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Mark Driscoll & the Mars Hill church

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January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
September 11, 2017, 03:40:40 am Christian40 says: those in america should better repent or things will only get worse
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Author Topic: Mark Driscoll & the Mars Hill church  (Read 2277 times)
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« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2014, 06:14:05 pm »

Why Do Mark Driscoll’s Sermons Keep Disappearing?

In recent weeks, many of Mark Driscoll’s sermons have disappeared from the Mars Hill Church website. On March 19, we saw the disappearance of all preaching content before 2008....Also, the page on Driscoll’s study guide on Peter is now missing. According to a message once posted on that page, the guide was to be returned to the site after plagiarized sections were properly sourced. Nothing is there now. He once disclosed that he had the ability to visualize the sins of others in graphic detail. He claimed to get those visions from God. Those sermons are now missing.  During a 2007 sermon, Driscoll famously wished he could “go Old Testament” on a couple of elders...He did not disguise his anger at elders who disagreed with his direction during those messages. Those sermons are now gone. 

MORE: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2014/03/24/mark-driscolls-sermons-keep-disappearing/

Colosians_2:18  Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshipping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind,

FYI, the NIV and those other perversions change this verse to "visions he's seen"(paraphrasing here - but pretty much says this).
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« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2014, 06:50:50 am »

Mark Driscoll Was Wrong About Noah

According to pastor Mark Driscoll, “Noah was not a good guy but a graced guy.” In fact, he says, “The most common way Christians butcher the story of Noah is by misreading what the Bible actually says.”

Let’s take a look at what the Bible actually says to evaluate these strong claims.

Genesis 6:5 states, “The Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (ESV). In stark contrast, verse 8 reads, “But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord.”

Pastor Driscoll is convinced that the normal (and obvious) way of reading this passage is wrong, and he rejects the idea that the Scripture is saying, “There were a bunch of bad guys who drowned and one good guy who got a boat. The moral of this story is that if you are a good guy, then God will save you from death and wrath.”

If that were true, he argues, then it would not be the gospel but rather salvation by works.

In contrast, he understands the text to say that Noah, like everyone else, was totally wicked, but he received grace from God (apparently by God’s sovereign choice), which then enabled him to live a godly life, as described in Genesis 6:9: “Noah was a righteous man, blameless in his generation. Noah walked with God.”

And Pastor Driscoll points out that Genesis 6:8 is the first time in the Bible where the word grace appears, which then connects the passage to Paul’s message of grace.

Of course, it is true that none of us are righteous enough to stand before God without His grace and that without His help and intervention, we would all be lost. I’m not arguing that for a second.

But Pastor Driscoll’s interpretation is contrary to the testimony of the rest of the Scripture, and it misunderstands the Hebrew as well.

Actually, the Hebrew expression “to find grace” in someone’s eyes means to find favor or to please, as most translations recognize (see, for example, Proverbs 28:23), and the expression is unrelated to the New Testament concept of grace, which is expressed in other ways in the Old Testament (see, for example, Psalm 103:10-14, Micah 7:18-19 and Jeremiah 31:31-34). Anyone who knows biblical Hebrew well knows this to be true.

So, what the Bible is saying here is that, contrary to the rest of the human race, Noah stood out before the Lord, which is the opposite of Pastor Driscoll’s interpretation.

Noah was different. He was righteous. As professor Bob Gladstone, my FIRE School of Ministry colleague, notes, “How refreshing Noah must have been to God’s just heart! Noah would be like a new Adam, the father of a renewed Adamic race.”

This is further confirmed in Ezekiel 14:14 (and Ezekiel 14:20), where Noah, along with Daniel and Job, is mentioned as an extraordinarily righteous man but not righteous enough to save Ezekiel’s sinful generation: “Even if these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, they would deliver but their own lives by their righteousness, declares the Lord God.”

This same testimony is confirmed again in 2 Peter 2:5, which tells us that God “did not spare the ancient world, but preserved Noah, a herald of righteousness, with seven others, when he brought a flood upon the world of the ungodly.”

Noah was chosen by God to build the ark and preserve the human race because he was righteous (Genesis 7:1). It was for this same reason that he was raised up to preach as “a herald of righteousness.” And the fact that a person is righteous because they live a righteous life is taught throughout the Bible, meaning throughout the Old Testament and the New (see, for example, Ezekiel 18:1-32 and Luke 1:6).

The key thing to remember is that this is the result of faith and the proof of faith, as Jacob (James) explains so clearly in his letter, where he teaches emphatically that faith without works is dead (James 2:14-26).

So, Hebrews 11:7 presents Noah as a God-fearing man of faith, which was the key to his righteous living. In other words, because he believed in the one true God, he lived a righteous life (rather than earning his salvation by his good works). To quote Professor Gladstone again, “Noah was a human with a nature like ours. Yet that same Noah showed me that it is possible to live in this stubborn, rebellious world and still be truly innocent, holy, righteous—God’s friend.”

To be sure, we can always discuss questions of God’s sovereignty and His empowering grace, but those questions are not the subject of the flood account, nor are they part of the lesson the Lord wants us to learn from the text.

Instead, the moral of the story is clear: God destroys the wicked and delivers the righteous, as numerous biblical texts declare, and we become righteous by faith, which is demonstrated in a godly life.

Noah serves as a great example to all of us.

http://www.charismanews.com/opinion/in-the-line-of-fire/43334-mark-driscoll-was-wrong-about-noah
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« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2014, 04:12:59 am »

Driscoll's Apology Backlash

 Many following the continuing saga of Mars Hill pastor, Mark Driscoll, have expressed encouragement at his recent apology for dishonestly gaming the NYT best-seller list and for generally displaying pride, anger, and lack of maturity in his ministry. However, segments of the online community of people who self-identify as Christians are wary. 

Such coolness toward Driscoll’s apology has been met with rancor as well. (As in: 'How dare we NOT forgive this man? That’s the problem with Christians. We throw stones at each other and shoot our wounded. No wonder the world sees us as divided and unloving, etc...')

But the issue isn't really whether we should forgive Mark Driscoll. That's a given. Jesus said to forgive seventy times seven, and so we do forgive him and pray for him. Outspoken Driscoll critic, Benjamin L. Corey, also expressed this with charity at his blog "Formerly Fundie:"

If we’re actually going to take this “following Jesus” thing seriously, we must always root for and encourage lives to be changed and restored– even when that is someone we don’t particularly like. Especially when it is someone we don’t particularly like.

The fact remains that until Driscoll steps down from pastoral leadership, no amount of hiatus from social media or reduction of outside speaking engagements will free his apologies from the cloud of suspicion that they may have merely been the forced reactions of damage control and spin.

Yes, we’re all sinners. And all Christians are called to pursue the spiritual qualities of an elder. But leaders with an ongoing track record for unsuccessfully meeting elder qualifications yet who continue to cling to the title of pastor must honestly ask themselves why.

Christ’s brother, James, said “Let not many of you be teachers" because elder qualifications are Scripture’s built -in safeguards to protect the church. Among the passages describing the traits of a leader are Titus 1:5-9, which describes an elder as being “above reproach.” Likewise, 1 Timothy 3:7 says that an elder must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace.

For Driscoll, these appear to be high hurdles. Does saying so equate to being judgmental? Then why are those passages in the Bible? What is their purpose if not to discern--objectively--what type of man is fit to lead? What if one of the biggest reasons for Christianity’s lack of credibility isn’t actually the “lack of love” among Christians but the lack of trembling at God’s Word (Isa. 66:2) about matters that are so clear?

Mars Hill is an autonomous church and no amount of public praise or outrage can ultimately change what the leaders at Mars Hill decide to do. But does vilifying other Christians who hold high standards for the office of pastor/elder really solve Christianity’s perception problem? What do you think? Is it impossible to be simultaneously thankful that Mark Driscoll has apologized and yet also question whether he is fit to continue in church leadership as a pastor?

http://www.christianheadlines.com/links/driscoll-apology-backlash.html
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« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2014, 09:47:07 am »

These Driscoll and Warren-types are no different from these Hollywood celebs - they just LOVE the spotlight.

On the contrary, Jesus Christ's voice could NOT be heard in the streets when he did his 3.5 year ministry on earth.
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« Reply #34 on: April 03, 2014, 09:49:49 am »

On the contrary, Jesus Christ's voice could NOT be heard in the streets when he did his 3.5 year ministry on earth.

 Huh The Lord drew in huge crowds.
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« Reply #35 on: April 03, 2014, 09:54:17 am »

Huh The Lord drew in huge crowds.

This is what I meant...

Matthew 12:17  That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying,
Mat 12:18  Behold my servant, whom I have chosen; my beloved, in whom my soul is well pleased: I will put my spirit upon him, and he shall shew judgment to the Gentiles.
Mat 12:19  He shall not strive, nor cry; neither shall any man hear his voice in the streets.
Mat 12:20  A bruised reed shall he not break, and smoking flax shall he not quench, till he send forth judgment unto victory.
Mat 12:21  And in his name shall the Gentiles trust.


What I meant to say is that these Mark Driscoll/Rick Warren types just LOVE the attention centered around them - for example, look at the WAY they talk. They talk LOUD, their words are MANY - pretty much, their egos are no different than that from Hollywood celebs/political types(ie-Obama and Gingrich).

On the contrary, scripture further says...

2Corinthians 3:12  Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech:
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« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2014, 05:25:46 am »

Former Mars Hill Pastors Introduce Confessions Website

 Four former Mars Hill Church leaders have introduced a website intended to repent for the sins they committed while leading the church alongside Pastor Mark Driscoll.

The group includes Mars Hill Orange County Pastor Kyle Firstenberg, Leadership Pastor Dave Kraft, Mars Hill Everett Pastor Scott Mitchell and Mars Hill co-founder Lief Moi reports The Christian Post. The former leaders hope that members of the Seattle-based church will be able to go to http://repentantpastor.com/ to begin the process of reconcilation.

The website home page reads, “We recognize and confess that Mars Hill has hurt many people within the Mars Hill community, as well as those outside the community including those who don’t believe Mars Hill’s religious beliefs, and we want to acknowledge the hurt we may have caused. We humbly ask your forgiveness. These are our individual confessions, letters, stories, and apologies.”

The idea of confessing began with Kirstenberg and Kraft, before Mitchell and Moi joined in the effort to seek repentance.

“Dave and I decided we needed to start with our own confession, because we can’t and shouldn’t call someone else out on sin without first doing so ourselves,” Firstenberg said.

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/former-mars-hill-pastors-introduce-confessions-website.html
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« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2014, 01:47:23 pm »

Former Mars Hill Pastors Introduce Confessions Website

 Four former Mars Hill Church leaders have introduced a website intended to repent for the sins they committed while leading the church alongside Pastor Mark Driscoll.

The group includes Mars Hill Orange County Pastor Kyle Firstenberg, Leadership Pastor Dave Kraft, Mars Hill Everett Pastor Scott Mitchell and Mars Hill co-founder Lief Moi reports The Christian Post. The former leaders hope that members of the Seattle-based church will be able to go to http://repentantpastor.com/ to begin the process of reconcilation.

The website home page reads, “We recognize and confess that Mars Hill has hurt many people within the Mars Hill community, as well as those outside the community including those who don’t believe Mars Hill’s religious beliefs, and we want to acknowledge the hurt we may have caused. We humbly ask your forgiveness. These are our individual confessions, letters, stories, and apologies.”

The idea of confessing began with Kirstenberg and Kraft, before Mitchell and Moi joined in the effort to seek repentance.

“Dave and I decided we needed to start with our own confession, because we can’t and shouldn’t call someone else out on sin without first doing so ourselves,” Firstenberg said.

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/former-mars-hill-pastors-introduce-confessions-website.html

So they just admitted they're Catholic. Roll Eyes
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« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2014, 01:56:08 pm »

So they just admitted they're Catholic. Roll Eyes

where did you get that at?
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« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2014, 02:32:38 pm »

where did you get that at?

 Huh From the article you posted? How former pastors of his church introduce "confession" web site?
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« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2014, 02:39:39 pm »

Huh From the article you posted? How former pastors of his church introduce "confession" web site?

UHM, that's not exactly a catholic thing.

Jas 5:16 Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much.

They are trying to come clean for all the Mars Hill stuff over the years. Of course Driscoll wont hop onboard.
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« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2014, 02:52:33 pm »

Quote
They are trying to come clean for all the Mars Hill stuff over the years. Of course Driscoll wont hop onboard.


Oh that's what it's all about.(Now I think I understand it) Thanks! Smiley
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« Reply #42 on: April 13, 2014, 03:12:55 am »

Big difference between "confess your faults..."(biblically accurate) and a confessional (a perversion of scripture).
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« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2014, 10:46:40 pm »

http://www.inquisitr.com/1401090/mark-driscoll-is-removed-from-major-christian-organization-because-of-his-transgressions/
Mark Driscoll Is Removed From Major Christian Organization Because Of His Transgressions
8/9/14

For the longest time, Mark Driscoll was considered the “rock star” pastor among all pastors when it comes to mega churches. Unlike Joel Osteen, Joseph Prince, or Joyce Meyer, he was known for his edginess, his aggressiveness, and – of course – his potty mouth. Unfortunately, we here at The Inquisitr have reported numerous times on when Driscoll was in trouble for his actions, which could be labeled as transgressions. Not to mention, he has been on the chopping block for twisting the Word of God, especially for his stance on marijuana – not on whether or not one is allowed to partake in the herb, but utilizing Luke 6:37 as a go-to for it.

Now there are reports coming in that the pastor of the mega church, Mars Hill, has been removed from a major Christian organization. That also includes his church, too.

According to an article by The Blaze, followed by Charisma News, The Acts 29 Church Planting Network are the ones who removed Mark Driscoll from its ranks. This is verified by a statement they released on their official website on Friday. For them, the decision was made with deep sorrow as they cite numerous accusations against Driscoll that have made it untenable and unhelpful to keep him and Mars Hill in their network. What might be more shameful for Driscoll is the network also said the move to remove him was “so that the name of Christ will not continue to be dishonored.”

That is an extremely powerful accusation right there. The primary reason of one’s removal from a Christian network is because one “dishonors the name of Jesus Christ” has got to be a terrible bit of history on a pastor’s resume. However, Acts 29 isn’t just terminating Mark Driscoll without any warning. Apparently, he had plenty of chances as shown from the excerpt from the letter below:

    “Over the past three years, our board and network have been the recipients of countless shots and dozens of fires directly linked to you and what we consider ungodly and disqualifying behavior. We have both publicly and internally tried to support and give you the benefit of the doubt, even when multiple pastors in our network confirmed this behavior.”

The numerous transgressions going against Mark Driscoll includes his unceremonious termination of Mars Hill staff – which includes pastors – who didn’t have a 100 percent acceptance to his views as well as his marketing scheme to make his book a best seller on the New York Times Best Seller List.

At this moment, Mark Driscoll hasn’t commented on being removed from Acts 29. It might be understandable why because he is a co-founder of the network. He was also a former leader until turning it over to Matt Chandler back in 2012.

What do you think about Mark Driscoll’s situation with Acts 29? Is the network right to let go of the controversial pastor after so many chances or should they have kept him on since he one-half of the reason they exist? Please let us know in the comments below.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sounds like this reprobate Acts 29 Church Planting Network is doing DAMAGE CONTROL.
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« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2014, 07:25:08 am »

Mars Hill Board Responds: Acts 29 Network Announced 'Divisive' Decision Without Directly Speaking to Mark Driscoll

The Board of Advisors & Accountability of Mars Hill Church has responded to the Acts 29 church-planting network's "divisive" decision to dismiss Pastor Mark Driscoll and his megachurch from membership, complaining it was announced prior to speaking directly with the pastor or any of the board members.

"No one from Acts 29 contacted Larry Osborne of our board prior to this decision," reads a letter signed by Mars Hill BoAA chairman Michael Van Skaik and member Larry Osborne and sent to church members in response to the Acts 29 Network's announcement. "And perhaps most significantly, Pastor Mark was not personally contacted by the A29 board prior to receiving this announcement."

Despite apologies from Pastor Driscoll, the Acts 29 Network he founded more than a decade ago announced Friday they have dismissed him and his Seattle, Washington-based church from membership, citing complaints from other network pastors concerning the minister's divisive behavior. The pastor was also asked to remove himself from ministry.

"Be assured of this, the formal charges that were filed were serious, were taken seriously and were not dismissed by the board lightly," Van Skaik and Osborne respond. "There is clear evidence that the attitudes and behaviors attributed to Mark in the charges are not a part and have not been a part of Mark's life for some time now."

The Acts 29 Network said they were convinced that the nature of the accusations against Pastor Driscoll, "most of which have been confirmed by him," make it "untenable and unhelpful" to keep the pastor and his church in the network. "In taking this action, our prayer is that it will encourage the leadership of Mars Hill to respond in a distinctive and godly manner so that the name of Christ will not continue to be dishonoured," it said.

The Mars Hill BoAA says its decision "is final regarding these charges."

"Again, I am deeply saddened that the A29 board would make such a decisive and divisive conclusion without speaking directly to the board or Mark prior to their public announcement," the letter says.

The board urges church members not to become bitter or angry. "Continue to pray for all involved. Continue to love and lead the people God has brought to your churches. They need a pastor right now and God has given them you!"

According to a letter published on Warren Throckmorton's Patheos blog shown as addressed to "Mark," the Acts 29 board wrote: "Over the past three years, our board and network have been the recipients of countless shots and dozens of fires directly linked to you and what we consider ungodly and disqualifying behavior. We have both publicly and internally tried to support and give you the benefit of the doubt, even when multiple pastors in our network confirmed this behavior.

"In response, we leaned on the Mars Hill Board of Advisors & Accountability to take the lead in dealing with this matter. But we no longer believe the BoAA is able to execute the plan of reconciliation originally laid out. Ample time has been given for repentance, change, and restitution, with none forthcoming. We now have to take another course of action."

Driscoll's dismissal from the network came days after a group of former Mars Hill Church members held a protest outside of the megachurch last weekend. The disaffected members staged the protest to challenge Pastor Driscoll's claim in a videotaped statement that he would not be able to fully reconcile with members who were abruptly dismissed from or displeased with his ministry because "a lot of the people … remain anonymous." That apology was later followed by another statement of regret over strongly-worded and vulgar comments he made 14 years ago on the church's website.

Driscoll's 14-year-old comments, revealed under the name "William Wallace II" and posted in 2000, opened with the words, "We live in a completely pussified nation." Driscoll (as Wallace) condemned the majority of Christian men for being "Promise Keeping homoerotic worship loving mama's boy sensitive emasculated neutered exact male replica evangellyfish."

He added, "It all began with Adam, the first of the pussified nation, who kept his mouth shut and watched everything fall headlong down the slippery slide of hell/feminism when he shut his mouth and listened to his wife who thought Satan was a good theologian when he should have lead her and exercised his delegated authority as king of the planet.

"As a result, he was cursed for listening to his wife and every man since has been his pussified sit quietly by and watch a nation of men be raised by bitter **** envying burned feministed single mothers."

Driscoll ended his remarks by explaining that he expected many women to disagree with him, but "they like Eve should not speak on this matter."

http://www.christianpost.com/news/mars-hill-board-responds-acts-29-network-announced-divisive-decision-without-directly-speaking-to-mark-driscoll-124590/
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« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2014, 07:26:56 am »

Finally this guy is on the way out

LifeWay Stops Selling Mark Driscoll's Books at 180 Christian Stores
Southern Baptist chain decides to 'assess the situation regarding his ministry.'


 LifeWay Christian Resources, which bills itself as "one of the world's largest providers of Christian products and services," has pulled Mark Driscoll's books from its website and more than 180 stores nationwide.

The action comes one day after Matt Chandler's Acts 29 church planting network removed membership from Mars Hill churches and their popular pastor. Driscoll has authored 15 books and amassed a following of 13,000 weekly worshipers at 15 locations in five states.

"LifeWay Stores and Lifeway.com are not selling Mark Driscoll's books while we assess the situation regarding his ministry," Marty King, LifeWay's communications director, told CT. Earlier this month, LifeWay offered 42 products authored by or connected to Driscoll. Now, only five books that Driscoll contributed to remain.

The decision echoes the debate raised after the recent resignation of another popular pastor, Bob Coy, following a moral failing: Should Christians stop studying the teachings of fallen pastors?

Mars Hill has yet to respond to LifeWay's decision. But on Friday, leaders rebuked Acts 29's "divisive" decision, asserting "we are making real progress in addressing the serious reconciliation and unhealthy culture issues that have been a part of Mars Hill Church for way too long," and citing "clear evidence that the attitudes and behaviors attributed to Mark in the charges are not a part and have not been a part of Mark's life for some time now."

Driscoll, whose provocative preaching style has proved surprisingly successful in secular Seattle, has already apologized for the steady stream of controversies over the past few years.

Driscoll critic Warren Throckmorton broke the news of LifeWay's decision.

LifeWay was asked to ban Driscoll's books from its stores at the Southern Baptist Convention's 2009 annual meeting, but the motion failed to pass. Debate focused on whether Driscoll's blunt approach undermined his message.

Altogether, five motions were made against Driscoll at the 2009 convention, including a motion to have all Southern Baptist entities report any contact with Driscoll or the Acts 29 church planting network. Some were ruled out of order and others were referred to committees, Christian Retailing reported.

Driscoll was not alone—other 2009 motions reportedly requested to have The Shack and books by T.D. Jakes, John Hagee, and “Catholics” removed.

LifeWay has made news several times for banning materials. In 2012, stores pulled the film The Blind Side from shelves after complaints over the film’s profanity and use of a racial slur. The same year, the chain banned Rachel Held Evans’ book A Year of Biblical Womanhood for reasons not made public.

Evans claimed her use of the word “****” merited the ban, but CT reported that other LifeWay books use the word numerous times, including Driscoll's Real Marriage (five uses).

Also in 2012, LifeWay declined an SBC request to remove the 2011 NIV Bible translation from its shelves, and halted sales of a breast cancer awareness Bible amid concerns over the book's beneficiary: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which also partners with Planned Parenthood.

In early 2011, CT reported when LifeWay dropped its “read with discernment” sticker program, which targeted books that “may have espoused thoughts, ideas, or concepts that could be considered inconsistent with historical evangelical theology.”

http://www.christianitytoday.com/gleanings/2014/august/lifeway-stops-selling-mark-driscolls-books-at-180-christian.html
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« Reply #46 on: August 11, 2014, 08:58:55 am »

Hopefully, the SBC will show Rick Warren, Richard Land, Franklin Graham, Billy Graham, Russell Moore, Beth Moore, Fred Luter, and Richard Foster the door next!
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« Reply #47 on: August 24, 2014, 11:25:34 am »

Mark Driscoll’s Books Pulled from Southern Baptist Convention’s Lifeway Stores

You really have to ask why were they there to begin with

The nation’s second largest Christian book retailer has pulled Mark Driscoll’s books from its website and 186 stores.

Leaders at the Southern Baptist Convention’s LifeWay Christian Resources, informed stores on Friday to stop selling books by the Seattle pastor who has been in hot water.

Last week, leaders of the church planting network Acts 29 removed Driscoll and his churches from the group he helped found and asked that he “step down from ministry for an extended time and seek help.”

Continue reading this story > http://www.religionnews.com/2014/08/11/mark-driscolls-books-pulled-southern-baptist-conventions-lifeway-stores/
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« Reply #48 on: August 24, 2014, 12:14:54 pm »

Well, hopefully the next books to go by SBC's Lifeway bookstore are Rick Warren's, Beth Moore's, Richard Foster's, Billy Graham's, and Franklin Graham's.

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« Reply #49 on: August 24, 2014, 05:08:49 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/22/mark-driscoll-charges-abuse_n_5701296.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592#
8/22/14
Megapastor Mark Driscoll Charged With Abusive Conduct By 21 Former Mars Hill Pastors

RNS) Twenty-one former Mars Hill Church pastors have filed charges against Seattle megachurch founder Mark Driscoll, saying that he has engaged in a pattern of abusive and intimidating conduct and has not changed.

The charges, lodged with the executive elders of the church, include:

* “Pastor Mark exhibits lack of self-control by his speech and by verbally assaulting others.”
* “We believe that the way Pastor Mark leads has created a culture of fear instead of a culture of candor and safety. People are often afraid to ask questions or challenge certain ideas.”
* “Pastor Mark is verbally abusive to people who challenge him, disagree with him, or question him.”

Mars Hill Church has attracted as many as 14,000 people at 15 locations across five states each Sunday.

“We take these allegations seriously and we are thankful that we have a process in place where allegations will be reviewed by our board and our elders,” the church said in a statement.

Mars Hill also canceled its October Resurgence Conference, which was to feature recently resigned board members Paul Tripp and James MacDonald as speakers.

Driscoll was removed as closing speaker at an October church conference in Dallas and stricken from the speaker list at a series of four Christian “Act Like Men” conferences.

Earlier this month, Driscoll was removed from a church-planting network of more than 500 churches he helped found after a pattern of “ungodly and disqualifying behavior.” One of the most noticeably critical comments came from another prominent evangelical pastor in a story for the New York Times.

“He was really important — in the Internet age, Mark Driscoll definitely built up the evangelical movement enormously,” Timothy Keller, the senior pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, told The Times. “But the brashness and the arrogance and the rudeness in personal relationships — which he himself has confessed repeatedly — was obvious to many from the earliest days, and he has definitely now disillusioned quite a lot of people.”

Driscoll has been an influential but edgy pastor within conservative evangelical circles for several years. He has been provocative, occasionally profane, and has faced allegations of plagiarism and inflating his book sales.

“Mr. Driscoll is rapidly becoming a pariah in the world that once cheered him,” The Times wrote.

Driscoll returns from vacation on Sunday.
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« Reply #50 on: August 25, 2014, 05:29:01 pm »

Driscoll to Step Down From Megachurch Over Allegations of Spiritual Abuse

Controversial Seattle megachurch founder Mark Driscoll will step down for at least six weeks while leaders review formal charges lodged by a group of pastors that he abused his power.

The 43-year-old pastor has been under fire in recent months for plagiarism, inappropriate use of church funds and improper behavior toward subordinates.

Returning from vacation Sunday (Aug. 24), Driscoll addressed Mars Hill worship services through a pre-recorded message.

“I want to say to my Mars Hill family, past and present, I’m very sorry. I genuinely mean it,” Driscoll said in his address. “I’m very sorry for the times I’ve been angry, short or insensitive. I’m very sorry for anything I’ve done to distract from our mission by inviting criticism, controversy or negative media attention.”

Driscoll said he will not do any outside speaking for the foreseeable future and postpone the publication of his next book.

“I have begun meeting with a professional team of mature Christians who provide wise counsel to help further my personal development and maturity before God and men,” Driscoll told the congregation.

Mark DeMoss, an Atlanta public relations consultant and former supporter and adviser to Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, has been brought in to help paint Driscoll in a positive light.

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DeMoss, who represented the late Jerry Falwell Sr. and now Franklin Graham, stated that it is because of faults like Driscoll’s that he remains in business.

“I think he’s a gifted, biblical communicator who has done effective church work in an unchurched part of the country,” DeMoss said. “I like him, I believe in him, and if I only worked with ministry leaders who were faultless, I would be out of business tonight.”

Warren Throckmorton, a Grove City College psychology professor who has been blogging details of the events surrounding the church’s turmoil, first posted an audio clip of Driscoll’s 13-minute message. Throckmorton said he is aware of other elders planning to resign or considering it.

“Storm clouds seem to be swirling around me more than ever in recent month, and I have given much thought and sought much counsel as to why that is and what to do about it,” Driscoll said. “Some have challenged various aspects of my personality and leadership style, and while some of these challenges seem unfair, I have no problem admitting I am deserving of some of these criticisms based my own past actions that I am genuinely sorry for.”

Though he has long been controversial but popular for his unapologetic chauvinism, Driscoll faced increasing turmoil this past year within evangelical circles. A front-page story in The New York Times Saturday (Aug. 23),  suggested that Driscoll’s empire was “imploding.”

“He was really important — in the Internet age, Mark Driscoll definitely built up the evangelical movement enormously,” Timothy Keller, the senior pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, told the Times. “But the brashness and the arrogance and the rudeness in personal relationships — which he himself has confessed repeatedly — was obvious to many from the earliest days, and he has definitely now disillusioned quite a lot of people.”

Mars Hill Church has claimed as many as 14,000 members at 15 locations across five states each Sunday.

Earlier this week, 21 former Mars Hill pastors filed charges against Driscoll, saying that he has engaged in a pattern of abusive and intimidating conduct and has not changed.

“God is not honored by conflict, strife, disunity, arguing, slander, gossip, or anything else that is inconsistent with the fruit of the spirit, and I am deeply sorry, genuinely sorry, for the times I have not lived peaceably with all men,” Driscoll said.

Mars Hill also canceled its fall Resurgence Conference, which was to feature recently resigned board members Paul Tripp and James MacDonald as speakers. Driscoll was removed as closing speaker at an October church conference in Dallas and stricken from the speaker list at a series of four Christian “Act Like Men” conferences.

DeMoss, who also helped MacDonald during a theological controversy a few years ago, declined to comment on the criticism Driscoll has faced from other fellow evangelical pastors.

Earlier this month, Driscoll was removed from Acts 29, a church-planting network of more than 500 churches he helped found, after board members said they found a pattern of “ungodly and disqualifying behavior.”

“Based on the totality of the circumstances, we are now asking you to please step down from ministry for an extended time and seek help,” board members told Driscoll.

Driscoll recently admitted to and apologized for comments he made under the pseudonym “William Wallace II” where he posted statements critical of feminism, homosexuality and “sensitive emasculated” men. He noted those comments again in his address on Sunday.

“I have acknowledged and confessed many of my sins and shortcomings and missteps and God has been more than faithful with his forgiveness,” he said.

He has been provocative, occasionally profane, and has faced more recent allegations of plagiarism and inflating his book sales. “Mistakes were made that I am grieved by and apologize for,” he said late last year of plagiarism charges. He also apologized in March, saying “my angry-young-prophet days are over.”

After Acts 29 removed Driscoll from its membership, LifeWay Christian Resources, the nation’s second largest Christian book retailer, pulled Driscoll’s books from its website and 186 stores.

Driscoll, who came into evangelical prominence as multi-site churches and podcasts were becoming more popular, noted one of the paradoxes of being a pastor in a media age.

“The same media channels that can be used to carry a sermon to virtually anyone around the world, can be used by anyone around the globe to criticize, attack or slander,” Driscoll said. “However, another part of it is simply my fault and I will own it, confess it and move on from it as God continues to redeem me.”


http://christiannews.net/2014/08/24/driscoll-to-step-down-from-megachurch-over-allegations-of-spiritual-abuse/
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« Reply #51 on: August 27, 2014, 06:55:29 am »

5 Things Christians Need to Know about the Mark Driscoll Scandals

 As Christian Headlines previously reported, megachurch pastor Mark Driscoll announced to his Seattle-based congregation Sunday that he is taking a six-week leave of absence from his position as lead pastor of Mars Hill Church. Driscoll maintains he will take time to seek council about the next season of his life.
 
At the age of 25, Driscoll planted the church in 1996; Mars Hill has since grown to more than 13,000 people.
 
The ministry of Mars Hill has expanded since its founding and now includes 15 locations in five states: Washington, Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Arizona.
 
Popular within evangelical circles, Driscoll’s fall from fame happened in phases.
 
1. Mark Driscoll Accused of Plagiarism
 
On Nov. 21, 2014, Christian talk show host Janet Mefferd interviewed Driscoll about his most recent book, A Call to Resurgence. In what was presumed to be a typical author interview segment, Mefferd accused Driscoll of plagiarizing the scholarship of Peter Jones, an author and adjunct professor at Westminister Seminary California.
 
During the interview, Mefferd accused Driscoll of not providing proper attribution of Jones’ concept on "One-ism" and "Two-ism."
 
In One or Two: Seeing a World of Difference, Jones states, “One-ism believes that everything that exists is of one substance and that the goal of theology, spirituality and even sexuality is to destroy all distinctions, and bring all things together. Two-ism believes that there is a God outside creation who made all that is not God and has structured creation for the good of humanity.”
 
About the accusation, Todd Starowitz of Tyndale provided the following statement to Religion News Service:
 
“Tyndale House Publishers was provided a recording of the show by representatives of Pastor Driscoll. A number of people at Tyndale reviewed the tape and were stunned, not only by the accusations, but by the belligerent tone of Ms. Mefferd’s questioning. When Ms. Mefferd asked Pastor Driscoll her first question to accuse him of plagiarism, she did not invoke Peter Jones’s name. The first person that Pastor Driscoll credited in his response was Mr. Jones. Pastor Driscoll also credits Mr. Jones in the section that Janet refers to in Mark’s book, A Call to Resurgence.
 
Tyndale has taken immediate steps as in the process of reviewing the section of Pastor Driscoll’s book that has been called into question. Pastor Driscoll has also reached out to Mr. Jones and we expect to be able to release some information on his reaction to the interview very soon.”
 
In an abrupt reversal, soon after the interview, Mefferd removed the Driscoll audio file interview link from her website and apologized to her audience for her conduct.
 
Dr. Warren Throckmorton, professor of psychology at Grove City College and Patheos columnist, is unaware of Driscoll’s motives or what took place in each case.
 
“All I know is that I have found citation errors in nine of Mark Driscoll's books,” said Throckmorton. “Publishers have validated these findings by quietly correcting many of them. Driscoll has only addressed two instances so it is not possible to know how this pattern has persisted.”
 
While never admitting to plagiarism, Driscoll admitted to problems with “sourcing” and “attribution.”
 
2. Inappropriate Use of Church Funds
 
In March, World Magazine reported that Mars Hill Church spent at least $210,000 with a firm that sought to get Driscoll’s Real Marriage book on the New York Times best-seller list.
 
According to a document obtained by World Magazine Associate Publisher Warren Smith, Mars Hill contracted with ResultSource Inc. (RSI) “to conduct a bestseller campaign for your book, Real Marriage on the week of January 2, 2012. The bestseller campaign is intended to place Real Marriage on The New York Times bestseller list for the Advice How-To list.”
 
Through the efforts of RSI, the book indeed, became a New York Times bestseller.
 
Upon the release of the World Magazine story Driscoll once again apologized and ordered the publisher to remove any mention that Real Marriage had become a New York Times bestseller.
 
Once the information had become public and verified that Driscoll had both plagiarized and used church funds inappropriately to promote his book, individuals begun to come forward questioning various aspects of the Mars Hill ministry.
 
For example, Smith claims some questioned how Mars Hill Church used donations to its global mission fund called Mars Hill Global.
 
“Mars Hill had to refund to some donors some funds and had to admit that money was not being used for global missions, but being used in the Seattle-based church.”
 
3. Claims of Bullying and Abrasive Management Styles
 
In what Throckmorton calls “arguably the worst week in the history of Mars Hill Church,” as of last week, Driscoll now faces charges from twenty-one former Mars Hill Church Pastors.
 
“Accompanied by a cover letter, briefs on workplace bullying and a summary of the powers of Mars Hill elders, the charges are being leveled by well-respected former pastors and are in the possession of the Mars Hill leadership,” wrote Throckmorton. These documents greatly expand on charges brought by former pastor Dave Kraft.”
 
On March 7 Kraft posted to his blog the following:
 
I addressed these “concerns and issues” by filing “Formal Charges” in May of 2013, which I mentioned in my March 7 Blog Post.
 
On September 19, 2013, I resigned my membership and Eldership, because I have serious questions about the ministry and leadership philosophy/practices of the Executive Elders of MHC, no longer trust them and, therefore, cannot submit to their authority.
Mark Driscoll’s sin(s) (for many of us who know him and have worked with him) are about clear violations of I Timothy 3, Titus 1 and I Peter 5.
 
1.  Not being self-controlled and disciplined
2.  Being domineering
3.  Being verbally violent
4.  Being arrogant
5.  Being quick-tempered
 
4. Driscoll Steps Down Making Room for Review
 
In early August Acts 29, the church planting organization Driscoll co-founded, issued a statement announcing the removal of the controversial pastor and Mars Hill Church from its membership.
 
The statement reads:
“It is with deep sorrow that the Acts 29 Network announces its decision to remove Mark Driscoll and Mars Hill Church from membership in the network. Mark and the Elders of Mars Hill have been informed of the decision, along with the reasons for removal. It is our conviction that the nature of the accusations against Mark, most of which have been confirmed by him, make it untenable and unhelpful to keep Mark and Mars Hill in our network. In taking this action, our prayer is that it will encourage the leadership of Mars Hill to respond in a distinctive and godly manner so that the name of Christ will not continue to be dishonored.”
 
Warren maintains the culmination of issues led to a climax, which resulted in the call for Driscoll’s resignation.
 
On Sunday, August 24, Driscoll addressed his Seattle congregation through a pre-recorded message announcing his decision to step aside allowing for a review of the circumstances.
 
“I want to say to my Mars Hill family, past and present, I’m very sorry. I genuinely mean it,” said Driscoll. “I’m very sorry for the times I’ve been angry, short or insensitive. I’m very sorry for anything I’ve done to distract from our mission by inviting criticism, controversy or negative media attention.”
 
5. Common Thread Among Christian Leaders
 
Many within Christian organizations have experienced the pain and destruction of a fallen leader. Whether it is from a moral failure, abuse of power or financial issues, leaders contend there is a common thread among those who fall from grace.
 
Sadly, Driscoll joins a long list of fallen leaders, including the likes of Bill Gothard, Ted Haggard, James MacDonald and Steven Furtick.
 
Smith contends leaders of high stature place themselves in positions lacking in accountability and transparency.
 
“They get so powerful that no one feels they can confront them or speak into their lives for fear of losing their jobs or influence,” said Warren. “Driscoll becomes a celebrity and people think it is cool to know him. “If you are friends with a celebrity there is something perverse that makes us feel that we are accomplished ourselves, which is damaging to ourselves and to the church.”
 
Throckmorton agrees.
 
“Mark Driscoll said he is stepping down to reflect while serious charges are examined,” said Throckmorton. “However, the same people who dismissed earlier charges will examine the new ones. There is no true elder board at Mars Hill Church to which Driscoll is accountable. There is reason to question the objectivity of the process.”
 
 
Russ Jones is co-founder of Christian News Service, a content creation and news distribution firm. He's also a media consultant to a number of cause oriented campaigns and organizations. Russ has been a guest on such programs as the Mike Gallagher Show, the Dennis Prager Show, Bill Martinez Live and Sandy Rios in the Morning. He holds degrees from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a master’s degree from St. Paul School of Theology. He is married to Jackie and together they have four children.
 
Publication date: August 26, 2014

http://www.christianheadlines.com/news/5-things-christians-need-to-know-about-the-mark-driscoll-scandals.html
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« Reply #52 on: August 27, 2014, 10:16:22 am »

This is just my opinion on this...

The reason why I think that once in a blue moon they will "expose" one of their so-called "influentials" like Driscoll is so that the establishment can make an "example" of them, and in turns they can make themselves look good like they exposed a wolf, and give themselves a pat on the back.

Seriously - does anyone really think Rick Warren exercises the least bit of honesty and integrity?(aside from his false doctrines, that is) Does anyone really think he writes his own books, amidst his very busy travel schedules and trying to upkeep one of the largest churches in America? Does anyone really think he keeps an honest accountability will all the MILLIONS of dollars he's handling at his church?(which has north of $90m budget)

Or how about Billy/Franklin Graham? Bill Hybels? Brian McLaren? Rob Bell?

And as for all of the books these people supposedly write - I'm not trying to belittle anyone, but as the years have gone by, the American public have by and large read less and less(as they expose themselves to visual media as there's more accessibleness to them via tv, PCs, iphones, etc) - for example, I highly doubt Warren's and Graham's books are read much(as they probably use the same tactics of buying out their own books in chunks to make it look good on these best-seller lists).

IOW - if someone in the establishment starts to become an embarassment, they will at least to some extent be outed - and subsequently while they end up getting all the attention, it ultimately ends up being a smokescreen b/c the the wolves in the fold like Warren, Hybels, and Graham will continue to push their agendas.
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« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2014, 07:46:49 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/28/pastors-letter-mark-driscoll_n_5731444.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592
8/28/14
Mars Hill Pastors' Letter To Mark Driscoll Blasts Former Church Leader For Foul Play

RNS) A letter from nine Mars Hill Church pastors to their fellow elders offers the most trenchant criticism yet of controversial megachurch pastor Mark Driscoll, who recently stepped down for at least six weeks amid a series of accusations.

The pastors did not mince words in their lengthy Aug. 22 letter [full text] concerning Driscoll, who has been caught up in allegations that include plagiarism, inappropriate use of church funds and abuse of power:

* [W]e direct that he steps down from ministry, submitting himself under the authority of the elders of the church, who will oversee the details of his restoration plan.
* He must step down not only from the pulpit, but from all aspects of ministry and leadership.
* He will continue to receive his salary so long as he continues to cooperate with the restoration plan set before him by the elders of Mars Hill Church.

The letter was posted within a Mars Hill online network and provided to Warren Throckmorton, a Grove City College psychology professor who has been blogging updates about Mars Hill.

The 4,000-word letter suggests there were insufficient layers of accountability at Mars Hill, a congregation of an estimated 14,000 people at 15 locations in five states, and that power was consolidated at the top with Driscoll given free rein to do what he wanted.

The pastors included quotes from conversations with Paul Tripp, a widely respected evangelical pastor who is seen as a “pastor to pastors” and was on the Mars Hill’s Board of Advisors and Accountability before he resigned in June.

“This is without a doubt, the most abusive, coercive ministry culture I’ve ever been involved with,” Tripp is quoted saying in the letter.

One of Tripp’s concerns was the way the church governance was set up.

“You can’t have a church culture where you essentially have a very tight circle and everyone else is your enemy,” he said.

Tripp declined to an interview request.

“This letter, as with past letters voicing accusations toward Mark Driscoll will be processed in accordance with Article 12 of the church’s bylaws,” a statement provided by public relations firm head Mark DeMoss said. “This means the accusations will be thoroughly examined and a report issued when the review is complete. In the meantime, it does not seem appropriate to comment on specific accusations before/while they are being formally reviewed as we don’t want to circumvent the process prescribed by the governing body of Mars Hill.”

The church’s bylaws, which spell out how the church is governed, are not public. It’s also unclear what the governing body entails, as DeMoss was unavailable to respond to more questions. The pastors in the letter suggest that the bylaws do not offer church elders much authority.

“While the current bylaws greatly restrict our authority, we believe we must act like elders none-the-less,” they write. “It is time to take responsibility for our church, regardless of how much our current bylaws prevent us from exercising that authority.”

The pastors suggest that there has been a lack of transparency from the leadership, especially surrounding Driscoll’s ouster from the Acts 29 Network, a church-planting coalition of more than 500 congregations that he helped found.

“We have been repeatedly told that no one from the A29 board talked to Mark or to our board prior to removing Mark from the network,” the pastors wrote. “The truth is that multiple members of both boards had been in direct contact with each other, and with Mark, exhorting and rebuking him over the course of months and years, and to say or imply otherwise is deeply misleading.”

The pastors also cited issues of “questionable transparency and truth-telling” surrounding church finances and the Mars Hill Global Fund, along with a controversy last year involving a conference on charismatic theology called Strange Fire. In addition, they cite charges that Driscoll plagiarized, inflated his book sales, and sowed confusion around transitions and resignations from its board, including Tripp and pastor James MacDonald.

The letter cited another recent letter, from Mike Wilkerson, who, along with other former Mars Hill pastors, sent a list of allegations to church elders regarding Driscoll. The pastors suggested that the statement put out from the church at the time was misleading.

“Even this Thursday we put out a statement claiming that Wilkerson’s formal charges were being ‘reviewed by the board and the elders,’” the letter from the current pastors stated. “This is misleading as it gives people the impression that the elders as a whole are able to take part in reviewing and adjudicating the case.”

As of Thursday (Aug. 28), Mars Hill would not provide information about who will oversee Driscoll during his time off from the pulpit; neither did it provide a copy of the church bylaws requested by Religion News Service.

The pastors’ letter ends by quoting a sermon from Driscoll from 2006.

“I just shudder to say this, but if I should ever say or do anything that the elders would need to fire me, do not be loyal to me,” Driscoll said. “Be loyal to Jesus; be loyal to your elders. Be loyal to the pastors in your church.”
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« Reply #54 on: September 09, 2014, 10:37:37 pm »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/08/mars-hill-church-closures_n_5784804.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592
9/8/14
Mars Hill Church Begins Church Closures Due To Financial Trouble

Mars Hill Church announced on Sunday the closure of three of its church locations due to financial strain, with a possible fourth on the horizon.

Downtown Seattle and U-District churches in Washington will be consolidated with Mars Hill Church Ballard as of October 12th. The Mars Hill Church in Phoenix will close its doors on September 28th. The organization also announced that it has ceased development of a Los Angeles church plant and may be forced to close its Huntington Beach location if it is unable to raise funds by the end of the year.

"We have found ourselves in a serious financial situation, as giving and attendance has declined more than we had anticipated over the last few months," Mars Hill Communications & Editorial Manager Justin Dean told HuffPost by email.

The closures mark another blow to the organization, which has found itself in the spotlight in recent months over church founder Mark Driscoll's alleged plagiarism and misuse of church funds.

Mars Hill acknowledged on its website that unflattering media coverage may have played a roll in the dip in church donations. In a weekly update the organization wrote:

    It is your continued support that is needed now more than ever. While we were able to end the fiscal year strong, giving and attendance have declined significantly since January. Specifically, we have seen a substantial decrease in tithes and offerings these past two months, due to the increase in negative media attention surrounding our church.

Prior to announcing its financial difficulty, Mars Hill raised nearly $3 million at the end of 2013 in part to fund the planting of its Phoenix location and the replanting of the Huntington Beach location -- as well a much-touted Jesus Festival that disappeared from the church's calendar over the summer.

The church closures leave many wondering what Mars Hill's future will be moving forward.

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« Reply #55 on: October 17, 2014, 05:52:36 am »

Mark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill Church

 Mark Driscoll, the larger-than-life megachurch pastor who has been accused of plagiarism, bullying and an unhealthy ego that alienated his most devoted followers, resigned from his Seattle church Tuesday (Oct. 14), according to a document obtained by RNS.
 
The divisive Seattle pastor had announced his plan to step aside for at least six weeks in August while his church investigated the charges against him. Driscoll’s resignation came shortly after the church concluded its investigation.
 
“Recent months have proven unhealthy for our family — even physically unsafe at times — and we believe the time has now come for the elders to choose new pastoral leadership for Mars Hill,” Driscoll wrote in his resignation letter.
 
Driscoll was not asked to resign from the church he started 18 years ago, according to a letter from the church’s board of overseers. “Indeed, we were surprised to receive his resignation letter,” they wrote.
 
Seven elders and one member of the board of overseers conducted this investigation, and the board of overseers provided findings and conclusions:
 

    “We concluded that Pastor Mark has, at times, been guilty of arrogance, responding to conflict with a quick temper and harsh speech, and leading the staff and elders in a domineering manner. While we believe Mark needs to continue to address these areas in his life and leadership, we do not believe him to be disqualified from pastoral ministry.”
    “Pastor Mark has never been charged with any immorality, illegality or heresy. Most of the charges involved attitudes and behaviors reflected by a domineering style of leadership.”
    “We found some of the accusations against Pastor Mark to be altogether unfair or untrue.”
    “Other charges had been previously addressed by Pastor Mark, privately and publicly. Indeed, he had publicly confessed and apologized for a number of the charges against him, some of which occurred as long as 14 years ago.”

In his resignation letter, Driscoll noted that he was not being disqualified from future ministry.
 
“You have also shared with me that many of those making charges against me declined to meet with you or participate in the review process at all,” Driscoll wrote. “Consequently, those conducting the review of charges against me began to interview people who had not even been a party to the charges.”
 
Driscoll hinted, though, that his continued presence would be a distraction.
 
“Prior to and during this process there have been no charges of criminal activity, immorality or heresy, any of which could clearly be grounds for disqualification from pastoral ministry,” Driscoll wrote.
 
“Other issues, such as aspects of my personality and leadership style, have proven to be divisive within the Mars Hill context, and I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission to lead people to a personal and growing relationship with Jesus Christ.”
 
Driscoll’s boisterous personality seemed to dominate Mars Hill, a congregation he built up to an estimated 14,000 people at 15 locations across five states. Weekly attendance is now reportedly about 7,600.
 
“The Board of Overseers has accepted that resignation and is moving forward with planning for pastoral transition, recognizing the challenge of such a task in a church that has only known one pastor since its founding,” states the letter, signed by Michael Van Skaik, Larry Osborne, Jon Phelps and Matt Rogers.
 
Mars Hill shuttered its Downtown Seattle and University of Washington District churches due to financial challenges.
 
“During the month of August, we received $1,552,817 and expenses were $2,222,274, so our net over expenses (loss) after depreciation and capitalizing assets was $647,768,” stated a report released to church members in September and obtained by World magazine. “Our income target was $1,842,414, and we missed this target by almost 16 percent.”
 
Driscoll, who came into evangelical prominence as multisite churches and podcasts rose in popularity, found a niche within a largely secular Northwest culture. Though he has been controversial for years for statements on women and sexuality, several tipping points likely led up to Driscoll’s resignation.
 
Driscoll admitted to and apologized for comments he made under the pseudonym “William Wallace II” that were critical of feminism, homosexuality and “sensitive emasculated” men.
 
The church-planting network he founded, Acts 29, removed Driscoll from its membership after influential leaders such as Paul Tripp and James MacDonald stepped down from helping the church. LifeWay Christian Resources, the nation’s second largest Christian book retailer, pulled Driscoll’s books from its website and its 186 stores.
 
In the past, Driscoll has been provocative, occasionally profane, and has faced more recent allegations of plagiarism and inflating his book sales. “Mistakes were made that I am grieved by and apologize for,” he said late last year of plagiarism charges.
 
A front-page story in The New York Times on Aug. 23 had suggested that Driscoll’s empire was “imploding.”
 
“He was really important — in the Internet age, Mark Driscoll definitely built up the evangelical movement enormously,” Timothy Keller, the senior pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, told the Times. “But the brashness and the arrogance and the rudeness in personal relationships — which he himself has confessed repeatedly — was obvious to many from the earliest days, and he has definitely now disillusioned quite a lot of people.”
 
During Driscoll’s planned sabbatical, elders within his own church asked him to step down from all aspects of ministry. All nine elders who signed the letter resigned or were laid off.
 
Members of Mars Hill have sought more transparency from church leadership. A petition was launched requesting the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability to suspend Mars Hill’s membership over allegations of financial impropriety.
 
At the height of his influence and popularity, Driscoll admitted that he harbored grand ambitions, both for himself and the church he built from scratch.
 
“I’m a guy who is highly competitive,” Driscoll said in a 2006 sermon. “Every year, I want the church to grow. I want my knowledge to grow. I want my influence to grow. I want our staff to grow. I want our church plants to grow. I want everything — because I want to win.”
 
Driscoll conceded that he wouldn’t be content with remaining the same.
 
“That’s my own little idol and it works well in a church because no one would ever yell at you for being a Christian who produces results. So I found the perfect place to hide,” he said.
 
“And I was thinking about it this week. What if the church stopped growing? What if we shrunk? What if everything fell apart? What if half the staff left? Would I still worship Jesus or would I be a total despairing mess? I don’t know. By God’s grace, I won’t have to find out, but you never know.”

http://www.christianheadlines.com/news/mark-driscoll-resigns-from-mars-hill-church.html
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« Reply #56 on: October 27, 2014, 07:25:02 am »

Mark Driscoll Getting Death Threats, Attacks at Home

 Former Mars Hill Pastor Mark Driscoll said this week that his family is experiencing “a very trying season,” including death threats, attacks and night terrors.
 
Driscoll spoke briefly at the 2014 Gateway Conference on Monday. He was originally scheduled to speak at the conference, but chose to just attend.
 
Gateway Pastor Robert Morris asked Driscoll to come on stage and Driscoll asked for prayers.
 
 "We've had a very trying season and (I'm) just trying to figure out how to be a good pastor to my family first. We all know that's the most important thing."
 
"We've got five kids, three boys, two girls ages eight to seventeen. We've moved three times for safety issues: people arrested at our home, death threats, address posted online, all kinds of things and more recently it's gotten more severe," he said.
 
Driscoll said rusty nails have been placed in his driveway and that he and his children were attacked when camping in their backyard.
 
Driscoll resigned as pastor of the church he founded in 1996 after accusations of plagiarism and comments he made on the church’s website from years ago surfaced.
 
Driscoll said in his resignation letter that he is "an imperfect messenger of the gospel of Jesus Christ."
 

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/mark-driscoll-getting-death-threats-attacks-at-home.html

Quote
including death threats, attacks and night terrors.

I really hate to see this stuff go on. No true Christian would do those things. Especially to his family. But what do you expect from his apostate church members?

Quote
night terrors.

I would like more explanation on this one...

Night Terrors Overview


The sleep disorder of night terrors typically occurs in children aged 3-12 years, with a peak onset in children aged 3½ years.

Sleep is divided into 2 categories: rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (non-REM). Non-REM sleep is further divided into 4 stages, progressing from stages 1-4. Night terrors occur during the transition from stage 3 non-REM sleep to stage 4 non-REM sleep, beginning approximately 90 minutes after the child falls asleep.

Night terrors are distinctly different from the much more common nightmares, which occur during REM sleep. Night terrors are characterized by frequent recurrent episodes of intense crying and fear during sleep, with difficulty arousing the child. Night terrors are frightening episodes that disrupt family life.

A small percentage of children experience night terrors. Boys and girls are equally affected. Children of all races also seem to be affected equally. The disorder usually resolves during adolescence.
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/night_terrors/article_em.htm

This is also associated with demonic "alien" abductions.... Wonder if that is what he is talking about?
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« Reply #57 on: October 31, 2014, 08:27:54 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/seattle-megachurch-dissolves-founder-resigns-231406002.html
Seattle megachurch dissolves after founder resigns
10/31/14

SEATTLE (AP) — Two weeks after lead Mars Hill Church pastor Mark Driscoll resigned amid questions about his leadership, the Seattle megachurch he founded announced Friday it was dissolving its network of branches across four states.

The church said on its website that the best future for its branches would be for them to becoming "autonomous self-governed entities."

"This means that each of our locations has an opportunity to become a new church, rooted in the best of what Mars Hill has been in the past, and independently led and run by its own local elder teams," Pastor Dave Bruskas wrote on the church's website.

The existing Mars Hill Church organization will be dissolved.

The megachurch's controversial founder resigned as elder and lead pastor on Oct. 14, following an investigation into formal charges brought against him.

The church currently has multiple branches in Washington, and one location each in Oregon, California and New Mexico. Last month, it closed its Phoenix location as a Mars Hill church.

Driscoll's resignation came after a group of church elders recently ended an investigation into the charges.

Driscoll took a leave of absence in August so church leaders could investigate whether he was fit to lead. He faced accusations that he bullied members, threatened opponents, lied and oversaw mismanagement of church funds, the Seattle Times has reported.

The church said it found Driscoll had a domineering style with a quick temper and harsh speech, but it noted he was never charged with immorality or heresy.

On Friday, Bruskas said on the church's website that central Mars Hill staff would be compensated for their work and then let go, and that church properties would be sold off or individual property loans would be taken over by independent branches.

Local leaders and pastors will decide whether to become independent, merge with an existing church or disband.

"Mars Hill Church has never been about a building or even an organization," Bruskas wrote. "Mars Hill is a people on mission with Jesus, and that singular focus continues as these newly independent churches are launched."

The church says it hopes the reorganization plan will be completed by Jan. 1.
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« Reply #58 on: December 26, 2014, 02:37:28 pm »

Mars Hill Turning Over Pulpit to Rick Warren to Deliver Final Message Before Closing

Mars Hill has accepted an offer from megachurch leader and author Rick Warren to deliver the final message to the congregation this Sunday as it closes its doors following the resignation of Mark Driscoll.

“This Sunday, December 28th, will be our final Sunday as Mars Hill Church,” the website for Mars Hill reads. “Our dear friend Pastor Rick Warren from Saddleback Church has graciously offered to preach the final sermon for us.”

As previously reported, Driscoll temporarily stepped down from his leadership position at Mars Hill in August during a six-week review of charges lodged by 21 former pastors who accused him of abusing his power. He expressed his regret for his actions at that time.

“God is not honored by conflict, strife, disunity, arguing, slander, gossip, or anything else that is inconsistent with the fruit of the spirit, and I am deeply sorry, genuinely sorry, for the times I have not lived peaceably with all men,” Driscoll said.

Two months later, he resigned from Mars Hill Church, stating that he did not wish to continue to be a distraction to the ministry although the formal review cleared him of moral wrongdoing.

“By God’s grace I have pastored Mars Hill Church for 18 years. Today, also by God’s grace, and with the full support of my wife Grace, I resign my position as a pastor and elder of Mars Hill,” Driscoll wrote in a letter to Michael Van Skiak, the chairman of the Board of Advisors and Accountability over Mars Hill Church. “I do so with profound sadness, but also with complete peace.”

Following Driscoll’s departure, the leaders of Mars Hill, which has campuses throughout Washington and also one each in California, Oregon and New Mexico, decided to dissolve the ministry. They outlined on the Mars Hill website this week that some of the congregations will continue on their own.

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“As we reflect on over eighteen years of ministry, and ultimately close the doors on Mars Hill Church, we are thankful that many of our churches will continue as new independent, autonomous churches,” the leadership wrote. “While Mars Hill Church will cease to exist, God’s work through his people will continue.”

It was also noted that Rick Warren, author of the “The Purpose Driven Life” and leader of Saddleback Church in California, will deliver the final message to the congregation this Sunday.

“Each of our churches will be showing a special message from Pastor Rick, based on John 12:24,” the Mars Hill website outlines.

As previously reported, Driscoll invited Warren to speak at his “Resurgence” leadership conference in 2012, and released a nearly 7-minute video outlining his reasons for the invitation, knowing that many would question his decision.

“He has people who love him and hate him, and I am, quite frankly, one of the guys who really appreciates him,” he explained. “[H]e actually does things, and has something to teach us if we’re actually humble enough to learn it.”

However, the appearance generated controversy as some have expressed concerns about Warren since the release of his best-selling book “The Purpose Driven Life.”

“He seemingly seeks to be all things to all men,” stated writer Tim Challies. “[W]hen it comes to Warren, there appears to be a great deal of malleability. He will be one thing for one audience and another thing for another audience. He will move seamlessly back and forth. He will be A and then not A as the situation demands.”

In 2007, Warren invited Hillary Clinton to speak at his “Global Summit on Aids and the Church” conference, during which she received a standing ovation. Barack Obama had also been invited to speak the year prior.

In 2009, Warren spoke at the annual convention of the Islamic Society of North America. At the event, he called upon “Muslims and Christians to form an interfaith coalition to combat prejudice and stereotypes.” Sayyid Syeed, one of the Islamic Society’s leaders, has confirmed that he and Warren have worked together on projects addressing the epidemics of malaria and AIDS.

Warren was also invited to deliver the invocation during the 2009 inauguration ceremony for Barack Obama. The openly homosexual “bishop” Gene Robinson was similarly asked to deliver the benediction. When Warren learned of Robinson’s appointment, he applauded the selection, stating that it was rightly done “all in the name of common ground.”

Most recently, Warren was featured in an interview released by the Catholic News Service, during which he called upon Christians and Roman Catholics to work together in defending the sanctity of life and family, likewise urging cooperation in the name of common ground. Warren had just finished speaking at a Vatican interfaith conference on the “Complementarity of Man and Woman.”

http://christiannews.net/2014/12/25/mars-hill-turning-over-pulpit-to-rick-warren-to-deliver-final-message-before-closing/
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« Reply #59 on: April 22, 2015, 08:07:40 am »

Mark Driscoll Makes Comeback with Online Leadership Videos

 Mark Driscoll, former lead pastor of Mars Hill Church, has posted videos online that give biblical leadership advice. The videos were created from 2011 to 2014, according to Christian Today.
 
Patheos reports an email from Driscoll introducing the videos said, “Being a leader is wonderfully complicated. Whether it’s leading in family, business, or ministry, leaders face particular challenges that make simultaneous joy and fruitfulness difficult.
 
“By the grace of God, I would like to help if I can. So, I’m starting something new called ‘Leadership Coaching with Pastor Mark.’
 
The leadership videos are posted on markdriscoll.org, a website the pastor created after resigning from his position as Mars Hill lead pastor.
 
Driscoll previously fell from grace after allegations arose of misuse of church funds, misogynist views, and intimidation of church leaders. 

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/mark-driscoll-makes-comeback-with-online-leadership-videos.html
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