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Catholics threaten to crucify evangelicals

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http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
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Lisa
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« on: September 23, 2011, 07:30:36 am »

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO (Worthy News)– At least 70 evangelical Christians in Mexico's east-central region were homeless Saturday, September 17, after being expelled by local authorities from their village where traditional Catholics reportedly threatened to "crucify or lynch" them.

The government of Puebla state "bowed" to pressure from the traditional Catholics in San Rafael Tlanalapan village, some 96 kilometers (60 miles) from the capital Mexico City, reported Mexico's leading La Jornada de Oriente newspaper.

Initially about 50 Protestant families were ordered to leave the village by September 12, but some were allowed to stay under condition they would worship outside the area. Additionally they are not allowed to intervene with traditional Catholics, who practice a mix of indigenous and Catholic rituals.

"There is an agreement reached with the local authority that those evangelicals have to go who are not originating from the area as the state government can not guarantee their safety," La Jornada de Oriente quoted regional government official Roberto Solano Pineda as saying.

PICKING UP BELONGINGS

Witnesses earlier said they saw several evangelicals, including a pastor, arriving with suitcases to quickly pick up their belongings. Traditional Catholics told them they would be "crucified or lynched" if they dared to stay after the September 12 ultimatum, locals and reporters said.

The mayor did not stop the expulsions amid fears he could be expelled himself by Catholics, Mexican media reported.

Catholic Irma Diaz Perez told local television he was pleased as "They will never return, because we have drawn up a document wherein they have no permission to come back now or ever."

A few residents who agreed to discuss the issue with reporters said they regretted that authorities did not pressure local priest, identified as Benítez González, to halt the expulsions.

YEARS OF TENSIONS

Tensions date back to 2006 when local Catholics reportedly refused to connect evangelical residents to a water network. Officials also reported attacks against evangelical families in previous years.

Evangelical Pastor Josué Jiménez Ovando said he had provided videos of the attacks to authorities, but the local Catholic church has denied wrongdoing.

There have been several attacks against evangelicals in Mexico, a heavily traditional Catholic nation, and some were held for crimes they did not commit.

In 2009 twenty men, most of them evangelical Christians, were freed after spending more than a decade in prison after Mexico's Supreme Court overturned their sentences in a massacre in southern Chiapas state.

Mexico's top court ruled that prosecutors used illegally obtained evidence to charge the men with involvement in killing 45 Indian villagers, including children as young as two months old, on December 22, 1997, in the hamlet of Acteal.

http://www.worthynews.com/10963-mexico-evangelicals-leave-village-amid-crucifixion-threats

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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 08:19:24 am »

Noise Of Thunder Radio - Spurgeon On Rome - 9.22.11
Thursday, September 22, 2011 at 1:57AM

Spurgeon On Rome - 9.22.11
http://www.noiseofthunder.com/storage/NOTR_Spurgeon.On.Rome_9.22.11.mp3


Noise Of Thunder Radio - Abominations Of Mystery Babylon - 9.23.11
Friday, September 23, 2011 at 2:15AM

Abominations of Mystery Babylon - 9.23.11
http://www.noiseofthunder.com/storage/NOTR_Abominations.of.Mystery.Babylon_9.23.11.mp3

Chris is all over this... wont here about on PPF!!
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« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2011, 07:44:22 pm »

Christians in Mexico Forced From Village
Traditionalist Catholics in Puebla state threaten to kill Protestants
By Compass Direct News
 
About 70 Protestant Christians lived in the village of San Rafael Tlanalapan, Puebla state, until Monday (Sept. 12), when they faced a frightening ultimatum – leave immediately or be “crucified or lynched.”

Evangelical Christians in Mexico Increasingly Persecuted by 'Traditional Catholics'Traditionalist Catholics in the village, near the municipality of San Martín Texmelucan about 60 miles from Mexico City, reportedly threatened to burn down or otherwise destroy their homes. The Protestants left.

The traditionalist Catholics, who practice a blend of indigenous and Catholic rituals, reportedly asserted that 20 years ago an assistant village president had vowed that no temple of any non-Catholic faith would ever be permitted in San Rafael Tlanalapan. Protestants in Puebla, Hidalgo, Chiapas and other states sometimes refuse to help pay for and participate in traditionalist Catholic festivals, which often include drunken revelry and what they regard as idolatrous adoration of saints.

In 2006, the Protestants in San Rafael Tlanalapan asked for government help after Catholics led village authorities to cut off their water supply.

Tensions reached a crisis level two weeks ago, when local priest Ascension Benitez Gonzalez reportedly said in a Sept. 4 sermon that his parishioners should pressure the Protestants to leave for good. Although their number has grown to 70, the evangelical Protestants have been allowed no place of worship.


On Sept. 7, the village’s assistant president, Antonio Garcia Ovalle, reportedly met with the Protestants. The evangelicals promised to leave, though the 200 traditionalist Catholics present sought to beat them and expel them right then. According to Puebla online news portal Quince minutes.com, the priest rang the church bells continually during the meeting.

The evangelicals’ departure date was set for Monday (Sept. 12). In a newscast two days later on TV Azteca of Puebla, area traditionalist Catholic Irma Diaz Perez rejoiced, saying, “They will never return, because we have drawn up a document wherein they have no permission to come back now or ever.”

On the same segment, another traditionalist Catholic, Hortencia Minero Garcia, said critics should not finger the priest for the expulsion.

“We are strong Catholics and respect our religion and don’t want anyone to touch our priest, because he has nothing to do with this – it is the people,” Minero Garcia said.

In the city of Puebla, the state capital, Catholic leaders tried to soften prejudices.

“It is necessary to respect the traditions of the towns,” Puebla Archbishop Victor Sanchez Espinosa told the daily La Jornada de Oriente. “The Catholics feel attacked, but we would hope there would be no violence. I invite the community, totally Catholic, and the small Christian community, to prudence, order and respect.”

The Protestants sought refuge in nearby towns, including the municipal center of San Martin Texmelucan, where their churches have become prominent. Others have reportedly fled to a church building in Alto Aposento.

The “Uses and Customs” section of the Mexican constitution grants indigenous communities some autonomy to exercise traditional law, although Protestant attorneys say it is misused to allow local authorities to violate minority communities’ religious freedom. The “Uses and Customs” article is designed to protect indigenous customs from government obliteration, but traditionalist Catholics evoke it to jail or expel those who differ from them, the attorneys say.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/christians-in-mexico-forced-from-village-55849/
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2012, 01:44:46 pm »

Mexican town celebrates Easter with ‘burning of the Jews’A small Chiapas town ends its Holy Week observance by parading Jewish effigies through the streets, then setting them on fire

The world is full of charming Easter traditions, but this isn’t one of them.

A newspaper in Mexico is detailing Sunday’s “burning of the Jews,” an annual tradition in Coita, a small town in the state of Chiapas. As part of the custom, locals spend the middle of their Holy Week making Jewish effigies — a reference to Judas Iscariot, the disciple who betrayed Jesus before his crucifixion.

The fake Jews are then displayed for three days in different parts of the town, serving as an example of poor conduct.

They’re ultimately paraded through the streets on Easter Sunday, with local children assigned to stand in front of them and collect money for flammable materials.

The article notes that the tradition differs in Coita, where locals set fire to the effigies on Easter itself, rather than the day before, as in other towns. The burning is followed by a dance, where locals eat a corn treat made with cocoa. The article says the custom “strengthens” the culture of the Zoque, an indigenous people in southern Mexico who were converted to Catholicism.

The ceremony seems to echo, to some extent, the “Running of the Jew” event depicted in Sacha Baron Cohen’s 2006 movie “Borat” — a work of fiction.

The Chiapas Herald takes an uncritical view of the ritual, reporting that it “fosters unity and respect” and “purifies the soul.”

http://www.timesofisrael.com/mexican-town-celebrates-easter-with-burning-of-the-jews/
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2012, 02:43:53 pm »

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The world is full of charming Easter traditions, but this isn’t one of them.

There is nothing "charming" about observing pagan fertility rituals.
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2014, 11:36:23 am »

Christians' Utilities Shut Off for Refusing to Participate in Religious Ceremony

Twenty-five Protestant families have had their water and electricity supplies disconnected and have effectively been put under house arrest in Mexico because of their refusal to participate in Traditionalist Catholic religious ceremonies.

On Feb. 11, village authorities cut off the Protestant families’ water supply. Two days later, their electricity supply was also disconnected, and chains, ropes and civilian guards were placed around the families’ homes in order to further isolate them.

On the same day, one member of the group was arbitrarily detained by village authorities and imprisoned for more than 24 hours after he attempted to reconnect his water while under the supervision of state officials and police. Village authorities in Unión Juárez, located in La Trinitaria municipality in the state of Chiapas also detained the police officers for 10 hours.

Traditionalist Catholic village authorities are demanding that the families, who belong to the local Mount Tabor Evangelical Church, contribute financially to religious festivals and have said they will not permit the families to reconnect their services or receive visitors until they pay 500 pesos (approximately $38) each.

The village authorities are justifying their actions as in line with the Law of Uses and Customs, which gives indigenous populations autonomy to exercise traditional forms of justice and to protect their culture.

The situation follows an escalation of discriminatory behavior toward the group of Protestant Christians in the municipality beginning in 2010, when the local village assembly blocked their access to firewood and refused them permission to attend or participate in village assembly meetings.

According to Luis Antonio Herrera, a local activist representing the victims, the families have pointed out that under the Mexican Constitution, they cannot legally be forced to be involved in festivals or ceremonies linked to religions to which they do not ascribe. The victims have filed a complaint with the National Commission for Human Rights.

Dr. Jorge Lee Galindo, director of Impulso 18, Christian Solidarity Worldwide's partner organization in Mexico, says, “Unfortunately, this case is not atypical in Chiapas, where village authorities regularly attempt to impose the majority religion on all inhabitants of the village. Crimes like this take place with impunity, contributing to a worsening of the situation, as can be seen in this case. State authorities should intervene in the early stages to prevent increasing violations of human rights, and those responsible for criminal acts must be held accountable in a court of law.”

Mervyn Thomas, chief executive of Christian Solidarity Worldwide, says, “We call on the government of Chiapas state and as well as the federal government to take urgent action to protect the fundamental rights of the people of La Union Juarez. It is unacceptable that access to electricity and water be used as a tool to enforce religious belief in a modern democracy with constitutional protections for religious freedom.

“We are also concerned that without swift action on the part of government officials, and based on the trajectory of similar cases, the situation could deteriorate further and lead to violence. Those who are responsible for the criminal acts committed thus far, including the deprivation of basic services, water and electricity, and arbitrary detention, must be prosecuted.”

http://www.charismanews.com/world/42967-authorities-shut-off-utilities-for-christians-who-refuse-to-participate-in-religious-ceremony
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2014, 12:36:24 pm »

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Mervyn Thomas, chief executive of Christian Solidarity Worldwide, says, “We call on the government of Chiapas state and as well as the federal government to take urgent action to protect the fundamental rights of the people of La Union Juarez. It is unacceptable that access to electricity and water be used as a tool to enforce religious belief in a modern democracy with constitutional protections for religious freedom.

And the irony about all this is that it's CATHOLICS nowdays(ie-Phyllis Shaeffer, who's a leading activist) who are crying for religious freedom!
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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2015, 05:56:08 am »

Protestants barred from village in Chiapas

Three Protestant members from Unión Juárez village, La Trinitaria municipality in Chiapas State were physically prevented from entering the village on 31 August and one was arbitrarily detained for 24 hours.
 
Village leaders blocked the three men from entering the village, citing a curfew, and other travel restrictions were placed on Protestants in the village.
 
According to Luis Herrera of the Coordination of Christian Organisation (COOC), René Vázquez, who was arbitrarily detained for 24 hours, had his mobile phone and cash stolen. Vasquez and two other Protestant men were returning home when they were stopped at a checkpoint outside the village at approximately 8pm. According to Herrera, there are no travel restrictions on anyone else but the Protestants in the village.
 
The events in Unión Juárez follow the arbitrary detention of three other Protestant men on 22 August in Nuevo Las Tacitas, Ocosingo municipality, Chiapas State. The three men, who belong to the Presbyterian Church, were detained as they arrived to the home of a local family to celebrate a religious thanksgiving day. They were imprisoned and ordered to pay a fine. According to COOC they refused to do so and the musical instruments they were carrying were confiscated. The men were freed after 24 hours but the instruments were not returned.
 
COOC reports that the government has not moved to hold local authorities to account for their illegal actions in either case. Herrera has also expressed concern that 27 families in Unión Juárez have had their electricity cut and access to clean water blocked for almost a year and a half because they declined to participate in Roman Catholic religious festivals. Many of the villagers now suffer from health problems because of their lack of access to clean water. Although the State Government has been slow to act, Herrera added that officials have promised to resolve the situation by mid September.

http://www.csw.org.uk/2015/09/04/news/2755/article.htm
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« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2015, 07:40:23 pm »

Mexico: 7 Evangelical Christians Jailed for Refusing to Convert to Catholicism

Seven Mexican evangelical Christians have reportedly been jailed for refusing to convert to Catholicism. International Christian Concern (ICC) reports the individuals were imprisoned in Chiapas on Dec. 15.
 
Eight evangelical families in Leyva Velazques were ordered to sign documents indicating their conversion to Catholicism or face expulsion. When seven individuals refused, they were imprisoned.
 
Christian Today reports the incident is an example of growing religious persecution in Mexico, where 82.7 percent of the population practice Roman Catholicism. Though Mexicans have the right to practice the religion of their choosing according to their Constitution, religious minorities are targeted in rural areas of the country without intervention from state or federal officials.
 
ICC Advocacy Director Isaac Six said, “It is simply unconscionable for the state and federal governments of Mexico to repeatedly ignore the arbitrary arrest and expulsion of their own citizens by local governments on the basis of religious belief.”

"Today, hundreds of men, women, and children are homeless in Mexico because they chose to follow their beliefs, and because their government refused to act. We call on the federal government of Mexico to immediately intervene and halt the unlawful detention of members of the evangelical community in Leyva Velazques.”

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/mexico-7-evangelical-christians-jailed-for-refusing-to-convert-to-catholicism.html
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« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2016, 05:35:39 pm »

Mexico ‘in denial’ over Christians forced out of homes for their beliefs

Mexico has a “policy of denial” about the thousands of evangelical Christians forced out of their homes because of their beliefs, according to a Mexican human rights activist.
Pedro Faro Navarro, director of the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Human Rights Centre, accused the government of “making up the figures” of people forcibly displaced because they have left the ‘traditionalist’ Church, which blends aspects of indigenous paganism and popular Catholicism.

He said that the scale of the problem is hard to gauge. “Unfortunately, there are no records that we can use to officially count the number of cases because the Mexican state has never recognised the problem of forced internal displacement,” he said.

According to the Mexican Commission for the Defence and Promotion of Human Rights, a non-governmental organisation, more than 287,000 cases of forced internal displacement took place in the last five years. But the UN-accredited National Human Rights Commission puts the figure at around 35,000.

Faro disputes both figures. “There are some who speak of more than a million people,” he said. “For the time being, what we know for definite is that the lowest number is always the official one.” Many families have to leave their homes and nobody comes to count them, he added.

In 2015, World Watch Monitor reported that 12 evangelical Christian families were allowed to return home five years after they were forced out by village elders. But many other families remain isolated, without access to schools or medical facilities.

Thirty people from the Tuxpan de Bolaños community in western Mexico were forced out of their homes in January 2016 because, they say, they were attracting other villagers to evangelical Christianity, posing a threat to their ancestral traditions.

They were forced out in the middle of the night and were given temporary shelter in warehouses in the town of Bolaños, 30 miles away and a three-hour drive through the mountains.

Eleven months on, the families remain in Bolaños, having been moved three times. They live under threat of moving again because their landlord is about to sell the warehouses. The families live, sleep, cook and eat in two rooms.

Víctor de la Cruz González, a primary school teacher, was working away from home when his wife, Rosa, and two children, aged three and nine, were displaced. He continues to work in the village but his family is not welcome back. Rosa said: “My husband comes to see us when he has money… I went back [to Tuxpan de Bolaños] once and people threw stones at the house we were sleeping in. They left holes in the roof and door.”

The pressures faced by evangelical Christians are most common in indigenous communities, because of the perception that they are disrupting cultural life. The two parties cannot seem to find a solution, Faro said.
“They have searched for a dialogue for many years, but core beliefs end up dominating the matter. It’s very difficult because each case must be examined within its cultural complexity,” he said.

“Sometimes there are reports that seem to be related to religious differences, but when you analyse them, you discover that this is only one of the factors, that they also involve political interests or power struggles. Each case is different and has to be well analysed.”

Faro added that he expects the displacement problem to escalate, because the state does not take action against the perpetrators. “The states in the north are most problematic, but no part of the country is free of this crisis,” he said.

There is no national law regarding forced internal displacement because the state doesn’t want to acknowledge there is a problem, Faro said.

“Accepting that it exists means having to confront it,” he added, but he said the Mexican government would not intervene because it was trying to encourage foreign investment in territories “where there are indigenous villages that are practically for sale”.

This lack of intervention at a national level “encouraged local governments to try and solve their own cases with the social programmes already in place”, he said. “[The states of] Chiapas, and later Guerrero, created their own legislation, but it is not being regulated, which renders it non-operational; they are laws that don’t function in practice. A project for a federal law is currently being discussed; it is an initiative by several senators and representatives, but it is not making any impact in government.”

Because he says he feels the Mexican government ignores the problem, Faro has reported the situation to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, an institution that promotes human rights across the Americas.

Faro said he believes the local government in Chiapas, where the Fray Bartolomé centre is situated, is especially compromised in its duty to maintain law and order because of complicity by some individuals in local crime networks.

“Chiapas has suffered for many years due to an armed internal conflict between its drug cartels, but there are also criminal organisations that do as they like, with open collaboration with, and protection from, the authorities. Civil servants in the government don’t do anything against these groups because they are accomplices. The situation exists in varying degrees in [the other states of] Coahuila, Chihuahua, Tamaulipas, Michoacán, Veracruz and Jalisco. However, I can guarantee that there are no states without any problems.”

Evangelical families’ isolation is compounded by the traditional Day of the Dead, and Halloween – the modern day variant imported from the US. Both are widely celebrated in schools, but evangelical Christian families have said that their children were forced to take part in the celebrations against their will.

In June, more than 100 Protestants were asked by the local authority to leave their village for not taking part in local festivals.

In 2009, one Protestant family was told they could not bury their child in a local graveyard because they had left the ‘traditionalist’ Church. They were subjected to the illegal confiscation of their properties, physical violence and denial of health services. The village authorities then forbade commercial transactions with them. With little political will to intervene and traditionalists and evangelicals at a stalemate, Faro sees no sign of imminent improvement. Without renewed efforts at dialogue between the two parties, he said evangelicals’ marginalisation will only worsen.

https://www.worldwatchmonitor.org/2016/12/4759489/
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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2017, 02:32:47 pm »

Mexican Christians Forced to Live in Wine Cellar after Refusing to Recant Faith

Seven Baptist families are living in a wine cellar after being expelled from their village because of their faith.

In January 2016, the townspeople of Tuxpan de Bolanos, in the western Mexican state of Jalisco, voted to kick the families out of the village after they refused to recant their faith.

Rosa Blanca Vázquez de la Rosa remembers that fateful day.

"They put us in the vans and abandoned us right there outside the village," Rosa told World Watch Monitor. "{We had} nothing at all but the clothes we had on when they came."

The plight of these families is just another example of the decades-long struggle that evangelical Christians in rural parts of Catholic-majority Mexico have experienced.

The human right's group, Open Doors, says they were evicted from their homes because of "religious reasons."

"It was because they are Christians, which the indigenous chiefs deemed incompatible with their culture and religious traditions," said Open Doors' Latin America analyst Dennis Petri.

Petri questions whether the 2,000 residents of Tuxpan de Bolanos had the right or even the legal basis to evict the Christian families.

"The indigenous chiefs claim it was, since they have the authority, as protected by the federal constitution, to govern based on their indigenous uses and customs," Petri told World Watch Monitor. "At the same time, the federal constitution also guarantees freedom of religion and human rights - you can't just force someone out of his home, for whatever reason, including religious reasons."

For the past year, Rosa and the other families have been living in temporary shelters provided by the government. The wine cellar is the latest one.

She said she tried to go back to her village, but was met with resistance.

"They threw stones at the house where we were sleeping. They left holes in the door and the roof," she said.

For this reason, some of the families are afraid of returning home and wish to be relocated.

"The state government does not know what to do because if it rules that the group must return to their homes, they violate indigenous autonomy. But if they don't, they violate human rights and religious freedom," Petri said. "For this reason their strategy is just to wait, trying to gain time and probably hoping the group may lose hope and just move on to somewhere else."

http://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/world/2017/january/mexican-christians-forced-to-live-in-wine-cellar-after-refusing-to-recant-faith
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« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2017, 07:45:22 pm »

Mexican Christian starts new life away from village where he was beaten, imprisoned and eventually forced to leave

After facing beatings, imprisonment and eventually exile from his home village, Lauro Pérez Núñez and his family are starting a brand new life.

He and his wife Amalia, converts to evangelical Christianity, were first ordered to leave La Chachalaca, in Oaxaca, southern Mexico, in 2015, together with their four children.

They were told it was because they no longer wanted to belong to the “traditionalist” church, which blends aspects of indigenous paganism and popular Catholicism.

Lauro was imprisoned four times in less than a year, and his cousin Misael was beaten while trying to defend Lauro’s sister from an angry crowd.

World Watch Monitor last caught up with them in May last year, two months after they’d returned to La Chachalaca, only to find they still weren’t welcome.

They now live in Ayotzintepec, also in Oaxaca, which is two-and­-a-half hours away from their old community. After months living in a small room in the back of a church, they finally have their own home, built with the help of other Christians.

Their children – Alma (12), David (11), Arnold (9) and Levy (2) – are settling into their new school there.

And this year, Lauro and Amalia have started a family business, a small eatery in the centre of the Ayotzintepec, called “Maná del Cielo” (Manna from Heaven).

They offer a variety of foods, including regional dishes such as tacos, quesadillas, sopes, pozoles, pancitas, tlayudas, and cheese and chicken empanadas.

In a telephone interview, Lauro told World Watch Monitor that the idea for this business was his wife’s.

“At first I had another type of business in mind, but she persuaded me that this was better,” he said. “You see, we already had experience in this sort of thing because when we lived in Mexico City, we prepared and sold food to people there, the same thing that we are doing here.

“It is a simple place, covering an area which is six-metres long by four-metres wide. It has no walls but a chain-link fence all around and the roof is made of galvanised steel sheets.”

The property belongs to Lauro’s aunt. She agreed to rent it out to them, and the cost of the refurbishing work will be deducted from the rent, which is 500 pesos ($23) a month.

“Our vision is that with this business we will be able to make a living out of it,” said Lauro. “Ours is a big family with lots of expenses, but we are confident that God will continue to provide for us.”

https://www.worldwatchmonitor.org/2017/03/mexican-christian-starts-new-life-away-from-village-where-he-was-beaten-imprisoned-and-eventually-forced-to-leave/
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The Man from George Street
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