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"and there shall be famines..."

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Psalm 51:17
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« Reply #60 on: March 15, 2013, 03:52:10 pm »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-21797095
3/15/13
New Zealand North Island hit by worst drought in 30 years

A drought has been declared on the entire North Island of New Zealand - in what the government describes as the worst dry spell in 30 years.

Farmers are especially hard hit, with losses in agriculture expected to shave about 1% off economic growth.

The capital Wellington is said to have just 18 days of water left, and parts of the South Island could soon be hit.

But there is likely to be some relief over the weekend when the first decent rainfall in two months is forecast.

'Perfect' conditions
 
The scale of the drought can be seen from space: satellite images show how parts of New Zealand have turned from lush green to parched brown.

Farmers, who traditionally drive the nation's economy, estimate that the drought has already cost them about NZ$1bn (£544m; $820m) in lost earnings.

They are now being offered financial assistance by the government to deal with the crisis.

"What we are telling our farmers is forget about this season, start concentrating on next season," Derek Spratt, the chairman of New Zealand's Rural Support Trust, told the BBC.

Some scientists say the unusually dry weather could be a harbinger of climate change.

At the same time, many city residents are enjoying sun soaked days as they go eating lunch outdoors or spend evening on the beach.

And winemakers describe the current conditions as perfect.
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« Reply #61 on: April 24, 2013, 11:21:41 am »

http://money.msn.com/now/post.aspx?post=d8b415e2-0985-432c-9bd0-a0a67209a20d
Record cold will mean costlier bread

It's known as winter wheat and is key to flour and exports, but freezing temperatures have added to drought to slash production figures.

4/24/13

Boy, was the groundhog wrong. It seems the winter weather currently gripping much of the Midwestern U.S. just won't let go. But this cold spell is more than just an annoyance -- it's creating some major problems for the nation's economically important wheat crop.  Record low temperatures, combined with the ongoing historic drought, are damaging winter wheat across the Great Plains states. And that will likely mean higher prices through much of the food chain. The U.S. is the world's largest exporter of wheat -- and industry analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg say American wheat farmers will most likely lose about 25% of their hard red winter wheat this season.

And hard red winter wheat is a big deal. It's the class of wheat used for many breads and in all-purpose flours, and it accounts for more than 40% of the overall U.S. wheat crop and half of U.S. wheat exports.  Bloomberg reports that Societe Generale estimates wheat futures prices will jump by 15%, to $8.50 a bushel, by the fourth quarter.

Winter wheat is sown in the autumn, goes dormant over the winter and starts growing in the spring. But this month in Kansas, the state with the largest wheat production, temperatures dropped to their lowest levels for the first half of April in more than a century. "I’m going to assume 75% of my wheat froze," Gary Millershaki, a farmer in southwestern Kansas, told Bloomberg about his 2,800 acres of hard red winter wheat. "It looks like someone sprayed a defoliant on it." Food Business News, quoting the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture weekly crop report, says overall growing conditions in the 18 major winter wheat states had 35% of the crop rated at good to excellent, compared to 63% during the same time period a year ago, with 32% of the current wheat crop rated fair and 33% at poor to very poor.

At the same time, U.S. government estimates say global wheat supplies will drop to a four-year low in 2013, with production also declining in other major wheat producing countries. There's one bit of silver lining, according to Food Business News. "Exceptional” drought conditions in some wheat-growing states, particularly Nebraska and North Dakota, are decreasing. And as of last week, moderate or worse drought conditions in the Lower 48 states fell to less than 50% for the first time since last June.
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« Reply #62 on: May 08, 2013, 12:39:39 pm »

Bad news at the grill as beef prices hit all-time high
5/7/13
http://www.nbcnews.com/business/bad-news-grill-beef-prices-hit-all-time-high-6C9814441

Outdoor chefs are in for an unhappy surprise as the summer grilling season approaches: The cost to fire up a backyard barbecue is going up.

The price of wholesale beef hit an all-time high Friday and there is no indication it will decline this year. While the price of beef alone is up at least 5 percent, that summer cookout is going to feel much more expensive to any serious barbecue aficionado buying good-quality meat.

“His meat has gone up. His buns have gone up. Everything’s gone up,” said Jim Early, the founder and president of the North Carolina Barbecue Society. Once you count all the fixins – ranging from brisket and chicken to barbecue slaw and salad – the price has doubled from just a few years ago. “The only thing that stayed the same is cabbage,” he said.

There are many causes for the increase, which has been edging up slowly. On Friday, the wholesale price of a USDA cut of choice beef reached $201.68 per 100 pounds. The previous high, $201.18, was set in October 2003. That was when all Canadian beef imports were prohibited after its first confirmed case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, also called mad cow disease. That peak turned out to be a short-term blip and the prices dropped by 30 percent by the end of the year.

Now, “it’s a whole different scenario,” Kevin Good, a senior analyst with CattleFax, told NBC News.

The U.S. cattle and calf herd is at its lowest level since 1952 and cattle producers have been hard hit by poor pasture conditions, a poor hay crop, drought in the Southern Plains and late freezing weather, according to a USDA economist. Those problems will linger at least until the second half of 2014, he said. Until then, that tight supply means higher beef prices, particularly for better cuts of meat.


More of that U.S. meat is also going overseas as foreign demand rises.

Among the increasing costs to raise cattle is a doubling of corn prices due to its demand for use to produce ethanol. The use corn ultimately results in better barbecue if it is mixed into the cow’s diet, Early said. “That’s what they feed to the cows for the white fat, which is what we want,” Early said. ”If they feed them $8 corn, that’s going to run our prices up.”

Early said the price increases won’t be as obvious to anyone buying factory-raised meats, which often use growth hormones to speed the fattening process and cut other costs. But as the big farmers are better able to absorb the pitfalls, the smaller farmers get nudged out of the business, further tightening the supply of those most choice meats, Early said. “They can’t make it,” Early said of the small farmers. “All it takes is something like a drought like they’ve been having and the yields go down.”

Although everything’s going up, there are ways to make your dollar go farther even when you’re not springing for filet mignon. Early suggests finding a good butcher who knows how to cut the meat in a way to enhance flavor. Also, find recipes or take a class to learn how to get the most flavor out of the cheaper cuts, Early said.

“The public will adjust to it, like they have for $15 movie tickets,” Early said.

While the public is indeed paying for more expensive beef, there are also signs they are slowly making changes.“US consumers are eating less beef” than six years ago, Good said.

Tyson Foods on Monday said it sold 3.9 percent less beef in the quarter that ended March 31 compared with a year ago. Its beef prices went up 6.5 percent over that same period, the company said. “Consumers,” Tyson said in its quarterly report, “opted for the relative value of chicken.”

When it comes to grilling, hamburgers are still the No. 1 choice, according to the 24th annual Weber GrillWatch Survey. Hot dogs, steaks, chicken pieces were also popular. But the new trend of the past three years is the increasing use of vegetables in addition to meats, said Mike Kempster, the executive vice president at Weber grill maker.

People are becoming flexitarians and going meatless more often. Health and costs are factors, especially for women cooks, Kempster said. “The guys just want the beef,” Kempster said.

It’s not just at home where consumers will see the sticker shock. Overall restaurant menu prices have gone up, boosted in large part by the rise in beef, said B. Hudson Riehle, senior vice president of the research division for the National Restaurant Association.

Nationally, menu prices have gone up 2.3 percent over the first quarter of this year compared with the first quarter of 2012, Riehle said. At that same time, wholesale food prices went up 2.6 percent, meaning restaurant owners have been absorbing some of the costs and not passing it all on to the price-sensitive consumer.

A recent beef and pork survey by the Technomic food trend consultancy found that 46 percent of diners said they have noticed beef prices going up, but only 21 percent said they are already ordering less beef.

“Consumers aren’t changing their behavior,” said Kelly Weikel, a senior consumer research manager at Technomic. But it’s not going to take much more for them to order something different at a restaurant. When the price increase $1.50 to $2 more, 49 percent of beef-eaters said they’ll make a switch, according to the survey.
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« Reply #63 on: May 08, 2013, 04:08:41 pm »

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Now, “it’s a whole different scenario,” Kevin Good, a senior analyst with CattleFax, told NBC News.

The U.S. cattle and calf herd is at its lowest level since 1952 and cattle producers have been hard hit by poor pasture conditions, a poor hay crop, drought in the Southern Plains and late freezing weather, according to a USDA economist. Those problems will linger at least until the second half of 2014, he said. Until then, that tight supply means higher beef prices, particularly for better cuts of meat.

More of that U.S. meat is also going overseas as foreign demand rises.

Among the increasing costs to raise cattle is a doubling of corn prices due to its demand for use to produce ethanol. The use corn ultimately results in better barbecue if it is mixed into the cow’s diet, Early said. “That’s what they feed to the cows for the white fat, which is what we want,” Early said. ”If they feed them $8 corn, that’s going to run our prices up.”

Yes, it is. Corporate agriculture has made sure of that.

The love of money has caused people to seek profit from farming, rather than seeking to feed people, and that mentality has driven them to seek more and more "cost effective" ways to make a dollar off farming. The huge risk with massive corporate farms is that a much larger percent of the herd or crop can be affected because farms have become concentrated in large areas of the country, so if that area gets a drought, most of the crop or herd is affected.

That wouldn't be possible if families still had their own personal small farms, a few animals and a decent garden. The supply is spread out, and no one local situation will hurt the overall supply. Those unaffected in the surrounding areas help out those in need. Not so with corporate agriculture. They are in business to make money, evidenced by how they continue to jack up prices by manipulating supply, and the financial markets, regardless of the public need.

Thieves and robbers. 
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« Reply #64 on: May 19, 2013, 03:14:20 pm »

Global Food Crisis - Thousands Of Bees Suddenly Die In Winthrop, Minnesota

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« Reply #65 on: May 23, 2013, 12:12:36 pm »

Prelude to a water and economic crisis?(China)
5/14/13
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2013-05/14/content_16497933.htm

Steady deterioration of water bodies is one of the most pressing problems facing the world today. In Asia, degradation of water quality and the problems it spawns are so extensive and serious that they are threatening to harm economic growth and affect the health and quality of life of billions of people.

China's high economic growth has had an adverse impact in terms of access, volume and quality of water as well as equity, management and investment requirements. While the magnitude of the water quality problem has steadily widened, planning, management and institutional capacities have not improved commensurately, and thus complicated matters further.

Water scarcity and pollution of water sources are two of the most serious problems for China. Pollution has now spread from the coastal region to inland water bodies, affecting both surface water and groundwater. More than 53 billion tons of (untreated or inadequately treated) wastewater is discharged into China's water bodies every year. And as early as 2006, water in a stretch of more than 25,000 km of rivers failed to meet the quality standards for aquatic life and about 90 percent sections of rivers in and around urban areas were seriously polluted. The World Bank estimates that water scarcity and pollution are costing China about 2.3 percent of GDP - 1.3 percent due to water scarcity and the rest as a direct impact of water pollution.

Water quality is a bigger problem in North China, where shortage of water prevents pollutant discharges from being diluted. In the northern region, about 40 percent of the rivers have the two worst water quality standards: grades V and VI. This means water is so highly polluted that it is not only unsafe to drink (a serious health issue in itself), but also very difficult and expensive to treat.

Pollution is a serious problem in rural areas, too. Ministry of Water Resources data show that more than 300 million people don't have access to safe drinking water. While in terms of money the cost is a staggering 66 billion yuan ($10.72 billlion), the main cost is in terms of human life as diseases like diarrhoea, cholera and cancer continue to afflict people.

Although the impact of water pollution on health is very serious, it cannot be quantified because of lack of reliable data both on the pollutants and the households that use poor quality water.

Water pollution is also harming China's south-to-north water transfer project. Along the "East Route", for example, industrial pollution has affected many of the poorer areas of northern Jiangsu and western Shandong provinces, delaying the construction of the project. Speaking at a forum in September 2000, Zhu Rongji, then premier, said the initial stage of the project should follow the principle, "first save water, then transfer it; first clean up pollution, then let the water flow; first protect the environment, then use water". Unfortunately, more than a decade later, pollution problems along the East Route have still not been fully solved.

In addition, industrial accidents and illegal dumping of wastes often worsen the quality of water in rivers and lakes. Such incidents include the Songhua River toxic chemical spill in 2005, the algae bloom in Taihu Lake which polluted the source of drinking water for people of the surrounding areas in 2007 and the dumping of more than 13,000 pig carcasses in the Huangpu River earlier this year.

The government is aware of the challenges and the public is worried about the associated health and environmental costs of water pollution. Water pollution is a monumental problem today because relevant officials ignored it over the years. And it will not be easy to solve it in the short term.

Pollution, aggravated by urbanization and industrialization, has intensified water scarcity in China, and relevant governments have failed to properly implement the existing policies to protect water sources and fight pollution.

But new and more stringent standards on treatment of drinking water represent a good example of how to fight water pollution. According to new regulations, from July 2012, drinking water treatment plants in China have to measure up to 106 quality parameters compared with only 15 previously. If properly implemented, this could significantly improve the quality of drinking in the country.

But the success of the new regulations will depend on multiple issues, which include unifying the fragmented monitoring system; ensuring that there are enough personnel and laboratory facilities to properly test all the 106 parameters; guaranteeing reliable collection, analysis and interpretation of data; making sure a well-oiled infrastructure is in place to supply safe drinking water; and ascertaining that officials in charge of plants not complying with all the norms are punished.

China and its people deserve the fruits of fast economic growth. But water, air and other environmental problems, if not solved, could undermine their future course of development.

Cecilia Tortajada is the co-founder and president of the Third World Centre for Water Management and former president of the International Water Resources Association. Asit K. Biswas is distinguished visiting professor at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and co-founder of the Third World Centre for Water Management.
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« Reply #66 on: August 16, 2013, 06:09:11 pm »

http://money.cnn.com/2013/08/16/news/economy/shrimp-prices/index.html
8/16/13
Shrimp shortage leads to record high prices

You may have to skimp on the shrimp this summer.

Shrimp prices are skyrocketing to all-time highs, amid a disease that's plaguing the three largest prawn producers: Thailand, China and Vietnam. White shrimp prices are nearing $6 a pound, up 56% from a year ago, according to an Urner Barry index.

Interestingly though, the Cadillac of crustaceans is cheaper than it's been in a long time. Lobster prices, while still a lot higher than shrimp, have fallen recently. But more about that later.

The world is facing an "acute shrimp shortage," the worst of its kind since industrial shrimp farming emerged, say Rabobank analysts in a report aptly named "Shrimp in a crimp."

Thailand is the world's largest shrimp producer and has been hit hardest by the disease. The country alone supplies about 30% of the tropical shrimp in the United States and the European Union, and is expected to see its supply cut in half this year.

Related: How access to fresh food divides Americans

Each year Americans eat an average of four pounds of shrimp per person, but consumption will probably drop in 2013, the Rabobank analysts say.

"After a decade of explosive growth, the global farmed shrimp industry has reached a turning point," they said.

Back in June, Darden Restaurants (DRI, Fortune 500), the parent company of Red Lobster, Olive Garden and other chains, noted higher food costs partly due to "shrimp supply disruptions" could cut into future sales. Seafood alone accounts for about a quarter of Darden's total cost of goods sold, of which shrimp is the most popular protein.

Related: Jumbo shrimp pizza and green tea Oreos are big in China

And the disease isn't the only thing pushing shrimp prices higher. In other news on the shrimp beat, the Commerce Department ruled Tuesday that China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia and Vietnam have all unfairly subsidized shrimp that's exported to the United States.

The ruling could lead the U.S. to enact duties on shrimp from some of those countries, leading to even higher shrimp prices.

It was welcomed by shrimpers in the Gulf Coast, who suffered setbacks from the BP oil spill three years ago and now struggle to compete with cheap shrimp farmed in Asia. American suppliers account for less than 10% of the shrimp consumed in the U.S.

But back to lobsters. As of August, the average 4 oz. lobster tail cost $13.25, according to Urner Barry. That still costs more than 2 pounds of shrimp, but it's the lowest price in 11 years, as warmer water and fewer predators have led to an abundant supply of lobsters.

In fact, over-supply has become such a problem for Maine fisherman, the state recently approved a $2 million campaign to promote their lobsters both in the U.S. and abroad.
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« Reply #67 on: August 23, 2013, 06:35:50 pm »

http://www.delish.com/food/recalls-reviews/farmers-battle-citrus-greening-killing-crop
Farmers Battle Disease Which Could Wipe Out America's Citrus Crop

August 23, 2013

Something you may not know about your morning OJ: it's under attack and at risk of disappearing off the breakfast table. Over the last few years, America's citrus growers have been battling a disease that could potentially wipe out their entire crop — permanently.

According to the USDA, "citrus greening" or yellow dragon disease, is believed to be a bacterial disease that originated in China in the 1900s. It is spread by two insects, Asian citrus psyllids, and there are three strains of the bacteria, but don't worry, according to the USDA, it is not harmful to humans. However, it will be devastating for citrus if it can't be stopped.

Florida's citrus growers first encountered citrus greening in 2005, and as the New York Times reports, this year they've experienced the worst crop to date with some groves losing up to 40 percent of their crop. "The long and short of it is that the industry that made Florida, that is synonymous with Florida, that is a staple on every American breakfast table, is totally threatened," Senator Bill Nelson told the New York Times.

In California, they are fighting the same battle. According to the Los Angeles Times, pesticides have failed miserably, so earlier this month, citrus growers imported a wasp to do the work. The species is the "Taxarixia radiate" and it traveled from Pakistan in a carry on bag to the West Coast — and the Los Angeles Times reports it to be "half the size of a chocolate sprinkle."

Mark Hoddle told the paper that the wasp "is going to be our number one weapon to control Asian citrus pysllid." He added that the farmers have no choice in the matter saying "the 'do nothing' option is unacceptable." As a response they have released more than 75,000 wasps onto their groves in the hopes of combatting the disease. In Florida, they imported a wasp from Vietnam, however they did not have positive results.

At the moment the USDA has quarantines in nine states, reports the Los Angeles Times, which prohibits "interstate movement of citrus trees and requires labeling of citrus nursery stocks from areas where greening has been detected." Each year since 2010, California growers have spent roughly $15 million in the effort to stop the greening.

At the same time Cornell University scientists have developed genetically modified orange trees which would produce natural insecticide making them resistant to the insects that spread the bacteria, according to The Grower. However, consumers, politicians, and farmers are divided on the subject of G.M.O.'s concerned that changing the DNA may in fact have harmful effects on humans in the long run, reported the New York Times.

Do you think the answer to citrus greening is G.M.O.'s or continuing the search for an effective pesticide?
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« Reply #68 on: August 24, 2013, 03:25:12 am »

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The world is facing an "acute shrimp shortage," the worst of its kind since industrial shrimp farming emerged

So who is really suffering? Business. That's it. Their profits have dropped, so what? Good riddance I say.

I understand a person thinking they need to make money to survive, but to buy, sell, and "get gain" is not a right to life. It's a life choice that only those with money get to participate in. Got NOTING to do with the needs of the public or the food chain.

The public doesn't need commercially-raised shrimp from Asia to survive. The public simply needs to eat.
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« Reply #69 on: July 16, 2014, 01:13:55 pm »

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/colorado-river-drought-holds-s/30029304

More Than a Decade of Drought on Colorado River Sculpts Impending Southwest Water Shortage

7/12/14

The Colorado River serves as one of the most vital water sources in the United States, providing water to nearly 40 million people in the West.

Numerous resources are dependent on the river, which has been under drought conditions since 2000. According to the U.S. Department of the Bureau of Reclamation, several resources that depend on a healthy river system include hydroelectric power generation, fish and wildlife, as well as water for municipal, industrial and agricultural use.

As drought conditions grip the western part of the country, states are reinforcing preparations they've made years ago in the possibility of a water shortage.

Officials are taking steps to monitor current water levels and analyze future scenarios for potential shortages. As part of its 24-month study, the Bureau of Reclamation issues a study every month based on computer modeling of lake elevations, trying to give water managers solid data to plan for future water reserves.

The river is divided into two districts-the upper basin and the lower basin-with Arizona, Nevada and California making up the lower basin, while Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and Utah encompass the upper basin. Mexico is also allocated 1.5 million acre-feet from the river.

As part of the Colorado River Compact instituted in 1922, the two basins were each allotted 7.5 million acre-feet per year. One acre-foot is equivalent to 325,851 gallons of water according to the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA).

Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the U.S. and supplier of nearly 90 percent of southern Nevada's water supply, is dwindling to near-record low levels. It also holds water for California, Arizona and Mexico. As of the end of June, the lake sat at an elevation of 1,082 feet above sea level.

"The levels of Lake Mead are solely dependent on runoff from the Colorado River," said SNWA Spokesman Bronson Mack.

The first intake sits at elevation 1,050 feet above sea level and the second intake resides at elevation 1,000 feet. Currently the SNWA is building a third intake, which is expected to be completed in 2015, that will sit at an elevation of 860 feet to keep supplying the region with Colorado River water.

Another reservoir along the river is Lake Powell, which straddles the Utah-Arizona border.

Lake Powell, which acts as a savings account for the upper basin similarly to Lake Mead in the lower basin, is operated in tandem with Lake Mead, with the average release of water from Powell to Mead typically around 8.23 million acre-feet per year.

"That allows Lake Powell to, in good, wet years, release more water to Mead and in dry years, it also allows them to release less water to Mead," Mack said.

In the past 14 years, there have been only three years where the river flows have either been normal or slightly above normal. The last above-average year was 2011, when inflows in Lake Powell were 130 percent of average, Mack said.

Currently, the state of Arizona is not under any water shortages and still receives its full 2.85 million acre-feet allotment. However, by 2017, officials said there is a greater-than-50-percent probability of a shortage, according to the aforementioned computer models.

The shortage time-frame was delayed by one year after predictions for this coming water year (starting Oct. 1) indicated that the flow from Lake Powell to Lake Mead will be 9 million acre-feet, due to a strong snowpack in the watershed, said Tom Buschatzke, the assistant director of the Water Planning Division for the Arizona Department of Water Resources.

In Arizona, there are priorities in place for Colorado River users. The senior users are those in the Yuma region, an essential agricultural area in the state. The more junior users get their water provided to them by the Central Arizona Project (CAP), a 336-mile-long system of aqueducts, tunnels, pumping plants and pipelines.

The CAP receives about 23 percent of the state's Colorado River allotment and diverts its water from Lake Havasu, which unlike Lake Mead, doesn't see its levels fluctuate.

Buschatzke said there are water reserves throughout the state of Arizona in case a shortage takes effect.

Established in 1996, the Arizona Water Banking Authority is a state agency that stores about 3.2 million acre-feet of excess Colorado River water in aquifers underground to be used in times of shortage. There are also individual providers that can store water and receive long-term credits. About 5 million acre-feet of water is stored by those providers.

Storing water has allowed water officials plenty of time to prepare for a shortage situation.

Pamela Pickard, president of the CAP board, recently wrote that "CAP is likely to experience shortage by 2017, but that shortage will primarily affect central Arizona agriculture which is already preparing for planned reductions in their CAP supplies."

Pickard also wrote that the CAP shortages are not expected to impact Arizona cities for 10 to 15 years, due to the fact that cities have the highest priority within the CAP system.

In the short term, over the next five to 15 years or so, upper basin states are in a better position for water supply than the lower basin due to the Law of the River, Buschatzke said.

The greater concern for those states would be the loss of power production from Lake Powell and the Glen Canyon Dam, which forms the reservoir, since they rely more heavily on hydroelectricity than the lower basin states, Buschatzke said.

According to a recent article from Circle of Blue, the upper basin states want to keep the surface level of Lake Powell above 3,490 feet because below that point hydropower generation from Glen Canyon Dam would stop.

The revenues that come from the hydropower have surcharges that can create funding for programs such as the Endangered Species Act that help the upper basin continue to use its water, Buschatzke said.

Mack added that the effects of the drought on the river have been more visible in the lower basin, in particular because of the dwindling of levels at Lake Mead.

Because the river is such a vital resource, many regulatory guidelines, federal laws, court decisions, decrees and compacts are in place. Collectively they are known as the "Law of the River."

If a shortage were to take effect, some states could be in better shape than others.

For instance, the Colorado River Basin Project Act of 1968, which authorized the development of the CAP, among other projects in the upper basin, states that the water supply for the CAP would be subordinate to California's apportionment.

California's reliance on the river (4.4 million acre-feet) is primarily for irrigation of several huge agricultural areas such as the Coachella and Imperial Valleys, that are extremely important to the food supply to the entire United States, especially during the winter months.

In the event of a shortage, Nevada and Arizona would have to curtail their usage while California would not.

Mack said this is because the Colorado River was initially divided up based on how much agriculture or potential agriculture each state supplied.

While short-term priorities are taking effect, the long-term picture is less clear.

In 2012, the Bureau of Reclamation, along with agencies representing the seven basin states, completed the Colorado River Basin Study.

According to the study, "the amount of water available and changes in the demand for water throughout the Basin over the next 50 years are highly uncertain and dependent upon a number of factors. The potential impacts of future climate variability and climate change further contribute to these uncertainties."
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« Reply #70 on: July 24, 2014, 08:05:58 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/drought-apocalypse-approaches-colorado-river-basin-dries-221214264.html
The Drought Apocalypse Approaches As The Colorado River Basin Dries Up
7/24/14

Scientists on Thursday released the results of a first-of-its-kind study that finds the seven states of the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin are depleting groundwater reserves at a rapid rate. That threatens the future of a river that supplies water to 40 million people and irrigates 4 million acres of farmland.

Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, and NASA analyzed data from a satellite that measures underground water reserves to calculate that the Colorado River Basin has lost 65 cubic kilometers—that’s 17.3 trillion gallons—of water between December 2004 and November 2013. That represents twice the capacity of the United States’ largest reservoir, Lake Mead in Nevada. Most worrying, 75 percent of the loss came from groundwater supplies.

“We don’t know exactly how much groundwater we have left, so we don’t know when we’re going to run out,” Stephanie Castle, the report’s lead author and a water resources specialist at UC Irvine, said in a statement. “This is a lot of water to lose. We thought that the picture could be pretty bad, but this was shocking.”

Terrifying, actually. Groundwater reserves have accumulated over thousands of years and recharge at an exceedingly slow rate as rainwater and snowmelt seep into the ground. Rain is rare as the current drought enters its 15th year.

The data indicates that farmers and cities are pumping far more groundwater than can be replenished. At some point, the well will run dry.

“We observe a negative net change in groundwater storage over the 108-month time period [of the study], indicating that groundwater withdrawals (pumping) are not balanced by recharge and must be greater than the observed depletion rate,” Castle said in an email.

Once the seven states of the Colorado River Basin—Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming—deplete their groundwater reserves beyond the point of no return, they will run out of options. Usually, the states rely on aboveground reservoirs like Lake Mead to help them weather dry years. But the water level at Lake Mead has fallen to a historic low, and other reservoirs are drying up fast.

It will get worse, especially as the region grows hotter because of climate change.

“The rapid rates of groundwater depletion will lead to further declines in Colorado River steam flows and, combined with declining snowpack and population growth, will likely threaten the long-term ability” to supply water to the seven states, said Castle.

With less water flowing into reservoirs, the states will keep pumping irreplaceable groundwater reserves. That “poses a significant threat to the long-term water security of the region,” concluded the report, which is to be published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

So what to do? First, fill in the data gap to figure out exactly how much water is left so decisions can be made about its management for the future. That’s where the satellite program called Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment comes in. The satellite measures tiny changes in an area’s gravitational pull to determine its groundwater capacity.

“There’s only one way to put together a very large–area study like this, and that is with satellites,” Jay Famiglietti,  a coauthor of the report and a senior water cycle scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement.
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« Reply #71 on: August 02, 2014, 10:00:36 am »

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-01/drought-goes-bad-catastrophic
8/1/14
The Drought Goes From Bad To Catastrophic

As we previously commented, when scientists start using phrases such as "the worst drought" and "as bad as you can imagine" to describe what is going on in the western half of the country, you know that things are bad. However, in recent weeks the dreadful situation in California has gone from bad to catastrophic as the U.S. Drought Monitor reported that more than half of the state is now in experiencing 'exceptional' drought, the most severe category available. And most of the state – 81% – currently has one of the two most intense levels of drought.



As WaPo reports,

    While California’s problems are particularly severe, that state is not alone in experiencing significant drought right now. There are wide swaths of moderate to severe drought stretching from Oregon to Texas, with problems impacting numerous states west of the Mississippi River.

    Some of the most severe droughts outside of California are impacting large pockets in Oklahoma, Texas and, particularly, Nevada, where more than half of the state is currently experiencing one of the two most intense drought conditions:



As we concluded previously,

    Most people just assume that this drought will be temporary, but experts tell us that there have been "megadroughts" throughout history in the western half of the United States that have lasted for more than 100 years.

    If we have entered one of those eras, it is going to fundamentally change life in America.

    And the frightening thing is that much of the rest of the world is dealing with water scarcity issues right now as well.  In fact, North America is actually in better shape than much of Africa and Asia.  For much more on this, please see my previous article entitled "25 Shocking Facts About The Earth’s Dwindling Water Resources".

    Without plenty of fresh water, modern civilization is not possible.

    And right now, the western United States and much of the rest of the world is starting to come to grips with the fact that we could be facing some very serious water shortages in the years ahead.
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« Reply #72 on: August 12, 2014, 11:11:22 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/southwest-braces-lake-mead-water-levels-drop-095930749.html
Southwest braces as Lake Mead water levels drop
8/12/14

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Once-teeming Lake Mead marinas are idle as a 14-year drought steadily drops water levels to historic lows. Officials from nearby Las Vegas are pushing conservation but also are drilling a new pipeline to keep drawing water from the lake.

Hundreds of miles away, farmers who receive water from the lake behind Hoover Dam are preparing for the worst.

The receding shoreline at one of the main reservoirs in the vast Colorado River water system is raising concerns about the future of a network serving a perennially parched region home to 40 million people and 4 million acres of farmland.

Marina operators, water managers and farmers who for decades have chased every drop of water across the booming Southwest and part of Mexico are closely tracking the reservoir water level already at its lowest point since it was first filled in the 1930s.

"We just hope for snow and rain up in Colorado, so it'll come our way," said marina operator Steve Biggs, referring to precipitation in the Rockies that flows down the Colorado River to help fill the reservoir separating Nevada and Arizona.

By 2016, continued drought could trigger cuts in water deliveries to both states. While water authorities say they've been saving water for potential dry days, the prospect of the first cuts is already prompting action.

"I've downsized in the last couple of years, probably a good thing the way this water shortage is going," said farmer Dennis Bagnall, who has planted just 225 of the 1,500 acres that are typically green this time of year on his farm south of Phoenix.

Last week, officials announced an $11 million pilot program involving the federal government and water agencies in Denver, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Phoenix to pay farmers, cities and industries to reduce river water use.

"We can certainly hope for better conditions than we've experienced in recent times, but we have to actively and continue to plan for the worst case," said Michael J. Lacey, director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources.

This week, an update from the federal Bureau of Reclamation, the keeper of the Colorado River network's dams and reservoirs, will help set the course for water deliveries for the next two years. Administrators say they are confident they can meet current commitments next year.

Federal officials and water administrators in metro areas such as Las Vegas and Phoenix say they're committed to finding new ways to make every drop of river water count — from cloud seeding to pipelines to new reservoirs to desalination plants.

They point to agreements to leave surpluses unused in wet years, share pain in dry years and buy water designated for farms for city use.

But they're all watching Lake Mead, the biggest in a Colorado River basin that supplies water to California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming and part of Mexico. The states get annual allotments dating to the Colorado River Compact of 1922.

Over the years, the amount hasn't kept pace with a post-World War II development boom in the Southwest, and pressure has increased with drought gripping the region for almost 15 years.

The effect of increased demand and diminished supply is visible on Lake Mead's canyon walls. A white mineral band often compared with a bathtub ring marks the depleted water level.

The lake has dropped to 1,080 feet above sea level this year — down almost the width of a football field from a high of 1,225 feet in 1983.

A projected level of 1,075 feet in January 2016 would trigger cuts in water deliveries to Arizona and Nevada.

At 1,000 feet, drinking water intakes would go dry to Las Vegas, a city of 2 million residents and a destination for 40 million tourists per year that is almost completely dependent on the reservoir.

That has the Southern Nevada Water Authority spending more than $800 million to build a 20-foot-diameter pipe so it can keep getting water.

The region is also stressing water conservation, prohibiting grass lawns for new homes and fountains at businesses. Officials say the overall effort has reduced consumption 33 percent in recent years while the Las Vegas area added 400,000 residents.

But severely restricting water use for swimming pools or lawns in a city like Phoenix wouldn't make much difference, said Kathryn Sorensen, the city's Water Services Department director, because conservation efforts need to be applied across the western U.S.

"The solution can't come just from municipal conservation; there isn't enough water there," she said.

If cuts do come, they'll test the agreements forged in recent years between big, growing cities and farmers.

In California, home to 38 million residents, farmers in the sparsely populated Imperial Valley in southeast California have senior water rights ensuring that they get water regardless of the condition.

Kevin Kelley, general manager of the Imperial Irrigation District, defends his agency's position at the head of the line and dismisses the idea that water should go to those who can pay the most or make the most compelling economic argument.

Imperial Valley farmers grow some 200 crops, Kelley said, from alfalfa to cotton and celery to zucchini. "There has to be a place in a diverse economy and a diverse Southwest for a place like this that grows food and fiber year-round," he said.

In Arizona, reduced deliveries of Colorado River water would largely affect the Central Arizona Project, which manages canals supplying 80 percent of the state's population. A tiered system means farmers would face cuts first, shielding Native American tribes and big cities.

Bagnall, who owns Morningstar Farms in Coolidge, Arizona, worries about the future of farming in the region. Tighter supplies mean there will be less farming and fewer dollars going to agricultural services like fertilizer suppliers.

"Eventually," he said, "the prices are going to hit the consumer. Sooner or later, it's got to go up. So it's just a domino effect."
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« Reply #73 on: September 28, 2014, 01:44:55 am »

I`ve always thought that prepping is probably a waste. When the time comes I don`t think it will do much good unless you are willing to kill other people in order to keep whatever it is that you got. I`m really not sure what I would do if I got put in that position. I don`t value my own life enough to kill somebody for it but I have loved ones with that kind of value to me.

Recently I have begun buying and storing some extra food and supplies. I never thought I would choose to do that but I am really concerned about what could happen during the next year or two.

I think such things are good as an investment if for no other reason. All of those things will go up in value but money won`t.
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« Reply #74 on: September 28, 2014, 12:32:04 pm »

I think the key to understanding whether to prep or not is found in His will for my life personally. He knows my future role in the grand scheme of things.

Years ago, I had enough savings to stock up on supplies and did so. In my case, the money got tighter and tighter as the supplies were used up. Now, my pantry is what it is. Some of the leftover emergency supplies are quite old now. Financially, I’m running on empty.

I’ve also seen preppers lose everything they had due to a completely unforeseen event.

And yet, somehow, my family has been able to eat, stay warm, stay relatively healthy even though the medical system is crumbling.

My challenge is to know when to turn a problem over to Him, taking my hands off of the problem, and knowing what He would have me do.

I also recognize that it’s important to allow Him to run His body. The individual plan he would have for me is not necessarily the individual plan He would have for others that are His. But the trust is that He is working all things in an interconnected way that I’m not necessarily privy to in order to accomplish His purposes.

This is easier said than done. My fallen human nature struggles with doubt as the worry comes in. It’s counterintuitive to throw away the worldly safety net. Yet God does things to prove to me that He is in control of circumstances that I cannot take credit for. Like the Gideon’s army scenario. Like His people doing the 40-year circles in the desert lamenting that they were going to die. Thankfully, I'm not the only one that has done this with Him.
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« Reply #75 on: September 28, 2014, 04:45:43 pm »

I think the key to understanding whether to prep or not is found in His will for my life personally. He knows my future role in the grand scheme of things.

Years ago, I had enough savings to stock up on supplies and did so. In my case, the money got tighter and tighter as the supplies were used up. Now, my pantry is what it is. Some of the leftover emergency supplies are quite old now. Financially, I’m running on empty.

I’ve also seen preppers lose everything they had due to a completely unforeseen event.

And yet, somehow, my family has been able to eat, stay warm, stay relatively healthy even though the medical system is crumbling.

My challenge is to know when to turn a problem over to Him, taking my hands off of the problem, and knowing what He would have me do.

I also recognize that it’s important to allow Him to run His body. The individual plan he would have for me is not necessarily the individual plan He would have for others that are His. But the trust is that He is working all things in an interconnected way that I’m not necessarily privy to in order to accomplish His purposes.

This is easier said than done. My fallen human nature struggles with doubt as the worry comes in. It’s counterintuitive to throw away the worldly safety net. Yet God does things to prove to me that He is in control of circumstances that I cannot take credit for. Like the Gideon’s army scenario. Like His people doing the 40-year circles in the desert lamenting that they were going to die. Thankfully, I'm not the only one that has done this with Him.

I hear that. I`m buying things I will eventually use so I don`t intend to waste anything. But I`m still conflicted about it. It`s not clear to me at this time if I`m doing the right thing or not.

I started because I have a conviction that ignoring it and making no preperations at all is going to prove to be a mistake.

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« Reply #76 on: September 28, 2014, 06:33:53 pm »

Personally, in these turbulent times, I see it as prudent to prepare if you have the means to do so. That’s what I did. God knows my heart and why I do things before I know.

“Why do you doubt?” and “Where is your faith?” are rhetorical questions from Him that I have not figured out yet.

And if I end up doing something that’s not part of His plan for my life, He will correct it as long as I agree to let Him. He will gently lead me toward the right path and will be with me during the journey. I don’t have to struggle or travel alone.
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« Reply #77 on: September 28, 2014, 07:03:36 pm »

Personally, in these turbulent times, I see it as prudent to prepare if you have the means to do so. That’s what I did. God knows my heart and why I do things before I know.

“Why do you doubt?” and “Where is your faith?” are rhetorical questions from Him that I have not figured out yet.

And if I end up doing something that’s not part of His plan for my life, He will correct it as long as I agree to let Him. He will gently lead me toward the right path and will be with me during the journey. I don’t have to struggle or travel alone.

Not knowing which thing to do is something I don`t see as a faith issue. After all we have to believe without seeing. I believe I hear the stillsmall voice the Bible talks about sometimes and I have had several prophetic dreams in my life that I know came from God.

Mostly we are left to try to make decisions based on what we know is right in our hearts and our only real means is to pray that God will guide our path and show us the way. I believe my faith is strong but that doesn`t mean I know which way to go.

If Jesus appeared to me and said to do this or that I know I wouldn`t doubt, wouldn`t question. But that`s not how it works at the present time.

I think when Christ berated the apostles for their lack of faith He was challenging them and challenging everyone who believes to have faith. Because of His emphasis on it we all know having faith is what we need to do.

Not knowing which way you should turn doesn`t reflect on your faith in my opinion.

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« Reply #78 on: September 28, 2014, 08:44:18 pm »

I'm not a prepper, will say this - these Apostate churches in America, who are LOADED with money in their bank accounts, are going to be in for a big shocker when all is said than done.(ie-I've heard of churches that have set aside $100K+ in their bank accounts, and just letting it sit there)

I don't know when the rapture will happen - but nonetheless there will come a time when Caesar will be coming back to collect his chips, and these hireling pastors will be bowing their knees toward Baal just to keep their riches.
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« Reply #79 on: September 28, 2014, 09:07:17 pm »

I'm not a prepper, will say this - these Apostate churches in America, who are LOADED with money in their bank accounts, are going to be in for a big shocker when all is said than done.(ie-I've heard of churches that have set aside $100K+ in their bank accounts, and just letting it sit there)

I don't know when the rapture will happen - but nonetheless there will come a time when Caesar will be coming back to collect his chips, and these hireling pastors will be bowing their knees toward Baal just to keep their riches.

You got a few issues I do believe .
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« Reply #80 on: September 28, 2014, 09:58:16 pm »

Quote
You got a few issues I do believe .

99% of churches in America are 501c3 - meaning that they made this deal with the IRS - in exchange for allowing donation write-offs on their 1040s, they have to abide by IRS laws(ie-can't endorse political candidates, can't speak out on anything that the government's laws allows like abortion/sodomy/gambling, etc).

As a result, they're not able to preach the whole council of God - this is largely why churches in America are so Apostate.

If/when Martial Law in America hits - they'll be in line with Caesar, alot like what churches in Nazi Germany did.
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« Reply #81 on: September 28, 2014, 10:02:23 pm »

99% of churches in America are 501c3 - meaning that they made this deal with the IRS - in exchange for allowing donation write-offs on their 1040s, they have to abide by IRS laws(ie-can't endorse political candidates, can't speak out on anything that the government's laws allows like abortion/sodomy/gambling, etc).

As a result, they're not able to preach the whole council of God - this is largely why churches in America are so Apostate.

If/when Martial Law in America hits - they'll be in line with Caesar, alot like what churches in Nazi Germany did.

I believe all Christianity right or wrong, good or bad will come under vicious assault in the great tribulation. Everyone in the same boat facing the same calamities.
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« Reply #82 on: September 30, 2014, 08:20:16 am »



Years ago, I had enough savings to stock up on supplies and did so. In my case, the money got tighter and tighter as the supplies were used up. Now, my pantry is what it is. Some of the leftover emergency supplies are quite old now. Financially, I’m running on empty.



This comment of yours is something that keeps returning to my mind. In my own situation my finances are deteriorating but I know I am better off then many are. At the present time anyways. In the end I think it`s my answer for whatever amount of prepping I may or may not do. I have a conviction that it is the thing to do at this hour but in my heart I feel it futile and I almost see it as a weakness in faith. But yet I know often times God would have us do what is sensible and prudent.

If true calamity struck the country I think my faith would compel me to pool whatever supplies I had with other brethren who likely wouldn`t have much. And that`s assuming of course somebody didn`t come along to take it from me by force which is a real possibility.

I appreciate the conversation brother and my thoughts are with you in your difficulty.
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« Reply #83 on: September 30, 2014, 12:44:08 pm »

People struggle with the same thing concerning medical issues. Will God heal me miraculously? Will He work through the doctors and nurses? Or is it time for me to have such an affliction or even to die?

As a bystander, I’ve seen things go all these ways for people. In what we view as an extreme in the latter, I have to trust that He has a higher purpose. I’ve had an experience where He partially used somebody else’s untimely death to affect deep changes within my heart. It was a discipline issue. There were some flaws in my attitude that He needed to correct in a way that would garner my full attention. Can’t say what He was doing with everybody else. What is the state of everyone’s heart around me, state of my own heart, reality of circumstances around me vs. what it seems to be, the ripple effect of one event now on future events and lives? All these things are interconnected. So many variables that I am not privy to. Nor do I want the burden and therefore the responsibility of knowing.

If I can look back at any point in my life and honestly be able to say that I did the best I could with what I had at the time and what I knew at the time, then I can forgive myself. This includes the days back when I was stepping all over His grace and taking it for granted, or not even recognizing it at all. And, realizing this, I can forgive others as well.

On the other hand, I’ve seen spikes in my finances in such an uncanny manner that I recognized that it would be needed. In my case, it was for a future wife and child that He was about to give me. This has been one of the greatest, most wonderful blessings that He has ever done for me. At this time, I may not be wealthy. But my life is fulfilled in ways that I could have never imagined. He has put meaning and purpose in my life – a beautiful reason to be here based on love. Other than that, to be honest, I have no desire to be on this earth.
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« Reply #84 on: September 30, 2014, 03:09:35 pm »

People struggle with the same thing concerning medical issues. Will God heal me miraculously? Will He work through the doctors and nurses? Or is it time for me to have such an affliction or even to die?

As a bystander, I’ve seen things go all these ways for people. In what we view as an extreme in the latter, I have to trust that He has a higher purpose. I’ve had an experience where He partially used somebody else’s untimely death to affect deep changes within my heart. It was a discipline issue. There were some flaws in my attitude that He needed to correct in a way that would garner my full attention. Can’t say what He was doing with everybody else. What is the state of everyone’s heart around me, state of my own heart, reality of circumstances around me vs. what it seems to be, the ripple effect of one event now on future events and lives? All these things are interconnected. So many variables that I am not privy to. Nor do I want the burden and therefore the responsibility of knowing.

If I can look back at any point in my life and honestly be able to say that I did the best I could with what I had at the time and what I knew at the time, then I can forgive myself. This includes the days back when I was stepping all over His grace and taking it for granted, or not even recognizing it at all. And, realizing this, I can forgive others as well.

On the other hand, I’ve seen spikes in my finances in such an uncanny manner that I recognized that it would be needed. In my case, it was for a future wife and child that He was about to give me. This has been one of the greatest, most wonderful blessings that He has ever done for me. At this time, I may not be wealthy. But my life is fulfilled in ways that I could have never imagined. He has put meaning and purpose in my life – a beautiful reason to be here based on love. Other than that, to be honest, I have no desire to be on this earth.


I can relate to all that. More then you know.  I think you are looking at life in the right way with the right heart.
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« Reply #85 on: November 09, 2016, 05:06:47 pm »

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