End Times and Current Events
December 05, 2021, 02:21:06 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: "Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me." John 5:39 (KJB)
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

The Falling Away

Shoutbox
August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
View Shout History
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10] 11 12   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Falling Away  (Read 22258 times)
RickStudy
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 80


View Profile
« Reply #270 on: October 21, 2015, 06:10:45 pm »


This is a pretty good article. Comes reasonably close to getting it.


http://beforeitsnews.com/politics/2015/10/the-great-christian-falling-away-will-be-a-new-world-order-hoax-2751100.html
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #271 on: November 21, 2015, 07:42:36 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/us-religious-leaders-forceful-appeal-admit-refugees-173908562.html
11/21/15
US religious leaders make forceful appeal to admit refugees

In rare agreement across faith and ideological lines, leaders of major American religious groups have condemned proposed bans on Syrian refugees, contending a legitimate debate over security has been overtaken by irrational fear and prejudice.

Top organizations representing evangelicals, Roman Catholics, Jews and liberal Protestants say close vetting of asylum seekers is a critical part of forming policy on refugees. But these religious leaders say such concerns, heightened after the Paris attacks a week ago, do not warrant blocking those fleeing violence in the Middle East.

"The problem is not the Syrian refugees," said Archbishop Thomas Wenski of Miami, who noted how his state has welcomed a large number of Cuban refugees over the years. "This is falling into the trap of what the terrorists wanted us to become. We shouldn't allow them to change who we are as a people."

About 70 percent of all refugees admitted to the U.S. are resettled by faith groups, according to the U.S. State Department office for refugees. The bulk of the work is done by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services. World Relief, the humanitarian arm of the National Association of Evangelicals, and Church World Service, representing Protestant and Orthodox groups, are each responsible for about 10 percent. The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society and Episcopal Migrant Ministries also handle several thousand cases.

The Rev. Russell Moore, head of the public policy agency for the conservative Southern Baptist Convention, the country's largest Protestant group, said screening is crucial and "we should insist on it," but he said evangelicals should not "demagogue the issue as many politicians are doing right now."

"Evangelicals should be the ones calling the rest of the world to remember human dignity and the image of God, especially for those fleeing murderous Islamic radical jihadis," Moore said.

Lawmakers and more than half of U.S. governors, mostly Republicans, have said they were worried Islamic extremists may try to take advantage of the U.S. refugee process. Some governors are refusing Syrian refugee settlement in their states for now. They point to a passport found near the body of one of the Paris suicide bombers that had been registered along the route asylum seekers are taking through Europe. It's not clear how the passport ended up near the attacker.

On Thursday, the U.S. House voted by a veto-proof majority to pass legislation which in effect would suspend admissions of Syrian and Iraqi refugees. Stephan Bauman, president of World Relief, called the bill "without rational basis" and "a huge disservice."

"Differential treatment, with no clear justification, amounts to discrimination on the basis of nationality," Bauman said.

Reform Judaism, the largest American Jewish movement, joined the American Jewish Committee, an influential policy group, the Anti-Defamation League, the Jewish civil rights organization, and the Orthodox Union, in opposing any halt in resettlement.

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, said, "we will not let the nightmare" of terrorism "keep us from carrying out the words of Jesus who told us to be a neighbor to those in need."

Bishop Scott Jones, head of the United Methodist Great Plains Conference, said 35 Methodist congregations in Kansas and Nebraska have offered to sponsor Syrian refugees. "We need to stand by them against the jihadist movement," Jones said Friday.

Some of the faithful are more openly struggling to find the right balance between national security and compassion.

Refugees already go through a comprehensive vetting process that can take as much as three years, including biometric screening, fingerprinting and additional classified controls. Some lawmakers are now demanding even tougher assessments. Still, a Pew Research Center survey last September, conducted soon after President Barack Obama announced an increase in the number of Syrian refugees the U.S. would accept, found just 31 percent of white evangelicals favored the increase, compared to 51 percent of the general public, in the lowest approval level for any Christian group.

The Rev. Franklin Graham, son of evangelist Billy Graham, said new immigration policies are needed because "Islam is not a peaceful religion" and "our nation's security is at stake."

"We cannot allow Muslim immigrants to come across our borders unchecked while we are fighting this war on terror," Graham said in a Facebook post.

Still many, faith leaders who share those security concerns are condemning the tone of the current discussion.

The Orthodox Union said "we encourage a sensible process of reviewing and enhancing security," with the goal of "getting to yes" on admitting asylum seekers. But the group said, "Neither partisan politics nor xenophobia can have a place in that debate."

The Arizona Muslim Community, which helps resettle Syrian refugees in suburban Phoenix, planned a public picnic Sunday in Scottsdale for more than a dozen refugees, hoping to improve understanding of the families' plight.

Catholic Charities in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has reported threats against a Syrian refugee family the agency assisted. Sister Donna Markham, president of Catholic Charities USA, said her office has received "very disturbing mail coming to us from people who are very angry that we are trying to extend help to these people."

"It's tragic," she said.
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #272 on: December 08, 2015, 01:50:08 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/defining-evangelical-121100329.html
Defining 'Evangelical'
December 7, 2015

The religious historian George Marsden once quipped that in the 1950s and 1960s an evangelical Christian was “anyone who likes Billy Graham.” But when Billy Graham was asked to define the term in the late 1980s, he replied, “Actually, that’s a question I’d like to ask somebody too.” As it turned out, even America’s most famous evangelical preacher couldn’t describe what the term meant.

Graham isn’t alone. While the word evangelical pops up in American media to describe everything from mega-churches to voting blocs, few people seem to know what an evangelical is exactly. Those who claim to know often disagree.

The disparate nature of evangelicalism makes its members difficult to define. They don’t have a single authority like the Roman Catholic pope or Mormon First Presidency, so you can’t just phone a central office and ask for the official definition. Since they span a range of denominations, churches, and organizations, there is no single membership statement to delineate identity. As a result, individual observers are left to decide how to define what makes someone or something evangelical. To the pollster, it is a sociological term. To the pastor, it is a denominational or doctrinal term. And to the politician, it is a synonym for a white Christian Republican.

So what is an evangelical, for the love of God, and why does it even matter? The answer requires an understanding of both the history and theology of the movement.

Recommended: Why Obama Isn't Afraid of ISIS

The term evangelical derives from the Greek word euangelion meaning “gospel” or “good news.” Technically speaking, evangelical refers to a person, church, or organization that is committed to the Christian gospel message that Jesus Christ is the savior of humanity. The Greek root word is used in the New Testament and was popularized in the first centuries A.D. to distinguish the love-centric movement of Jesus followers from the violent Roman Empire that often made its own “good news” announcements to celebrate military victories.

But words are more than their etymologies and dictionary definitions. They carry connotations with them too, which change over time and across geographies as they are used in different ways and settings.

According to the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College outside of Chicago, Martin Luther first used the Latinized form of the word evangelium to describe the non-Catholic churches birthed by the Protestant Reformation in the 1500s.

But the term largely took hold in the English-speaking world more than a century later during the Great Awakening, a series of revivals in Britain and the American colonies led by fiery preachers such as Jonathan Edwards and George Whitfield. Due to their influence, evangelicalism became a synonym for revivalism, or a fervent expression of Christianity marked by an emphasis on converting outsiders. By the early 1800s, it was “by far the dominant expression of Christianity” in the United States.

Recommended: Donald Trump Assumes That a Majority of Republican Voters Are Bigots

In some ways, Christianity took a beating in the early 1900s in America. The carnage of two World Wars and a Great Depression raised questions about whether God existed, and if so, whether God was both powerful and good. And modern science raised doubts about the viability of Christianity’s explanations for the origins of life. Evangelical leaders spanning denominations contemplated forming an organization to represent what one pastor called “the unvoiced multitudes,” and in 1942, the National Association of Evangelicals was born.

While the NAE couldn’t claim to be the sole or definitive voice speaking on evangelicals’ behalf, it helped redefine the term. According to Robert Wuthnow, the director of Princeton University’s Center for the Study of Religion and the author of Inventing American Religion, the de facto definition for evangelical was any person who belonged to a church aligned with the 40-odd denominations under the NAE’s umbrella.

Depending on how you define the term, evangelicals comprise between 7 percent and 47 percent of the American population.
But in 1976, the term went mainstream when a peanut farmer named Jimmy Carter won the Democratic primary and then the general election. He became the first U.S. President to call himself a “born again” evangelical Christian. Pundits scrambled to understand who evangelicals were and how many existed. Newsweek ran a cover story declaring 1976 the “year of the evangelical.”

Not to be left out, more conservative evangelicals who diverged from Carter politically began mobilizing under new organizational banners like the Christian Coalition and the Moral Majority—collectively labeled the religious right. These politically active conservative Christians were well-funded and media savvy, but they were only able to become synonymous with evangelicalism with the help of American pollsters.

Recommended: Supreme Court Declines Case on Assault-Weapons Ban

When the NAE was founded, Wuthnow says, new reports estimated the organization represented about two million people. Ten years later, in 1953, the NAE claimed it represented 10 million. Lack of data made the number impossible to verify at the time. In 1967, one New York Times reporter estimated the number to be around 20 million. With Carter’s emergence, George Gallup decided to conduct a poll in which he defined evangelical as anyone who claimed to be “born again.” This simplistic definition led Gallup to report that as many as 50 million Americans—a third of the eligible electorate—were evangelical.

The “unvoiced multitudes” now had their microphone. Conservative Christian leaders embraced the spotlight and their newfound legitimacy, and pastors began showing up on the nightly news and in major magazines to endorse candidates and push forward policy proposals. Over time and in the minds of many, evangelical became a catch-all term for politically conservative Christians.

In recent years, however, a range of definitions for evangelical have been proposed. Many polling firms, like Pew Research, count everyone who identifies themselves as “evangelical” or “born again.” A prominent Christian polling firm, Barna Group, has traditionally used a very specific nine-question definition that requires, for example, the person to claim they believe Satan exists. And Molly Worthen, University of North Carolina professor and author of Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism, defines evangelicals as Christians who are wrestling with a set of specific questions.

This may all sound obscure, but it matters.

“Evangelicals’ influence may be waning, but it is still important for us to understand who evangelicals are, who speaks for them, and what the future looks like,” says David Kinnaman, the president of Barna Group and author of the forthcoming Good Faith: Being a Christian When Society Thinks You’re Irrelevant and Extreme. “The way one defines ‘evangelical’ influences the story they tell about the most influential group within the most influential religion in the world’s most influential country.”

Depending on how you define the term, evangelicals comprise between 7 percent and 47 percent of the American population. Divergent definitions have led to inconsistent, even contradictory survey results about evangelicals’ beliefs and characteristics. Reports based on these surveys can shape elections, public policies, and broader public opinion.

The most widely accepted definition of evangelical is probably the one put forward by historian David Bebbington in 1989. It’s called the “Bebbington quadrilateral” because it identifies evangelicals as Christians who share four main qualities:

Biblicism: a high regard for the Bible
Crucicentrism: a focus on Jesus’s crucifixion and its saving effects
Conversionism: a belief that humans need to be converted
Activism: the belief that faith should influence one’s public life
While some have criticized this quartet of beliefs as being too capacious, many scholars—including sociologists like Wuthnow and historians like Marsden—believe it is the best of all proposed definitions. LifeWay Research and the National Association of Evangelicals have recently suggested a definition that closely mirrors Bebbington’s after receiving input from a diverse group of religious thinkers and academics. Even Barna’s David Kinnaman says his firm has been experimenting with a similar definition in some overseas studies in place of their nine-point criteria.

This four-point criterion is the most widely accepted definition among scholars and the only one approved by the NAE, America’s largest coalition of evangelicals. And it provides a tool to help researchers classify evangelicals by belief, which seems like an appropriate way to handle almost any religious group. Additionally, it leads to a more reasonable estimate of the movement’s size—somewhere around a quarter of all Americans.

Like all definitions, Bebbington’s description of evangelical isn’t perfect. But it allows the term to be appropriately narrow while making room for a diverse range of Christians who fit the bill. If it sounds complex, it should be. Religion is always more complicated than “hallelujah” and “amen.”Read more from The Atlantic:
Report Spam   Logged
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #273 on: January 19, 2016, 06:00:14 pm »

Wheaton Alumni Threaten to Withhold Donations if ‘We Worship Same God’ Professor Is Fired

Hundreds of Wheaton College alumni are threatening to withhold future donations to the school if officials follow through with the firing of a controversial associate political science director who was placed on leave after she declared in a self-initiated campaign to fight “Islamophobia” that Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

According to reports, alumni submitted a petition to the college board and administrators on Friday calling for reconciliation with the professor.

“Until full restoration and reconciliation are reached, each of us will prayerfully re-consider our commitment to financially support the mission of Wheaton College,” it read.

Petition organizers told the Chicago Tribune that the petition generated at least 800 signatures from seven decades of Wheaton graduates.





As previously reported, professing Christian Larycia Hawkins posted to Facebook two photos of herself wearing a hijab last month, and stated in a lengthy explanation that she planned to wear it everywhere she goes during the Advent—including at the Christian college and to church. She outlined in her reasons for solidarity that she believes that Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

“I stand in religious solidarity with Muslims because they, like me, a Christian, are people of the book,” Hawkins asserted. “And as Pope Francis stated last week, we worship the same God.”

In light of controversy over the matter, especially Hawkins’ “same God” assertion, the professor was placed on paid administrative leave by university officials while a review would be conducted.








 Connect with Christian News



 

“Wheaton College faculty and staff make a commitment to accept and model our institution’s faith foundations with integrity, compassion, and theological clarity,” the college said in a statement. “As they participate in various causes, it is essential that faculty and staff engage in and speak about public issues in ways that faithfully represent the college’s evangelical Statement of Faith.”

Wheaton officials acknowledged late last month that talks had come to a standstill as Hawkins refused to continue discussions with members of administration about her “same God” beliefs following initial meetings. They soon issued Hawkins a “Notice of Recommendation to Initiate Termination-for-Cause Proceedings.”

While some have expressed support for the professor in light of the situation, others have used the opportunity to outline why it is flawed to believe that Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

“Muslims hold that ‘God is one.’ Allah has no partners and assigning partners to him is shirk, the highest blasphemy,” explained Thabiti Anyabwile, pastor of Anacostia River Church in Washington, D.C., in a blog post for the Gospel Coalition. “Christians believe ‘God is one in three Persons.’ Each Person in the Trinity is fully and eternally God. Yet there is one God.”

He noted that as Muslims do not worship Jesus, who is God, Christians and Muslims do not worship the same God.

“No one knows God who does not know the Son, who is the only mediator between God and man,” Anyabwile said. “The goal of Christianity is the salvation of sinners through the righteousness, substitutionary atonement and resurrection of Jesus Christ.”

http://christiannews.net/2016/01/19/wheaton-alumni-threaten-to-withhold-donations-if-we-worship-same-god-professor-is-fired/
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #274 on: February 13, 2016, 11:04:58 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/happens-donald-trump-wins-big-south-carolina-130005301.html
What happens if Donald Trump wins big in South Carolina?

Despite Palmetto State polling, establishment insiders still think Donald Trump won't grab the nomination, but, if so, when will he stop winning?

2/13/16

Donald Trump is rolling along and gaining momentum. At what point will he have enough electoral/kinetic force that no other candidate will be able to prevent him from winning the nomination?

That’s our immediate reaction to a new poll out of South Carolina that shows Mr. Trump maintaining a wide lead in the state. He’s the choice of 36.3 percent of South Carolina voters, according to the Augusta Chronicle survey. Sen. Ted Cruz (R) of Texas is a fairly distant second at 19.6 percent, with Sen. Marco Rubio (R) of Florida is third at 14.6.

There hasn’t been a lot of polling in the Palmetto State but these results are consistent with polls conducted prior to the New Hampshire primary. What they show is that the race may remain static. Trump leads. Senator Cruz is his only real competition. Behind them come the peloton of contenders for the title of establishment alternative, jammed up and elbows out.

That sound you hear is the slap of face-palming pundits as the reality of the situation sinks in.

“Folks, I’ve been as skeptical as anyone about Trump, but make no mistake he wins SC by 15+: it’s possible but tough to stop that train,” tweeted FiveThirtyEight poll expert Harry Enten on Friday afternoon.

Poll data shows Trump winning almost all South Carolina GOP demographic categories. He even wins voters who say they are “very conservative,” though by only one point over Cruz.

Add the poll figures for the so-called establishment candidates – Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush, and John Kasich – and the total number is still a couple of points lower than Trump’s 36 percent. That suggests that even if party elites could rally around one candidate and get the other two to drop out, Trump would still win.

“What I wonder now after New Hampshire is if anyone can stop Trump even if someone gets to the point where they’re one of the final three,” said University of New Hampshire political scientist Dante Scala on a February 12 episode of POTUSCast, a political podcast.

Recommended:    The Trump effect (+video)

Trump could still lose, Mr. Scala added. It’s just becoming more doubtful that will happen.

It’s true the Augusta Chronicle poll is just one poll in just one state. Trump’s national numbers have dropped a few points in recent weeks.

Cruz remains the pivot point. Can he gain strength in the South by hammering Trump as a closet liberal? If so, could he actually win? If not, where would his voters go?

A large majority of the members of Politico’s Caucus, a group of insiders in early voting states, still think Trump’s a goner. Eighty-five percent of them say Trump is not on track to win the nomination, despite his recent big New Hampshire primary win.

But insiders have been saying that for months now. When does Trump’s losing start?


Report Spam   Logged
christistruth
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


View Profile
« Reply #275 on: February 14, 2016, 06:16:43 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/happens-donald-trump-wins-big-south-carolina-130005301.html
What happens if Donald Trump wins big in South Carolina?

Despite Palmetto State polling, establishment insiders still think Donald Trump won't grab the nomination, but, if so, when will he stop winning?

2/13/16

Donald Trump is rolling along and gaining momentum. At what point will he have enough electoral/kinetic force that no other candidate will be able to prevent him from winning the nomination?

That’s our immediate reaction to a new poll out of South Carolina that shows Mr. Trump maintaining a wide lead in the state. He’s the choice of 36.3 percent of South Carolina voters, according to the Augusta Chronicle survey. Sen. Ted Cruz (R) of Texas is a fairly distant second at 19.6 percent, with Sen. Marco Rubio (R) of Florida is third at 14.6.

There hasn’t been a lot of polling in the Palmetto State but these results are consistent with polls conducted prior to the New Hampshire primary. What they show is that the race may remain static. Trump leads. Senator Cruz is his only real competition. Behind them come the peloton of contenders for the title of establishment alternative, jammed up and elbows out.

That sound you hear is the slap of face-palming pundits as the reality of the situation sinks in.

“Folks, I’ve been as skeptical as anyone about Trump, but make no mistake he wins SC by 15+: it’s possible but tough to stop that train,” tweeted FiveThirtyEight poll expert Harry Enten on Friday afternoon.

Poll data shows Trump winning almost all South Carolina GOP demographic categories. He even wins voters who say they are “very conservative,” though by only one point over Cruz.

Add the poll figures for the so-called establishment candidates – Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush, and John Kasich – and the total number is still a couple of points lower than Trump’s 36 percent. That suggests that even if party elites could rally around one candidate and get the other two to drop out, Trump would still win.

“What I wonder now after New Hampshire is if anyone can stop Trump even if someone gets to the point where they’re one of the final three,” said University of New Hampshire political scientist Dante Scala on a February 12 episode of POTUSCast, a political podcast.

Recommended:    The Trump effect (+video)

Trump could still lose, Mr. Scala added. It’s just becoming more doubtful that will happen.

It’s true the Augusta Chronicle poll is just one poll in just one state. Trump’s national numbers have dropped a few points in recent weeks.

Cruz remains the pivot point. Can he gain strength in the South by hammering Trump as a closet liberal? If so, could he actually win? If not, where would his voters go?

A large majority of the members of Politico’s Caucus, a group of insiders in early voting states, still think Trump’s a goner. Eighty-five percent of them say Trump is not on track to win the nomination, despite his recent big New Hampshire primary win.

But insiders have been saying that for months now. When does Trump’s losing start?




I got caught up in "Trumpmania" a few months ago, but now I am just ashamed for it. This guy is a joke. I can not, in all good conscience, lend support to a man who unabashedly lives such a degenerate, anti-Christian lifestyle. I will support Rubio, and even he has a lot of flaws, come my primary.
Report Spam   Logged

Luke 21:28

Jesus is the answer for our moral ills. Conservative principals are the answer to our government corruption.
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #276 on: February 27, 2016, 10:13:37 am »

Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #277 on: March 15, 2016, 09:38:10 pm »

The confusion that's driving support for Trump
3/14/16
http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/14/opinions/confusion-drives-support-for-trump-opinion-dearing/index.html

(CNN)—At some level, the 2016 presidential race has stopped being a presidential race and become a fight about who we are as a country. We clearly don't know the answer. We do know one thing, though. People seem confused. Confusion breeds Donald Trump.

A caller to a national radio program recently noted that he had been a Rand Paul supporter until Paul left the race. Now he's supporting Bernie Sanders. Paul is a libertarian. Sanders is a socialist. Moving from one to the other is like saying, "I was a vegetarian, but the store was out of broccoli, so I bought a steak."

An interviewee on NPR on Super Tuesday was asked who she supports. She's a self-identified Christian and began her answer by lamenting false claims of Christianity by many Republican candidates. I figured she'd be a lock for Ted Cruz.

Almost. She was undecided between Cruz or Trump. Yeah, because they'd definitely score the same on a Bible quiz.

People aren't confused because they're stupid. People are confused because the state of the social contract is a mess. The symbols and short cuts we traditionally use to tell us who stands for what are a mess, too. To make matters worse, those taking the clearest stances on what the social contract should be are not necessarily the ones who could get the hard work done to fix it.

Put it all together and we get a nightmare, three-way grid. There's Insider versus Outsider. Then, Who Gets It versus Who Can Govern. Then, there's a jumble of characteristics like Christian, or Fiscal Conservative, or Pro-Choice, that used to align pretty cleanly with tags like "Democrat," "Republican," "liberal" or "conservative," but now basically work as "independent variables." They could show up anywhere.

If you're an upper-class liberal from the Northeast, the country is going to hell in a handbasket. If you're a working-class conservative from the South, the country's also going to hell, just in a different basket. As a Gallup poll noted in February, only 27% of Americans felt the country was headed in the right direction, and it's been a year since that number topped 30.

Either way, we can't afford business as usual and need someone who understands that. That means the Outsider Who Gets It. So, we get a voter who might prefer Rand Paul, but also Bernie Sanders.

But some voters consider themselves realists. They want a person who can govern, or maybe just someone who doesn't want to blow up the very infrastructure of governance they're asking to run. That's likely an "Insider," even if she or he doesn't Get It, and it's one way to get an un-enrolled Massachusetts voter who went for John Kasich in the primary but is ready to for vote for Hillary Clinton in the general.

What about voters who feel specific values are critically important? If you're an evangelical Christian, conservative Christian values are critical. Historically, politicians who represented such values also represented ideas like protected trade, a strong national defense or American Exceptionalism. Think George W. Bush circa 1999-2000, when he ran as a Christian and also authored the aggressive security doctrine of "preemptive defense." You could pick a candidate who took one of those positions and feel fairly certain he held the others you cared about, too. Not so much in 2016. But that's hard to see, so we get a voter undecided between Cruz and Trump. Throw in a preference for Outsider, though, and that evangelical dumps Cruz.

People don't like confusion. We like certainty. Nothing fits that bill better than someone who offers absolutes. Combine absolutism with an Outsider Who Gets It -- and who is so slippery he can convincingly sell, "Whatever values you think you care about, those are my values, too" -- and we get a juggernaut. We get Donald Trump.

This election isn't about who the president will be. It's about who America will be. If the Insider candidates Who Can Govern don't do a better job of Getting It, owning that they helped mess it up in the first place, and connecting their plans for fixing it to the core, traditional values of their parties, we're all in trouble. We've seen the alternative.
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #278 on: March 15, 2016, 09:48:59 pm »

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2016/03/15/evangelical-christians-are-enormously-divided-over-donald-trumps-runaway-candidacy/
3/14/16
Why Donald Trump is tearing evangelicals apart
 
Pastor Rick Scarborough has spent 20 years traveling the country to politically mobilize evangelical voters and knows better than most just how un-monolithic they are. In recent years, those differences have just gotten more pronounced, said Scarborough.

“In the past when we’d talk about abortion, 90 percent said: ‘You’re right.’”  Now half seem to have experienced it or know someone who has, he said.  And “when Falwell spoke against gay marriage there was unanimity. Now half the congregation has a niece or brother who is impacted.”
But the Texas Baptist says he’s never witnessed the bitter divisions among evangelicals that this GOP primary season has unleashed.

Every day, Scarborough fields calls from distressed pastors who don’t know which candidate they’re supposed to support. Many, especially the conservative ones, are floored that candidates seem to show little interest in gay marriage, abortion and religious liberty issues. Some Trump supporters are threatening to leave their churches if their pastors preach against the Republican frontrunner. Arguments have broken out among prominent evangelical leaders about whether the Biblical mandate to love the sinner should include Donald Trump.

“Evangelicals are so divided….It’s because we are living in a growing age of secularism that is forcing itself on people who hold traditional values,” Scarborough said. “Along comes a champion to the common man, a guy who says to Christians: ‘I’m going to take care of you.’ Now it’s a numbers game and I don’t know if he can be stopped. People are confused.”

Evangelical divisions over Trump –53 percent of white evangelicals have a favorable view of the magnate, a recent Public Religion Research (PRRI) poll found – appear to be a stand-in for a deeper identity crisis. Negative comments about Muslims and Mexicans, for example, are revealing the extent to which self-described evangelicals are split in their belief that racial and ethnic equality is a core Christian value. Trump’s support of torture reveals a similar rift over what an evangelical means by saying he or she is “pro-life.”

The debate over whether evangelicals can legitimately support Trump without betraying their beliefs “may be shaping the very nature of evangelicalism,” dividing evangelicals between those who are able to reconcile their support of Trump with their Christianity and those who view his ideas and language as blasphemy, Mark Galli, editor of the flagship evangelical magazine Christianity Today, wrote last week.

“I mean that literally: “The act or offense of speaking sacreligiously…about sacred things.’ Racial and ethnic justice has become a ‘sacred thing,’ an item that defines what it means to be an evangelical Christian to many,” Galli wrote.

The embrace and endorsement of Trump by evangelical leader Jerry Falwell Jr. – son of a founding father of the religious right – led to a recent public break  with one of Falwell’s father’s closest confidants: Mark DeMoss, now an influential public affairs executive.

“The bullying tactics of personal insult have no defense – and certainly not for anyone who claims to be a follower of Christ. That’s what’s disturbing to so many people,” DeMoss told the Post, chastising Falwell Jr. The spat was major news among evangelicals as DeMoss chairs the executive committee – the governing board — of Liberty University, the massive Virginia evangelical university Falwell Sr. founded and Falwell Jr now heads.

 [Watch singers all over the world join in ‘Hallelujah’ in this impressive Mormon video] 

If Fox is conservative Christianity’s flagship media institution, Liberty is its academy.

But Becki Falwell, wife to the university president, expanded the public argument, saying there is nothing remotely unevangelical about Trump, or his behavior.

“Dr. Falwell was outspoken with his politically incorrect statements and embraced sinners,” she wrote March 2 on her Facebook page, in a rebuke to DeMoss. Then she went further. Not only did Falwell Sr. embrace sinners, she suggested, but they were his more loyal friends. “When he first had his heart problems in 2005, the only national figures who wrote him letters of well wishes were Jesse Jackson, Larry Flynt and Ted Kennedy. He supported a divorced and remarried Hollywood actor over a Southern Baptist Sunday school teacher and now, suddenly, Liberty has changed because its leader has embraced Donald Trump. Jesus was called a friend of publicans and sinners and called the religious elite of his time hypocrites.”


more
Report Spam   Logged
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #279 on: May 23, 2016, 05:42:38 pm »

Children's Pastor Arrested in Human Trafficking Sting

A church terminated it's children pastor after he was caught in a human trafficking sting.

Jason Kennedy of Grace Baptist Church was one of two pastors arrested in the operation that netted 32 men and women last week. The other, Zubin Parakh, was reportedly a volunteer creative pastor for Lifehouse Church outside Knoxville, Tennessee.

"I was devastated, I was totally shocked. It is something you can not anticipate, in fact I speak about it constantly," Grace Baptist Church Ron Stewart says. "I have nine other pastors and I speak to them constantly, 'We are held to a higher standard and what someone else may do and be accepted is not accepted and anything you do will be magnified and we understand much is given, much is required.' It goes with being a pastor."

Parakh reportedly expected to meet a 17-year-old girl and to pay $100 for a half-hour of sex. Court records report Kennedy negotiated a $100 fee for a half-hour of sex with a 15 and 18-year-old girl.

"We are saddened today as a result of information relating Zubin Parakh who was a volunteer worker at our church. Our church and its leaders were not aware of any alleged misconduct regarding Mr. Parakh. However, we are praying for all parties involved," LifeHouse posted in a statement. "We both ask for and hope our church family's privacy will be respected throughout this process."

Grace Baptist Church also asked for prayer as the congregation moves forward after Kennedy's arrest and subsequent firing:

We are deeply saddened by the recent events affecting our church family. The children's pastor of Grace Baptist Church has been terminated as a result of his arrest which is in violation of the statement of ethics that he signed and church standards of moral conduct.

The actions of the children's pastor for which he has been arrested were part of his life outside the church, and we have received no questions or concerns related to his conduct within the church or its ministries.

The children's pastor was hired two-and-a-half years ago. The church's background check turned up no issues that indicate any previous problem. In fact, the children's pastor in his application affirmed that he had no issues in his background of a criminal or other nature.

We want to reassure our church family that we are committed to the safety and security of our members, and especially our children. Our security system includes 78 security cameras, electronic check-in, background checks of employees and volunteers, and security officers during gatherings at the church.

We are praying for the children's pastor's family and will continue to provide the services of our ministry to them.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) says the entire incident happened within 1,000 feet of yet another church. 

"What so many people in our community don't quite understand is that human trafficking is a demand driven crime. And that demand comes from every single part of our society, including those parts that we'd all like to believe are not part of the problem," said Kate Trudell with the Community Coalition against Human Trafficking.

http://www.charismanews.com/us/57358-children-s-pastor-arrested-in-human-trafficking-sting
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #280 on: May 26, 2016, 10:17:29 am »

Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #281 on: July 13, 2016, 11:00:01 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #282 on: August 03, 2016, 10:06:24 pm »

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/08/02/chicago-man-kills-wife-leaving-church-couple-active-members-for-20-years.html
8/2/16
Chicago Man Kills Wife Leaving Church; Couple Active Members for 20 Years

A 38-year-old man fatally shot his 36-year-old wife as she came out of her church in Chicago, Illinois, after Sunday service, and then shot himself to death. Both were found dead on the scene.

The shooting took place shortly after the morning service ended at Second Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church on the West Side of Chicago on Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Kenneth Giles, the church's pastor, said, according to Chicago Tribune.

The woman, identified as Trinyce L. Sanders-Wilson, attended the service and was just leaving when she was shot, Giles added. "I think they were probably estranged at this time. I think there was probably some things going on between the two of them."

The woman had parked her car across the church and her husband waited for her to come and shot her as she reached the car. He then shot himself.

"She was a wonderful woman," the pastor said. "It's a tragedy on both sides for the church. He was also a good guy. But you never know what's going on in the minds of people," he added.

The couple had been members of the church for about two decades, and the woman actively served at the church voluntarily.

A witness, Andrew Davis, told ABC7 Chicago that he first heard a gunshot and then saw the woman falling to the ground. The man then shot the woman two more times, he added.
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #283 on: August 04, 2016, 02:27:09 pm »

http://www.vox.com/2016/8/4/12369912/hillary-clinton-pro-life

I'm a pro-life Christian. Here's why I'm voting for Hillary Clinton.

Updated by Rachel Held Evans on August 4, 2016, 8:40 a.m. ET


I’m pro-life.

Or, put another way, as a Christian, I believe the sacred personhood of an individual begins before birth and continues throughout life, and I believe that sacred personhood is worth protecting, whether it’s tucked inside a womb, waiting on death row, fleeing Syria in search of a home, or playing beneath the shadow of an American drone.

I’ve also voted for both pro-life and pro-choice candidates for political office, including Barack Obama in 2012 and 2008, and George W. Bush in 2004 and 2000.

So I speak as someone who has struggled with, and in some cases regretted, her decisions at the ballot box, and who recognizes that no single political party boasts a consistent pro-life ethic, just as no single political party embodies the teachings of Jesus or the values of his kingdom. I speak too as someone acutely aware of the inconsistencies and uncertainties in my own pro-life convictions, which continue to be challenged and changed in the midst of lived experience.

Related Evangelicals like me can't vote for Trump — or Clinton. Here's what we can do instead. 
 
As a frequent blogger and commentator and the author of several books, I’ve written in the past about feeling caught between the pro-life and pro-choice camps. Still, I’ve never used my platform to endorse a presidential candidate.

But as so many others have said, this year is different. Knowing many of my pro-life friends feel torn between voting for an unpopular but highly qualified pro-choice candidate in Hillary Clinton and an incompetent narcissist who poses a unique threat to our American democracy in Donald Trump, I’d like to make a proposal:

You should vote for Hillary Clinton.

And I’d like to suggest that voting for a pro-choice candidate in this election, or any election, need not overburden your conscience.

Here’s why.

In the eight years since we’ve had a pro-choice president, the abortion rate in the US has dropped to its lowest since 1973. I believe the best way to keep this trend going is not to simply make it harder for women to terminate unwanted pregnancies but to create a culture with fewer unwanted pregnancies to begin with.

Data suggests progressive social policies that make health care and child care more affordable, make contraception more accessible, alleviate poverty, and support a living wage do the most to create such a culture, while countries where abortion is simply illegal see no change in the abortion rate.

By focusing exclusively on the legal components of abortion while simultaneously opposing these family-friendly social policies, the Republican Party has managed to hold pro-life voters hostage with the promise of outlawing abortion (which has yet to happen under any Republican administration since Roe v. Wade), while actively working against the very policies that would lead to a significant reduction in unwanted pregnancies.

So even though I think abortion is morally wrong in most cases, and support more legal restrictions around it, I often vote for pro-choice candidates when I think their policies will do the most to address the health and economic concerns that drive women to get abortions in the first place.

For me, it’s not just about being pro-birth; it’s about being pro-life. All children deserve to live in a home and in a culture that welcomes them and can meet their basic needs. Every mother deserves the chance to thrive. Forcing millions of women to have children they can’t support, or driving them to Gosnell-style black market clinics, will not do.

I believe we have to work together — pro-life and pro-choice, Democrat and Republican, conservative Christian and progressive Christian — to create a culture of life that celebrates families and makes it easier to have and raise kids. This is the only way to make our efforts to rarify abortion truly sustainable.

This year, I believe Hillary Clinton has better policy proposals to help improve the lives of women, children, and families than Donald Trump, whose pro-life convictions are lukewarm at best; whose mass deportation plan would rip hundreds of thousands of families apart; whose contempt for Latinos, Muslims, refugees, and people with disabilities would further marginalized the "least of these" among us; and whose support for torture and targeting civilians in war call into question whether Christians who support him are truly pro-life or simply anti-abortion.

Those are my views in summary, but I’d like to unpack them in four main points:

1) Voting pro-choice is not the same as voting for abortion

Regarding the 2016 election, the Washington Post recently declared, "For evangelicals, the question has become: which is a worse sin, abortion or racism?" While the people quoted in the article offer far more nuanced perspectives, the headline betrays a common but reductive sentiment — that people who vote for pro-choice candidates are voting for abortions.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been called a "baby killer" by conservative Christians, some of whom routinely sent me images of mutilated fetuses during my pregnancy, which is no way to treat any woman, regardless of her views on abortion.

But characterizing all pro-choice voters as pro-abortion is inaccurate and unfair. In fact, a majority of Americans (56 percent) say abortion should be legal in most cases, even though nearly half (49 percent) believe it is immoral. Even those numbers don’t tell the whole story.

While it would be easier to debate one another if reproductive issues fell neatly into black and white categories of right and wrong, good and evil, most of us recognize this is simply not the case. The fact that a woman’s body naturally rejects hundreds of fertilized eggs in her lifetime raises questions about where we draw the line regarding the personhood of a zygote. Do we count all those "natural abortions" as deaths? When does personhood begin — at fertilization? Implantation? The presence of brainwaves? The second trimester?

There is disagreement among Christians (and historically, even among evangelicals) about this, so is it really my place, or the government's job, to impose my beliefs on people of all faiths and convictions? If abortion is criminalized, should every miscarriage be investigated by police? Should in vitro fertilization be outlawed?

Most of us would question whether this couple should have been forced to deliver their stillborn baby, or this woman told by her insurance company that terminating a desperately wanted but unviable pregnancy counted as an abortion. Given the complex nature of these and other issues, the degree to which the government should make decisions on behalf of women and families regarding pregnancy is, and should be, debatable.

I think it’s safe to say that few people who vote for Hillary Clinton this year will do so because they want the abortion rate to go up. Every person I’ve spoken with personally, whether pro-life or pro-choice or somewhere in between, wants to see abortions reduced.

That said, I’m concerned by efforts from some in the Democratic Party to move beyond the "safe, legal, and rare" posture on abortion to one that treats it as just another routine health procedure. (The recent "comedians in cars getting abortions" sketch is a troubling reflection of this trend.) I intend to speak out about this, and other concerning changes to the Democratic platform, and would encourage other pro-life progressives to do the same.

2) Criminalizing abortion won’t necessarily reduce abortions

Recent data published by the Lancet journal shows that countries where abortion is illegal or heavily restricted — mainly in Africa and Latin America — don’t have lower abortion rates than the rest of the world. In those countries, the rate is 37 abortions per 1,000 women, compared with 34 per 1,000 in countries where it is legal. In fact, in Latin America, a region with highly restrictive abortion laws, one in three pregnancies (32 percent) ended in abortion in 2010–'14, higher than in any other region.

This data underscores an important reality: that women will continue to seek out abortions even if they are illegal. This was certainly true in the US before Roe v. Wade, and remains true for women who resort to dangerous and clandestine methods of terminating pregnancies in countries where it is illegal.

Still, we have to be careful of comparing apples to oranges when it comes to the statistics. Most of the countries where abortion is illegal also suffer from widespread poverty and limited access to contraception — huge drivers in the abortion rate. In addition, some surveys show that here in the US, states with more abortion restrictions do in fact have lower abortion rates, suggesting legal changes may indeed have some effect.

So with those considerations in mind, I think it’s safer to say that while legal restrictions on abortion might put a dent in the abortion rate, they won’t put an end to abortion as we know it, and, most importantly, they won’t do a thing to alter the number of unwanted pregnancies.

Rather than waiting around for a hypothetical and unlikely legal scenario to play out, our efforts would be better spent working to decrease the number of unwanted pregnancies using the tools we already have. Which brings me to my next point.

3) Pro-life advocates should support, rather than oppose, efforts to help low-income families care for their children

When President Obama recently announced an initiative aimed at improving the distribution of free or low-cost diapers to poor families struggling to care for their babies, many conservatives sneered, calling it the ultimate example of a "nanny state."

It was frustrating to see an idea that was so obviously pro-life and pro-family get lampooned by the very people who say they want millions of low-income women to have millions more babies. I know I’m not the only one who gets red-faced whenever a self-proclaimed pro-life politician or pastor belittles and demeans "welfare queens" and "moocher moms," seemingly unaware of the hypocrisy of forcing women to have children they can’t afford while simultaneously dismantling the social safety net that helps them care for those children.

The fact is that most women who choose to have abortions do so because they feel they cannot manage the financial burden of carrying out the pregnancy and raising another child. The latest survey from the Guttmacher Institute found that 49 percent of abortion patients in 2014 had incomes of less than 100 percent of the federal poverty level ($11,670 per year), and 26 percent had incomes of 100 to 199 percent of the federal poverty level.

The survey reports:

The reasons patients gave for having an abortion underscored their understanding of the responsibilities of parenthood and family life. The three most common reasons — each cited by three-fourths of patients — were concern for or responsibility to other individuals; the inability to afford a child; and the belief that having a baby would interfere with work, school or the ability to care for dependents.

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Imagine you’re a mother of two working 40 hours a week at a minimum wage job in food service while your husband hunts for a job. (At $7.25 per hour, that works out to $15,080 a year.) Child care takes about 30 percent of those earnings; rent, groceries, and other bills the rest.

Now imagine that, like a third of American workers, you don’t get any paid sick days, so every time one of your children gets an ear infection or catches the flu, your pay is docked for taking time off to care for them. Imagine, too, that you can barely afford your health insurance, much less days off for doctor visits, and your employer doesn’t offer any paid maternity leave.

Now imagine you get pregnant…

This is the reality faced by millions of women who consider abortions each year. And the sad irony is the same pro-life politicians who want to force them to have their babies typically oppose raising the minimum wage, ensuring paid sick leave and parental leave for all American workers, and protecting the 20 million people who can finally afford health insurance thanks to the Affordable Care Act. Those politicians also tend to oppose additional funding for successful programs like WIC, which provides food assistance to low-income pregnant and postpartum women and their children.

Creating a culture of life isn’t just about standing in a picket line with a "Choose Life" sign. It’s about seriously addressing the problem of income inequality in this country so that no woman has to choose between getting an abortion and raising her child in poverty.

It means celebrating parenthood by making America the most generous country in the developed world when it comes to maternity and paternity leave, not the least generous, and it means working together on efforts to reduce the costs of food, diapers, child care, pediatrician visits, college tuition, adoption, and resources for special needs children.

Like her or not, agree with her or not, Hillary Clinton has devoted much of her life to tackling these very issues, and she’s made them a centerpiece of her campaign. (Check out Shannon Dingle’s post "I'm pro-life. And I'm voting for Hillary. Here's why" for more on this.)

Some of Clinton’s plans include guaranteeing 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave, expanding early childhood education, capping child care expenses at 10 percent of a household’s income, helping the families of children with autism and other special needs get access to more resources and support, and insuring more families through the Affordable Care Act.

In the past, she has worked with Republicans on legislation that reformed the foster care system and encouraged more adoptions, issues I know matter to many pro-life evangelicals who advocate on behalf of adoption and open their homes to children.

Sometimes I think it’s easier for us to talk about "saving millions of babies" than it is to work to create a culture that can sustainably welcome those babies as they grow into children and adults. Speaking in abstract terms about blank, amorphous "innocent lives" keeps us from confronting the reality that if most of these children are born at or near the poverty line, then the lives we are saving are more likely to be troubled ones, and if nothing changes, those lives will get caught in vicious cycles powered by poverty and systemic racism.

Thinking holistically about pro-life values means thinking beyond the labor and delivery unit. If we don't address income inequality in this country, and if we don't support robust plans to improve health care and education, we simply can't sustain the very lives we're advocating be protected.

4) If we want to dramatically reduce the abortion rate in this country, we must support efforts to make contraception more accessible and affordable

Study after study after study shows this to be true.

Not only would improved access to contraception impact the abortion rate in the US, it would also dramatically reduce maternal and infant deaths around the world. There are more than 220 million women in developing countries who don’t want to get pregnant but who lack access to family planning information and contraceptives. Every year, nearly 300,000 of them will die during pregnancy or from complications giving birth, and many more will be permanently disabled. More than 2.6 million babies will be stillborn, and another 2.9 million will die before they are a month old.

As Melinda Gates explains here, giving women the opportunity to time their pregnancies and space out their children through effective, low-cost contraception is key to turning these numbers around. Some estimate it could save as many as 2 million children every year, and dramatically curb maternal mortality rates.

If that isn’t pro-life, I don’t know what is.

This essay is adapted from a post that appeared on Rachel Held Evans’s website.

Rachel Held Evans is a New York Times best-selling author whose books include Faith Unraveled (2010), A Year of Biblical Womanhood (2012), and Searching for Sunday (2015). Hailing from Dayton, Tennessee — home of the famous Scopes monkey trial of 1925 — she writes about faith, doubt and life in the Bible Belt. Her website is RachelHeldEvans.com.
Report Spam   Logged
christistruth
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


View Profile
« Reply #284 on: August 04, 2016, 02:45:15 pm »

I couldn't even stomach to finish that article. Very disturbing.
Report Spam   Logged

Luke 21:28

Jesus is the answer for our moral ills. Conservative principals are the answer to our government corruption.
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #285 on: August 04, 2016, 03:35:41 pm »

I couldn't even stomach to finish that article. Very disturbing.
I'm not a Trump supporter either, but nonetheless we're seeing the work of God here at the same time - I believe he's blinding the minds and hearts of those that don't believe his word (and hence we may be witnessing the signs of the strong delusion before this current dispensation period concludes).

Acts 28:26  Saying, Go unto this people, and say, Hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand; and seeing ye shall see, and not perceive:
Act 28:27  For the heart of this people is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes have they closed; lest they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Report Spam   Logged
christistruth
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


View Profile
« Reply #286 on: August 04, 2016, 03:40:29 pm »

I'm not a Trump supporter either, but nonetheless we're seeing the work of God here at the same time - I believe he's blinding the minds and hearts of those that don't believe his word (and hence we may be witnessing the signs of the strong delusion before this current dispensation period concludes).

Acts 28:26  Saying, Go unto this people, and say, Hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand; and seeing ye shall see, and not perceive:
Act 28:27  For the heart of this people is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes have they closed; lest they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.



Deu 1:30  The LORD your God which goeth before you, he shall fight for you, according to all that he did for you in Egypt before your eyes;
Deu 1:31  And in the wilderness, where thou hast seen how that the LORD thy God bare thee, as a man doth bear his son, in all the way that ye went, until ye came into this place.

These people are insane. Shillary will not protect the lives of the innocent -- I will say, however, that apparently Trump's speech at the RNC was the first nominees speech for years that does pertain a Pro-Life view.

So I will say that neither Shillary or Don are pro-life.
Report Spam   Logged

Luke 21:28

Jesus is the answer for our moral ills. Conservative principals are the answer to our government corruption.
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #287 on: August 05, 2016, 11:57:35 am »

Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #288 on: August 05, 2016, 07:51:08 pm »

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/opinions/wp/2016/08/05/the-two-wings-of-conservatism-have-combined-to-finally-destroy-the-republican-party/
8/5/16
The two wings of conservatism have combined to finally destroy the Republican Party

They had a good run, from Morning in America until the Dark Night of Donald Trump, but the internal contradiction in the GOP coalition has finally hit the inevitable fail moment.

Social conservatives had hoped to forestall and/or roll back social change that includes women’s rights, minority rights and LGBT rights. So they allied themselves with a form of unregulated economics that was nearly certain to trample all of their agenda. There is nothing about laissez-faire economics that is concerned with preserving existing social norms other than the prerogatives of the wealthy.

On the other side, the economic conservatives built their political base on the backs of people they fundamentally didn’t really like or respect, and had no real intention of delivering anything to. How long did they think that would work? Pretty long, as it turned out, but all good scams must come to an end.

So the great and very successful GOP coalition is now collapsing. That is the real story of this election, not Donald Trump. That’s what the GOP will be staring at, as will the rest of us, after Trump’s nearly inevitable November defeat.

Reassembling the GOP is the Humpty Dumpty problem. That is, it can’t be done. We are entering an era where there may be only one party that is a viable presidential-level party. This state of affairs won’t last forever either, but it is a great mystery now trying to think of a coalition that could successfully replace the previous one. I’m stumped. If you have an answer, please share it.
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #289 on: August 15, 2016, 01:34:41 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-stebenne/hillary-clintons-religiou_b_11507644.html
Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #290 on: August 15, 2016, 02:49:17 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/charles-redfern/is-american-evangelical-christianity_b_11459552.html
8/15/16
Is American Evangelical Christianity Sinking On The GOP Ship?



Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #291 on: August 22, 2016, 01:11:55 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #292 on: August 24, 2016, 02:14:54 pm »

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/44b9d476-b741-3d7b-b2ce-15afdfd76604/ss_with-christianity-in-decline%2C.html
8/23/16
With Christianity in Decline, Britain Sees Rise of Humanist ‘Pastors’

London (CNSNews.com) – With participation in traditional faiths at near-record lows, Britain is seeing the rise of what humanists describe as “pastors” for the non-religious.

Last month the University of Westminster in London broke new ground by appointing its first official secular advisor for students.

The move followed efforts by the British Humanist Association since 2014 to train more than 100 volunteers to go into schools, hospitals and prisons in order to provide counseling support for those who don’t believe in a deity.

Early this year hospitals run by Britain’s National Health Service in Leicester also saw their first humanist appointed to the local chaplaincy team.

Government guidelines published in 2015 obligate medical trusts in England to provide pastoral support on an equal basis to those who are atheists as well as the religious.

This month, the landmark British Social Attitudes Survey showed that decline in religious belief in Britain has plateaued out but is still near its historic low point.

The survey, which has been run since 1983 and surveys roughly 3,000 British residents on a range of social-related issues, said that that 48 percent reported having “no religion.”

Ian Simpson, a senior researcher at NatCen, the social research firm that runs the survey, said that if anything this showed a small rebound for Christianity and other religions in the United Kingdom.

“The proportion of people saying they have no religion peaked at 51 percent in 2009 and has plateaued since then,” he said. “It appears that the steady decline of religion in Britain has come to a halt, at least for now.”

In the first year of the survey, only 31 percent of respondents described themselves as non-religious.

With nearly half of the population now describing themselves as not having a belief in God of gods, the British Humanist Association (BHA) says those people need a “listening ear” during difficult times in their lives, much in the same way that the religious have.

“Religious chaplains work to support people at some of life’s most trying times, or in moments of emotional difficulty or moral uncertainty,” said BHA chief executive Andrew Copson. “For a very long time, non-religious people haven’t been able to benefit in that same way from having a non-judgmental person to speak to who shares their outlook on the world.”

The association said it has also trained and accredited more than 300 people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland to lead humanist-themed ceremonies for occasions such as weddings and funerals.

more
Report Spam   Logged
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #293 on: August 25, 2016, 04:13:50 am »

Pew: Americans giving up on God, miracles

Half of Americans who have left their church no longer believe in God, leading a surge of nearly one quarter of the nation who have no affiliation with any religion, according to a new survey.

Pew Research Center said Wednesday that 49 percent of what they term "nones" left their church and religion because they "don't believe." Another 20 percent said they don't like organized religion. Other reasons included "common sense" and a lack of belief in miracles.

The survey is the latest from Pew that demonstrates a growing trend in America: more and more people are junking religion and many are giving up on God.

Pew interviewed several respondents to try and find a reason. Pew Said for example:

"About half of current religious 'nones' who were raised in a religion (49%) indicate that a lack of belief led them to move away from religion. This includes many respondents who mention 'science' as the reason they do not believe in religious teachings, including one who said 'I'm a scientist now, and I don't believe in miracles.' Others reference 'common sense,' 'logic' or a 'lack of evidence' – or simply say they do not believe in God."



http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/pew-huge-surge-in-americans-who-no-longer-believe-in-god-miracles/article/2600066
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #294 on: August 25, 2016, 08:25:14 am »

The rotten fruits of "fundamentalism" - this is largely happened b/c the HOMES didn't do their jobs, first and foremost - they would show an outward appearance of being "holy" on Sundays, but by the time Sunday was all said and done, most in their HOMES went back to their worldly, albeit secular lifestyles...as a result, their next generations saw the hypocrisy of all this.

Ephesians 5:22  Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord.
Eph 5:23  For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church: and he is the saviour of the body.
Eph 5:24  Therefore as the church is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in every thing.
Eph 5:25  Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it;
Eph 5:26  That he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word,
Eph 5:27  That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish.
Eph 5:28  So ought men to love their wives as their own bodies. He that loveth his wife loveth himself.
Eph 5:29  For no man ever yet hated his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the church:
Eph 5:30  For we are members of his body, of his flesh, and of his bones.
Eph 5:31  For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh.
Eph 5:32  This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church.
Eph 5:33  Nevertheless let every one of you in particular so love his wife even as himself; and the wife see that she reverence her husband.
Report Spam   Logged
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #295 on: August 29, 2016, 07:29:27 pm »

Pastor Who Says Single Christians Can Have 'Mutually Pleasurable' Sex Doesn't See Bible as God's Infallible Word

This is why feminist liberals cant be a Pastor.


The Reverend Bromleigh McCleneghan and the cover of her new book, 'Good Christian Sex.'

The Rev. Bromleigh McCleneghan, the married mother of three and associate pastor for ministry with families at Union Church of Hinsdale in Illinois, who argues that single Christians can have sex as long as it's "mutually pleasurable and affirming," says she doesn't interpret the Bible as God's infallible Word.

"I profess Jesus as the Word of God, and the Bible as a witness to His life, ministry, death and resurrection. Which is to say that I take it seriously as a living witness, but also as a historic document written in a particular time and place," McCleneghan said in a Q&A via email with The Christian Post on Tuesday.

McCleneghan, who is advocating that single Christians can have sex in moderation in her new book, Good Christian Sex: Why Chastity Isn't the Only Option — And Other Things the Bible Says About Sex, also responded to criticism from CP readers about the subject of her book.

The following is an edited transcript of CP's Q&A with McCleneghan:

CP: Readers are concerned that you might not believe in the Bible as the infallible Word of God. What in a nutshell is your understanding of the Bible in this context? Do you think the Bible is the infallible Word of God?

McCleneghan: Different Christian churches read and interpret the Bible differently. I profess Jesus as the Word of God, and the Bible as a witness to His life, ministry, death and resurrection. Which is to say that I take it seriously as a living witness, but also as a historic document written in a particular time and place.

CP: The Bible advises against fornication in 1 Thessalonians 4:3-4. What is your interpretation of this Scripture? Isn't what your book is recommending to unmarried Christians fornication?

McCleneghan: I think that there have to be additional norms for what makes sex moral or immoral, just or unjust; the question of marriage is insufficient.

Because, of course, there can be harmful or non-consensual (abusive) sex in marriage. So we need to reflect on, with the biblical authors and other theologians, what sex is about: what makes it moral or immoral? What makes something loving, holy, and good? On page 144 of my book, I reflect a bit on the word "fornication:"

If sex is for the appropriate practice and experience of vulnerability, then repeated behaviors that mask that purpose are unethical. I've always wondered what to do with the Apostle Paul's condemnation of "fornication" in that letter to the church at Corinth (6:18 in particular). In the Greek, it's "porneia." In the new Common English Bible, it's "sexual immorality." Fornication is traditionally seen as extramarital sex. But that seems both overly broad and overly narrow. Porneia includes just about every naughty thing you can think of, including sex with relatives and animals, but also some that seem categorically "not like the others" to our modern ears (i.e., sex with someone who has been divorced). "Sexual immorality" is similarly all-inclusive, and unhelpfully vague. What makes something immoral?

My book is really an invitation for people to reflect on Scripture and their experiences in the light of their faith. It is not an "anything goes" approach to sexuality, but it does ask readers to consider what is at stake in the ways they order their sexual relationships.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/pastor-who-says-single-christians-can-have-mutually-pleasurable-sex-doesnt-see-bible-as-gods-infallible-word-168434/
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #296 on: August 29, 2016, 08:50:34 pm »

Quote
"I profess Jesus as the Word of God, and the Bible as a witness to His life, ministry, death and resurrection. Which is to say that I take it seriously as a living witness, but also as a historic document written in a particular time and place," McCleneghan said in a Q&A via email with The Christian Post on Tuesday.

It means she had nothing more than a mental ascent - nothing more than a HEAD BELIEF, with NO conviction and godly sorrow of her sins.
Report Spam   Logged
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #297 on: August 29, 2016, 09:38:53 pm »

More Americans Than Ever Are Losing Their Religion

Never before in U.S. history have so many Americans chosen to be unaffiliated with any particular religious group. As you will see below, the percentage of “nones” in this country has absolutely skyrocketed over the past decade. But not all faiths are losing members in the United States. In fact, Islam, Buddhism, Wicca and various New Age organizations have all experienced excellent growth in recent years. Sadly, almost all of the growth for the “nones” has come at the expense of Christianity. Americans are leaving the Christian faith in droves, and this is why many of our churches are less than half full on Sunday mornings. What we are doing right now is clearly not working, and hopefully we can get the church in America to wake up while there is still time to do so.

Earlier today I came across a brand new study from the Pew Research Center entitled “Why America’s ‘nones’ left religion behind“. One thing that particularly stood out to me was the fact that most “nones” were once affiliated with a particular religion but have now discarded that label…

    Perhaps the most striking trend in American religion in recent years has been the growing percentage of adults who do not identify with a religious group. And the vast majority of these religious “nones” (78%) say they were raised as a member of a particular religion before shedding their religious identity in adulthood.

Overall, the percentage of “nones” in this nation has been absolutely soaring in recent years. Back in 2007, “nones” made up 16 percent of the population, but now that number has risen to 23 percent. The following is from a different Pew Research Center report that was published last year…

    Religious “nones” – a shorthand we use to refer to people who self-identify as atheists or agnostics, as well as those who say their religion is “nothing in particular” – now make up roughly 23% of the U.S. adult population. This is a stark increase from 2007, the last time a similar Pew Research study was conducted, when 16% of Americans were “nones.” (During this same time period, Christians have fallen from 78% to 71%.)

I want you to notice one particularly sobering fact in the excerpt posted above. The seven percent increase in the percentage of “nones” was matched exactly by a seven percent decrease in the percentage of Christians.

It is time to face a very hard truth – Christianity is in rapid decline in America.

So why is this happening?

Is there an explanation for why so many people are leaving the church?

Well, here is some of the feedback that the Pew Research Center received while conducting their new survey…

    About half of current religious “nones” who were raised in a religion (49%) indicate that a lack of belief led them to move away from religion. This includes many respondents who mention “science” as the reason they do not believe in religious teachings, including one who said “I’m a scientist now, and I don’t believe in miracles.” Others reference “common sense,” “logic” or a “lack of evidence” – or simply say they do not believe in God.

This is such a tragedy, because during my decades of research into these things I have found that logic and reason should always point people toward the Christian faith and not away from it. There is an absolutely gigantic mountain of evidence for Christianity out there, but unfortunately most people don’t know about it or they are not interested in considering it.

The biggest cultural shift has been happening among our young people. Most of them have been raised in an environment where God has been removed from almost every corner of public life, and the results have been beyond catastrophic.

In America today, 35 percent of all Millennials are “nones”.

Millennials are more than twice as likely to be “nones” as Baby Boomers (17 percent), and they are more than three times as likely to be “nones” as the Silent Generation (11 percent).

In other words, the younger you are the more likely you are to be religiously unaffiliated.

And this shows up in the church attendance numbers as well. Millennials are much, much less likely to be in church on any particular Sunday morning than the oldest Americans are. The following information comes from another Pew Research Center report…

    Millennials – especially the youngest Millennials, who have entered adulthood since the first Landscape Study was conducted – are far less religious than their elders. For example, only 27% of Millennials say they attend religious services on a weekly basis, compared with 51% of adults in the Silent generation. Four-in-ten of the youngest Millennials say they pray every day, compared with six-in-ten Baby Boomers and two-thirds of members of the Silent generation. Only about half of Millennials say they believe in God with absolute certainty, compared with seven-in-ten Americans in the Silent and Baby Boom cohorts. And only about four-in-ten Millennials say religion is very important in their lives, compared with more than half in the older generational cohorts.

We are slowly losing an entire generation.

When you walk into most churches in America on Sunday morning, what are you going to find?

You are going to find that the congregation is dominated by “the greys”, and I am not talking about space aliens.

As the oldest Americans die off, the United States is becoming less and less Christian. We are on the exact same path that Europe has already gone down, but most churches are just going on with business as usual and don’t seem to even understand that we have a major crisis on our hands.

As I said at the top of this article, what we are doing right now is clearly not working, and if we continue on the path that we are currently on we will continue to lose young people by the millions.

America needs revival more than it has ever needed it before.

Let us pray that one arrives very soon.

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/more-americans-than-ever-are-losing-their-religion
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Mark
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 21729



View Profile
« Reply #298 on: August 29, 2016, 09:39:42 pm »

Witchcraft, Islam And Humanism Are Filling The Spiritual Void Left By The Dying Church

A dramatic spiritual paradigm shift is taking place in the western world. At the end of last week, I discussed the fact that more Americans than ever before appear to be turning away from the Christian faith, and this is particularly true among our young people. And while it is undeniable that atheism and agnosticism are both growing rapidly, it is also important to point out that other faiths are on the rise in the western world at the exact same time that Christianity is shrinking. If you are a Christian, what you are about to read should concern you greatly.

Let’s start with witchcraft. It has been estimated that Wicca (one very popular form of witchcraft) is now the fastest growing faith in America. Books and movies featuring Harry Potter and others that use “magic” for good have fueled a tremendous amount of interest in the dark arts these days. Just consider the following excerpt from a Salon article that was published earlier this month…

    Stores specializing in metaphysical sundries (think ritual candles, blended oils, sacred herbs) like Spellbound Sky and House of Intuition in Los Angeles, while not brand-new, are suddenly crowded. In Brooklyn, Witches of Bushwick has evolved from a venue on the underground party circuit to a social collective that celebrates witchcraft as a feminist art and collaborates with fashion companies like Chromat. Of course, for those who prefer whipping up potions at home, several new witch- and occult-themed subscription boxes deliver the magical arts to the doorstep.

And social media has enabled young people interested in magic to connect with one another in a way that we have never seen before. Here is more from Salon…

    Check social media: A search for #witch on Instagram yields about 2,375,000 posts — whereas one for #kardashian scores only 1,630,000. Search next time at a boutique: Tarot decks are coming back in high style, thanks to retailers like the Wild Unknown — its artful cards are in stores across the country, from upscale meccas like ABC Home in New York City to indie hot spots like Skylark in Venice Beach, California. K-Hole was right, “mysticore” is the new norm.

Yes, there are still many more Christians than witches in America.

But the ranks of those that are into the occult are growing very quickly – especially among our young people – and in many churches on Sunday morning you will be fortunate to find even a handful of young adults.

Meanwhile, Islam is on the rise in the western world as well. Much of this is due to immigration, and new mosques are springing up all over the United States and Europe.

As Islam gains ground, there has been a concerted effort in some quarters to bring Christianity and Islam together. This movement has become known as “Chrislam”, and in recent years we have seen some things that many of us never imagined that we would ever see in the Christian world.

For example, earlier this year the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church USA was opened with a prayer offered to Allah…

    “Allah bless us and bless our families and bless our Lord. Lead us on the straight path – the path of all prophets: Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad.”

    These were the words that rang out over the congregation at The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, USA meeting in Portland, Oregon. Wajidi Said, co-founder of the Muslim Education Trust, led the attendees in the prayer to the Islamic deity, a move arranged by the Ecumenical and Interfaith ministry staff at the assembly.

    The prayer was part of the “first order of business” during the meeting’s opening session, a time dedicated to praying for those affected by the Orlando shooting that occurred just weeks before.

And of course the Presbyterian Church USA is far from alone. As I have documented, Pope Francis has stated that Christians and Muslims both “worship the one God”, and in 2014 he authorized Islamic prayers and readings from the Quran at the Vatican for the first time ever.

But despite such efforts to “bring Christians and Muslims together”, the truth is that Islamic terrorists continue to slaughter Christians on a continual basis all over the planet. The most recent attack on a church took place in Indonesia on Sunday…

    An ISIS suicide bomber today attacked a Catholic priest with an axe as he tried to blow up hundreds of worshippers at a church during Sunday Mass.

    Priest Albert Pandiangan, 60, was holding the holy ceremony at the altar when the 18-year-old fanatic rushed towards him with a backpack bomb and tried to blow himself up.

    But the bomb burned without setting off the explosives, so the jihadi pulled an axe from his bag and slashed the priest’s arm at St Yoseph Church in Medan, the capital of North Sumatra in Indonesia.

So far there have been well over 1000 Islamic terror attacks in 2016, and ISIS appears to have a renewed emphasis on attacking churches and Christians wherever they can find them.

Without a doubt, we are also witnessing a huge increase in the number of atheists and agnostics in the western world. Europe is much farther along than the United States is in this regard, and many areas of the continent are rightly regarded to be “post-Christian” at this point.

In the UK, the Christian faith has declined so dramatically that now we are seeing the rise of “humanist chaplains” that don’t hold to any sort of faith at all…

    With participation in traditional faiths at near-record lows, Britain is seeing the rise of humanist chaplains providing “pastoral” support for the non-religious.

    Last month the University of Westminster in London broke new ground by appointing its first official secular advisor for students.

    The move followed efforts by the British Humanist Association since 2014 to train more than 100 volunteers to go into schools, hospitals and prisons in order to provide support for those who don’t believe in a deity.

Fortunately, things are much different in much of the rest of the world. In fact, the Christian faith is currently experiencing explosive growth in China, India, South America and many portions of Africa.

But in the United States and Europe people are leaving the faith of their forefathers in astounding numbers, and that spiritual void is often being filled by other faiths such as witchcraft and Islam.

So what does this mean for the future of our society?

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/witchcraft-islam-and-humanism-are-filling-the-spiritual-void-left-by-the-dying-church
Report Spam   Logged

What can you do for Jesus?  Learn what 1 person can accomplish.

The Man from George Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkjMvPhLrn8
Psalm 51:17
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28357


View Profile
« Reply #299 on: September 04, 2016, 09:31:25 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10] 11 12   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
Free SMF Hosting - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy