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The Euro-What do you think is happening, is this prophetic

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Poll
Question: Whats the plan for the euro  (Voting closed: December 14, 2011, 02:58:14 am)
Collapse the euro before Chritmas - 0 (0%)
Collapse the euro before this time next year - 1 (25%)
Add a stronger currency to absorb the mess - 0 (0%)
Collapse the whole world financial structure soon to implement the mark(revelation) - 2 (50%)
Not clear from prophecy whats happening - 1 (25%)
Total Voters: 2

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Author Topic: The Euro-What do you think is happening, is this prophetic  (Read 5570 times)
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« Reply #240 on: March 02, 2013, 11:23:58 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/euro-bailout-fund-may-not-050635337.html

3/2/13
BERLIN (Reuters) - Deep reservations in some European states could ultimately stop the euro zone's bailout fund being used for bank recapitalisation, the head of the fund said.

Klaus Regling, the head of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), told Wirtschafts Woche magazine he was not able to say with certainty that the ESM would be used for this purpose.

"There are several states where enthusiasm for direct bank recapitalisations is very limited," he said, noting it needed unanimous backing. "I can therefore not say with 100 percent certainty that we will have this instrument."

Euro zone leaders agreed last June to allow the ESM to directly recapitalise banks to stop the rescue of failed financial institutions from piling debt on individual countries.

But Germany and others have doubts about using the fund for this purpose because they fear it will leave them on the hook for bad loans made in Spain and elsewhere. Regling also has doubts.

"If money from the ESM goes into saving banks then it reduces the ESM's capacity to make loans to needy states," he said in an interview made available on Saturday, adding that recapitalising banks without an upper limit could hurt the ESM's credit rating.

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said last month the ESM should limit any recapitalisation of banks to well below 80 billion euros (69 billion pounds), if anything at all.

The Eurogroup of euro zone finance ministers will meet in Brussels on Monday where besides discussing a bailout for Cyprus they are also set to discuss the ESM.

Regling also called on Italy, where parties are wrangling over how to form a government after elections left no group with a workable majority, to stick to austerity moves implemented under outgoing Prime Minister Mario Monti.

"It's important that Italy is run by a government which continues on this path of reforms," he was quoted as saying.

"If that succeeds, the country will regain competitiveness and return to growth," he added.

(Reporting by Alexandra Hudson; Additional reporting by Michelle Martin; Editing by Jason Webb)
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 11:27:16 am by BornAgain2 » Report Spam   Logged
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« Reply #241 on: March 05, 2013, 09:59:21 pm »

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/05/europe-economy-idUSL4N0BX4LF20130305?feedType=RSS&feedName=marketsNews&rpc=43

3/5/13
WRAPUP 1-Europe's economic fractures widen in February

* France, Spain and Italy behind deeper euro zone downturn

* Germany still prospering, UK services PMI brighter

* Euro zone retail sales better than expected

* Economists warn outlook poor from here

By Andy Bruce

LONDON, March 5 (Reuters) - France, Spain and Italy dragged the euro zone into a deeper downturn in February, according to business surveys that showed the chasm between these countries and prosperous Germany widening yet again.

While British services companies had a slightly better month than expected, Tuesday's purchasing managers' indexes (PMIs) showed deepening fractures running through the European economy.

The divide between Germany and France, the euro zone's two biggest economies, grew to its widest since the currency union's inception in 1999.

The PMIs reflected how euro zone businesses were faring mostly before the inconclusive outcome of Italy's general election, which unsettled international financial markets.

"Two months into 2013, we've been somewhat disappointed with the euro zone economy's progress. The PMIs again reaffirm that," said Victoria Clarke, economist at Investec in London.

"Germany's doing a bit better than the rest of the pack, but in general, there's no real sign there of stabilisation, or of the contraction at least bottoming out."

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« Reply #242 on: March 07, 2013, 04:48:04 pm »

Emboldened parliament ready to veto EU budget deal

http://news.yahoo.com/emboldened-parliament-ready-veto-eu-174653936.html
3/7/13
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Parliament is prepared to block agreement on the European Union's hard-fought budget deal last month unless governments agree to increase spending on boosting growth, the president of the assembly said on Thursday.

Victory last week in imposing a cap on bankers' bonuses has fired the parliament's self-confidence, which it is now ready to use to change or block legislation, including the 2014-2020 budget, German Socialist Martin Schulz said.

"We are a very influential and powerful parliament," he said, adding that it wasn't about flexing muscles.

"Why would we refuse the (budget) deal? Not to show our power, but because we think with an overwhelming majority that the priorities are wrong."

Last month, after all-night talks, EU leaders struck a deal on a seven-year plan that included a first real-terms decrease in future spending, while protecting traditional areas such as farm subsidies and public infrastructure.

While the parliament is unlikely to challenge the overall spending ceiling of 960 billion euros agreed by EU leaders, Schulz said they could demand changes to how the money is spent, potentially throwing the entire deal into doubt.

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« Reply #243 on: March 11, 2013, 09:55:22 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/hungary-insert-rejected-laws-constitution-114140274.html
3/11/13
Hungary to insert rejected laws into constitution

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hungary's prime minister can't take "no" for an answer, even when he is being instructed by the country's highest court.
 
Over the past 18 months, the Constitutional Court has struck down several of the government's policies, including fining or jailing the homeless for living in public spaces, banning political campaign ads on commercial radio and TV stations and forcing university students who accepted state scholarships to work in Hungary for years after they graduate.
 
On Monday, however, lawmakers from Prime Minister Viktor Orban's Fidesz party are preparing to pass a lengthy amendment to the constitution that will entrench all those discredited policies and many others, ensuring that the government gets its way no matter what anyone says.
 
The amendment has alarmed the European Union, which over the past several months has forced Orban to dilute some of the laws meant to expand his control over everything from the central bank and the economy to the arts and the media.
 
The current argument is only the latest example of international criticism over government policies seen to be concentrating power in Orban's hands, paying lip service to democratic principles and expanding the state's role to the detriment of private enterprise.
 
On Friday, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso spoke by telephone with Orban and sent him a letter expressing his concerns about possible conflicts between the planned amendment and EU laws.
 
"We trust that these contacts will ensure that our concerns are taken into account," commission spokeswoman Pia Ahrenkilde Hansen told The Associated Press, adding that the intention was to avoid facing "any vote that would result in incompatibility with EU law ... and would make the time ahead more difficult."
 
In a written response to Barroso after their call, Orban confirmed "the full commitment" of Hungary's government and parliament to European norms, but gave no direct indication that Monday's vote on the amendment, which has more than 20 articles, would be delayed.
 
With most domestic challengers neutralized — Orban allies run the media council, the state audit office, the central bank and other key institutions — the prime minister has taken to lashing out at EU bureaucrats in Brussels.
 
Although 97 percent of Hungary's development funds over the past years have been provided by the EU, Orban has said Hungary won't allow itself "to be dictated to by anyone from Brussels or anywhere else" and that Hungary does not need "unsolicited comradely assistance" from people in "finely-tailored suits" to write its constitution.
 
The U.S. has also voiced concerns about the amendment. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said it "could threaten the principles of institutional independence and checks and balances that are the hallmark of democratic governance."
 
The 49-year-old Orban's repeated attempts to concentrate power and carry out his "revolution in a voting booth," as he dubbed his party's landslide win in 2010, seem at odds with his past. Once a determined anti-communist dissident, he entered the political stage in 1989 by publicly calling for the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Hungary and the end of the communist dictatorship.
 
To rebuild an economy deeply damaged by eight years of Socialist Party rule, Orban and his "right hand," Gyorgy Matolcsy, until last week economy minister but now president of the National Bank of Hungary, have applied unorthodox policies.
 
Since 2010, the government, for example, has nationalized about $14 billion in assets earlier administered by private pension funds, introduced the EU's highest bank tax and value added tax rates as well as levies on financial transactions and phone calls. Hungary also has a flat income tax rate of 16 percent and, to help counter a rapidly aging population, substantial tax breaks for families with children.
 
Orban says the institutional overhaul is needed to break the influence of former communists. The new constitution replaces one based on a Stalin-era constitution that was rewritten in 1989, when the country threw off communist rule.
 
By including legislation in the constitution which earlier had been struck down as unconstitutional, the new amendment — the fourth since the constitution, or Fundamental Law, as it is called, took effect in January 2012 — makes it clear that Orban will accept no setbacks and that the decisions of his parliamentary majority should not be questioned.
 
That attitude is also expressed in one of the key articles of the amendment, which says the country's president, who signs all legislation into law, and the Constitutional Court can review whether the procedures to pass the amendment were lawful, but can't examine its contents.
 
"Instead of defending citizens from the will of the state," the new articles "defend the will of the government from constitutionality," said Mate Daniel Szabo, a legal expert with the pro-democracy Eotvos Karoly Policy Institute.
 
The proposal also bans courts from referring to legal precedents set under the previous constitution.
 
"This means stepping back to where we were in 1990," said Szabo. "We'll be starting everything over, which is very dangerous."
 
The new constitution was met with large street protests in 2012, with some calling Orban a dictator or a "Viktator." Recently, however, most of the domestic complaints about the amendment have come from legal scholars, though there have been some signs of public anger.
 
A few dozen activists staged a sit-down protest at Fidesz headquarters Thursday, while around 2,500 people marched Saturday to the Constitutional Court to protest the amendment.
 
For the government, the amendment is just business as usual.
 
Justice Minister Tibor Navracsics said the proposal "is, to a great extent, merely a technical amendment," while Foreign Minister Janos Martonyi said criticism was being "fueled by misunderstandings and inadequate information."
 
A year before the next parliamentary elections, Hungary's opposition parties are in disarray and a new electoral law makes it even harder to seriously challenge Fidesz, so the effects of Orban's constitutional amendments could be enduring.
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« Reply #244 on: March 13, 2013, 08:43:43 pm »

EU lawmakers reject $1.3tn budget proposal
3/13/13
Empowered European Parliament rejects $1.3 trillion EU budget proposal

BRUSSELS (AP) -- The European Parliament overwhelmingly rejected a proposal for the European Union's €960 billion ($1.3 trillion) budget Wednesday, in the latest example of the lawmakers' newfound resolve to stand up to the bloc's national leaders.

"This is an important step for the European democracy," said European Parliament President Martin Schulz.

The seven-year plan — brokered at a summit of the 27 heads of state and government last month after two days of nearly round-the-clock negotiations — didn't address Parliament's main demands that more be spent to foster economic growth and that there be flexibility to move money within the budget. For that reason, Schulz said, it had to be rejected.

The leaders' proposal involved spending cuts for the first time in the EU's history and would cement the bloc's budget through 2020.
 
http://news.yahoo.com/eu-lawmakers-reject-1-3tn-133420066.html
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« Reply #245 on: April 27, 2013, 10:01:30 pm »

Southern Europe’s Recession Threatens to Spread North
  Published: Friday, 26 Apr 2013 | 1:37 AM ETBy: Jack Ewing
  http://www.cnbc.com/id/100676316

No company symbolizes German industrial might like Daimler, the giant maker of Mercedes-Benz autos and trucks. So when the company said this week that it, too, had finally been caught in the downdraft of the European economic crisis, it was an ominous sign for all of the Continent, if not the whole world.

German exporters like Daimler have been bastions of stability on a continent burdened with shaky banks, dysfunctional governments and legions of unemployed youth — not to mention the worst auto industry slump in two decades. But Daimler's glum forecast for 2013 was the latest evidence that Germany, and other relatively healthy countries like Austria and Finland, risk falling into the recession that has long afflicted their southern neighbors.

The slowdown in Germany was foreshadowed by months of declining industrial output, said Carl B. Weinberg, chief economist of High Frequency Economics in Valhalla, N.Y. "The E.U. has made Europe a much more cohesive economy, which is good when things are going up," he said. "But when things are going down the multiplier is very strong. An outgoing tide lowers all ships."

The region's overall economic weakness as well as slowing demand in China and other big markets for German exports of consumer products, cars and sophisticated machine tools, industrial robots and construction equipment are finally taking their toll.

Just one more consecutive quarter of shrinking economic output and Germany would officially enter a recession. The same is true of Belgium, France, Luxembourg, Austria, even Sweden and Finland. The Netherlands has already suffered two quarters of declining gross domestic product.

Further evidence of the spreading European recession came Thursday, first from Madrid, where the Spanish government reported that unemployment had reached a record level: 27.2 percent. Then new economic data from London indicated that Britain had barely avoided slipping back into recession for the third time since 2008.

"The reality is that Europe still faces severe vulnerabilities that — if unaddressed — could degenerate into a stagnation scenario," David Lipton, first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund, said in London on Thursday.

If Germany slips into recession, much would slide down with it. Germany and the other 26 countries of the European Union together represent the world's second-largest economy and as a bloc it is the single largest United States trading partner. The further delay in Europe's recovery that a German recession would cause would seriously hamper growth in the United States, Asia and Latin America.

What growth remains in the region is coming mostly from countries in Eastern Europe. Poland is protected by its large domestic market and a healthy banking system. After a severe downturn that began in 2008, growth is rebounding in the Baltic nations of Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia. In that recession, wages fell, real estate prices dropped and banks worked through the painful process of improving their financial condition.

Unemployment there is by no means low, but those countries benefit by being the low-wage economies of Europe. They continue to attract investment of capital. It also helps that those economies, because they do not use the euro as their currency, can adjust their currency more easily to changing economic conditions in the rest of the world. Their economic planners have more policy tools than simply adjusting interest rates.

In Germany, there is little overt sign of crisis. Unemployment is 5.4 percent compared with an average of 10.9 percent in Europe. Nevertheless, polls show businesses are growing pessimistic. "The German market cannot decouple from this environment," Bodo K. Uebber, the Daimler chief financial officer, told analysts Wednesday.

The problem for the rest of Europe is that any hope for recovery is pinned on a robust German economy. Companies in Spain and Italy have depended on German demand to compensate for a collapse in consumer spending in their own countries.

"In my area there are some enterprises that work 100 percent to serve Germany," said Mario Moretti Polegato, the founder and chief executive of Geox, a shoemaker based in Montebelluna, Italy, near Venice.

Geox, known for shoes with waterproof but breathable soles, sells its products around the world and is not dependent on any one market. Still, Italy accounted for 35 percent of the company's total revenue last year, and those sales fell 15 percent as Italy remained stuck in a recession that began in mid-2011.

Geox sales in Germany helped to offset the decline, Mr. Polegato said by telephone. Germany is also a critical market for his family's wine business, which sells bubbly prosecco under the Villa Sandi and La Gioiosa brands. "The first market is Germany," Mr. Polegato said. That is true for most winemakers in the Veneto region, he said.

The worst case, said Mr. Weinberg, the economist, would be a depression caused by the failure of political leaders to fix the region's many weak banks and restore the flow of credit.

The worsening economic situation has raised hopes that the European Central Bank will come to the rescue, as it has so often since 2010 when the debt crisis began in the euro zone, the 17 countries in the European Union that use the euro. Somewhat perversely, the dismal economic news this week prompted a rally in stocks and bonds, as investors bet that the unexpectedly bad business surveys would prod the central bank to lower interest rates.

Economists now expect the bank to cut its benchmark rate to a record low of 0.5 percent from 0.75 percent when it meets on Thursday in Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, another of the few euro zone countries still growing.

Many business people would welcome a cut because it would tend to lower the value of the euro compared with the dollar and other major currencies, and make it easier for European exporters to sell their comparatively cheaper products abroad.

"It would be a sign that policy makers understand it is time to find a way to compete," said Marco Tronchetti Provera, chief executive of the Italian tire maker Pirelli.

But it is unlikely that a rate cut would address a more fundamental problem in the euro zone: the lack of credit in countries that need it most.

Extraordinary measures by the central bank, including virtually unlimited loans to euro zone banks at the rock-bottom official interest rate, have not trickled down to help corporate borrowers in countries like Spain or Italy. The lack of credit is particularly vexing for the small and medium-size companies that are too small to raise money on the bond market and thus depend on banks.

Signs of a spreading recession are also strengthening the position of those people who argue that countries like Portugal, Spain and Greece should not be compelled to cut government spending so quickly. They say countries that have budget surpluses, like Germany, should increase spending to stimulate demand.

"The fiscal compact is going to kill Europe," said Mr. Provera of Pirelli, referring to the agreement among euro zone members to reduce deficit spending.

Mr. Provera reflects the growing sentiment among leaders like José Manuel Barroso, president of the European Commission, that policy should be more oriented toward growth and not just budget cutting.
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« Reply #246 on: September 10, 2014, 05:33:34 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/currency-heart-scottish-debate-061955666.html

Currency question at heart of Scottish debate
New currency for a new country? Scotland faces range of options, risks if it breaks from UK

9/10/14

LONDON (AP) -- In for a penny, in for a pound.

There'll be no going back if Scotland votes for independence from the United Kingdom on Sept. 18.

Opinion polls showing that may happen have prompted investors to sell off the British pound. If a knockout blow is dealt to Scotland's 307-year union with England, that selling could accelerate as the U.K. plunges into a constitutional crisis.

The fate of the pound, which is also known as sterling and is one of the most tangible links of the union, will be front and center in any separation proceedings, as it has been during the campaign.

The nationalists, led by Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond, hope Scotland will still use the pound through a currency union with what's left of the U.K.— Wales, Northern Ireland and England. The main British political parties, notably the Conservatives and Labour, say that's not going to happen.

Enmeshed are other complexities, such as the division of the U.K.'s 1.3 trillion pounds ($2.1 trillion) or so debt mountain and whether Scotland would be part of the European Union.

Uncertainty reigns — a toxic backdrop for the world's fourth-most traded currency. With polls showing the referendum too close to call, the pound has fallen almost 3 cents this week to a 10-month low of $1.6052 Wednesday.

"Huge uncertainties connected with the costs of separation, defense policy, the currency regime in Scotland and the political fall-out in the U.K. would unlikely be resolved quickly and so volatility is likely to stay at heightened levels," said Jane Foley, senior currency strategist at Rabobank International.

One thing's certain: Scotland will have to start paying its bills come March 24, 2016, the date set for Independence Day, so chosen because it is exactly 309 years since the union was signed.

DITCH ONE UNION, AGREE ANOTHER

For months, the Yes campaign made little headway, with many commentators blaming its plan to enter a currency union with what remains of the U.K. The No campaign rules that out and points to the problems that have afflicted the nearby euro currency union. "No ifs, no buts, we will not share the pound if Scotland separates from the U.K.," said George Osborne, the British Treasury chief.

The nationalists argue an agreement is possible. With the two economies so closely tied, a currency union would reduce transactions costs and uncertainty for both and Scotland would gain financial stability.

But a currency union would require Scotland to share political powers with Britain, meaning it would immediately hand back a chunk of its newly won sovereignty. It could, for example, have to get approval for its budget.

George Buckley, chief U.K. economist at Deutsche Bank, said a currency union would also likely require approval in the rest of the U.K. through a vote. "Popular agreement for a currency union with the newly independent neighbor may be potentially difficult to achieve," he said.

THE PANAMA PRECEDENT

No, it's not a Robert Ludlum thriller.

Even without agreement, Scotland could use the pound. "It's our pound and we're keeping it," Salmond said.

It's not an outlandish idea. Panama uses the dollar though it's not part of the United States, while Montenegro pays its way with euros despite not being in the EU. Because Scotland's economy is well synchronized with the U.K., so-called "sterlingisation" is an option, but it's fraught with problems.

Interest rates would be set by the Bank of England without any regard to what's going on north of the border. Scotland would also need to run up reserves to support its financial system, which means spending cuts and siphoning off money from the North Sea energy resources.


Analysts at BNP Paribas say the idea may be a ruse to force the remaining U.K. into a corner. "The hope would be that by choosing sterlingisation, the Scottish government could force some degree of cooperation from the U.K. government, resulting in something that looked more akin to a currency union," they wrote in a report.

EMBRACING THE EURO

Despite its problems, the euro could be the long-term alternative. By the time Scotland opts to join, the eurozone may have solved its many financial problems.

The nationalists used to back the idea of joining the euro before it was in crisis. Since that crisis, however, euro countries have been pooling many of their financial and political powers under strict rules. It's unclear whether Scotland would like to leave one union with Britain to join another.

One problem with the euro option is that Scotland would likely have to reapply to join the EU if it decides to become independent. It's uncertain how easy that will be. Spain, for example, may balk at the idea of early readmission for Scotland for fear it may encourage other nationalist movements in Europe, notably in the Spanish region of Catalonia.

GOING IT ALONE

An independent Scotland may be tempted to go the full hog and create its own currency, possibly resurrecting the Pound Scots that existed before the union. Other similar-sized European economies such as Norway and Denmark manage just fine.

"Having its own currency would provide the Scottish economy with the flexibility to make the necessary competitive adjustments and having its own central bank means that the appropriate level of interest rates can be set to suit the needs of the Scottish economy," said Neil MacKinnon, global macro strategist at VTB Capital.

It's not straightforward. A new Scottish currency would likely require higher interest rates than those in the U.K., even if it were pegged to the pound. There would be transaction costs in financial deals with the U.K. and Scotland would become vulnerable to shocks in currency markets. Businesses and savers may decide it's not worth the risks and move.

Precedent suggests a new Scottish currency would take time to establish itself. When Ireland won independence from the U.K. in 1922, it took six years for its new currency to be launched and decades for it to trade openly. As recently as the 1990s, Ireland needed to have high interest rates to support the Irish pound.

Still, for all its problems, it is "the only truly independent option of the four," said Deutsche Bank's Buckley.
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« Reply #247 on: September 14, 2014, 08:33:03 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/scottish-independence-could-mean-messy-123634237.html
Scottish independence could mean messy divorce
9/14/14

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« Reply #248 on: September 14, 2014, 08:39:42 pm »

http://news.msn.com/world/queen-to-scots-think-carefully-about-future
Queen to Scots: Think carefully about future
9/14/14

LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II has made her first comments about this week's Scottish independence vote, urging Scots to "think very carefully about the future."

But the popular British monarch didn't indicate a preference on how Scots should vote, carefully maintaining the neutrality that is her constitutional obligation.

Still, some may interpret her comments as a suggestion that Scots looking to embrace independence should be cautious about severing Scotland's long ties to the United Kingdom, which date back more than 300 years.

The queen spoke after a Sunday church service near her Balmoral estate in Scotland. She made the comment to a well-wisher in the crowd.

Buckingham Palace recently issued a statement indicating her plans to remain neutral before Thursday's vote.

She was seen as resisting calls from some Conservative Party lawmakers that she should make her views known before the historic vote because it could possibly lead to a breakup of the United Kingdom.

She is well known to have a deep affection for Scotland and to spend much of her free time every summer at her extensive Balmoral estate, where she can be seen walking in the woods or riding horses.

Weekend polls have suggested the race is too close to call with both sides planning a frenetic final few days of campaigning.

Prime Minister David Cameron is expected to return to Scotland to attempt to persuade voters to reject independence and remain part of the United Kingdom.

The "Better Together" campaign has been emphasizing the economic uncertainties that would face an independent Scotland, while pro-independence forces have been predicting a rosy future for an oil-rich Scotland free of the United Kingdom.

If Scotland votes for independence, it would split from the United Kingdom in 18 months. Scottish leaders have indicated a desire to have the queen serve as head of state of an independent Scotland if the Yes campaign triumphs.
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« Reply #249 on: September 15, 2014, 06:44:19 pm »

http://news.msn.com/world/a-scottish-yes-also-means-exit-from-eu-nato
A Scottish 'Yes' also means exit from EU, NATO
9/15/14

BRUSSELS (AP) — If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security — the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance.

In breaking away from the rest of the United Kingdom, Scotland would automatically find itself outside both the EU and NATO, and have to reapply to join both, officials from those Brussels-based organizations have stressed.

For the EU especially, Scottish re-entry could be a long and arduous process, with other countries dead set against letting the Scots retain the privileges awarded Britain: the so-called opt-outs from being required to use the euro single currency and to join the multination Schengen zone where internal border controls have been scrapped.

For NATO's admirals and generals, the current Scottish government's insistence on a sovereign Scotland becoming free of nuclear weapons would pose enormous strategic and operational headaches, even if a transitional grace period were agreed on. A new home port would have to be found for the Royal Navy's four Trident missile-carrying submarines and their thermonuclear warheads, currently based on the Clyde.

This "risks undermining the collective defense and deterrence of NATO allies," Britain's Ministry of Defense has said. In what might be read as a warning to the Scots, the ministry has said a nuclear-free stance could constitute a "significant" hurdle to Scotland being allowed back into NATO.

Until Scotland rejoined the alliance, to which it's belonged with the rest of Britain for 65 years, new arrangements would also need to be found to patrol vital shipping routes in the North Atlantic and North Sea. If Scotland were to choose not to rejoin, it would pose a conundrum for NATO for which there is no real precedent: what to do following the loss of a developed, democratically governed part of alliance territory that has opted for neutrality, said Daniel Troup, research analyst at the NATO Council of Canada.

Emergence of a new Western European country of 5 million inhabitants with roughly the land area of the Czech Republic or the U.S. state of Maine or would also set in motion political and social forces whose effects are impossible to predict. Because of British voting patterns, the political groups in England, Wales and Northern Ireland that are seeking Britain's exit from the European Union would become proportionately stronger in Parliament.

Meanwhile, on the continent, from Catalonia in Spain to the Dutch-speaking Flemish areas of Belgium, other European peoples that do not have their own states would likely be emboldened to follow the Scots' example.

Loss of Scotland would also weaken the influence of Britain inside the 28-nation European Union. For the moment, the British, along with the Germans and French, constitute the trade bloc's Big Three. Without Scotland's population, Britain would drop to No. 4, behind Italy.

That would mean fewer British members of the European Parliament, as well as a reduced say in population-weighted decision-making in the EU's executive.

"In the European Union, size matters," said Almut Moeller, an EU expert at the German Council on Foreign Relations. "It will be a rump United Kingdom."

This would have major policy implications. A whittled-down Britain would have a weaker hand in pressing for the kind of EU it favors: more of a free market, and less of a political union.

Simultaneously, said Professor Richard G. Whitman, director of the Global Europe Center at the University of Kent, politicians and civil servants in London would be "massively preoccupied" for years in disentangling England from Scotland, following more than three centuries of political and economic unity.

The result would be "a much-reduced bandwidth for defending a more liberalistic agenda" in Europe, Whitman said, including the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership between the EU and the United States.

Under both NATO and EU rules, any existing member could blackball Scotland's application for admission, and some might find domestic political cause to do so. Spain, for example, might want to discourage independence-minded Catalans. For the English, divvying up the common assets with the Scots might turn as acrimonious as a Hollywood divorce, Whitman said.

If Scotland sought special arrangements while trying to get back into the European Union, that could provide a wedge for other countries to demand renegotiation of their own terms of membership, and calls to revise the treaties that are EU's constitutional basis, Moeller said. Germany, the bloc's richest and most influential nation, would be adamantly against that, she said.

A dissenting prediction comes from a Swedish expert on the EU. The 18-month interlude between Thursday's vote and the start date of actual Scottish independence would be enough to allow the Scots and EU to negotiate a deal so that on the very day it became a country, Scotland could seamlessly become an EU member in its own right, said Niklas Bremberg, a research fellow at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs.

The most fateful consequence of a Scottish vote in favor of independence could be very close to home: in neighboring England. The English have already soured sufficiently on the European Union to the extent that in the March elections for the European Parliament, they cast more votes for the anti-EU UKIP party than any other.

Fabian Zuleeg, chief executive of the European Policy Center, a Brussels-based think tank, predicted the Scots this Thursday could set an example of sorts_for the English.

"The exit of Scotland from the UK would increase the chances of the exit of the UK from the EU," Zuleeg said.
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« Reply #250 on: September 16, 2014, 07:20:56 pm »

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2014/09/14/it-would-be-impossible-for-an-independent-scotland-to-establish-a-sovereign-oil-fund/
9/14/14
It Would Be Impossible For An Independent Scotland To Establish A Sovereign Oil Fund

One of the more snigger worthy aspects of the case being promoted for Scottish independence is that the country would be able to establish a sovereign oil wealth fund, along the lines of Norway, and thus wax fat and rich off into the future. My own political prejudices are that I’m overjoyed at any argument at all that makes it more likely that there will be a yes vote: but this particular reason simply doesn’t stand up to a moment’s scrutiny. It doesn’t stand up for two reasons, one theoretical the other a matter of simple accounting.

We’ve Sir Ian Wood insisting that it would be very difficult of Scotland to have such a fund:

    North-east oil services tycoon Sir Ian Wood has claimed it would be “extraordinarily difficult” to establish an oil fund in an independent Scotland.

    The Aberdeen-based industry expert yesterday said it was not possible to squirrel away money while spending it on public services at the same time.

I would upgrade that extraordinarily difficult to impossible myself. For you only get to use the one lot of money once. Yes, even the miracle of the Keynesian multiplier doesn’t actually let you use the same pile of cash twice. So, if you’re using (as the Scottish and British governments are and have been all along) the resource rents and profits from the existence of North Sea oil to pay for social security spending, or lower than otherwise would be the case tax rates, then you cannot at the same time be putting that cash into a wealth fund. This is just a matter of simple accounting. And no, no one does believe that a newly independent Scotland will be willing to either raise taxes in that country, or cut current services, so as to be able to sock that oil revenue away for future generations. It’s simply not going to happen.

The second problem is a more theoretical one. The Norwegians didn’t have a wealth fund in order to make life easy for the future. They actually had it so as to avoid Dutch Disease. When Holland found vast gas reserves back in the 50s it found that exporting all that energy meant vast piles of loot entering the country. This is great: until you note that your exchange rate is therefore spiraling ever upwards. This makes imports cheap, exports expensive and you find, at the extreme, that you’ve no economy left other than the extraction of that natural resource: plus a whole series of import agents. To avoid this you’ve got to stop that money entering the domestic economy: and that’s what the Norwegians have done. The whole point of the wealth fund is that none of it, not a penny (perhaps a little bit of the returns from it) is allowed to enter the Norwegian economy. It’s not in krone, it’s not spent in Norway, it’s not invested in Norwegian industry, it’s not spent on social services either. It’s all invested in other currencies and in other countries. This avoids killing off the rest of the Norwegian economy.

Arguably this is what Venezuela should have done as well: there’s a good argument that over and above the Chavista idiot socialism the country is suffering badly from Dutch Disease. But of course doing so wouldn’t get a left-leaning government elected who promised to spend the oil wealth on improving the lives of the poor.

And that’s where the other of Scotland’s problems would lie. No one at all is suggesting a wealth fund that would go invest in England, or France. But that’s what would have to be done to mimic Norway: they’re all in fact arguing that a wealth fund should invest in Scottish industry. Exactly what is not the point of having one.

There is of course one final complication. Scotland has asserted that it would retain the pound sterling. Meaning that it wouldn’t actually be possible for them to suffer from Dutch Disease anyway as the foreign exchange value of their currency will be set by the vastly larger rUK economy, not whatever is happening with oil up north.

So Scotland can’t suffer from the original problem that leads to a wealth fund, they wouldn’t invest in in foreign parts either, and they can’t actually build one while they spend that oil money on current pleasures anyway. I’d say it’s a lot more than difficult, it’s impossible that Scotland will have an oil wealth fund.
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« Reply #251 on: September 19, 2014, 09:29:37 am »

From the little I've read - this vote could have been rigged. Will have to read more about it.

Scotland votes 'No': Salmond accepts defeat as Cameron says debate has been 'settled for a generation'
9/19/14
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/scottish-independence-result--scotland-rejects-independence-as--no--vote-triumphs-043827993.html#TPNWUWF

The Scottish electorate's rejection of independence was greeted with delight by Prime Minister David Cameron, who said that the victory margin of around 55%-45% had settled the issue "for a generation... perhaps for a lifetime".

Speaking outside Downing Street, Mr Cameron said he would ensure that commitments to further devolution to Scotland made during the campaign would be "honoured in full".

Earlier, Scottish National Party First Minister Alex Salmond acknowledged that his dream of leading his nation to independence was over, telling supporters in Edinburgh: "Scotland has by a majority decided not at this stage to become an independent country.

"I accept that verdict of the people and I call on all of Scotland to follow suit in accepting the democratic verdict of the people of Scotland."

Turnout in the referendum on Scottish independence hit a record high for any election held in the UK since the introduction of universal suffrage in 1918.

Alex Salmond accepts defeat but tells the PM he will expect new powers with rapid course.

The participation rate of 84.5% topped the previous best of 83.9% recorded in the 1950 general election and dwarfed the tallies in recent Westminster polls, which saw 65.1% vote in 2010.


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« Reply #252 on: September 19, 2014, 09:31:39 am »

Quote
From the little I've read - this vote could have been rigged. Will have to read more about it.



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« Reply #253 on: September 19, 2014, 09:34:54 pm »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2761216/Scotland-independence-referendum-results-announced.html
9/18/14
Alex Salmond resigns hours after Scotland votes no to independence

    Alex Salmond announces he is resigning as Scotland's First Minister after independence defeat

    It came after the 'No' campaign secured 55% of the vote with Mr Salmond's Yes to independence camp achieving 45%

    Long-serving deputy Nicola Sturgeon tipped to take over SNP leadership when Mr Salmond steps down in November

    The Queen tonight said it was a result 'that all of us throughout the United Kingdom will respect'

    In her first remarks since the result was announced she urged all sides of the debate to put aside their differences

    She said: 'We should remember we have in common an enduring love of Scotland which helps to unite us all'

    Total turnout was 84.5% topping 90% in pro-Union areas but dipping to the mid-70s in key Yes working-class areas   

    Yes wins in Dundee, Glasgow, North Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire, but fell short by 384,935 votes

    David Cameron addressed the nation this morning vowing to introduce 'English votes for English laws'
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« Reply #254 on: September 24, 2014, 06:44:00 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/independence-vote-rigging-conspiracy-theory-102118074.html;_ylt=A0SO8oebASNUes0A37JXNyoA
9/24/14
An Independence Vote-Rigging Conspiracy Theory Is Sweeping Scotland
9/24/14

An  online petition  demanding a revote in the Scottish independence referendum is now at almost 100,000 signatures as vote rigging conspiracies continue to gain momentum among disappointed pro-independence campaigners.

It didn't take long for accusations of voting irregularities to start swirling after Scotland voted "No" to independence on September 18th. In the aftermath of the result, pro-independence Yes campaigners have taken to social media in large numbers to complain about reported incidents of vote fraud and demand a return to the polls.

The accusations come despite First Minister Alex Salmond, leader of the Yes campaign, calling on pro-independence supporters to "accept the democratic decision." Mary Pitcaithly, the chief counting officer for the referendum, also refuted accusations of irregularities claiming that both camps had been happy with how the vote was carried out (emphasis added):

The chief counting officer is satisfied that all counts throughout Scotland were properly conducted and scrutinized by thousands of people representing both the Yes Scotland and the Better Together campaigns, as well as international election observers, media and police. None of these people raised any concerns during the verification, counting and adjudication stages.

Those demanding a recount, however, remain unconvinced. They cite Russian election observers that raised concerns that the results were "rigged" and point to videos that appear to show votes being shifted from Yes piles into No.

Responding to the claims, Pitcaithly says it appears that the women in the video " has put some papers on a pile by mistake and is then putting them right" and suggested that the " video is looped so it is deceptive in its presentation."

So far, her rebuttals and Salmond's intervention have failed to quell the calls for a recount. At the time of writing over 90,000 people have signed the e-petition at change.org. As one pro-independence blogger put it:

We believe that it is only a matter of time before the fullness of the truth comes out. There can be no doubt that the count was a fraud.
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« Reply #255 on: November 27, 2014, 02:14:49 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/scots-powers-rejecting-separation-113623098.html
Scots to get new powers after rejecting separation
11/27/14

LONDON (AP) — Britain's main political parties agreed Thursday to grant Scotland new tax and spending powers to fulfill a promise of greater autonomy made as politicians scrambled to persuade Scots to reject independence in a recent referendum.

The plans are unlikely to satisfy hard-core Scottish nationalists, but could have far-reaching consequences, taking Britain toward a looser, more federated state.

In a Sept. 18 referendum, 55 percent of Scottish voters opted to remain in the United Kingdom, while 45 percent voted to leave.

Since then a commission of politicians from Scotland and the rest of Britain has been thrashing out proposals to fulfill the promise made by anti-independence forces in the final weeks of the campaign, as polls showed rising support for separation.

A plan published Thursday would give the Edinburgh-based Scottish parliament, established in 1999, the power to set income tax rates and keep the revenue in Scottish coffers. Scotland would also gain new control over welfare spending.

Prime Minister David Cameron said the proposals kept a promise he'd made during the referendum campaign, "that a No vote did not mean no change."

But John Swinney, deputy leader of Scotland's pro-independence administration, said the powers fell short of what Scottish people wanted.

"Under these proposals, less than 30 percent of our taxes will be set in Scotland and less than 20 percent of welfare spending will be devolved to Scotland," he said.

The proposals will be introduced as legislation in Parliament in January.

They could open a constitutional can of worms, boosting calls for other British regions, and even major cities, also to be given tax-raising powers.

Cameron also promised to introduce a contentious proposal for "English votes for English laws." It is intended to address a quirk of Britain's political system that means Scottish lawmakers in the House of Commons can vote on policies that only affect England.
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« Reply #256 on: April 09, 2015, 11:49:49 am »

Unraveling at the Seams: EU on Verge of Collapse

Everyone in the EU is worried about the economy and financial situation, forgetting about the importance of geopolitics, and that could be the downfall of the union, according to French journalist Coralie Delaume.

Greece’s exit from the European Union (EU) and its rapprochement with Russia would have serious geopolitical implications for Europe, French journalist Coralie Delaume said in an interview with Le Figaro.

The Eurozone is getting weaker every day, said Delaume, adding that Greece’s withdrawal from the monetary union is highly probable, especially after Greece’s intention to introduce a “dual currency.” The so-called “Greek euro”, a currency that would be used in Greece only, would be in fact another step towards leaving the European monetary union.

As Greece failed to find support in Europe, Tsipras hopes to get closer to Russia, especially considering that the two countries have a longstanding relationship.

At this point in time, everyone in Europe is worried about the economy and financial situation, forgetting about the importance of geopolitics.

“Everyone seems to be convinced that geopolitics is a residue of the 19th Century and that we now live in the era of economics and accounting… Europe has become a political black hole!” Delaume told Le Figaro.

Meanwhile, Moscow is building political relationships with Greece, Turkey and Cyprus. Soon, the Russian navy will be allowed to enter the waters near Cyprus. Europeans are foolish enough to allow Russia to gain support in the Mediterranean region. From an economic and political standpoint, the EU is on the verge of collapse, Delaume said, as cited by the French daily.

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/politics/20150408/1020616814.html#ixzz3WpcjvjJq
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« Reply #257 on: January 26, 2016, 04:24:34 pm »

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/new-world-order-power-broker-george-soros-predicts-the-collapse-of-the-eu/
NEW WORLD ORDER POWER BROKER GEORGE SOROS PREDICTS THE COLLAPSE OF THE EU
George Soros is a firm backer of transnational bodies such as the European Union, and his Open Society Foundation (OSF) provides assistance for pro-migration activists. He is well-known for his support for “progressive” causes such as the Centre for American Progress, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

1/20/16

BILLIONAIRE FINANCIER GEORGE SOROS HAS WARNED THAT THE EUROPEAN UNION IS ON THE “VERGE OF COLLAPSE” OVER THE MIGRANT CRISIS AND IS IN “DANGER OF KICKING THE BALL FURTHER UP THE HILL” IN ITS MANAGEMENT OF THE ISSUE WHICH HAS SEEN MORE THAN A MILLION MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES ARRIVE IN THE REGION IN 2015.

George Soros, for those of you who don’t know him, is the “money man” behind the coming New World Order. Starting from his early days as a young Jewish teenage who betrayed his own people to work with the Nazis, to his rise as a multibillionaire financier, George Soros is the man who ‘get it done’. In 1992, he single-handedly broke the Bank of England, and in 2015 spent 33 million dollars on financing the Ferguson race riots in St. Louis. Anywhere you find Liberals working to overthrow the rule of law and order, you will invariably find Soros there as well.

In an interview with the New York Review of Books, George Soros warned of the coming collapse of the European Union, and puts the responsibility squarely on the shoulders of German chancellor Angela Merkel.

Merkel led Europe’s response to the Muslim migrant crisis, opening Germany to the refugees that had travelled from the Middle East, in particular Syria, to try and find a new home in Europe. The decision by the German leader marked a sea-change in her policy. In the interview, Soros said he welcomed Merkel’s move.

“THERE IS PLENTY TO BE NERVOUS ABOUT,” SOROS CRYPTICALLY REMARKED.

“As she (Merkel) correctly predicted, the EU is on the verge of collapse. The Greek crisis taught the European authorities the art of muddling through one crisis after another. This practice is popularly known as kicking the can down the road, although it would be more accurate to describe it as kicking a ball uphill so that it keeps rolling back down.”

“Merkel correctly foresaw the potential of the migration crisis to destroy the European Union. What was a prediction has become the reality. The European Union badly needs fixing. This is a fact but it is not irreversible. And the people who can stop Merkel’s dire prediction from coming true are actually the German people. ”

“Now it’s time for Germans to decide: Do they want to accept the responsibilities and the liabilities involved in being the dominant power in Europe?”

What Soros conveniently leaves out in the his interview, however, is that at it’s core it is not a refugee problem, but rather an invasion problem. George Soros knows the true mission of these militant Muslim jihadi “migrants”, and has spent millions of dollars of his own money to finance their migration. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban accused Mr Soros – who was born in Hungary – of deliberately encouraging the migrant crisis.

“THIS INVASION IS DRIVEN, ON THE ONE HAND, BY PEOPLE SMUGGLERS, AND ON THE OTHER BY THOSE (HUMAN RIGHTS) ACTIVISTS WHO SUPPORT EVERYTHING THAT WEAKENS THE NATION-STATE,” MR ORBAN SAID. “THIS WESTERN MINDSET AND THIS ACTIVIST NETWORK IS PERHAPS BEST REPRESENTED BY GEORGE SOROS.”

Mr Soros has now issued an email statement to Bloomberg Business, claiming his foundations help “uphold European values”, while Mr Orban’s actions in strengthening the Hungarian border and stopping a huge migrant influx “undermine those values.”

George Soros is a firm backer of transnational bodies such as the European Union, and his Open Society Foundation (OSF) provides assistance for pro-migration activists. He is well-known for his support for “progressive” causes such as the Center for American Progress, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

Is George Soros really so powerful that he can bring about the collapse of the European Union? Just ask the Bank of England how much power Soros has.

They’ll be happy to tell you all about Black Wednesday.
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« Reply #258 on: September 12, 2016, 10:36:30 am »

http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/12/europe/david-cameron-resigns/index.html?adkey=bn
9/12/16
David Cameron resigns from UK Parliament

(CNN)From world leader to the wilderness in just under three months.
David Cameron, the former British Prime Minister has announced he will stand down as a member of parliament for his constituency of Witney immediately, triggering a by-election.

Cameron, who has worked in Parliament since 2001, stepped down as Prime minister in the aftermath of the Brexit vote in which the UK decided to leave the European Union.

He had previously said that he was "keen to continue" in his role as a backbench MP after stepping away from Downing Street but has since decided such a role is untenable.

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