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"And there shall be pestilences ..."

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November 24, 2017, 07:52:34 pm tennis shoe says: What happened to BA? He seems to have vanished.
November 14, 2017, 01:43:05 am Mark says:
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2012, 11:32:44 am »

Drug-resistant malaria is spreading and it could be a public health disaster

April 6, 2012 – AFRICA - Malaria remains one of the world’s great unnecessary killers. More than 650,000 people succumb to the disease each year — that’s more than one per minute — mostly in the poor nations of sub-Saharan Africa, but as deadly as malaria is, it doesn’t have to kill. Prevention and better treatment can stop the progression of the disease, and death tends to be a matter of extreme poverty. Indeed, in recent years great progress has been made in controlling malaria, with deaths down 30% over the past decade. That’s thanks largely to more effective treatment regimens that make use of artemisinin, a plant-derived antimalarial drug originally developed in China. Artemisinin is the closest thing we have to a miracle drug for malaria. That’s what makes the results of two studies out this week in the Lancet and Science so disturbing. Health officials have known for a while that some malaria parasites in the Southeast Asian nation of Cambodia have begun to develop resistance to artemisinin, but they hoped the resistance wasn’t spreading. Now researchers in the region have shown that artemisinin is becoming dramatically less potent in malaria cases in western Thailand, and they know it’s due to growing drug resistance in the malaria parasites themselves. If resistance to artemisinin were to spread to sub-Saharan Africa, the result could be a “public health disaster,” in the words of lead Lancet author Standwell Nkhoma of the Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites first emerged in Cambodia in 2006, which led to an international effort to control malaria and contain resistant strains there. But scientists in the Lancet study looked at more than 3,000 patients who were treated at malaria clinics in northwestern Thailand between 2001 and 2010. The researchers — including staff from Texas Biomed, Mahidol University in Bangkok and the Centre for Tropical Medicine at Oxford — found that it took longer and longer for malaria parasites to be cleared during treatment, a sign of growing resistance. Molecular analysis of the malaria parasites showed that this resistance to treatment was due to a genetic trait — the parasites were adapting to artemisinin, just as they had in Cambodia. “Genetically determined artemisinin resistance in the parasite emerged along the Thailand-Myanmar [Burma] border at least eight years ago and has since increased substantially,” the authors wrote in the Lancet paper. “At this rate of increase, resistance will reach rates reported in western Cambodia in two to six years.” -Time

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2012/04/06/drug-resistant-malaria-is-spreading-and-it-could-be-a-public-health-disaster/
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« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2012, 03:50:37 pm »


http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2012/04/08/salmonella-outbreak-reported-in-19-u-s-states/

April 8, 2012 – WASHINGTON - Federal and state health officials are investigating a salmonella outbreak in 19 states and the District of Columbia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC reports 93 people in 19 states and the District of Columbia have been sickened by an unusual strain of the bacteria called salmonella Bareilly. So far 10 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported, according to health officials. The first case of this particular food-borne illness was reported on January 28. The most recent case was reported Monday. “CDC is collaborating with public health officials in several states and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multistate outbreak of salmonella serotype Bareilly infections,” CDC spokeswoman Lola Russell said in a statement. News of the investigation surfaced late Tuesday when an internal memo was inadvertently sent to everyone at the FDA, according to FDA spokesman Curtis Allen. He says the memo speculates about a possible source of contamination — sushi — but he says the FDA doesn’t know the origins of the outbreak at this time. According to the CDC, state public health officials are interviewing those who became ill to find out what they may have eaten and been exposed to in the week before they got sick. This is how investigations into food-borne illnesses are typically conducted. Russell said in “initial interviews, many of the ill persons reported consuming sushi, sashimi, or similar foods in a variety of locations in the week before becoming ill.” However, it is still early in the investigation. According to the CDC, consumers are not being told to avoid any particular food or restaurants. Once a particular food is identified for this outbreak, the public will be notified, according to a CDC statement. Consumers are advised to contact their doctor if they believe they became ill from eating potentially contaminated food. -CNN
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« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2012, 04:40:27 pm »

Vietnam baffled by mystery disease
 
(UKPA) – 4/20/12

Vietnam has asked the World Health Organisation to help investigate a mystery disease that has killed 19 people and left 171 others sick.

Le Han Phong, chairman of the People's Committee in Ba To district in Quang Ngai province, said patients first experience a rash on their hands and feet along with high fever, loss of appetite and eventually organ failure.

He said nearly 100 people remain in hospital, including 10 in critical condition. Patients with milder symptoms are being treated at home.

Mr Phong said the first case was detected last year and that the disease had died down until a spate of new infections were recently reported, mostly in one impoverished village.

A Ministry of Health investigation was inconclusive.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5ghB-OLHV42vvo6RVCZrgopSGkxog?docId=N0424811334900578759A
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« Reply #33 on: April 24, 2012, 08:59:25 pm »

4/24/12

Mad cow case confirmed in California

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/mad-cow-case-confirmed-california-190915437.html

The United States Department of Agriculture confirmed Tuesday that it found a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a dairy cow from central California.
 
The infected cow was found as part of a "targeted surveillance system," says John Clifford, the USDA's chief veterinary officer. This is the nation's fourth confirmed case of the ailment commonly known as mad cow disease, which can be fatal to humans who eat parts of the animal infected.
 
"The animal was never presented for slaughter for human consumption, so it at no time presented a risk to the food supply or human health. Additionally, milk does not transmit BSE," Clifford said. The cow was found at a "rendering plant," which takes sickly or discarded animal meat and recycles it into  inedible products.
 
The animal tested positive for atypical BSE, a very rare form of the disease not generally associated with an animal consuming infected feed.

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« Reply #34 on: May 04, 2012, 11:54:50 am »

http://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/blogs/pertussis-whooping-cough-outbreak-strikes-washington-state


Pertussis: Whooping cough outbreak strikes Washington state
5/4/12

More than 1,100 cases of whooping cough have already been diagnosed this year in the state, nearly doubling the number seen in typical peak years.

Washington state is gearing up for one of the worst epidemics of pertussis in nearly 70 years. Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes a nasty cough. It is particularly dangerous for young infants.
 
Public health officials have confirmed more than 1,100 cases of whooping cough so far this year in the state. Thankfully, no deaths have been reported this year, but 20 infants have been hospitalized with the illness. 
 
Washington's Gov. Christine Gregoire announced May 3 that state emergency funds would be available to provide free vaccinations and help spread awareness about the disease and the importance of getting vaccinated. 
 
In the U.S., most kids receive a series of vaccines against whooping cough at the age of 2 months. But some kids don't get immunized, either because their parents object or they are unaware of the importance of vaccines.
 
Outbreaks of pertussis are not uncommon, but they do tend to run in cycles. Tim Church, a spokesman for the Washington state Health Department, said the current epidemic is running well above typical peak years in the past, when 500 to 600 cases might be reported in a year.
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« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2012, 05:44:38 pm »

http://tribune.com.pk/story/378936/collateral-damage-measles-outbreak-kills-12-children-in-waziristan/

MIRAMSHAH: 
A measles outbreak has killed 12 children in the North Waziristan tribal region and is spreading as fighting, power cuts and curfews cause a vaccine shortage, doctors said on Monday.
 
North Waziristan, which is infamous for its alleged Taliban and al Qaeda sanctuaries, is frequently hit by US drone strikes.
 
“For the past three weeks we are daily receiving five to 10 children suffering from measles,” said Dr Muhammad Ali Shah, chief of the agency headquarters hospital in Miramshah. He would normally see only one or two deaths a year from the disease, he said.
 
But another doctor, Mohammad Sadiq, said 12 children and a man had died from measles in the last three weeks, and that there were up to 70 confirmed cases in hospital.
 
The UN children’s agency UNICEF said there had been 143 measles alerts this year in the seven tribal agencies of the country.
 
The measles virus is highly contagious and can be fatal, but can easily be prevented by proper immunisation.
 
However Shah said: “We do not have proper storage for measles vaccination because of long power outages and curfews and most of our stock expires due to these reasons.”
 
Poverty and poor transport facilities mean villagers in the rugged, mountainous areas cannot come to hospitals for treatment, he added, while military operations and unrest mean vaccination teams cannot reach them.
 
“There is accumulation of significant number of unvaccinated children in different parts of this region which are revealing as outbreaks or alerts from time to time,” said Dr Quamrul Hasan of the World Health Organisation (WHO).
 
WHO and local health officials are to carry out a supplementary campaign in the tribal areas aimed at vaccinating more than a million children aged under 10 by the end of June, he said.
 
Polio vaccination campaigns in tribal areas have in the past suffered because of rumours – sometimes spread by radio stations or from mosque loudspeakers – they were a Western conspiracy to sterilise children to reduce the Muslim population.
 
But UNICEF said work had been done to tackle misconceptions and there was less suspicion of the measles vaccine, administered by injection, than of the orally-administered polio dose.
 
Published in The Express Tribune, May 15th, 2012.
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« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2012, 12:24:49 pm »

http://www.dt.bh/newsdetails.php?key=301110213455&newsid=130512164820

5/14/12
Mysterious disease outbreak in Nepal

Kathmandu
Around 200 people at Neta of Arman Village Development Committee in Myagdi district in western Nepal were sickened by an unidentified disease in the last four days, local media reported.

The disease affected a majority of 50 families in Neta, said Harka Bahadur Chhantyal, a local resident.

The sick suffered from shaking body, fever and unconsciousness, he added.
 
Elderly people and children have been mostly affected by the disease.
The villagers have been panic-stricken owing to the rapid spread of the disease, said Chhantyal, who is also the teacher of local Mangala Higher Secondary School.

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« Reply #37 on: May 17, 2012, 02:54:43 pm »

http://www.kvia.com/news/31076520/detail.html

5/17/12

(CNN) -- A second case of flesh-eating bacteria has been reported in South Carolina as a Georgia woman continues to battle the same kind of infection.

Lana Kuykendall, 36, is in critical condition fighting a similar infection, her husband says. Doctors have removed skin and tissue from her legs. She is on a ventilator.

In Augusta, Georgia, meanwhile, 24-year-old Aimee Copeland continues to battle a flesh-eating bacteria. Doctors already have amputated her leg and removed part of her abdomen. Her father says doctors probably will amputate her fingers to halt the bacteria's spread.

Copeland contracted the flesh-devouring bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila when she fell from a zip line May 1 and cut her leg. The gash required 22 staples, but days later, still in pain, she returned to the hospital, where doctors diagnosed her with necrotizing fasciitis.

The psychology student is on life support and has since had a tracheotomy.

An unrelated case of necrotizing fasciitis may be responsible for Kuykendall's hospitalization in South Carolina.

She gave birth to twins on May 7 but returned to the hospital days later after noticing a rapidly expanding bruise on her leg. Doctors have since removed dead skin and tissue from both of her legs.

Kuykendall's husband, Darren, said his wife is suffering from flesh-eating bacteria, though doctors have not publicly confirmed the diagnosis.
Copeland is also on a ventilator. Still, Copeland's father and Kuykendall's husband say they remain positive about the women's conditions.
Various bacteria are responsible for the condition called necrotizing fasciitis, in which the bug attacks healthy tissue and destroys it.

The bacteria are common in the environment but rarely cause a serious infection. When they do, the body's immune system is almost always able to fight them off.

Occasionally, however, the bacteria find their way into the bloodstream. That can happen through a cut or abrasion, as was the case with Copeland, or even through a black-and-blue mark or other internal bleeding, as appears to be the case with Kuykendall.
In such cases, doctors must act quickly and aggressively, removing even healthy tissue around the infection site to make sure they've caught it all.

Necrotizing fasciitis is rare. Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, estimates there are fewer than 250 cases every year in the United States, though it is impossible to say for sure because the reporting of such cases is not currently required by law.
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« Reply #38 on: May 21, 2012, 05:58:00 pm »

http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/?articleID=2000058551&story_title=Disease%20outbreak%20in%20Homabay%20leaves%2012%20cattle%20dead

Published Monday, May 21 2012 at 00:00

By James Omoro

Farmers in Rangwe Division of Homa Bay District have lost 12 cattle following acute outbreak of Black quarter disease.

The farmers expressed concern saying curing the disease among their cattle has become a nightmare.

They said the death of the cattle has caused an enormous loss in their economy owing to the fact that cattle keeping is regarded as a major investment among the area residents. The farmers are worried that the situation may aggravate if precautionary measures are not taken early enough.

They appealed to the government to intervene promptly and carry out preventive measures for curbing further deaths of cattle.

Area District Veterinary Officer Alexander Baboon confirmed the outbreak saying that Black quarter is one the dangerous diseases that can claim lives of many livestock within a short duration.

Baboon assured area residents that the government would undertake massive vaccination of animals to combat further spread of the disease in the affected areas.

He called upon farmers to co-operate with Veterinary Officers in a vaccination exercise scheduled for Tuesday May 22. The Officer said the exercise is expected to continue for a period of seven days in Rangwe and Asego Divisions where trace of the disease has been experienced.

He called upon farmers to present their animals for vaccination in the designated places adding that it would be offered free of charge.

Baboon attributed the bacterial disease to prevalent dirty water that has resulted from heavy rains experienced in the region. He told the farmers to be calm as he is making all possible efforts to arrest the situation.
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« Reply #39 on: May 26, 2012, 01:31:46 pm »

Flea-Borne Typhus Warning in Santa Ana

A warning to residents in Santa Ana after a man contracted typhus from a flea earlier this week.

The man lived in the area of Broadway and Washington.

Orange County Vector Control has gone out into the community to hand out literature advising people of how they can protect themselves and their pets.

Flea-born typhus, also known as endemic typhus and murine typhus, is caused by bacteria found in infected fleas and their feces.

Symptoms begin one to two weeks after exposure and include high fever, headaches, chills, body aches and pains, and a rash on arms, chest, back, or legs.

Here are steps you can take to protect yourself:

•Pets, yards, and homes should be kept free of fleas by treating pets with flea-prevention medication.

•Eliminate places where wild animals, such as opossums, cats, rats and raccoons, can find shelter.

•Eliminate food sources that might attract wild animals.

•Wear protective gear when cleaning areas that may be infested by the above-mentioned animals

VID: http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/ktla-flea-season-typhus-alert,0,3747526.story
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« Reply #40 on: May 31, 2012, 02:12:02 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/chagas-tropical-disease-really-aids-145745645.html

5/31/12

Video:
http://news.yahoo.com/video#video=29508674

Chagas, a tropical disease spread by insects, is causing some fresh concern following an editorial—published earlier this week in a medical journal—that called it "the new AIDS of the Americas."
 
More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States.
 
The editorial, published by the Public Library of Science's Neglected Tropical Diseases, said the spread of the disease is reminiscent of the early years of HIV.
 
"There are a number of striking similarities between people living with Chagas disease and people living with HIV/AIDS," the authors wrote, "particularly for those with HIV/AIDS who contracted the disease in the first two decades of the HIV/AIDS epidemic."
 
[Related: U.S. relief program prevented 741,000 HIV/AIDS deaths in Africa]
 
Both diseases disproportionately affect people living in poverty, both are chronic conditions requiring prolonged, expensive treatment, and as with patients in the first two decades of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, "most patients with Chagas disease do not have access to health care facilities."
 
Unlike HIV, Chagas is not a sexually-transmitted disease: it's "caused by parasites transmitted to humans by blood-sucking insects," as the New York Times put it.
 
"It likes to bite you on the face," CNN reported. "It's called the kissing bug. When it ingests your blood, it excretes the parasite at the same time. When you wake up and scratch the itch, the parasite moves into the wound and you're infected."
 


"Gaaah," Cassie Murdoch wrote on Jezebel.com, summing up the sentiment of everyone who read the journal's report.
 
[Related: Coming soon - an over-the-counter HIV test]
 
Chagas, also known as American trypanosomiasis, kills about 20,000 people per year, the journal said.
 
And while just 20 percent of those infected with Chagas develop a life-threatening form of the disease, Chagas is "hard or impossible to cure," the Times reports:
 
Quote
The disease can be transmitted from mother to child or by blood transfusion. About a quarter of its victims eventually will develop enlarged hearts or intestines, which can fail or burst, causing sudden death. Treatment involves harsh drugs taken for up to three months and works only if the disease is caught early.

"The problem is once the heart symptoms start, which is the most dreaded complication—the Chagas cardiomyopathy—the medicines no longer work very well," Dr. Peter Hotez, a researcher at Baylor College of Medicine and one of the editorial's authors, told CNN. "Problem No. 2: the medicines are extremely toxic."
 
And 11 percent of pregnant women in Latin America are infected with Chagas, the journal said.
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« Reply #41 on: May 31, 2012, 03:49:24 pm »

http://colombiareports.com/colombia-news/news/24311-anthrax-reported-northern-colombia.html

5/30/12

Anthrax reported on northern Colombia farms

One person has skin lesions and 16 animals have died in an anthrax outbreak in northern Colombia, near the Venezuelan border.
 
A notification on the website for the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) said the outbreak has affected two farms in the department of La Guajira. Colombia's Agriculture Ministry sent the information to the OIE on May 28.
 
The source of the deadly bacteria has not yet been determined, the report said. One of the affected populations "belongs to an indigenous community in the department of La Guajira," the notice states.
 
"The community has been informed of the protocol to be applied to dispose of the carcasses, mainly the fact that, under no circumstances, the dead animals must be neither manipulated nor consumed," the report said.
 
Humans commonly contract anthrax through close contact with infected animals or eating ones that have died from the disease.
 
"Susceptible species are being vaccinated. An intense epidemiological surveillance is being conducted in the area together with the public health authorities," the notification continued.
 
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« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2012, 09:43:05 am »

http://local.stv.tv/edinburgh/104650-six-people-in-intensive-care-after-outbreak-of-legionnaires-disease/

Six people in intensive care after outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease

6/4/12

Six people are in hospital and a further four are receiving medical attention after an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Edinburgh.

NHS Lothian is investigating four confirmed and four suspected cases of the Legionella bacteria in the Gorgie, Dalry, and Saughton areas of the capital.

Six men are being treated in hospitals throughout Lothian. Five of the men are in intensive care units while the sixth is in a high dependency unit.

A further four cases, as yet unconfirmed, are also being probed.

All ten cases are linked geographically to the Dalry, Gorgie and Saughton areas of Edinburgh.

The source of the outbreak is being investigated by officials from Edinburgh Council's Environmental Health Department and the Health and Safety Executive who are concentrating on the south-west Edinburgh area.

Steps are being taken to treat cooling towers in the area as a precaution until the source is located.

Dona Milne, acting director of Public Health and Health Policy for NHS Lothian, said: "We have four confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease which all seem to come from the same point source in the South West of Edinburgh.

"Anybody who develops symptoms of Legionnaires' disease should contact NHS 24 immediately or go to their GP.

"The safety of the public is our number one priority and we would urge people to look out for the symptoms of this disease.”

Duncan McCormick, consultant in public health for NHS Lothian said: "Investigations into the possible source of this outbreak are on-going and we continue to urge anyone who develops symptoms of Legionnaires disease to contact NHS 24 or go to their GP."

The cases currently under investigation arose between May 28 and Monday, June 4. All GP surgeries in Lothian are open on Monday but some will be closed on Tuesday for the Jubilee holiday.

Legionella bacteria is commonly found in sources of water, such as rivers and lakes but can also enter artificial supply systems such as air conditioning devices, hot and cold water facilities, and cooling towers. The bacteria have the potential to spread rapidly once they have entered a water system.

Legionnaires' disease is contracted by breathing in small droplets of contaminated water. The condition is not contagious and cannot be spread directly from person to person.

Symptoms usually begin within three to six days of contraction. They often originate as mild headaches and muscular pain before escalating to more severe symptoms including high fever, intense muscle pain, and chills. Once the bacteria infect the lungs, the sufferer will experience a persistent cough – dry at first but later bringing up mucus and even blood – shortness of breath, and chest pains.

There is also a risk of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and loss of appetite, while around half of those who contract Legionnaires' disease will also suffer changes to their mental state, such as confusion.
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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2012, 10:15:28 am »

WHO warns of growing drug resistance in sexually transmitted gonorrhea that infect millions

6/6/12

GENEVA - A sexually transmitted disease that infects millions of people each year is growing resistant to drugs and could soon become untreatable, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.
 
The U.N. health agency is urging governments and doctors to step up surveillance of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, a bacterial infection that can cause inflammation, infertility, pregnancy complications and, in extreme cases, lead to maternal death. Babies born to mothers with gonorrhea have a 50 percent chance of developing eye infections that can result in blindness.
 
"This organism has basically been developing resistance against every medication we've thrown at it," said Dr. Manjula Lusti-Narasimhan, a scientist in the agency's department of sexually transmitted diseases. This includes a group of antibiotics called cephalosporins currently considered the last line of treatment.
 
"In a couple of years it will have become resistant to every treatment option we have available now," she told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of WHO's public announcement on its `global action plan' to combat the disease.
 
Lusti-Narasimhan said the new guidance is aimed at ending complacency about gonorrhea and encouraging researchers to speed up their hunt for a new cure.
 
Once considered a scourge of sailors and soldiers, gonorrhea — known colloquially as the clap — became easily treatable with the discovery of penicillin. Now, it is the second most common sexually transmitted infection after chlamydia. The global health body estimates that gonorrhea is responsible for some 106 million infections annually. It also increases the chances of infection with other diseases, such as HIV.
 
"It's not a European problem or an African problem, it's really a worldwide problem," said Lusti-Narasimhan.
 
Scientists believe overuse or incorrect use of antibiotics, coupled with the gonorrhea bacteria's astonishing ability to adapt, means the disease is now close to becoming a super bug.
 
Bacteria that survive antibiotic treatment due to a mutation that makes them resistant then quickly spread their genes in an accelerated process of natural selection. This is a general problem affecting all antibiotics, but gonorrhea is particularly quick to adapt because it is good at picking up snippets of DNA from other bacteria, said Lusti-Narasimhan.
 
"If it didn't do so much damage it would actually be a fun organism to study," she said.
 
Resistance to cephalosporins was first reported in Japan, but more recently has also been detected in Britain, Australia, France, Sweden and Norway. As these are all countries with well-developed health systems, it is likely that cephalosporin-resistant strains are also circulating undetected elsewhere.
 
"I think this is probably only the tip of the iceberg," said Prof. Catherine Ison, who oversees the national surveillance program for treatment of resistant gonorrhea in England and Wales.
 
The over-the-counter availability of low potency antibiotics in some Asian countries is one of the reasons why resistance is increasing, she said.
 
Doctors in Britain are now switching to using a combination of antibiotics over a longer period of time to combat resistant gonorrhea, said Ison, who is based at the UK's Health Protection Agency.
 
The Geneva-based WHO wants countries not just to tighten their rules for antibiotic use but also to improve their surveillance systems so that the full extent of the problem can be determined.
 
Better sex education is also needed, as proper condom use is an effective means of stopping transmission, said Lusti-Narasimhan.
 
"We're not going to be able to get rid of it completely," she said. "But we can limit the spread."

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/health/157444915.html
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« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2012, 07:47:23 pm »


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/254843/27-children-die-mysterious-disease.html
27 children die of mysterious disease

Patna, June 5, 2012, DHNS:

With three more deaths reported on Tuesday, altogether 27 children have died so far in the last 11 days in Muzaffarpur and Gaya due to a mysterious disease. It is suspected that most of the children have succumbed to brain-fever, also called encephalitis, but the health department officials in Bihar have not confirmed the cause of the death yet.

“It is yet to be confirmed whether the deaths are due to encephalitis or any other ailment,” said Dr SP Singh, Director-in-chief, Health Services. Singh has sought a detailed report from the civil surgeons of the two districts.

Meanwhile, Health Commissioner Amarjit Sinha rushed to Muzaffarpur on Tuesday and took stock of the alarming situation.  Altogether 19 children have died in the district due to ‘brain fever’. He assured the parents that those children admitted in Muzaffarpur hospitals would be shifted to Patna for best possible treatment.
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« Reply #45 on: June 06, 2012, 11:20:56 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/china-faces-serious-epidemic-drug-resistant-tb-015613987.html

6/6/12

..

China faces a "serious epidemic" of drug-resistant tuberculosis according to the first-ever nationwide estimate of the size of the problem there, said a new US-published study.
 
"In 2007, one third of the patients with new cases of tuberculosis and one half of the patients with previously treated tuberculosis had drug-resistant disease," said the study in the New England Journal of Medicine.
 
Even more, the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB in new cases (5.7 percent) was nearly twice the global average, said the study.
 
Using World Health Organization figures as a basis for comparison, "China has the highest annual number of cases of MDR tuberculosis in the world -- a quarter of the cases worldwide," it added.
 
"China has a serious epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis."
 
The data came from a survey of more than 4,600 Chinese people who were recently diagnosed or treated for TB.
 
Patients for the study were treated at local TB clinics, not hospitals, and the survey was conducted by the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NTRL) of the Chinese Centers for Disease Control.
 
According to an accompanying editorial by Johns Hopkins University infectious disease specialist Richard Chaisson, the growth of drug-resistant TB presents an "enormous challenge."
 
Even more concerning was the finding that most of the 110,000 drug-resistant cases were in people newly diagnosed with the disease, suggesting that the virulent bacteria are being transmitted from person to person and not developing solely as a result of a person prematurely stopping treatment.
 
"MDR tuberculosis is linked to inadequate treatment in both the public health system and the hospital system, especially tuberculosis hospitals; however, primary transmission accounts for most cases," said the study.
 
Chaisson said the findings highlight the need for faster testing, and for new cases of TB to be tested for signs of drug resistance, not just recurrent forms.
 
In China, over one million new tuberculosis infections occur each year -- a large chunk of the estimated nine million new cases worldwide annually.
 
Known formally as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TB spreads through the air when infected people cough up bacteria. TB kills about 1.5 million people worldwide each year.
 
Often it can be cured with antibiotics, though drug availability is limited in the developing world and sometimes patients do not follow the entire regimen of treatment, which can encourage the development of resistant strains.
 
The study was funded by the Chinese Ministry of Health.
 
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« Reply #46 on: June 08, 2012, 09:37:39 am »

In Brief: DRC cholera outbreak worsens

KINSHASA, 8 June 2012 (IRIN) - A growing cholera outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has claimed nearly 400 lives and affected more than 19,100 people since January, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

"The total number of cholera cases in 2012 is around 90 percent of cases reported last year. Since January 2011, 983 people have died from the outbreak affecting eight of 11 provinces of the country," Yvon Edoumou, OCHA spokesman, told a news conference.

Since the outbreak started, more than 40,795 cases have been reported. Edoumou said the growing epidemic had put a strain on ongoing humanitarian interventions funded mainly by a US$9.1 million grant by the UN Central Emergency Response Fund, which provides rapid response grants for humanitarian emergencies.

Experts have blamed the continued spread of cholera in the DRC on poor hygiene, lack of awareness about transmission mechanisms, limited access to protected and monitored water sources and a general lack of sanitation infrastructure.

http://www.irinnews.org/Report/95604/In-Brief-DRC-cholera-outbreak-worsens
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« Reply #47 on: June 08, 2012, 10:40:46 pm »

http://www.chicagotribune.com/health/sns-rt-us-usa-health-ecolibre8571e9-20120608,0,3268675.story

E.coli strain sickens 14 in six states: CDC

6/8/12

ATLANTA (Reuters) - One person has died and 13 more have fallen sick in six U.S. states in the past two months by a mysterious outbreak of a strain of E.coli bacteria, federal health officials said on Friday.

TheCenters for Disease Control and Prevention has not yet identified a source of the bacteria, which since April 15 has sickened people in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, Louisiana and California.

A child in Louisiana died after being infected, officials said.

"The investigation is looking at both food and non-food sources as a part of the ongoing investigation," the CDC said in a statement on Friday.

The most recent report of illness from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli 0145, commonly abbreviated as E.Coli, was on June 4, according to the agency.

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« Reply #48 on: June 14, 2012, 03:35:01 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/plague-rare-u-surfacing-more-affluent-areas-180408195.html

6/13/12

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although the plague is typically considered a remnant of the Middle Ages, when unsanitary conditions and rodent infestations prevailed amid the squalor of poverty, this rare but deadly disease appears to be spreading through wealthier communities in New Mexico, researchers report.

Why the plague is popping up in affluent neighborhoods isn't completely clear, the experts added.

"Where human plague cases occur is linked to where people live and how people interact with their environment," noted lead researcher Anna Schotthoefer, from the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Wisconsin. "These factors may change over time, necessitating periodic reassessments of the factors that put people at risk."

This latest study confirms previous reports that living within or close to the natural environments that support plague is a risk factor for human plague, Schotthoefer said.

Plague is caused by a fast-moving bacteria, known as Yersinia pestis, that is spread through flea bites (bubonic plague) or through the air (pneumonic plague).

The new report comes on the heels of the hospitalization on June 8 of an Oregon man in his 50s with what experts suspect is plague. According to The Oregonian, the man got sick a few days after being bitten as he tried to get a mouse away from a stray cat. The cat died days later, the paper said, and the man remains in critical condition.

For the new study, published in the July issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, the researchers used U.S. Census Bureau data to pinpoint the location and socioeconomic status of plague patients.

About 11 cases of plague a year have occurred in the United States since 1976, with most cases found in New Mexico. Plague has also been reported in a handful of other states.

Although many cases were in areas where the habitat supports rodents and fleas, the researchers also found cases occurring in more upper-class neighborhoods. In the 1980s, most cases occurred where housing conditions were poor, but more recently cases have been reported in affluent areas of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, the investigators found.

"The shift from poorer to more affluent regions of New Mexico was a surprise, and suggests that homeowners in these newly developed areas should be educated about the risks of plague," Schotthoefer said.

Schotthoefer noted that these more affluent areas where plague occurred were regions where new housing developments had been built in habitats that support the wild reservoirs of plague, which include ground squirrels and woodrats.

Bubonic plague starts with painful swellings (buboes) of the lymph nodes, which appear in the armpits, legs, neck or groin. Buboes are at first a red color, then they turn a dark purple color, or black. Pneumonic plague starts by infecting the lungs. Other symptoms include a very high fever, delirium, vomiting, muscle pains, bleeding in the lungs and disorientation.

In the 14th century, a plague called the Black Death killed an estimated 30 percent to 60 percent of the European population. Victims died quickly, within days after being infected.

Infectious disease expert Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said he doesn't expect to see that kind of outbreak ever again.

"This is not a disease of the past, but you are never going to see a massive outbreak of plague in this country," he said.

"We don't have the public health problems we used to have and people would be quickly confined if there were ever a large number of cases," Siegel explained.

Yet, it is not surprising to see plague in these more affluent areas, he noted.

"We know that plague only exists where you have wild animals, and once a reservoir of plague is already present it is likely to persist," Siegel explained. "It isn't only about squalor; it's about where the reservoir is."

However, if the disease is caught early it is treatable with antibiotics, Siegel added.
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« Reply #49 on: June 27, 2012, 10:21:31 am »

Tests reveal high-path H7N3 in Mexican poultry farm outbreaks

Jun 26, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – Mexican veterinary authorities are intensifying avian influenza control efforts in a region that houses several large commercial farms after further tests determined that the strain responsible for more than 200,000 bird deaths at three farms is the highly pathogenic H7N3 subtype.

The events represent the first highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in Mexican flocks since the country battled H5N2 in the mid 1990s.

In a follow-up report submitted today to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), Mexican animal health officials said intravenous pathogenicity tests revealed the highly pathogenic H7N3 subtype. The initial report on Jun 21 said preliminary tests suggested a low-pathogenic H7 subtype.

The outbreaks began at three large commercial farms in Jalisco state on Jun 13, causing clinical signs in the layer flocks that included gasping, lethargy, fever, and death. The disease sickened 587,160 of more than 1 million susceptible birds, killing 211,424 of them. About 60,000 have been culled so far to curb the spread of the virus.

Today's update said that, based on the latest test results, authorities are sampling birds at about 60 poultry farms near the outbreak area, and quarantine measures are under way in the region, which has about 500 production units. Full gene sequencing and an epidemiologic investigation to determine the source of the virus are also in progress.

Jalisco state, in western Mexico, is the country's top egg producer.

Officials have also limited poultry movements near the outbreak area and are testing birds at commercial farms, backyard flocks, and poultry markets. They are also assessing biosecurity practices and overseeing depopulation efforts at the affected farms, according to the OIE report.

David A. Halvorson, DVM, an avian health expert at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul, told CIDRAP News that Mexico's last high pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks occurred in 1994 and 1995 and involved H5N2. He added that low-pathogenic H5N2 circulated in the country for several years.

He said that in some parts of Mexico, large populations of backyard poultry, live poultry markets, and commercial farms exist without adequate separation between them.

Halvorson said US poultry producers, especially those in Texas, are always cautious about the potential for disease introduction from indirect contact with Mexican poultry. Halvorson added Mexican workers support poultry farmers in the West and Midwest, which presents another reason for caution.

John Glisson, DVM, PhD, director of research programs for the US Poultry and Egg Association, said in an e-mail statement to CIDRAP News, "The US poultry industry would strongly agree with the idea that the disease should be dealt with quickly and that quarantine of these farms and elimination of infected flocks would be a prudent measure."

According to background information from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), poultry imported from all countries except Canada must be quarantined for at least 30 days at a USDA Animal Import Center and be accompanied by import permits and veterinary health certificates. Canadian poultry entering the United States must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued within 30 days of import date.

In 2004, highly pathogenic H7N3 outbreaks in British Columbia's Fraser Valley led to the culling of 19 million birds, and two related human infections were confirmed.

The patients, both men who had been exposed to infected poultry on the farms, were the first known H7N3 infections in humans. Both had conjunctivitis with mild flulike symptoms, according to a December 2004 report on the cases in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Neither patient mounted an H7 antibody response, which led researchers to suggest that the men had highly localized, rather than systemic, infections.

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/avianflu/news/jun2612mexico.html
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« Reply #50 on: July 03, 2012, 01:06:30 pm »

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Mexico_declares_bird_flu_emergency_999.html

7/2/12

The Mexican government declared a national animal health emergency on Monday in the face of an aggressive bird flu epidemic that has infected nearly 1.7 million poultry.

More than half the infected birds have died or been culled, the agriculture ministry said of an epidemic that was confirmed on Friday by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

"We have activated a national animal health emergency... with the goal of diagnosing, preventing, controlling and eradicating the Type A, sub-type H7N3 bird flu virus," the ministry said.

Health officials keep a close watch on such outbreaks in Mexico since so-called swine flu began there in 2009. The H1N1 virus spread into a global pandemic that claimed the lives of 17,000 people.

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« Reply #51 on: July 03, 2012, 03:50:51 pm »

7/3/12

HAVANA -- A rare cholera outbreak has killed three elderly people in Cuba and sickened dozens more.

The Communist Party daily Granma says 53 people tested positive for the disease in Manzanillo, 430 miles (700 kilometers) east of Havana. The three who died were 66 to 95 years old.

An official report in Granma blamed contaminated wells. It said Tuesday that authorities closed the wells, were disinfecting the hydraulic system and had the outbreak under control.

Cholera is a waterborne disease caused by a bacteria found in tainted water or food. It can kill within hours through dehydration, but is treatable if caught in time.

Cholera is unusual in Cuba. But recent outbreaks in nearby Haiti have killed more than 7,200 people.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/07/03/2880041/rare-cholera-outbreak-kills-3.html#storylink=cpy
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« Reply #52 on: July 03, 2012, 05:44:19 pm »

All of the deaths are of children under 7 years old. I'm wondering what medications were involved in those kids lives, that most likely would have originated from some international "health" organization through the local clinics. Seeing the WHO and UN involved, it doesn't look good, especially since this is limted so far to two areas, not all over the country.

http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/afp/unknown-disease-kills-60-children-in-cambodia-who

Quote
An unidentified disease has killed 60 young children in Cambodia in three months, the World Health Organization said Tuesday as it raced to identify the cause.
 
"The number of deaths reported to WHO is 60 cases and they have all been in young children," said Dr Nima Asgari, a public health specialist for the UN body in Cambodia, adding that the first casualties were reported in April.
 
The WHO is currently working with the Cambodian Ministry of Health "to identify the cause and the route of spread of this disease", he said.
 
With the investigation still at an early stage, Asgari said it was difficult to specify the symptoms, which "include high fever and severe chest disease symptoms, plus in some children there were signs of neurological involvement".
 
There have been 61 reported cases so far, Asgari said, with just one patient surviving. The victims, all aged seven and under, were admitted to hospitals in the capital Phnom Penh and the northwestern tourist hub of Siem Reap.
 
In separate comments sent to AFP, the WHO said there were no signs yet of contagion.
 
"To date, there is no report of any staff or any neighbouring patients to the cases at the hospitals becoming sick with similar symptoms," it said.
 
Asgari confirmed there was "no cluster of the cases yet" but said the high mortality rate in such a short space of time was worrisome.
 
"WHO is always concerned about a disease which causes death in such high numbers of children," he told AFP.
 
Cambodian health ministry officials were not immediately available for comment.
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« Reply #53 on: July 03, 2012, 05:54:34 pm »

Quote
"WHO is always concerned about a disease which causes death in such high numbers of children," he told AFP.

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« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2012, 12:42:51 pm »

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Concern_grows_over_H1N1_outbreak_in_Bolivia_999.html

7/3/12

An epidemic of H1N1 flu has infected almost 900 people and claimed 11 lives in Bolivia, health officials said Tuesday.

Although most of the cases occurred in the last few weeks, the outbreak does not rise to the level of a national epidemic, officials said.

"At the national level, the situation is under control. The most affected area is in the west," Johnny Rada, director of the ministry of health's epidemiology service, told AFP.

According to official tallies, 873 cases have been reported across the country, of which 606 are in the western department of La Paz and 60 in the department just south of it, Oruro.

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« Reply #55 on: July 06, 2012, 11:40:00 am »

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5gGjRccUkVjTZhoyluMSKK5DzgFKA?docId=N0023081341518182954A

Bird flu: One million chickens dead
 
(UKPA) – 7/5/12

An outbreak of the H7N3 bird flu virus in western Mexico has infected about 2.5 million chickens and led authorities to destroy or dispose of almost a million birds.

The country's Agriculture Department said 129 farms in the western state of Jalisco have been inspected.

Flu was confirmed in birds at 24 of the sites and tests continued on most of the rest.

The farms in question have been placed under quarantine, the department said in a statement.

The outbreak has caused increases in the price of chicken and egg products in Mexico.
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« Reply #56 on: July 16, 2012, 11:41:16 am »

7/16/12

BEIJING — The Chinese province of Hunan urged parents on Sunday to seek immediate treatment for children showing symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease after official figures showed 112 people died from the illness last month.

The disease, which children are especially vulnerable to, also infected more than 381,000 people, the Ministry of Health reported last week.

"The disease incidence rate in June was much higher than that of last June, which has much to do with the high temperatures this summer," said Liu Fuqiang with the provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The province urged parents and teachers to send children to hospital as soon as they showed symptoms of the disease, including mouth sores, skin rashes or fever.

In June, 34,768 cases were reported and 17 people died from the disease in Hunan, the statement said.

According to the Ministry of Health, over 460,000 people were infected by the disease in May, leading to 132 deaths.

In recent days, health departments in numerous Chinese provinces and regions, including Gansu, Fujian, Jiangsu and Xinjiang have issued warnings over the outbreak of the disease, state press reports said.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hAWbh8lci3Ta-9bzcQGv0-ftrELg?docId=CNG.3a6639c96eb50aabfbe32c62e19ee088.141
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« Reply #57 on: July 19, 2012, 04:16:22 pm »

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jkEwbUzzS7w6gliSQQyKE4SWwmcA?docId=CNG.011644044ab205dd97b782ce12dfd1d7.531

S.Leone cholera outbreak kills 62 in less than a month
FREETOWN — Sierra Leone's health ministry on Wednesday said an outbreak of cholera in the west African country has killed 62 people in less than a month.

The western area, including the capital Freetown, and "three towns in the northern and southern parts of the country have now been declared cholera outbreak areas", said a ministry statement.

"Emergency referral centres have been set up and hospitals and health clinics have been boosted with drugs to combat any escalation of the problem."

Between June 23 and Tuesday, 62 people have died and 3,721 cases have been reported in the areas concerned, statistics showed.

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« Reply #58 on: July 19, 2012, 04:18:16 pm »

7/19/12

MEXICO - The National Health, Food Safety and Food Quality Service (SENASICA) reported that as a result of the implementation of the National Animal Health Emergency Plan to contain and eradicate the outbreak of H7N3 avian influenza in Jalisco state, they have inspected 253 poultry farms, in 82 of which there was no presence of viruses, another 33 where the virus was confirmed, while the rest continue to be diagnosed. Senior editor, Chris Wright, reports.

SENASICA’s report, with information updated on 16 July, indicates that the 82 poultry farms which do not have the presence of exotic viruses have been issued an official certificate to allow them to move their products to market, since they do not represent a risk to poultry or consumers.
 
The farms that have confirmed the H7N3 avian influenza virus remain under quarantine and isolation, in order to control movement and prevent live birds, waste and litter from moving to virus-free regions.
 
SENASICA will keep the Emergency Plan in place on commercial farms and backyard poultry in the Los Altos region of Jalisco state, mainly in the towns of Acatic and Tepatitlan, with a flock of 16.5 million birds, primarily egg layers, of which 9.3 million are found within the surveillance area.
 
It has also expanded the scope of review into areas adjacent to the initial quarantine area in order to protect the birds in the buffer zone. As a method of control and eradication of the virus, 3.8 million birds have been depopulated under stringent animal health protocols established by international organizations.
 
This measure allows the containment of the virus in the area, said SENASICA.

They currently operate eight internal checkpoints and have increased to 43 the number of experts in the region carrying out the tasks of diagnosis, prevention, control and eradication of the virus.
 
SENASICA reiterates that the H7N3 influenza virus poses no risk to humans, whether they are in contact with birds or poultry products, such as meat and eggs, and that the control measures are intended to protect the commercial poultry production in the area.

more: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/26302/h7n3-control-measures-expand
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« Reply #59 on: July 20, 2012, 09:32:49 am »

Disclaimer: just ignore that parts promoting the vaccines in this article, FYI.

http://news.yahoo.com/u-whooping-cough-outbreak-could-worst-half-century-051355523.html

U.S. whooping cough outbreak could be worst in half century

7/20/12

SEATTLE (Reuters) - The number of U.S. whooping cough cases has risen to around 18,000 in an outbreak that is on track to become the most severe in over a half century and could in part stem from possible waning vaccine protection, health officials said on Thursday.

Washington state, which declared an epidemic in April, and Wisconsin were particularly hard hit, with each reporting more than 3,000 cases, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nine people have died overall and the number of cases was already more than double than at the same time last year.

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, causes severe, almost uncontrollable coughing. In the United States, most children are immunized with a DTaP five-dose series vaccine that is given as a series of shots, starting at two months.

All adults, including pregnant women, should get a booster shot because the contagious illness is especially dangerous for children under a year old who have yet to complete a cycle of vaccinations, Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told a media briefing.

"It's most dangerous for babies," Schuchat said, adding that the current outbreak at its existing pace could become the most severe since 1959, when 40,000 cases were reported. "Preventing infant deaths from the disease is our primary national goal," she said.

A spike in whooping cough cases among 10-year-olds and adolescents who are 13 and 14 was a concern, perhaps an indicator that the pertussis vaccine may be wearing off earlier than anticipated, Washington Health Secretary Mary Selecky said.

The U.S. groups of 10-, 13- and 14-year-olds who are experiencing a high illness rate had DTaP vaccinations, which were introduced in 1997 at the same time that the prior DTP vaccine was discontinued.

The earlier vaccine used whole cell parts made of killed pertussis bacteria, while DTaP uses only small acellular bacteria pieces, not the whole bacteria cell, said Donn Moyer, Washington state Health Department spokesman

CDC officials will begin an investigation in Washington state later this month "to analyze our data for cases among 13- to 14-year-olds to see what can be learned about disease rates and vaccination status," Moyer told Reuters.

The number of cases in Washington, with no deaths, has tripled since April, with 1,132 cases reported by the end of that month.

Moyer said the CDC also plans a similar study in California, where a 2010 epidemic counted more than 9,000 cases, including 10 infant deaths.

Whooping cough typically begins with cold-like symptoms such as a fever, runny nose and sneezing and is accompanied by a mild cough that grows more severe by the first or second week. A high-pitched whoop, giving the illness its name, can follow violent coughing fits.

This year, Australia is experiencing a high rate of whooping cough, Schuchat said.

(Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Philip Barbara)

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