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Louisiana's (Catholic)governor Bobby Jindal...

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Author Topic: Louisiana's (Catholic)governor Bobby Jindal...  (Read 827 times)
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« on: January 09, 2012, 11:21:47 pm »

8/22/2007

In a 1996 article for New Oxford Review, a Roman Catholic magazine, Jindal talks of the Catholic religion as the true Christian faith and refers to a "scandalous series of divisions and new denominations" of religions since the Protestant Reformation of the 16th Century.
 
But he also wrote of the binding ties of Christianity and says the Catholic Church must incorporate the "spirit-led movements" of other Christian faiths.


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,294069,00.html#ixzz1j1u4zGgO
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 11:23:42 pm by BornAgain2 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2012, 11:38:37 pm »

Jindal inauguration events begin with prayer
 
MELINDA DESLATTE, Associated Press
 
Updated 05:45 p.m., Sunday, January 8, 2012


BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Gov. Bobby Jindal on Sunday began several days of inaugural events, bowing his head in prayer in the traditional pre-inaugural church service while also acknowledging his swearing-in would be overshadowed by the BCS championship game Monday night in New Orleans.
 
The prayer service at St. Joseph's Cathedral included blessings, benedictions and readings from 20 religious leaders, representing the Jewish, Catholic and other Christian faiths. Among the blessings, four Protestant pastors laid hands on the Republican governor, who begins his second term Monday, and prayed for him to lead the state with wisdom and faith.
 
"May God inspire and sustain you, Gov. Jindal," said retired Archbishop Alfred Hughes of New Orleans. Dino Rizzo, pastor of the Healing Place Church in Baton Rouge, prayed, "Give our elected officials all around the state the heart to serve."
 
Jindal, 40, the son of Indian immigrants, converted to Catholicism when he was a teenager.He has spent many weekends of his first four-year term traveling to evangelical churches around the state, offering his testimony and prayers during the service.
 
The governor's family, friends, lawmakers and most statewide elected officials attended the service in a downtown cathedral with ornate arched stained glass windows and still decorated with the lighted trees, garland and poinsettias of the holiday season.
 
The swearing-in ceremony that officially begins Jindal's new term is set for Monday at the Old State Capitol. The governor will give his speech after noon.
 
"If there's one message I want to communicate clearly on Monday is we absolutely know we're going to run out of time before we run out of things to do. We take every second of every hour of every day of this second term as being precious, and we're going to do our best to honor the people of Louisiana," Jindal said.
 
The inaugural schedule for Jindal's second term has been upended by the hoopla surrounding the BCS national championship game between LSU and Alabama in New Orleans.
 
"I know that for 99.9 percent of the people in this state, the most important thing happening Monday is not the inauguration, and there will be a lot more people paying attention to the football game, including three young kids who live in (the governor's mansion) and belong to me and my wife," Jindal joked.
 
The governor shifted the formal, invitation-only inaugural ball to Sunday night to minimize any conflict with the football contest. Known for his lengthy speeches outlining multiple points, the governor also has pledged to keep his inaugural address to 10 minutes, citing the game and the expected traffic from Baton Rouge to the Superdome.
 
Attending the prayer service Sunday were Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne, Secretary of State Tom Schedler, Treasurer John Kennedy, Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelon and Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain. A dozen lawmakers also attended, including Jindal's hand-picked leaders for Senate president and House speaker, Sen. John Alario of Westwego and Rep. Chuck Kleckley of Lake Charles.
 
In his comments, Hughes told the officials present to eschew partisan and divisive politics.
 
"God seems to be urging us to shun the paralyzing and polarizing influences in favor of civil discourse," he said.


Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/Jindal-inauguration-events-begin-with-prayer-2449414.php#ixzz1j1y7IHcA
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2012, 11:42:50 pm »

http://tpmelectioncentral.talkingpointsmemo.com/2008/06/bobby_jindals_dance_with_the_d.php

6/11/08

Excerpt:

As others noted during his 2003 and 2007 gubernatorial campaigns (see update), in an essay Jindal wrote in 1994 for the New Oxford Review, a serious right-wing Catholic journal, Jindal narrated a bizarre story of a personal encounter with a demon, in which he participated in an exorcism with a group of college friends. And not only did they cast out the supernatural spirit that had possessed his friend, Jindal wrote that he believes that their ritual may well have cured her cancer.

Reading the article leaves no doubt that Jindal -- who graduated from Brown University in 1991, was a Rhodes Scholar, and had been accepted at Yale Law School and Harvard Medical School when he wrote the essay -- was completely serious about the encounter. He even said the experience "reaffirmed" his faith.
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 07:52:41 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/lousiana-gov-bobby-jindal-republicans-serious-changes-221145283--election.html

11/15/12

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal: Republicans ‘have to make serious changes



LAS VEGAS—At the end of a long day at this week's annual meeting of the Republican Governors Association,  the group's new leader, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, anxiously paced a conference room at the Encore Resort. Moments earlier, he had publicly rebuked comments made by the former leader of his party, Mitt Romney. And he's not sorry for it.

"It is corrosive," Jindal said. "We cannot become the party that divides people into special interest groups. By class, race, gender. But to the extent that we're talking about the 53 and the 47 percent? That to me doesn't sound like a party that's fighting for every vote. That doesn't sound to me like a party that really understands that 100 percent of the American people benefit from our principles."

The Republican Party is looking desperately for new leaders after losing the presidential election last week, and Jindal is vying to be the one who stands atop the rubble and provides solutions. He has made little effort to hide his disgust with the way members of his party—including Romney—conceded voters to the opposition. He's particularly frustrated with Romney for saying to campaign donors in private meetings that Republicans can't hope to win support from "47 percent" of the country and that Obama defeated him in part because he promised "gifts" to ethnic minorities and women in return for their support.

In the aftermath of an election in which Democrats not only kept control of the White House but also bolstered their numbers in Congress, Jindal is on a mission to, in his word, "modernize" the Republican Party. He wants fellow Republicans to be more aggressive about campaigning for the votes of the middle class, minorities and women, and to stop reinforcing stereotypes that the only voters Republicans care about are upper-class white men.

Jindal could hardly believe a pre-election poll that showed more Americans believed that Democrats were more likely than Republicans to lower taxes on the middle class. "To me that shows how far off the rails we've gone," he said. "It's a substantive as well as a messaging problem."

On a range of issues, Jindal says he wants to change the way Republicans talk about their positions without straying from their principles. When arguing for lower tax rates, he said, Republicans should emphasize that they support a progressive tax structure by removing loopholes and write-offs. On education, he wants to hear his colleagues talk about how school choice programs can benefit students in poor districts. On energy, Republicans should stop the obsession with oil and pursue "an all-of-the-above" approach that doesn't promote one industry over another. And on immigration—perhaps one of the most important issues in the coming year—Republicans should emphasize the value of opening more opportunities to enter the United States legally instead of sounding like an anti-immigrant party.

All of that starts by shifting the tone Republicans take when defending their positions, including on social issues, Jindal said.

Senate candidates such as Indiana's Richard Mourdock and Missouri's Todd Akin, who both lost to easily beatable Democrats after making what Jindal called "offensive and inexcusable" comments about ****, complicate the effort.

"I'm pro-life. I try to follow the teachings of my faith and [Catholic]church, but I don't think we have any business trying to demonize those we disagree with," Jindal said. "I think we can be respectful."

It would be premature to say Jindal is setting the stage for a 2016 presidential campaign, but he talks like someone who is considering the idea. This is not the same man who in 2009 tenderly delivered a widely mocked Republican response to President Barack Obama's first address to Congress. Now, that awkward, soft-spoken "Kenneth the Page" Jindal from four years ago has given way to a new, more aggressive politician.

"The future of this party is very bright," Jindal said. "But we have to make serious changes."
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2012, 07:53:33 pm »

I dunno, but Jindal seems to be playing the role of "referee" lately...
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2012, 04:49:34 pm »

http://www.inquisitr.com/402214/nm-gov-susana-martinez-joins-gop-cacophony-of-romney-critics/

NM Gov. Susana Martinez Joins GOP Cacophony Of Romney Critics

Quote
Martinez spoke plainly about her feelings on Romney’s candidacy and legacy after a recent meeting of Republican governors, saying:
 
“We have to start electing people who look like their communities all the way from city council to county commissioners to county clerks all the way through the state and up into national politics … We need to embrace them not just at election time.”
 

Looks like Jindal isn't the only one in the GOP using the same language as the Leftist Emergent Church uses.
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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2013, 08:26:38 pm »

Lots more here over how he's potentially helping the NWO minions...
http://news.yahoo.com/jindal-faces-troubles-home-state-203317199--politics.html
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« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2013, 06:36:58 pm »

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/bobby-jindal-announces-conservative-policy-group-america-next_763655.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter
Bobby Jindal Announces Conservative Policy Group 'America Next'

Louisana governor Bobby Jindal, the two-term Republican and potential presidential candidate, has announced the formation of a new group called America Next. The organization bills itself as a "conservative policy group" that aims to "focus on winning a war of ideas." Here's an excerpt from a mission statement by Jindal on the new group's website:

Quote
...here’s the truth – Conservatives have failed to articulate and sell a national policy agenda to the country, a vision of what conservative policies can accomplish when put into practice..  We’ve detailed the awful things the Obama Administration has done, all the failings of the left, and we’ve pledged to undo as much of that as we can.

That’s good, it needs to be done.

But conservatives must be willing to demonstrate that we have the courage of our convictions by going on offense in the war of ideas.   That is where AMERICA NEXT comes in.

Jindal's initial statement doesn't list any specific policy ideas or proposals, though he has made education reform a priority during his governorship. But in places, the America Next mission statements sounds a bit like the first draft of a presidential announcement:

Quote
Many historians call the 20th century the American century, and they see this century as something different.  Many of our politicians act as if our best days are behind us.

I disagree.

I believe America is a forever young country, and that we can usher in a new era of growth, of freedom, of unprecedented success and greatness.  Freedom is never an old idea.

However, I also believe that if we don’t develop and enact a new policy agenda in Washington very soon, our country will decline.  I believe the hour is late.

It’s up to us.  Each generation must affirm the promise and the Dream of America for themselves.  My generation has thus far failed to do so.

There will be no change in our country or in Washington, without building, championing, and selling the ideas that can unleash great opportunities for an American future.

Jindal will serve as America Next's honorary chairman, while the day-to-day operations will be run by Jill Neunaber, a veteran of Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign and most recently campaign manager for Massachusetts Republican Gabriel Gomez's failed bid for U.S. Senate. Neunaber will operate the 501(c)(4) group from Alexandria, Virginia, just outside of Washington.

Curt Anderson, a spokesman for America Next, says the group will have "experts all over the country, including Governor Jindal, working on policy plans."

"We will focus intensely on policy prescriptions," Anderson writes in an email to THE WEEKLY STANDARD. "Not just political talking points, but actual policy proposals that can turn conservative thought into reality. Jindal has done a lot of this at the state level, as have other conservative governors. And of course we will promote those ideas to the greatest extent possible. But this is not a super PAC, and it will not be playing around in elections. It’s all about policy formulation."
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« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2013, 12:11:13 pm »

http://dailycaller.com/2013/11/06/cuccinelli-advisor-blames-bobby-jindal-rga-for-defeat-they-just-blew-it/
11/6/13
Cuccinelli advisor blames Bobby Jindal, RGA for defeat: ‘They just blew it’

“Bobby Jindal and his political team totally blew it,” harrumphed one advisor for Ken Cuccinelli the morning after a closer-than-expected loss.

Cuccinelli, who narrowly lost last night’s gubernatorial election to Terry McAuliffe, was badly outspent in the days and weeks leading up to the election. The New York Times‘ Jonathan Martin described Cuccinelli’s plight as having been “close to abandoned at the end.” He was. As Politico’s James Hohmann reported, ”The Republican National Committee spent about $3 million on Virginia this year, compared to $9 million in the 2009.” And as the Roanoke Times noted, in 2009, the Chamber of Commerce spent $973,000 on Bob McDonnell, but “[t]his year, the chamber gave Cuccinelli nothing.”

But it was the Republican Governor’s Association (RGA) and chairman Bobby Jindal who drew the most ire from a Cuccinelli advisor I spoke to on Wednesday morning — this, despite the fact that the RGA spent millions on the race.

“Bobby Jindal’s presidential campaign is over,” said the Cuccinelli advisor. “He screwed this up so bad. And I don’t know why. The campaign knew it was moving numbers over ObamaCare. And the RGA was not very far from that information, they could have obtained it themselves, the advisor continued. They should have given the money to the campaign to spend as opposed to running these stupid China ads. They just blew it.

The Democratic Governor’s Association (which actually spent less on McAuliffe) forwarded most of the money they contributed directly to the campaign. This meant they could focus like a laser beam on their message — for example, attacking Cuccinelli for advocating a “war on women.” (Conversely, the advisor says because Cuccinelli’s team didn’t control all of the RGA’s money, they weren’t able to focus on hitting the ObamaCare issue as part of a closing argument.)

According to a DGA memo (authored by communications director Danny Kanner) released last night: “The DGA contributed a total of $6.5 million to the McAuliffe campaign over the last year, an unprecedented investment for the organization in Virginia. Roughly $6 million of that sum was transferred directly to the campaign, a strategic decision that POLITICO reported was the “most important” of all those made by the extraordinarily coordinated Democratic effort to win the race.”

And the DGA even went out of their way to mock the RGA’s strategy, saying: “The DGA’s wise investments stood in stark contrast to those of the Republican Governors Association. Despite laws in Virginia that allow for unlimited financial contributions and complete coordination between the campaigns and outside groups, the RGA tried to run a different campaign than their own candidate – a puzzling strategy that made both the Cuccinelli campaign and the RGA less effective.”

This complaint was echoed by the Cuccinelli advisor: ”[The RGA's] ads were stupid. Instead of giving the money to the campaign who could spend it on ads, they were running all these ads on China — which did not move the needle. The problem is, it’s too convoluted for TV.”

“We were grossly outspent from DGA to RGA from memorial day to labor day,” the advisor continued, which “is when a tie race became a McAuliffe lead.

“They just took their money and spent it in New Jersey where we took a 17 point win to a 20 point win. They had a system — they had a process — that they thought was better than what Haley did. For some reason, they don’t do that in Jindal land. They run the ads themselves. I don’t know what their strategic thinking is. It just doesn’t make sense to me,” the advisor continued.

Republicans who worry about winning elections might want to take a closer look at the RGA. As the DGA’s memo boasts: “Since 2010, the DGA has won eight of the nine elections in which both organizations have competed. In nearly all of those races, the RGA has either matched or spent more than the DGA. But we spend our dollars more effectively.”
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« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2014, 11:54:15 am »

Do NOT be fooled by this...for one, Louisiana is largely a Catholic state. And especially those in the greater New Orleans area send their children to private Catholic schools - so pretty much CC doesn't apply to a good % of Louisiana students anyways.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/18/bobby-jindal-common-core_n_5508169.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592#
6/18/14
Bobby Jindal Announces Huge Common Core Shift In Louisiana

On the heels of saying he would not be "bullied by the federal government" any longer, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) announced Wednesday that he plans to pull his state out of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Jindal issued a series of executive orders calling for the state to come up with "Louisiana standards and a Louisiana test" in place of the "one size fits all" Common Core standards.

"We won’t let the federal government take over Louisiana’s education standards," Jindal read from a prepared statement at a Baton Rouge press conference. "We’re very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators. Common Core has not been fully implemented yet in Louisiana, and we need to start the process over. It was rushed in the beginning and done without public input."

Conservative organizations such as the American Principles Project rejoiced at the news. Emmett McGroarty, the project's education director, said in a statement, "Today, the Governor stands alongside the moms, dads, and other citizens of Louisiana who are pushing back against the federal overreach. In so doing, he has reaffirmed the Framers’ intent that state government will guard the rightful interests of the state’s citizens."

But Jindal's own state education superintendent, John White, is incensed. "It is outside the bounds of both our state's laws and our state's aspirations for its children to think that we would turn back now," White said in a statement.

As a first step in moving away from Common Core, Jindal seeks to pull out of the Partnership of Assessments for College and Career Readiness, one of the two federally funded consortia tasked with creating standardized tests aligned with the Common Core. Louisiana entered into a memorandum of understanding with PARCC in 2010, but since then, the governor said, other test vendors have emerged. In a letter to Mitchell Chester, PARCC's chair and Massachusetts' schools chief, which was released Wednesday, Jindal threatened to "pursue cancellation of this MOU by any means necessary."

A lack of cooperation from White, who is in charge of implementing the state's education policies, could complicate Jindal's plan. Reached by phone Wednesday, White said that Louisiana will move forward with Common Core for the time being.

"We're just going to continue implementing the plan we've been implementing for four years," White said. "We've been saying since January of 2010 this is where we're headed. There's two outs and it's the ninth inning. He's bringing in the pinch hitter. This is a serious last-minute proposal."

PARCC also maintains that Jindal is stuck without White's cooperation. Laura Slover, CEO of the consortium, said in a statement that the memorandum of understanding signed by Jindal "makes clear that withdrawal requires the agreement of the same three signatories or their successors, so that no one individual can unilaterally decide the fate of a state's standards and assessments." Since both White and Chas Roemer, president of the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, "have made clear that they intend for Louisiana to stay the course" and remain in PARCC, Slover said, "we will continue to proceed under the MOU and continue to work with Louisiana."

Jindal previously described himself as a "strong supporter" of the Common Core. He was part of a group of governors who helped develop the standards, which lay out what students should know by the end of each grade. Federal funding encouraged states to adopt the standards.

Now, if Louisiana drops out as Jindal says it will, it will become the fourth state to formally pull out of the Common Core, following Oklahoma, Indiana and South Carolina. The governor of South Carolina signed a bill last week that requires the Common Core to be replaced by the 2015-2016 school year.

On "CBS This Morning" on Tuesday, Education Secretary Arne Duncan described Jindal's opposition to the Common Core as "about politics -- it is not about education. And frankly that is part of the problem."

Firing back in a statement Tuesday afternoon, Jindal said he "will not be bullied by the federal government."

"The proponents of Common Core claim it is not a federal takeover, but Secretary Duncan's comments and actions prove otherwise," the statement continued. "He has already threatened Oklahoma with a loss of funding, and we may be next."

The Common Core was developed to unify the patchwork of state-specific standards in order to ensure American students were learning what they needed to know to succeed in college and the workplace. But the standards have become a political football with their detractors attacking the program as a federal effort to micromanage local school curricula.

Jindal's Wednesday announcement goes against the wishes of the Louisiana legislature and the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, both of which continue to support the Common Core. White, the education superintendent, earlier said that Jindal lacks the authority to unilaterally reject the standards. "The laws of our state ... give the statutory authority for approving tests and standards to the state Board [of Education], not to the governor," White told HuffPost on Wednesday.

White noted that Louisiana differs from Oklahoma and other states that have withdrawn from the Common Core in that elsewhere the legislature drove the process. But in Louisiana, White said, "you have the exact opposite." The state legislature voted to reject anti-Common Core bills and passed a law in 2012 that required national standards and competitive tests.

When asked about Jindal's motives, White said he didn't know. "We have not talked about this subject in recent months," he said. "We certainly have talked about it over the years. It's not a secret the governor's position has changed."

UPDATE: 11 P.M. -- After White and PARCC said Jindal had no authority to implement his Common Core withdrawal plan, Jindal tried to make it happen through a bureaucratic technicality. Late Wednesday, Jindal's commissioner of administration, Kristy Nichols, said that the Office of Contractual Review temporarily suspended relevant contracts.

"Upon close review of these contracts and amendments to the contracts, it was necessary for OCR to temporarily suspend approval for further review of the scope of the services to be provided and the purchase of goods or supplies associated with the consulting services," Jindal spokesman Jordan Gleason said in an email.

"The Department of Education has suggested it has unlimited authority to use a state contract, paid for by taxpayers, for a purpose for which it was not intended," Nichols said. "Under Louisiana law, the Department of Education and the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education are prohibited from entering into a contract for the purpose of circumventing the laws governing procurement. For these reasons, we have issued a stay of the services under the contract until the Office of Contractual Review has had an opportunity to review it and obtain more information about how the Department is exercising its authority under the contracts.”

It wasn't immediately clear what this means for schools.

"We are going to review the issue and will make a decision after receiving legal counsel," said White after reviewing a letter from a Jindal administration lawyer describing the suspension of contracts.

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« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2014, 05:53:10 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/16/bobby-jindal-science_n_5830756.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592
9/16/14
Bobby Jindal Trusts Science Except When He Doesn't

WASHINGTON -- America needs a leader to bridge the widening gulf between faith and science, and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, a devout Roman Catholic with Ivy League-level science training, thinks he can be that person.

As a studious man of immigrant background with the kind of credentials admired by coastal intellectual meritocrats -- Brown, Oxford and McKinsey & Company -- the Republican governor, at least on paper, has a chance to appeal to the middle, should he run for president in 2016. He also has an impressive record as a government bureaucrat and administrator, both in Washington and in Baton Rouge.

Yet given his own deep faith and his roots in the Bible Belt, Jindal's early focus will be on wooing evangelical Christians and others on the cultural right.

If he can solve this Rubik’s Cube of religious belief and scientific trust, he may not only do the country a favor; he might reach the White House.

On Tuesday, Jindal showed his strategy for straddling the politics of the divide -- but also the political risks of doing so -- during an hourlong Q&A with reporters at a Christian Science Monitor Breakfast, a traditional early stop on the presidential campaign circuit.

Like the experienced tennis player he is, Jindal repeatedly batted away questions about whether he believes the theory of evolution explains the existence of complex life forms on Earth. Pressed for his personal view, Jindal -- who earned a specialized biology degree in an elite pre-med program at Brown University -- declined to give one. He said only that "as a parent I want my children taught the best science." He didn’t say what that "science" was.

He conceded that human activity has something to do with climate change, but declined to agree that there is now widespread scientific consensus on the severity and urgency of the problem.

Because of what he views as a lack of consensus on the gravity of the environmental threat, Jindal felt free to try to turn the science argument against the Obama administration. The president, the Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies are "science deniers," he argued, because they impose limits on carbon dioxide and other pollutants from "job-creating" businesses without really knowing how well those restrictions work.

He accused the administration of being on the wrong side of the faith divide in this area. "The left loves energy to be expensive and scarce," he said. "It’s almost a religious approach."

Jindal brought with him to the breakfast a detailed energy plan full of specific, thoughtful (and largely deregulatory) proposals.

Speaking about another international threat, he warned that the Ebola virus was a harbinger. "It's not the last potential epidemic in Africa," said Jindal, a former administrator of medical services at the state and federal levels.

On many other science and education issues, the governor also tries to straddle the partisan divide.

He favors a human life amendment to define the legal existence of a "person" at the moment of conception, but he is also a strong advocate for the cheap and wide distribution of contraceptives.

He refused to criticize his "friend" Phil Robertson, the Duck Dynast who said the other day that a Bible-based monogamous marriage of man and woman is the best way to end diseases like AIDS.

After initially supporting the Common Core attempt to write national education standards, the governor now opposes the project.

Jindal takes the latter stance in the name of greater "local control" of education -- which would presumably allow Louisiana schools to teach his version of acceptable "science."
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« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2014, 10:34:36 pm »

http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/week-god-122714
First up from the God Machine this week is a specific kind of invitation extended to far-right evangelical leaders by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R).
 
As we talked about last week, Jindal, a likely Republican presidential candidate in 2016, is set to host a massive prayer rally called “The Response” next month in his home state. The event is not without controversy in light of the religious extremists, including the American Family Association, which are helping sponsor the evangelical event.
 
Jindal has so far been publicly indifferent to the hullabaloo and this week, according to the conservative Washington Times, the GOP governor reached out to church leaders to encourage their participation in the upcoming rally (thanks to my colleague Laura Conaway for the heads-up).

In a letter distributed to pastors, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal calls on them to consider public service, as part of his invitation to a gathering scheduled to take place a day before a highly-publicized prayer event Jan. 24 at Louisiana State University.
 
The letter, which begins with “Pastor …” invites recipients to consider being a guest at a pastors’ briefing hosted by the American Renewal Project, which is to take place the night before “The Response: Louisiana” will take place at LSU.

Much of the letter was unremarkable, though the correspondence specifically told pastors, “As we make an appeal for leaders of faith to rise up and engage America in the public square with Biblical values, we are trusting you will hear God’s call on your life for this mission…. The time has come for pastors to lead the way and reset the course of American governance.”
 
The notion that church leaders – as opposed to public officials elected by the American public – would “lead the way and reset the course of American governance” seemed like an odd sentiment in a secular democracy. Indeed, given that the separation of church and state is a bedrock principle in the American system of government, it’s rather alarming that a governor and likely presidential hopeful is looking to pastors – presumably, ministers who share his beliefs and agenda – to establish the course for public policy.
 
Given that so many of Jindal’s allies on the extreme fringe, this is all the more problematic.
 
With about a month remaining before “The Response” event kicks off, look for protests to continue. If you missed it, Rachel’s segment from earlier this week is well worth your time.
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« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2014, 10:37:23 pm »

Much of the letter was unremarkable, though the correspondence specifically told pastors, “As we make an appeal for leaders of faith to rise up and engage America in the public square with Biblical values, we are trusting you will hear God’s call on your life for this mission…. The time has come for pastors to lead the way and reset the course of American governance.”

Psalms 3:1  A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. LORD, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me.

Psa_17:7  Shew thy marvellous lovingkindness, O thou that savest by thy right hand them which put their trust in thee from those that rise up against them.

Psa_18:48  He delivereth me from mine enemies: yea, thou liftest me up above those that rise up against me: thou hast delivered me from the violent man.

Psa_35:11  False witnesses did rise up; they laid to my charge things that I knew not.
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« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2015, 03:59:51 pm »

The "evangelical religious right" just never learns their lesson - the bible is true yet again - Apostasy in the last days, albeit getting worse and worse.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/01/24/us/ap-la-jindal-prayer-rally.html?_r=2
1/24/15
Jindal Headlines All-Day Prayer Rally in Baton Rouge

BATON ROUGE, La. — Gov. Bobby Jindal told Christian evangelicals gathered at an all-day prayer rally Saturday that the nation needs a "spiritual revival," as he continued to court religious conservatives for a possible presidential campaign.

The rally attracted thousands to the basketball arena on LSU's campus but drew controversy both because of the group hosting it, the American Family Association, and Jindal's well-advertised headlining appearance.

Holding his Bible, the two-term Republican governor opened the event by urging a revival to "begin right here, right here in our hearts." Later Saturday afternoon, he described his conversion to Christianity as a teenager.

While people sang, raised their hands in prayer and gave their personal testimonies inside the arena, hundreds more protested the event outside early in the day.

Jindal insisted the rally was a religious event, not a political one — even as participants prayed for religion to guide political decision-making.

"Today is about humbling ourselves before the Lord. Today we repent for our sins," he said. Later Jindal told attendees: "We can't just elect a candidate to fix our country ... We need a spiritual revival to fix our country."

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry headlined a similar prayer event in 2011 only days before launching his White House bid.

And the event comes as Jindal has held meetings with pastors in the key presidential campaign states of Iowa and New Hampshire and spoken at gatherings of faith leaders and conservative activists in several states, trying to gain traction among a crowded field of potential candidates in the hunt for the 2016 GOP nomination.

Several state lawmakers and local elected officials appeared on stage for the rally. State Sen. Jonathan Perry, R-Kaplan, prayed for "more born-again Christians" to be added to the Louisiana Legislature.

The governor's appearance at the prayer rally kept him from the Iowa Freedom Summit, a more prominent event with social conservatives that attracted several potential GOP presidential contenders.

Outside the prayer event, critics held a protest, saying the American Family Association, which the Southern Poverty Law Center has classified as a hate group, promotes discrimination against people who are gay or of non-Christian faiths.

Protesters accused Jindal of using the rally for political gain.

"I just knew this wasn't what LSU stands for. These aren't LSU values, Louisiana values or American values," said Peter Jenkins, a 26-year-old graduate student and protest organizer.

Jindal hasn't commented directly on the views of the American Family Association, which has linked same-sex marriage and abortion to disasters such as tornadoes and Hurricane Katrina.

The governor was raised by Hindu parents but converted to Catholicism in high school. He has described himself as an "evangelical Catholic."

Saturday's prayer rally, however, wasn't embraced by local Catholic leaders.

Catholic leaders participated in an anti-abortion march on LSU's campus that featured a speech from Jindal. But when the marchers merged into the prayer rally, the Catholic organizations weren't following them, said Robert Tasman, executive director of the Louisiana Conference of Catholic Bishops.

"The event was viewed more as an evangelical event with a political tone to it, and the bishops don't participate in such events," he said.
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« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2015, 10:01:23 am »

FYI - Louisiana has had deficits every year since he got into office in 2008.

http://news.yahoo.com/jindal-leave-louisianas-next-governor-budget-mess-164848646.html
Jindal to leave Louisiana's next governor with budget mess
2/11/15

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Year after year, Louisiana didn't have enough money to cover its expenses, yet Gov. Bobby Jindal refused to roll back income tax cuts or ever-increasing corporate tax breaks. Instead, he raided reserve funds and sold off state property.

Jindal suggested job growth from his economic development wins would replenish those assets once the recession ended. It hasn't — and money from the lucrative oil industry has taken a nose dive with crude prices. Now, the Republican is running out of short-term patches and is struggling to plug a $1.6 billion budget hole just as he tries to build support for a possible 2016 presidential run.

Funding for higher education and health care services will almost certainly be subject to cuts deeper than what they already have endured in recent years, and Jindal's successor will have to repay a string of debts and IOUs.

"They've used all the smoke that was in the can and all the mirrors that they could buy and now they're out of tricks. Their solution is to gut higher education like a fish," said Republican state Treasurer John Kennedy.

As for Jindal, he said in a recent interview that the shortfall isn't his fault, and he dodged any talk of his temporary fixes.

"The shortfall next year is almost entirely due to the declining revenues, and the vast majority of that is due to falling oil prices," he said.

The numbers, however, don't back up the governor's explanation.

More than $1 billion of the shortfall on the horizon for the fiscal year that begins July 1 can be tied to Jindal's refusal to match the state's spending to its yearly revenue over his two terms in office — as he also steadfastly refused to consider tax increases.

When Jindal took office in 2008, he positioned himself as a fiscal conservative who decried budget shell games akin to "using your credit card to pay your mortgage." It didn't take long to ditch that rhetoric and shift the focus to saving critical services with any money available.

Jindal scraped together what he could from all sorts of funds: railroad crossing safety, artificial reef construction, housing programs and the blind. He pieced together money from one-time legal settlements and property sales, using it to pay for continuing programs. Lawmakers went along, and Louisiana has careened from one budget crisis to the next as the dollars either don't pan out or the sources of financing dry up and need replacing.

"Our budget has been full of sleights of hand — it's almost a Ponzi scheme of moving moneys around, one-time money around, to serve recurring needs," Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne, one of the Republicans vying to be Louisiana's next governor, said at a recent forum.

In early February, national credit rating agency Moody's Investors Service described Louisiana's budget as having a "structural deficit," raising worries from Kennedy the state could be threatened with a rating downgrade that could make borrowing more difficult.

Jindal said those patchwork fixes aren't really "one-time dollars" because the state has similar types of money available to pull together annually. "They have been here year after year," he said.

The governor has successfully trimmed some spending by cutting more than 30,000 full-time state employees. He's reduced the state's vehicle fleet, privatized much of the Medicaid program, turned over the state's charity hospitals to outside managers and looked for ways to make state government more efficient.

That hasn't closed all the gaps, however, and Jindal's short-term solutions leave a string of debts for Louisiana's next governor to pay off.

The state owes $190 million to federal officials for improper Medicaid spending in hospital privatization deals, an order being appealed, and a $270 million repayment to the state "rainy day" fund in 2017 as part of a legal settlement. Economic development deals will cost the next governor at least $340 million over his first four years.

Far fewer savings accounts will be left to pay those liabilities because Jindal drained or reduced trust funds.

As complaints grew louder in recent years, the Jindal administration defended attacks from Democrats and conservative Republicans who decried budgets reliant on accounting gimmicks, claiming its budgeting protected needed programs without raising taxes.

When he talks of his record in national appearances, Jindal doesn't mention the budget troubles. He describes cutting Louisiana's budget from $34 billion in 2008 to $25 billion — but doesn't explain much of that drop comes from spending down one-time federal recovery dollars after hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

The state's general fund, by comparison, has only dipped from $8.7 billion to $8.4 billion during Jindal's seven years in office.

Previous governors have used piecemeal financing to fill budget gaps over the years. Jindal's two immediate predecessors, Republican Mike Foster and Democrat Kathleen Blanco, each used up to $600 million in such "one-time" funding to stop cuts in particular years.

But Jindal's use of such financing reached new highs, a situation the chair of the Louisiana Democratic Party, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson of New Orleans, called "a ticking time bomb."

New money hasn't rolled in, despite promises that tax revenue would increase from multibillion-dollar manufacturing and petrochemical projects announced by the Jindal administration in the last few years.

The escalating price tag for tax breaks has only made things worse.

In his first year in office, Jindal signed off on the largest individual income tax cut in Louisiana history, stripping hundreds of millions from the state treasury at the same time the national recession hit.

Meanwhile, the cost for the state's various tax credits, rebates and exemptions has ballooned by more than $600 million in the last five years alone, according to the Department of Revenue.

The Legislature's chief economist, Greg Albrecht, has described Louisiana's tax break programs as spending with no annual oversight from state lawmakers before the money goes out the door.

But Jindal considers any attempt to scale back a tax break equal to a tax hike and has successfully fought legislative efforts to rein in the state's giveaways.

As they ran into Jindal's resistance to tax break changes, lawmakers who voted for budgets packed with the governor's patchwork funding say removing the dollars would force harmful cuts to colleges, public safety and health care. For the upcoming session that begins in April, lawmakers are scrambling to find loopholes to generate new money but allow Jindal to call the plans "revenue neutral."

"Everybody says, 'Oh, you're using one-time money.' I tell people that say that, 'Well, tell me what you want to cut,'" said Senate Finance Committee Chairman Jack Donahue, a Republican. "'Is it higher education? Or is it health care? What university do you want to close?' The truth is, from a political standpoint, that's not possible."
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« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2015, 05:01:06 pm »

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2015/04/08/the-real-religious-freedom-fight-is-about-to-begin-in-louisiana/
4/8/15
The real religious freedom fight is about to begin — in Louisiana

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), a possible 2016 contender, is a relative unknown among voters; only 1 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents prefer him, according to the most recent Washington Post-ABC News poll.

That could soon change.

Following on the heels of contentious religious freedom bills in Indiana and Arkansas, Jindal said he plans to support his state's own bill. Judging from how Indiana's bill catapulted Gov. Mike Pence (R) to the national spotlight, Jindal could soon see the same thing happen for him — and not necessarily in a good way. But Louisiana's debate could be different in one significant way.

Whereas Indiana and Arkansas had versions of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, which included broad language that critics have said could have unintended consequences, Louisiana's Marriage and Conscience Act is more focused and deals specifically with religious beliefs in relation to same-sex marriage.

Polling suggests that could -- emphasis on could -- be more popular and more difficult for opponents to beat back. Critics can't as easily point to the possibility of the vague language leading to unintended discrimination, and polling shows half or more of voters support exempting religious businesses from serving gay weddings. A March 2014 Washington Post-ABC News poll found only 28 percent believe businesses should be able to refuse service to gay and lesbian people in general because of religious belief, but a January AP-GfK poll found 57 percent believe that wedding-related businesses should be able to refuse service. (A later Pew poll put it at 47 percent.)

Of course, that doesn't mean the bill won't have its critics. HRC legal director Sarah Warbelow said in a statement that Louisiana's bill is actually worse than other states'.

"This bill is worse than any RFRA in that it explicitly allows DISCRIMINATION based on an individual's religious beliefs about marriage," she said. "Nobody gets to go into court for a balancing test, there's no interpretation by a state judicial system. It flat-out gives individuals a right to discriminate, period."

The bill would allow private businesses to refuse to recognize same-sex marriage and not provide the same benefits to same-sex married couples, and the bill's sponsor, state Rep. Mike Johnson (R), said he is considering changes to the bill, according to the Times-Picayune. So the final product could be different than the bill we see today.

Backing the bill is a calculated risk for Jindal, who already stood up for the original bill in Indiana that Pence later pushed to clarify. Although it isn't like other states', it looks as if the public reaction could be similar, and Pence had a very difficult time beating back the public pressure.

On the flip side, though, is that in a crowded GOP presidential field, it could also give Jindal a national profile more quickly and effectively than anything else he has done, and could turn him into something of a hero in socially conservative circles. Where other Republicans declined to be bold, he will argue, he stood up for religious liberty — a cause he is no stranger to.

It's a ****, and one he looks prepared to make. And at least this time, the debate over RELIGIOUS FREEDOM will be less in the abstract.
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« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2015, 04:46:30 am »

Louisiana Makes It Illegal To Use Cash To Buy Used Goods

Louisiana businesses are suddenly discovering a new law that flew under the radar during the last legislative session:

    Cold hard cash. It’s good everywhere you go, right? You can use it to pay for anything.

    But that’s not the case here in Louisiana now. It’s a law that was passed during this year’s busy legislative session.

    House bill 195 basically says those who buy and sell second hand goods cannot use cash to make those transactions, and it flew so far under the radar most businesses don’t even know about it.

    “We’re gonna lose a lot of business,” says Danny Guidry, who owns the Pioneer Trading Post in Lafayette. He deals in buying and selling unique second hand items.

    “We don’t want this cash transaction to be taken away from us. It’s an everyday transaction,” Guidry explains.

    Guidry says, “I think everyone in this business once they find out about it. They’re will definitely be a lot of uproar.”

    The law states those who buy or sell second hand goods are prohibited from using cash. State representative Rickey Hardy co-authored the bill.

    Hardy says, “they give a check or a cashiers money order, or electronic one of those three mechanisms is used.”

    Hardy says the bill is targeted at criminals who steal anything from copper to televisions, and sell them for a quick buck. Having a paper trail will make it easier for law enforcement.

    “It’s a mechanism to be used so the police department has something to go on and have a lead,” explains Hardy.

    Guidry feels his store shouldn’t have to change it’s ways of doing business, because he may possibly buy or sell stolen goods. Something he says has happened once in his eight years.

    “We are being targeted for something we shouldn’t be.”

    Besides non-profit resellers like Goodwill, and garage sales, the language of the bill encompasses stores like the Pioneer Trading Post and flea markets.

    Lawyer Thad Ackel Jr. feels the passage of this bill begins a slippery slope for economic freedom in the state.

    “The government is placing a significant restriction on individuals transacting in their own private property,” says Ackel.

To say the least.

As Thad Ackel, who is quoted in the linked report, notes, this law goes far beyond even the extraordinary step of banning cash transactions:.

    The law goes further to require secondhand dealers to turn over a valuable business asset, namely, their business’ proprietary client information. For every transaction a secondhand dealer must obtain the seller’s personal information such as their name, address, driver’s license number and the license plate number of the vehicle in which the goods were delivered. They must also make a detailed description of the item(s) purchased and submit this with the personal identification information of every transaction to the local policing authorities through electronic daily reports. If a seller cannot or refuses to produce to the secondhand dealer any of the required forms of identification, the secondhand dealer is prohibited from completing the transaction.

    This legislation amounts to a public taking of private property without compensation. Regardless of whether or not the transaction information is connected with, or law enforcement is investigating a crime, individuals and businesses are forced to report routine business activity to the police. Can law enforcement not accomplish its goal of identifying potential thieves and locating stolen items in a far less intrusive manner? And of course, there are already laws that prohibit stealing, buying or selling stolen goods, laws that require businesses to account for transactions and laws that penalize individuals and businesses that transact in stolen property. Why does the Louisiana State Legislature need to enact more laws infringing on personal privacy, liberties and freedom?

The standard justification for a law such as this is easy to understand. Second hand stores and pawnbrokers if only because both have long been a source for people in possession of stolen good to fence their ill-gotten wares. However, the law itself actually exempts pawnbrokers from the no-cash part of the law even though it’s fairly clearly that pawn shops are notorious as the destination for stolen goods. If the law was really aimed at preventing stolen goods from being sold in this manner, why ban pawnbrokers? Even if you accepted the justifications on their face, though, his law goes way too far, especially in the banning of cash transactions. The purpose of the bill could be met simply be requiring some form of Identification be taken when a transaction is made, and that records of the same be maintained. Banning the use of legal tender completely is way over the top.

Additionally, while I haven’t researched the issue, I’m not even sure that the state has the authority to say that Federal Reserve Notes, which Congress has made legal tender for all transactions, cannot be used in a transaction.  I would think that there’s a case to be made here that Louisiana has violated the Supremacy Clause of the Constitutional by saying that U.S. currency cannot be used for a certain class of transactions. Certainly, if this is allowed to stand, then the effect would be that any state could say that cash cannot be used for any number of transaction in the name of “fighting crime,” “public safety,” or whatever other excuse an inventive legislator can come up with.

It’s easy to understand why Louisiana would want to ban cash transactions. Absent some other form of record keeping, cash brings a kind of anonymity that paying with credit cards, debit cards, or checks cannot offer. If I’ve got a hundred bucks in my wallet, I can spend it anywhere I want without any concern that someone, somewhere is tracking me. You can’t say the same thing with any other form of payment. There’s something to be said for the ability to conduct your business without worrying about whether or not what you buy and where you buy is being monitored, either by a private entity or the government. In Louisiana, though, you can’t do that anymore, at least not if you want to buy used goods.

http://govtslaves.info/louisiana-makes-it-illegal-to-use-cash-to-buy-used-goods/
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« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2015, 05:35:58 am »

Franklin Graham Calls for Intercession Over Gov. Bobby Jindal

First it was Duck Dynasty's Willie Robertson. Now, it's evangelist Franklin Graham. Both men are applauding a Christian governor who may or may not run for president: Bobby Jindal. And Graham is calling on Christians to make intercession for him.

"I appreciate strong leaders like Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal who are defending religious freedoms in our nation. Unlike some other governors who have waffled on their positions and retreated, he says no matter how tough the opposition he will fight for passage of the Marriage and Conscience Act in this legislative session," Graham wrote on his Facebook page.

"In this The New York Times article Jindal says 'We should ensure that musicians, caterers, photographers and others should be immune from government coercion on deeply held religious convictions.' He says, 'As the fight for religious liberty moves to Louisiana, I have a clear message for any corporation that contemplates bullying our state: Save your breath.' Pray for Governor Jindal and post your encouragement to him in the comments below—tell him you support what he is doing!"

Although Graham stopped short of a presidential endorsement, Robertson came out in full support of Jindal as the next Commander-in-Chief just weeks ago.

"If he chooses to go on, I know the values he has ... ," Robertson said. "He's got the values, he's got the intelligence to do it. I'd love to see him run."

http://www.charismanews.com/us/49353-franklin-graham-calls-for-intercession-over-gov-bobby-jindal
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« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2015, 07:55:57 pm »

http://theadvocate.com/news/neworleans/neworleansnews/12436119-123/new-orleans-mayor-mitch-landrieu
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu signs his own executive order, responds to Gov. Bobby Jindal
5/21/15

Two days after Gov. Bobby Jindal signed an executive order that critics said could promote discrimination against gays and lesbians, Mayor Mitch Landrieu on Thursday penned one of his own that he said would make clear to the rest of the nation that New Orleans “is an accepting, inviting city that thrives on its diversity and welcomes people from all walks of life with open arms.”

In a statement that directly referenced Jindal’s order, Landrieu said New Orleans has managed to protect religious freedom — the stated purpose of Jindal’s order — without opening the door to discrimination.

“In New Orleans, we believe religious liberty and freedoms should be protected and discrimination prohibited, and we have passed our own laws to reflect that principle,” Landrieu said. “This executive order is an important, symbolic affirmation that discrimination in any form will not be tolerated in New Orleans — and it should not be tolerated anywhere in Louisiana.”

New Orleans, a heavily Democratic city that has a substantial gay community, has a history of sailing against the prevailing winds of social conservatism that inform the politics in the rest of the state. The city also has more to lose from the Jindal order than most of Louisiana because so much of the economy is based on convention, tourism and special events. Jindal’s order, and the now-dead legislation that inspired it, have spawned fears that Louisiana could be shunned and possibly boycotted outright by conventioneers and other visitors.

On Tuesday, a House committee effectively killed the legislation that preceded Jindal’s order. House Bill 707 would have carved out protections for people who oppose same-sex marriage, which, while not recognized in Louisiana, has enjoyed a string of legal and political victories in other states and could be decided upon by the U.S. Supreme Court in June.

more
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« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2015, 02:03:56 am »

http://blogs.theadvocate.com/politicsblog/2015/11/02/6910/
11/2/15
Poll: John Bel Edwards leads David Vitter in gubernatorial runoff

A new independent poll out in the Louisiana governor’s race shows Democrat John Bel Edwards with a strong lead over Republican David Vitter with less than three weeks until election day.

The poll, conducted by JMC Analytics and Polling for Nexstar TV stations, including WVLA-TV out of Baton Rouge, puts Edwards at 52 percent in the Nov. 21 runoff, to Vitter’s 32 percent. Sixteen percent of those surveyed said they remain undecided.

Edwards, a state representative from Amite, and Vitter, a U.S. Senator from Metairie, came in first and second place, respectively, in Louisiana’s Oct. 24 primary. Because neither got more than 50 percent of the vote, the runoff will decide Gov. Bobby Jindal’s successor.

The poll found Edwards pulling in 41 percent of the white voters surveyed and 24 percent of Republicans. It also found him leading all areas surveyed, except Alexandria.

JMC surveyed 600 likely voters Oct. 28-31. The margin of error is 4 percent.

The poll lines up with internal polling in the days after the primary and a recent poll commissioned by the anti-Vitter GumboPAC. That poll, conducted by Anzalone Liszt Grove Research, had Edwards leading Vitter 52 percent to 40 percent, with 7 percent undecided.
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« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2015, 02:14:48 am »

The Louisiana Dem candidate(Edwards) is a ROMAN CATHOLIC! Surprise!
http://www.digplanet.com/wiki/John_Bel_Edwards
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