel's border and a critical conduit to Tehran-backed Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Palestinian Hamas in Gaza.

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« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2011, 05:11:23 am »

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Syria's tie to Iran is among the most important relationships in the Middle East, providing the Iranians with a foothold on Israel's border

And that I believe is why Assad is done for.

The classic military move is to cut off your enemy's supply lines, to isolate them. Basically starve them to death if they don't comply. It's an indirect action with low risks. Better to out-flank your opponent then to take them head on.
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« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2011, 07:07:54 am »

Syria agrees 'in principle' to observers

Syria has agreed "in principle" to allow an observer mission into the country, a senior official in Damascus said Friday, as fresh anti-government protests erupted and France called for the U.N. Security Council to act against President Bashar Assad.

The Arab League formally suspended Damascus this week over its crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising, which the U.N. estimates has killed more than 3,500 people. The group wants to send hundreds of observers to the country to try to help end the bloodshed.

"Syria has agreed in principle to the Arab League proposal (for observers) and we are still studying the details," the senior Syrian official said Friday. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the issue is so sensitive.

Arab League officials in Cairo, the seat of the 22-member organization, could not immediately be reached for comment by The Associated Press.

But Egypt state TV reported that the head of the Arab League, Nabil Elaraby, said he received "amendments" from Damascus, which the League is studying.

Assad is facing mounting pressure from home and abroad over the country's crisis, which appears to be spiraling out of control as attacks by army defectors increase and some protesters take up arms to protect themselves. The escalating violence has raised fears of civil war.

"We call on the Syrian opposition to avoid recourse to an armed insurrection," French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe told a joint news conference with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu in Ankara, Turkey. "A civil war would of course be a true catastrophe."

Asked about the possibility of foreign intervention, Juppe said: "This would have to be within the framework of the UN Security Council."

He also called on the U.N. Security Council to act against Assad's regime, saying the time has come to strengthen sanctions against Syria.

"We must continue to exert pressure," Juppe said. "The U.N. must act ... it is not normal for the U.N. Security Council not to act."

Davutoglu, responding to a question on whether his country would support a no-fly zone over Syria, said there might be need to enforce some measures if Syria maintains its crackdown on civilians.

He said the first actions should be economic, but "other options must be evaluated later."

Syrian activists said at least five people were killed as security forces on Friday fired on anti-government protests. Friday has become the main day for protests in Syria as thousands of people stream out of mosques following afternoon prayers.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_SYRIA?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=HOME
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« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2011, 07:29:23 am »

France, Turkey call for greater pressure on Syria

France and Turkey called on Friday for greater international pressure on Syria to end the violent crackdown on opponents of President Bashar al-Assad, while activists said security forces shot dead five people protesting after weekly prayers.

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said he doubted Syria would respond positively to an Arab League initiative aimed at stopping the bloodshed that has killed more than 3,500 people, according to a United Nations count.

The Arab League has suspended Syria and given it until the end of the week to heed the Arab peace plan that entails a military pullout from around restive Syrian cities and towns, threatening sanctions unless Assad acts to halt the violence.

Juppe, speaking alongside Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmed Davutoglu, said that France was ready to work with the Syrian opposition and that tougher sanctions were needed on Damascus.

He also said he opposed any unilateral intervention in Syria, but left the door open for wider action, saying any such move should be mandated by the United Nations.

Hundreds of people have been killed in Syria, including civilians, army deserters and forces loyal to Assad, since it agreed on November 2 to withdraw troops from urban areas and release political prisoners under an Arab League initiative.

Syria says it is trying to implement the deal but has called on neighboring countries to do more to stem a flow of arms to the opposition and end what it says is a media campaign of incitement against Syria authorities.

It has also invited the Arab League to bring civilian and military observers to monitor events on the ground.

"We will accept the protocol which includes admitting observers to Syria, but we have some observations which we will deliver to the general secretariat of the Arab League," a Lebanese official quoted a Syrian government official as saying.

FIVE KILLED IN PROTESTS

On Friday the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said security forces shot dead at least five protesters and wounded dozens when they fired to disperse protests in the cities of Deraa, Homs, Hama and the Damascus suburb of Erbin.

Syria's state media had no immediate reports of violence on Friday. Syria has barred most independent journalists from the country, making it difficult to verify reports from activists or officials. Authorities blame the violence on foreign-backed armed groups who they say have killed 1,100 soldiers and police.

Protesters called on foreign countries to expel Syrian ambassadors in a gesture of support for the opposition.

"Whoever fears God should expel the Syrian ambassador" read a banner at a demonstration in the southern province of Deraa, where the uprising erupted in March.

In the eastern province of Hasaka, people chanted, "Why are you afraid? God is with us!" In Homs and Hama, protesters dancing arm in arm shouted "The Free Army is our army," referring to army deserters who have waged an escalating campaign of attacks on state targets.

Opposition sources said on Wednesday the Free Syrian Army had killed or wounded 20 security police in an assault on an Air Force Intelligence complex on the outskirts of Damascus, the first of its kind in the revolt against Assad.

Russia said on Wednesday the raid showed that the conflict in Syria was "already completely similar to real civil war."

Syrian troops shelled two northern villages overnight after an attack by army defectors on forces loyal Assad, local activists said on Friday.

Eight villagers were injured when tank shells and heavy mortars fell for three hours on Tal Minnij and Maarshamsheh and surrounding farmland, the activists said.

"Hundreds of families have left. Electricity and Internet services have been cut off," said one of the activists, who gave his first name as Raed.

France, Britain and Germany plan to ask the U.N. General Assembly's human rights committee to approve a resolution condemning the violence in Syria, before putting the non-binding measure to a vote in an Assembly plenary session.

Iran's ambassador to Lebanon said growing international pressure would not topple Syria's government.

"These threats will not yield any results," Ghadanfar Roken Abadi said on Friday. "Intensifying these threats...only increases our enthusiasm for popular unity with Syria, which has seen more then 10 million people take to the streets to show their support for the Syrian regime."

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/syria-calls-arab-league-meet-avert-suspension-151134269.html
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« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2011, 05:47:40 am »

Britain in secret talks with Syrian rebels

Former envoy's overture to enemies of Assad


Britain has formally opened talks with the Syrian opposition movement as international pressure continues to mount against the beleaguered regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

Frances Guy, a former ambassador to Lebanon, met members of the exiled opposition in Paris yesterday. The Foreign Secretary, William Hague, is to meet members of the Syrian opposition in London next week when they will also hold talks with senior officials in Downing Street.

Although the UK, along with other Western states like France – which appealed to the United Nations yesterday to impose tougher sanctions – has been in informal contact with the opposition for the last three months, the progression of the working relationship opens up the prospect of the rebels eventually being recognised as the country's representatives and supplanting the Assad regime.

rest: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/politics/britain-in-secret-talks-with-syrian-rebels-6264592.html

hmmm, where have i seen this before?
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« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2011, 05:48:05 am »

Clinton says there could be civil war in Syria

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Friday Syria could slide into civil war but she did not foresee the global community intervening in the same way it did in Libya.


"I think there could be a civil war with a very determined and well-armed and eventually well-financed opposition that is, if not directed by, certainly influenced by defectors from the army," Clinton told NBC news in an interview in Indonesia, where she was attending a regional summit.

"We're already seeing that, something that we hate to see because we are in favor of a peaceful protest and a nonviolent opposition," she said.

Clinton said, however, that she saw no prospect for the kind of coordinated international intervention that occurred in Libya, where a NATO-led coalition won a U.N. mandate to mount air strikes in support of rebels fighting Muammar Gaddafi.

"There is no appetite for that kind of action vis-a-vis Syria," Clinton said, pointing to regional moves by the Arab League and Turkey as key to persuading Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to halt the violence against civilians.

rest: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/18/us-syria-usa-clinton-idUSTRE7AH2LQ20111118
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« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2011, 05:49:21 am »

Report: Russia warships to enter Syria waters in bid to stem foreign intervention

Syrian official says Damascus agrees 'in principle' to allow entrance of Arab League observer mission; 22-member body proposed sending hundreds of observers to the to help end the bloodshed.


http://www.haaretz.com/news/middle-east/report-russia-warships-to-enter-syria-waters-in-bid-to-stem-foreign-intervention-1.396359


Quote
Syria: Russia says conflict 'is similar to civil war'

Russia's Foreign Minister has said the situation in Syria is beginning to resemble civil war after defected soldiers attacked a key army base.

Sergei Lavrov said the Arab League must call on all sides to end the violence.

Last month Moscow vetoed a UN resolution condemning the violence and called for dialogue between the government and opposition groups.

The Arab League has suspended Syria and given the government three days to end the "bloody repression".

The League's 22 members said Syria must allow in a team of international monitors or face sanctions.

The plan drawn up by the Arab League earlier this month calls on Syria to withdraw tanks from restive cities, cease its attacks on protesters and engage in dialogue with the opposition within two weeks.

Mr Assad had agreed to the plan, but has failed to honour it and the violence has continued.

France's Foreign Minister Alain Juppe is heading for Turkey for talks on how to address the growing crisis.

rest: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-15769804
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« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2011, 01:36:49 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/syrian-troops-attack-despite-arab-peace-plan-101630726.html


Syrian troops attack despite Arab peace plan
11/19/11

BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian troops stormed a central town and a northwestern region in search of regime opponents on Saturday, activists said, a day after the government agreed in principle to allow the Arab League to send observers to oversee a peace plan proposed by the 22-member bloc. At least 15 people were killed, activists said.

The attacks on the town of Shezar in the central province of Hama and on the restive Jabal al-Zawiya region near the Turkish border came as pressure mounted on Damascus to end its eight-month crackdown on anti-government protesters. The unrest has killed more than 3,500 people since mid-March, according to U.N. estimates.

The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and another activist group called the Local Coordination Committees said land and cellular telephone lines as well as electricity were cut in the Jabal al-Zawiya region in the northwestern province of Idlib, where army defectors have been active for months.

At least 15 people were killed, around half of them in Idlib province, the LCC said. The observatory had a higher toll of 16 dead and said they included two civilians and two army defectors killed in a clash with troops in Qusair near the border with Lebanon, as well as four members of the air force intelligence whose car was ambushed in Hama by gunmen believed to be army defectors.

Syria agreed in principle Friday to allow dozens of Arab observers into the country to oversee an Arab League peace plan that calls on the government to stop attacking demonstrators, pull tanks out of cities and begin negotiations with the opposition.

It was a significant concession from a hard-line regime that loathes any sort of outside interference. But critics say the government is only stalling, trying to defuse international pressure while continuing its bloody crackdown.

The Arab League has already suspended Syria's membership in the bloc for failing to abide by the peace plan. On Wednesday, the league gave Damascus three days to accept the observer mission or face economic sanctions.

Violence has escalated in Syria over the past week, as army dissidents who sided with the protests have grown more bold, fighting back against regime forces and even assaulting military bases. Activist groups said security forces on Friday killed at least 16 anti-government protesters.

Pressure from European capitals and the U.S. is also building on President Bashar Assad to end the bloodshed.

An official at Britain's Foreign Office said Foreign Secretary William Hague intends to meet opposition representatives in London on Monday.

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe called on the U.N. Security Council to strengthen sanctions against Assad's regime. However, Russia, which holds veto power in the council, urged caution in moving against Damascus.

In Washington, State Department spokesman Mark Toner said the U.S. has seen no signs that Syria's government will honor the Arab League proposal.

Syria's neighbor to the north, Turkey, has become one its most vocal critics, a notable shift because the two countries once had close political and economic ties.

On Saturday, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, commenting on the deteriorating relations between his country and its southern neighbor, accused Syria of not fulfilling promises for reform or to stop the bloodshed.

"In the past nine years, it was Syria and the Syrian people — rather than Turkey — that had benefited from the Turkish-Syrian friendship," Erdogan said.

"... Syria has not kept its promises to Turkey, to the Arab League or to the world. It made promises but did not fulfill them. It has not acted in a sincere trustworthy manner," he said.

The attacks on Jabal al-Zawiya came two days after an army force in the nearby area of Wadi al-Deif came under attack by army defectors, a clash that lasted four hours and left an unknown number of casualties among troops loyal to Assad, an activist said.

The activist, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter, said troops fired heavy machine guns mounted on armored personnel carriers.

The Arab League observer mission aims to prevent violence and monitor a cease-fire that Damascus agreed to last week but has been unwilling — or unable — to implement.

Nabil Elaraby, the head of the Arab League, said in a statement Friday that he received "amendments" to the monitoring mission from Damascus, which the league is studying. He gave no details on the changes Syria seeks.

The original league proposal had been for a 500-member observer mission but the number has dropped to 40, said Ibrahim el-Zaafarani, an Egyptian member of the Arab Medical Union who is expected to be part of the team for Syria. He said it was not clear why or on whose behest the number was reduced.
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« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2011, 02:02:35 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/dozens-protest-jerusalem-supporting-syria-152432344.html

11/19/11

Dozens protest in Jerusalem supporting Syria

..Dozens of protesters gathered in front of the US consulate in west Jerusalem on Saturday in support of the embattled Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad.

Arab-Israeli and Palestinian protesters waved Syrian flags and held portraits of Assad, an AFP photographer reported. Israeli police and security guards deployed outside the consulate did not intervene.

"Down with imperialism and the reactionary conspiracy against Syria," one banner read. Another said: "Hands off Syria."

Other signs denounced Qatar and the Arab League, accusing both of joining a common front with the Unites States against Damascus.

The protest came hours before an Arab League deadline for Damascus to stop its lethal crackdown on a popular revolt and a day after Syrian security forces killed at least 15 civilians.

..
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« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2011, 07:41:27 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/syria-calls-arab-league-meet-avert-suspension-151134269.html

Deadline passes with no sign of Syria violence abating

11/19/11

..BEIRUT (Reuters) - An Arab League deadline for Syria to end its repression of anti-government unrest passed with no sign of violence abating, and President Bashar al-Assad remained defiant in the face of growing international isolation.

"The conflict will continue and the pressure to subjugate Syria will continue," he told Britain's Sunday Times newspaper. "Syria will not bow down."

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 14 people were killed Saturday by government security forces. Friday dozens were reported killed in clashes.

The Arab League had Wednesday set a Saturday deadline for Syria to comply with a peace plan which would entail a military pullout from around restive areas, and threatened sanctions if Assad failed to end the violence.

The League, a group of Arab states, suspended Syria's membership in a surprise move last week.

Non-Arab Turkey, once an ally of Assad's, is also taking an increasingly tough attitude to Damascus.

Turkish newspapers said Saturday Ankara had contingency plans to create no-fly or buffer zones to protect civilians in neighboring Syria if the bloodshed worsens.

"It's almost certain that Bashar al-Assad's regime is going down, all the assessments are made based on this assumption. Foreign Ministry sources say that the sooner the regime goes down, the better for Turkey," one paper said.

"It is out of the question that Turkey carries out a military intervention to change the regime. However, it takes a flexible stance on opposition groups running activities in Turkey."

Turkish President Abdullah Gul told Britain's Telegraph newspaper: "With a strong and clear voice we are saying that the legitimate demands of the (Syrian) people are being supported by us."

The United Nations says the crackdown on the Syrian protests has killed at least 3,500 people since March. Authorities blame the violence on foreign-backed armed groups which it says have killed some 1,100 soldiers and police.

Syria has barred most independent journalists from entering the country, making it difficult to verify reports from activists or officials.

DESERTERS

Dissident colonel Riad al-Asaad, organizing defectors in Syria from his new base in southern Turkey, said in a television interview with Al Jazeera Saturday that no foreign military intervention was needed other than providing a no-fly zone and weapons supplies.

He said more deserters would swell his Free Syrian Army's ranks if there were protected zones to which they could flee: "Soldiers and officers in the army are waiting for the right opportunity."

The dissident colonel denied government allegations that neighboring states were allowing arms smuggling across their borders into Syria. He said "not a single bullet" had been smuggled from abroad.

Weapons were brought by defectors, obtained in raids on the regular army or bought from arms dealers inside Syria, he said.

Saturday, Syria's state news agency SANA said security forces had captured 140 wanted men from several parts of the country that had seen protests.

President Assad repeated his assertion that any foreign military action against Syria would create an "earthquake" across the Middle East.

"If they are logical, rational and realistic, they shouldn't do it because the repercussions are very dire. Military intervention will destabilize the region as a whole, and all countries will be affected," he said.

(Writing by Andrew Roche; Editing by Andrew Heavens)

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« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2011, 08:53:11 am »

Blasts in Syrian capital as Assad vows crackdown


http://news.yahoo.com/blasts-syrian-capital-assad-vows-crackdown-092941460.html

BEIRUT (AP) — Residents in the Syrian capital awoke to two loud explosions Sunday amid reports from activists that the Damascus headquarters of the ruling Baath party had been hit by several rocket-propelled grenades.

There was no immediate confirmation of the report but the Free Syrian Army, a group of military defectors, claimed responsibility for the attack.

In a statement posted on the group's Facebook page, the FSA said the assault caused casualties and damage to the building. But eyewitnesses said the party headquarters appeared intact and reported no significant security deployment around it.

If true, the Damascus attack on the Baath Party's main building would signal a significant shift in the eight-month revolution against President Bashar Assad, bringing the violence that has engulfed much of the rest of the country to the heart of the Syrian capital, which has so far been relatively untouched.

In Cairo, the Arab League said it has rejected amendments proposed by Syria to a peace plan to end the crisis, saying the changes put forward by Damascus alter the plan's "essence."

The 22-member organization did not give details of Syria's proposed amendments. But it said in a statement Sunday that Damascus' proposals were unacceptable because they introduce "drastic changes" to the mandate of an observers' mission the league wants to dispatch to Syria to ensure the implementation of the peace plan.

The Arab League has already suspended Syria's membership over its failure to abide by the plan, which calls for the withdrawal of the government's tanks from the streets, the release of political prisoners and a halt to attacks on civilians.

An Arab League official speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief the media said the Syrian government was required to implement the peace plan in its entirety.

Assad, meanwhile, vowed to continue with a security crackdown to crush "militants" who he says are massacring Syrians on a daily basis.

"The role of the government is to fight those militants in order to restore stability and to protect civilians," he said in an interview with Britain's Sunday Times newspaper. He also repeated earlier warnings that any foreign military intervention in Syria would "shake the entire Middle East."

On Sunday, activist groups said at least three people were killed in continuing operations by security forces, including two in the flashpoint central city of Homs and one in northern Syria.

Syria's uprising against Assad, although largely peaceful, has grown more violent and militarized in recent weeks, as frustrated protesters see the limits of peaceful action. Army dissidents who sided with the protests have also grown bolder, fighting back against regime forces and even attacking military bases, raising fears of a civil war in Syria.

The Free Syrian Army group of dissident soldiers this week staged their boldest operation yet, striking a military intelligence building in a Damascus suburb.

If Sunday's attack on the Baath Party headquarters in Damascus is confirmed, it would mark the first assault on a government building in what has so far been a relatively quiet central Damascus.

The Local Coordination Committees activist network and several residents reported several explosions in the district of Mazraa in the heart of the Syrian capital.

The LCC said in a statement that the building had been hit at daybreak Sunday by several rocket-propelled grenades and that two fire brigades headed toward the area amid a heavy security presence. The group said it had no further details.

The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said unknown gunmen on motorcycles threw first a sound bomb and then fired RPGs at the Baath party headquarters, hitting the external wall of the building. Two other grenades missed the target, it said.

Residents in the Syrian capital said they heard two loud explosions but could not confirm whether the building had been hit.

"I woke up to the sound of two loud thuds," said a resident of the area who asked that he remain anonymous for fear of reprisals. "We have no idea what they were."

The U.N. says more than 3,500 people in Syria have been killed in the crackdown since the start of the uprising in mid-March. Assad, in the interview, said more than 800 Syrian officers and security forces were killed.

"We are not talking about peaceful demonstrations, we are talking about militants," he said.

Syrian TV said the country's foreign minister will announce Damascus' position on the Arab initiative later Sunday.

Assad, however, lashed out at the Arab League and said the peace plan was aimed at giving the international community an excuse to meddle in his country.

"It's been done to show that there's a problem between the Arabs, thus providing Western countries with a pretext to conduct a military intervention against Syria," he said.

The consequence of any such intervention, he warned, would be "an earthquake that would shake the entire Middle East."

In the interview, Assad said he feels "pain and sorrow" for the bloodshed but added the solution was to eliminate the militants he blames for much of the violence. The Assad regime maintains the militants are playing out a foreign agenda to isolate and weaken Syria.

"The conflict will continue and the pressure to subjugate Syria will also continue," he said. "However I assure you that Syria will not bow down and that it will continue to resist the pressure being imposed on it."

Assad, who took over power from his late father, Hafez, in 2000, said there would be parliamentary elections in February or March, after which there would be a new government and new constitution.

"That constitution will set the basis of how to elect a president ... the ballot box should decide who should be president."

..
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« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2011, 11:40:45 pm »

Violence Continues in Syria as Condoleezza Rice Promotes Unilateral U.S. Action
November 20, 2011

Thousands attend a pro-Assad rally in October


As clashes continue in Homs with opposition forces and pro-Assad forces engaging in what the New York Times calls, “A harrowing sectarian war,” Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice advocates unilateral U.S. action on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Rice says that Bashar al-Assad is bringing his country to the brink of a civil war, although it is arguable that civil war is already exactly what is going on with heavily armed opposition clashing with government forces and attacks on government compounds and vehicles.

She also said that ousting Assad would be a “great thing” for the people of Syria, along with U.S. interests and according to the Associated Press, “anyone seeking a more peaceful Middle East.”

Her statements are far from groundbreaking except in that she called for the “toughest” possible penalties against the Syrian government while saying that if Russia and China block sanctions in the United Nations, the United States should either apply pressure with allies or act unilaterally.

She also promoted more assistance to the Syrian opposition, which has already become a bloody insurgent force that has attacked government compounds and vehicles along with a rocket attack on the Baath Party’s headquarters in the Syrian capital of Damascus.

Eyewitnesses reported that the headquarters appeared intact and no large security force deployment was reported after activists said the building was hit with several rocket-propelled grenades.

This comes as the Assad government rejected the Arab League’s planned mission to send so-called “monitoring” forces, which would likely do a lot more than just monitoring like Qatar did in Libya.

The Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moualem said today that the proposed Arab League mission has “pervasive jurisidcation that reaches the level of violating Syrian sovereignty” and added that the Arab League would receive a letter from him questioning their role.

Previously the Arab League declared that Assad’s forces must withdraw from cities in which clashes are occurring by November 19th, along with starting dialogue with the opposition.

However, the opposition flatly rejected the notion of talking with Assad, just like the al Qaeda-affiliated and Western-backed rebels did in Libya.

The League outright rejected the Syrian request to modify the proposal which would send more than 500 monitors into the country, which Syria had tentatively agreed to on Friday.

The New York Times has painted a quite ugly picture of the sectarian violence that is occurring in Syria, describing, “supporters and opponents of the government [which have been] blamed for beheadings, rival gangs carrying out tit-for-tat kidnappings, minorities fleeing for their native villages, and taxi drivers too fearful of drive-by shootings to ply the streets.”

It is a grim picture indeed which places blame on both parties which is something the establishment media has been avoiding, painting them as “pro-democracy protesters” whenever possible just like they did with the Libyan rebels.

Despite this fact, the Obama administration is, yet again, placing the blame on the government, saying that the longer Assad “stays in power, what you see in Homs, you’ll see across Syria.”

If armed forces started attacking government buildings in the United States along with government vehicles and pro-government individuals, you can bet that the American government would wipe them out with impunity.

Seeing how police brutalize students sitting on the ground with their arms linked, can you imagine what force we would see if they were actually armed insurgents?

Yet of course, the American government attempts to be the moral authority despite the fact that the Obama administration has absolutely no place to do so.

The New York Times quotes a predictably anonymous American official who claims that the Obama administration believed that the Syrian government withdrew forces from Homs in accordance with the Arab League’s plan.

However, the article claims that several residents report that the government just repainted tanks and other military vehicles blue and then redeployed them as a police force.

Unsurprisingly, these reports, like all of the reports coming out of Syria, are unverified and come from so-called activists.

Abu Hassan, a man described by the Times as a 40-year-old activist in Homs said, “The regime wants to say to the Arab observers that the police are confronting protesters, not the army or security men.”

An anonymous man identified as a “prominent Sunni activist” by the New York Times said, “There are shabeeha on both sides now,” shaheeba being an Arabic word referring to government paramilitary forces.

While he blamed the Assad government for fomenting the sectarian strife he said, “I feel disgusted at what’s happening in Syria, and I am afraid of what might happen next.”

If the West has its way, he should be very afraid, but if Russia keeps up their stance, especially with the military presence, it will be much more difficult for Western nations to conduct the invasion they’ve been promoting for so long.

That being said, the West is already intervening in Syria, albeit not directly, and has been for some time now.

Yet the West is getting more brazen by the day with the British openly announcing that the Syrian opposition will meet with U.K. Foreign Secretary William Hague as soon as tomorrow, November 21st.

A London-based spokesperson who remains (as per usual) unnamed by Businessweek, said that the Syrian opposition has been meeting with officials from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office for several months.

The Western interference is unlikely to help the situation, given that the violence occurring in Syria now is largely driven by purely sectarian motives, at least in Homs if the unverified reports cited by the New York Times are to be believed.

A 54-year-old Alawite in Homs, Mohammed Saleh, who is a communist and former 12-year political prisoner released in 2000, claimed that on Sunday insurgents stopped a minivan full of factory employees, told the Sunni Muslims and Christians to leave and then kidnapped 17 Alawites.

He then said that the families of the Alawites took to the streets and randomly kidnapped Sunnis after demanding to see their identification and seeing their family name which indicates the sect they belong to.

Saleh said that after days of negotiations at the request of families he secured the release of all 36 individuals that were kidnapped but said that many others were still missing as a result of kidnappings.

Saleh has obvious reason to hold a grudge against Assad’s government, and he is indeed anti-government but added, “Now I am being critical of some of the revolutionaries. We are against the regime and we want it to fall, but the revolutionaries need to present a better and more beautiful alternative. And if the opposition is going to be similar to the regime, it’s going to be dangerous.”

It’s somewhat encouraging to see that the establishment media is covering this aspect of the conflict seeing as they glossed over it so much in Libya.

Never is it as cut-and-dried as the entire populous being anti-government and a brutal dictator instructing heartless military forces to kill his own citizens.

Just like in Libya, Syria has both pro-Assad rallies and anti-Assad activists in the streets and foreign meddling is not going to improve the situation by bombing the country into oblivion.

The New York Times reports that through a dozen interviews they found that Homs is in a state of chaos with paramilitary forces on both sides burning shops and homes and forcing Alawites to flee to their villages of origin.

They report a ramping up of random kidnappings of unknown numbers and some say the abductees are sometimes used as “bargaining chips,” for what is not clear.

Yet another anonymous “dissident activist” said that his cousin, an Alawite, was kidnapped and, “He was found killed and his head was chopped off.”

In contrast, an additional anonymous Sunni activist said that Alawites are only kidnapped in retaliation and denied that anyone had been beheaded by insurgents.

He claimed that the sectarian violence “was minimal compared with the ferocity of the government’s crackdown.”

But another man, identified only as Hisham, said that Sunni insurgents were killing Alawites in order to drive them out of Alawite dominated neighborhoods, “where support for Mr. Assad runs strongest.”

One can only gather from all of these reports is that many of the activists are either manufacturing events, blowing them out of proportion or some mix of the two.

Or, there is also the real possibility that some or all of the reports are completely and totally manufactured from whole cloth without an ounce of truth to them whatsoever.

The fact is that nothing can be confirmed, far too many sources are anonymous, and the establishment media runs with anything the opposition says while rejecting anything the Syrian government says.

The events in Libya and Syria perfectly exemplify the double standard held by the American government and the corporate-controlled media.

If the protesters are in a foreign country, they are peaceful pro-democracy protesters regardless of their status as armed insurgents who are killing each other and government forces.

Here in the United States, the government stands by in silence while unarmed, peaceful Americans are brutalized by police for expressing their right to free speech and assembly, and in doing so shows that they are complicit in these crimes.

Yet of course, to counter all of the coverage of sectarian violence and the reports of paramilitary forces on both sides, the New York Times peddles the oft-cited United Nations number of 3,500 killed by the government, which is wholly unverified and based purely off of the claims made by so-called activists.

The looming question is: how will the West step in this time?

Indirectly through supporting the opposition in every way possible without directly striking Assad forces?

Or, will they ignore the Russian ships being deployed to Syrian waters and engage in another bombing campaign in order to cash in on the rebuilding process and loot the country under “humanitarian” pretenses just like Libya?

http://endthelie.com/
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« Reply #22 on: November 21, 2011, 12:14:26 pm »

Gunmen attack Turkish buses in Syria, 2 wounded: media

Gunmen opened fire on a convoy of Turkish buses inside Syria carrying pilgrims returning from the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia early on Monday, wounding two Turks, Turkish media reported.

Reports of the incident were fragmentary and Turkish authorities said they were still trying to establish what had happened. Some of the shaken travelers said the attackers appeared to be Syrian soldiers.

REST: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/21/us-turkey-syria-attack-idUSTRE7AK1NJ20111121
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« Reply #23 on: November 21, 2011, 12:26:41 pm »

US: Ambassador to Syria will not return to Damascus as planned this month - Reuters
Story data:

http://www.breakingnews.com/
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« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2011, 03:42:07 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/turkey-says-syria-cant-oppress-people-forever-131222633.html

11/21/11

[size=18]Turkey says Syria can't oppress people forever[/size]

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey warned Syria's president Monday that he cannot continue to oppress his people with tanks and guns forever, even as Syrian soldiers opened fire on at least two buses carrying Turkish citizens, witnesses and officials said.

In separate attacks, Syrian security forces killed at least 13 people during raids in central Syria Sunday, activists said. The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and the Local Coordination Committees said most of the deaths were in the flashpoint city of Homs, a hotbed of dissent against Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime.

The attacks on the buses, which wounded two people, appeared to be retaliation for Turkey's mounting criticism of Assad, whose military crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising against his rule has killed nearly 4,000 people.

"You can only continue with tanks and guns to a certain point, the day will come when you will go," Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said during a speech at an international religion conference in Istanbul. "Sooner or later, the oppressed will win."

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« Reply #25 on: November 22, 2011, 05:04:07 am »

Turkey's Prime Minister Erdogan says Bashar Assad must step down, calls fight against Syrian people 'cowardice' - AP

http://www.breakingnews.com/
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« Reply #26 on: November 22, 2011, 02:40:40 pm »

Big time escalation!!!

Arab states, Turkey plan 'No-Fly Zone' over Syria

Senior European sources said that Arab jet fighters, and possibly Turkish warplanes, backed by American logistic support will implement a no fly zone in Syria's skies, after the Arab League will issue a decision, under its Charter, calling for the protection of Syrian civilians.

The sources told Kuwait's al Rai daily that the no fly ban will include a ban on the movement of Syrian military vehicles, including tanks, personnel carriers and artillery, adding that this move would aim at curbing the movement of Assad forces, and cripple their ability to bomb cities. The European sources said the no fly ban might lead to the paralysis of the Syrian regime forces "in less than 24 hours."

Meanwhile, it is reported that the leadership of the Turkish General Staff informed all the concerned parties with the Syrian issue its rejection of the idea that the Turkish army would launch any invasion to the Syrian territory including the area adjacent to the Turkish border to establish a "buffer zone" to protect civilians fleeing the violence.

http://www.albawaba.com/news/arab-states-turkey-plan-no-fly-zone-over-syria-402102

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« Reply #27 on: November 22, 2011, 04:13:40 pm »

Iran who?

Next target is sure looking like Syria, which is an indirect action towards Iran, without having to confront them directly. Cut off supply lines. Classic military strategy. And you can be sure Israel is standing at the ready to cove their flanks by watching Iran, while Syria falls.

"And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch." Mark 13:37 (KJB)
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« Reply #28 on: November 22, 2011, 05:19:43 pm »

Isaiah 17:1-3 is a big time prophecy that pretty much all of Churchianity ends up ignoring - sure, Iran may be part of the signs of the end times, however, again, Isaiah 17:1-3 can't be stressed enough, and it looks like it's escalating before our very eyes.
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« Reply #29 on: November 23, 2011, 02:41:13 pm »


Arab States, Turkey, U.S. Plan ‘No-Fly Zone’ Over Syria
November 23rd, 2011

Here we go again.



Senior European sources said that Arab jet fighters, and possibly Turkish warplanes, backed by American logistic support will implement a no fly zone in Syria’s skies, after the Arab League will issue a decision, under its Charter, calling for the protection of Syrian civilians.

The sources told Kuwait’s al Rai daily that the no fly ban will include a ban on the movement of Syrian military vehicles, including tanks, personnel carriers and artillery, adding that this move would aim at curbing the movement of Assad forces, and cripple their ability to bomb cities. The European sources said the no fly ban might lead to the paralysis of the Syrian regime forces “in less than 24 hours.”

http://www.albawaba.com/news/arab-states-turkey-plan-no-fly-zone-over-syria-402102
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