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Matthew 24:34

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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« Reply #120 on: November 06, 2015, 04:21:36 pm »

https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/the-real-heartbreaking-reason-kids-1292342892912694.html
The Heartbreaking Reason Kids Get Hooked on Social Media

YourTango on Yahoo
November 4, 2015

When I was growing up, my parents loved to go to casinos. I became really familiar with something called “gambler’s high.”  I can recall this feeling — a sense of momentary and intermittent euphoria and gratification — as far back as in the game rooms of my youth as I begged my father for another quarter while we waited for my mother to be ready to depart the casino.

I learned about it even more powerfully after I hit my first jackpot on a poker machine in Atlantic City. After that, I kept revisiting poker machines in casinos everywhere to try to get back to that euphoric feeling of being a winner.

Then, in graduate school, I discovered Facebook.

The feelings after I would post something and wait for people to notice were very familiar to me. They felt just like that space right before you know whether or not the ace will be the next card to complete your royal flush.

There is a powerful conditioning situation occurring for all of us when we engage on social media.

If this type of reinforcement is powerful for us as adults, it’s got an even bigger hold on our teens just because of the nature of adolescence.

Adolescence is a time in our lives when we begin to separate from our families. I see it in my 14 year old. He would much rather engage virtually with his peers than relate to us in the ways he has for the last 13 years. It is a normal developmental marker for a child to step out in to the world and try to find his way without his parents (even if it does initiate abandonment issues for us!).

Kids also tend to be risk takers at this time in their lives.

That’s why our insurance rates climb so dramatically after they get their license. The insurance companies know just how risky some of the behaviors of teens are and they capitalize on that.

Putting yourself out there on social media is risky. Especially for a teen. A teenager saying “yes, this is me and these are the things I like,” is one of the riskiest things they can engage in at that time of their lives.

Risk is different for adults. We care less once we get in our 40s and 50s whether or not our acquaintance from high school will agree with our taste in music or our political views. Some of us are even willingly to challenge our friendships by posting the most outlandish thing we can find to share.

But for kids, this is the mother of all risks — the equivalent of sky diving.

“As I step out into the world and away from my parents, who will like me?” Moreover,” who will accept me?” “Am I worthy enough to be part of a tribe?”

It is a rite of passage to create this kind of distress in our adolescence because it is the grounds on which we determine our worthiness. And if we’re accepted, then we will go forth and engage from that place of worthiness and our framework will be one of “the world is a safe place and I am safe within it.”


However, if we are traumatized in this risk taking space or the feedback we get aligns with a belief system we’ve already been trying out; the world can become a scary place.

That scary place is the birthplace of addiction, depression and anxiety.

When we see the world as an unsafe place, our developmental trajectory changes.

Now we see others as meaning us harm and out to get us wherever we go. From that place, we grow angrier every day and before we know it, we’re the 30 year old with raging anger that struggles interpersonally, in our careers and most awfully in our internal lives.

Our children are more prone to navigating the world this way if their caretakers have also been traumatized into believing they are unworthy. When we, as collective adults and young adults, turn to external sources to discover who we are in the world it can get pretty dicey. Teens are predisposed to making a rash decision from one moment that could affect their entire lives. If, as a teen, I am rejected on social media, it is possible that the next 20 or more years of my life could be framed in such a way that I replay rejection scenarios over and over.

I’m happy for my son that he’s brave enough to try his hand at living freely in this world. I feel like I’ve done a good job as a parent giving him the space to grow outside of his relationship to me.

I can’t help but have some concern for him and his peers because I have the perspective of hindsight. While waiting for the jackpot, life has a way of passing you by. —Lydia Kickliter
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« Reply #121 on: November 30, 2015, 11:53:20 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/millennials-would-rather-be-moms-1307844320362550.html
Millennials Would Rather Be Moms and Dads Than Spouses
11/30/15

The kids of the Millennial Generation are far more keen on the titles of Mom and Dad than Husband and Wife.

According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center, 52 percent of Millennials cited being a good parent as “one of the most important things in life.” Only 30 percent thought the same about having a successful marriage — a glaring 22 percent gap among the 18 to 29-year-olds.

Back in 1997 when the same age group, Generation X, was broached on these subjects, 42 percent placed a high value on parenthood and 35 percent said marriage was important. So, as time has gone on, young adults are putting more emphasis on raising a family, but not necessarily on tying the knot.

According to this recent research, Millennials are less likely than adults over 30 to think children can’t grow up happily in a one-parent household, or that single parenthood is a bad idea.

These statistics definitely echo society’s changed behavioral patterns, especially in regards to marriage. Only 22 percent of Millennials are currently hitched. Roughly 30 percent of Generation X members had tied the knot at the same point in their lives, and nearly four in ten Baby Boomers had heard wedding bells between ages 18 and 29.

There’s just not the same rush to get to the altar these days. But don’t get the wrong idea about this generation.

Even if marriage isn’t of the utmost importance in the perspective of their current life stage, most would still ideally like to have it all. Of non-married Millennials with no children, 70 percent said they would love to find wedded bliss, and nearly three-quarters of them want kids some day.
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« Reply #122 on: December 05, 2015, 04:20:52 pm »

http://www.businessinsider.com/goldman-sachs-chart-of-the-generations-and-gen-z-2015-12
Goldman Sachs has made a chart of the generations ... and it will make the millennials shudder
12/5/15

The generation that will succeed the millennials is already on the cusp of becoming more important and influential than the millennials, according to Goldman Sachs:

The oldest members of "Gen Z" are already 17, and entering college and the workforce in the US. They are going to be greater in number than the millennials were, better at using the internet, and more entrepreneurial and pragmatic about money, according to Goldman analysts Robert Boroujerdi and Christopher Wolf.

"Raised by Gen-X parents during a time marred by economic stress, rising student debt burdens, socio-economic tensions and war overseas, these youths carry a less idealistic, more pragmatic perspective on the world," the pair write.

A member of Gen-Z is anyone born after 1998. Here's what they look like, according to Goldman Sachs:

Even though none of them have yet reached adulthood they are already greater in number than Generation X and their grandparents' generations, and will soon overtake the millennials in number, too.

There are nearly 70 million of them in the US.

Every single Gen-Z member was born after the advent of the internet. They are the first generation to have no pre-internet knowledge. "However, unlike their Millennial predecessors, Gen-Z appears more conscious of protecting their reputations online. More than half (57%) have abstained from posting something because they felt it would “reflect badly on them in the future” (Pew Research)."

They will be America’s most diverse generation to date, and a majority of them will be nonwhite by 2020.

Gen-Z is more conservative, more money-oriented, and more entrepreneurial than the millennials were. "A recent Harvard Business Review article suggested that nearly 70% of Gen-Z teens were 'self-employed' (e.g., teaching piano lessons, selling goods on eBay) vs. just 12% that held a 'traditional' teen job (e.g., waiting tables)," Goldman says.
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« Reply #123 on: December 05, 2015, 04:50:47 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/millennials-around-world-react-americas-204255472.html
Millennials Around the World React to America's Gun Violence Problem
12/5/15

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« Reply #124 on: December 07, 2015, 03:59:12 pm »

http://www.businessinsider.com/millennial-median-wage-map-2015-12
12/7/15
Here's how much millennials are earning annually across the US

Millennials came of age during a tough economic time: Student debt has reached an all-time high, and the job market is more competitive than ever. As a result, young people today aren't earning as much money as their parents did when they were young. So how much are they making?

Using data from the Minnesota Population Center's 2014 "American Community Survey" in the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, we found the median annual total personal income for employed millennials. We used the Pew Research Center's definition of millennials: Americans born between 1981 and 1997.

The medians ranged between a low of $18,000 per year in Montana and a high of $43,000 in the District of Columbia. How do you stack up?


Note that the youngest millennials are college-aged and may only be working part-time, which may skew the median downwards.

Below, we included the median annual personal income by state for all employees over age 17, also from the Minnesota Population Center's 2014 "American Community Survey" in the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series.
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« Reply #125 on: December 23, 2015, 03:41:08 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/unusual-winter-millennials-concerned-climate-change-193246480.html
Unusual winter has millennials concerned about climate change
12/23/15

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Unusual weather is dominating the conversation on social media for the holidays, especially among millennials, who are increasingly concerned about climate change.

Yik Yak, a location-based mobile app popular with millennials, surveyed its audience and found nearly 70 percent are worried about climate change. More than a quarter of them say their concern has grown due to the unusual winter weather this year.

In New York City, 65-degree-plus weather is predicted for Christmas Day, potentially breaking the record high of 64 degrees in 1982. In Europe, Alpine ski slopes are facing one of the warmest Decembers on record and even glacial Moscow has been chalking up above-zero thermometer readings.

That's led to a jump in the number of people posting about climate change on Yik Yak.

"Climate Change is clearly an issue! It's going to be 70 degrees in DC on Christmas Day... I mean if that's not proof, what is?" posted a Yik Yak user from Boulder, Colorado.

Another user from College Station, Texas, wrote: "I feel like more people should pay attention to it. It's a bigger deal than people make it out to be."

Of the 30 percent of respondents who said they were not concerned about climate change, 18 percent said they did not know or did not care about the issue, while just 9 percent thought it was myth.

About 6 percent said unusual weather was just a part of the earth's natural process, according to Yik Yak.

Nearly 21,000 users participated in the poll. Yik Yak polls are often used to discuss hot topics among millennials, such as Star Wars or Netflix binge-watching.

The app turned to the serious topic of climate change after Saturday's U.S. Democratic presidential debate prompted an outpouring of Yik Yak user frustration that there were no questions about global warming and climate change.

According to the environmental advocacy group NextGen Climate, 74 percent of voters under 35 - approximately 80 million of whom are eligible to vote in 2016 - said they would be more likely to vote for a presidential candidate with a plan to tackle climate change.

About 63 percent of young voters said they would be more likely to vote for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton if she supports clean energy goals, NextGen Climate said, based on results of a survey done in September.

(Reporting by Angela Moon and Melissa Fares; Editing by Dan Grebler)
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« Reply #126 on: January 02, 2016, 03:18:51 pm »





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« Reply #127 on: January 04, 2016, 11:53:42 pm »

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« Reply #128 on: January 14, 2016, 06:27:16 pm »

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/01/13/test.html
1/13/16
Millennials are Losing Faith

It’s no secret that millennials are less likely to participate in organized religious services that other generations. But a new Pew Research Center report shows that their faith in religious institutions has taken a dive these past five years.

“Younger generations,” said the Pew report, “tend to have more positive views than their elders of a number of institutions that play a big part in American society. But for some institutions — such as churches — millennials’ opinions have become markedly more negative. Since 2010, millennials’ rating of churches and other religious organizations has dipped 18 percentage points.”

In 2010, 73 percent of millennials said churches and religious organizations had a “positive effect on the way things are going in this country,” the report said. That was the highest percentage among all the generations polled at that time.

That number now has fallen to 55 percent today, the lowest of all generations.

As the Pew report also noted, “Views among older generations have changed little over this time period. As a result, older generations are now more likely than millennials — who are much less likely than their elders to be religious — to view religious organizations positively.”

Naturally many in the mainstream media enjoy poking fun at all of this. Some say that most religious institutions take a firm stance against marriage equality, see women as inferior, have scandal after scandal and have little or no financial disclosure, so why is anyone surprised millennials don’t like them? Those skewed views, however, overlook the fact that most religious institutions have vibrant communities of the dedicated faithful even while they’re not perfect.

The Rev. Michael Sliney, a Catholic priest who is the New York chaplain of the Lumen Institute, an association of business and cultural leaders, shared this observation about today’s millennials and the Catholic faith: “How to get our young professionals back into the pews? Many feel they have ‘graduated’ from Catholicism and that although it gave them a solid ethical perspective, the skill set has been learned and they have moved on.”

“Presenting Jesus Christ at the center of Catholicism in the context of a friendship and companionship is appealing,” he continued. “They all feel a sense of solitude in facing their personal struggles, and Christ can and should be a part of the solution. They want to be happy ‘now,’ ‘today’ — so reminding them that Christ will give them inner peace and authentic joy, something the world cannot give, is vital as a motivating force.”


Sliney said most millennials “also want to give back, to make an impact on culture.” The Catholic Church, he said, “needs to provide more opportunities for mission trips and social outreach as a way for these young people to discover Christ in the poor.”
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« Reply #129 on: January 18, 2016, 06:46:14 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/millennial-mindset-americas-productivity-crisis-192700711.html
The Millennial Mindset and America's Productivity Crisis
1/18/16

Running is painful, but as exercise routines go, it does have its lighter moments. I admit to getting a kick from the New Year’s resolution crowd that hits the trail every January after a year of doing little more than shuffling from the couch to the fridge and back.

Anyhow, a recent run inspired me to come up with three resolutions of my own. Actually, they’re not for me. I’m long past the point where self-improvement is even a remote possibility, as you can tell from my somewhat sadistic observations. 

No, these resolutions are for you, or at least some of you. The good news is they’re nowhere near as taxing as getting up off the couch and moving around. You don’t even have to do anything, but rather stop doing some things the rest of us find incredibly annoying. Here they are:

1. Quit trying to deal with a certain generation as if they’re either special little snowflakes or entitled, narcissistic brats and start holding them accountable as unique individuals.

2. That said, those unique individuals need to quit doing such an effective job of living up to those Generation Me stereotypes, put on their big boy pants and get to work.

3. And their coddling parents should quit acting as if they had absolutely nothing to do with the demon spawn they raised and stop blaming gadgets, schools and society in general.

Let me come right to the point. There’s an enormous elephant in the room that nobody wants to see, and watching everyone dance around it like it isn’t there is getting pretty tedious, not to mention irritating.

The problem is that Millennials are not getting jobs or starting companies like their predecessors did. What are they doing? We’ll get to that in a minute, but suffice to say that America’s largest generation is not pulling its weight. And if we don’t start facing that reality and dealing with it, we’re all screwed.

Since the dawn of Web 2.0, the blogosphere and social media, Millennials have been branded as the entrepreneurial generation – a new breed of wunderkinds spearheading a movement that’s sweeping the globe. The hype and the sensational headlines have been overwhelming:

“Millennials Are the True Entrepreneur Generation.” “Gen Y Grads More Likely to Launch Startups.” “Millennials Are Snubbing the Corporate World for Entrepreneurship.” “Why Millennials Could Be the Most Entrepreneurial Generation Ever.” “Gen Y Makes a Mark and Their Imprint is Entrepreneurship.” And so on. 

But that turned out to be far more myth than reality. As I explain in my new book, Real Leaders Don’t Follow, Millennials have actually been the least entrepreneurial generation to hit the workforce in modern history, perhaps because they see entrepreneurship as a mindset that has nothing to do with actually starting a company. Unfortunately, wishful thinking does not lead to jobs or GDP. 

Data from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Census Bureau and Kauffman Foundation overwhelmingly show that Millennials are starting far fewer businesses than their predecessors. They’re the most unemployed, underemployed and indebted generation in America, by a wide margin. And they’re a big reason why the labor force participation rate is at its lowest point since 1977.

While it’s true that many Millennials are snubbing corporate America, they’re generally not starting companies but joining the growing ranks of the gig economy: doing a little of this and a little of that as self-employed solopreneurs. A recent report by MBO Partners says that Millennials make up 30% of all full-time independent workers.

Instead of climbing the corporate ladder and building their careers or starting companies and creating new jobs, they’re opting for the perceived freedom, flexibility and control of self-employment. That may sound like utopia for someone who doesn’t mind skating by and living hand-to-mouth, but as an economic trend, it spells disaster.

The problem is that driving an Uber cab, renting out a room on Airbnb or generating online content are not exactly high paying gigs or boons to the economy. That’s why self-employed Americans make up 17% of the working population but generate just 7% of the nation’s GDP, according to the MBO report.     

We have an aging population of retiring boomers starting to take advantage of the entitlements they’ve paid into and been promised. At the same time, we have more and more people taking part in a laundry list of government social programs, from healthcare and food assistance to public housing and welfare. 

If we don’t start treating Millennials – the largest demographic in our nation’s history – as individuals and hold them accountable for becoming productive members of society, how in the world are we going to increase productivity, return to robust growth, pay down our national debt, and fit the bill for all those entitlements?

When our largest generation is also our least productive, that’s a recipe for disaster. And while there is no magic solution to this vexing dilemma, those three resolutions are a pretty good start.
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« Reply #130 on: January 18, 2016, 07:01:11 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-key-reason-why-millennial-153500278.html
1/17/16
Here's a key reason why all of your millennial employees are quitting

Two-thirds of millennials plan to leave their current organization by 2020.

New research finds two-thirds of millennials plan to leave their current organization by 2020. One-quarter see themselves elsewhere within the next year.
While you could argue that young workers have always been inclined to job hop (and millennials are less inclined to do so), their reasons for restlessness may have changed.

Young workers' latest gripe? Insufficient opportunities to develop their leadership skills.

That's according to the fifth annual Global Millennials survey, cited on Bloomberg, for which Deloitte reached out to nearly 7,700 working college-educated professionals in 29 countries.

As many as 63% of respondents said their leadership skills are not being fully developed.

And it seems to be a key reason behind their willingness to leave: While 71% of those likely to leave in the next two years are dissatisfied with how their leadership skills are being developed, that number drops to 54% among those who are planning to stay beyond 2020.

As Punit Renjen, chief executive officer of Deloitte Global, told Bloomberg, young workers' pursuit of leadership skills even at the expense of switching jobs is a new phenomenon.

Perhaps it has something to do with the recent trend of flattening organizations, which was highlighted in The Washington Post. In an effort to cut costs, organizations have removed levels of bureaucracy, which means there's not much of a corporate ladder to climb anymore.

"The biggest driver of disengagement is people feeling like they're stuck in a job, and there's nothing for them there," one expert told The Post. "It's easier to quit your company and find a new job than find a new job within your own company."

Restoring some semblance of a corporate ladder may require a good deal of structural reorganization. In the meantime, managers can take small steps to help their employees develop into leadership positions.

The Wall Street Journal recommends creating mentoring programs in which workers are paired with more senior employees at their company. You can also rotate your employees through different jobs, so they gain new knowledge and expertise.

As for individual employees, US News & World Report suggests being proactive instead of waiting for a leadership position to open up.

If you work for a large company, you can speak to someone in human resources and ask what you should be learning to reach the next level. You can also volunteer to take charge of a particular project, so that management recognizes your capabilities.
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« Reply #131 on: January 20, 2016, 11:22:25 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/judge-judy-supreme-court-justice-college-graduates-223709181.html#
One in 10 college graduates believes Judge Judy sits on Supreme Court
Survey finds recent grads "alarmingly ignorant of America’s history and heritage."

1/19/16

Justice Judy?

Nearly one in 10 American college graduates believes Judith Sheindlin, a.k.a the wisecracking Judge Judy from syndicated afternoon television, is one of the nine justices currently serving on the United States Supreme Court. That's according to a report released Tuesday from American Council of Trustees and Alumni, which conducted a poll of 1,000 adults late last summer.

The survey found 9.6 percent of college graduates identified Judy as a Supreme Court justice, while 5.5 percent had Secretary of State John Kerry serving the country's highest court. Nearly 22 percent said Lawrence Warren Pierce — a former federal judge with an admittedly Supreme Court-worthy name — was a current Supreme Court justice.

(Sheindlin did serve as a supervising judge in Manhattan's family court, but the 73-year-old never served a higher court, retiring in 1996.)

What's more, nearly 60 percent of college grads polled incorrectly identified Thomas Jefferson as the "Father of the Constitution," while just 28 percent correctly identified James Madison.

When asked to identify the president of the Senate, a majority (54 percent) of college graduates correctly identified Vice President Joe Biden. But 32 percent chose then House Speaker John Boehner for that position.

The findings were part of a report titled "A Crisis in Civic Education" that concludes recent college graduates "are alarmingly ignorant of America’s history and heritage."

Ironically, the one thing college graduates are least ignorant about is their own constitutional rights, or lack thereof.

According to the survey, 84 percent of college graduates correctly said that the "right to an education" is not protected by the First Amendment.

But perhaps just as alarming, 2.5 percent of those surveyed said freedom of speech is not protected under the First Amendment.


To borrow a line from the snooty maître d' in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," I weep for the future.
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« Reply #132 on: January 20, 2016, 07:23:34 pm »

http://www.inc.com/john-brandon/heres-why-youre-having-such-a-hard-time-retaining-millennials.html
Here's Why You're Having Such a Hard Time Retaining Millennials
A new survey suggests that Millennials are looking for very specific perks in the workplace.


1/20/16

They show up wearing designer jeans and a Patagonia hoodie. They do some typing on a Macbook and drink a lot of coffee. Then, they leave for the next hot job offer.

That's right, we have a Millennial retention problem.

New research suggests Millennials are not happy with their employment options. And we're doing a terrible job figuring out how to retain them in the workplace.

A new report by Infosys and the Future Foundation this week blares the horn loud and clear. For starters, the survey results show that Millennials, in particular those who are 16 to 25, are anxious about their jobs. Many don't want to work for a startup. The common response in the survey was that they don't like the risk and excitement anymore. They want the stability of a corporate job.

Infosys also found that 40 percent of Millennials think their job will be outsourced or replaced by a robot and other automation within the next five years. That creates an even greater sense of insecurity. This age group walks in the door with a dark cloud hanging over their heads. They tend to view a job as remarkably transient, and think that it will likely lead to another job within a few months or even weeks.

Fortunately, there is something you can do about it, and the secret is contained right in the same Infosys report. The survey found that 80 percent of Millennials view training as incredibly important. It's a driver for their success. They view their future at a company as wholly dependent on the skills they learn and the education available. If they are not constantly learning new skills, they will find the door faster.

A staffing company called Yoh also told me about some ways to retain Millennials. Tied to this idea of needing constant training is a desire to provide constant feedback.

Yoh encourages companies to gain real-time insight into employee sentiment, to constantly ask about issues like management, salary, benefits, work-life balance. With Millennials, there's an expectation of inclusion and the ability to provide feedback. As explained in this helpful article on employee feedback, there are many apps that can help you track sentiment, such as Thymometrics and TINYhr.

Another factor in Millennials engagement has to do with the software you provide. I wrote about this last year, during the SxSW conference. Millennials want things to be easy. Yoh encourages companies to use software that is fun and intuitive, almost "entertaining," like a video game. If the tools you provide are complex and difficult, Millennials will likely look for a company that provides better options. Figure out how to gamify everything and you might keep them around longer.

Related to this, Yoh has found that employees need to be able to use these tools from anywhere and from any device. There is an expectation of mobility, so if an accounting app or HR tool only runs in your office on a desktop or laptop connected to the network, they see that as inferior. They want the freedom to work anywhere, and if the tools don't allow that, they'll find an employer who understands what they need. You can complain about the entitlement factors, but that won't help retain Millennials or make them any happier in the workplace.

The words "entitlement" and "expectation" are closely linked. In some ways, they are the same word. Millennials expect great things. They expect constant training, the opportunity to give feedback, and easy-to-use tools. Leave one of those things off the table, and you'll find that Millennials will find a new table.
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« Reply #133 on: January 21, 2016, 10:38:25 am »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anne-loehr/seven-frequently-asked-qu_b_8857548.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592
Seven Frequently Asked Questions From Those Who Manage Generation X and Generation Y
1/20/16

Do I have to hire Generation Y?

This is a real question I received while facilitating a workshop on engaging every age in the workplace. I love it! Curious what other questions I am often asked? Today I'll be giving you the inside scoop.

The questions people ask while I am speaking or facilitating workshops in their organization are extremely valuable. With every question I get, I learn more about the challenges managers, leaders and employees face in organizations of all sizes and industries, all over the map. That knowledge is good for me, and it's good for my clients. Plus, it's a lot of fun to see a light bulb go off for someone.

I've had a ton of learning opportunities in the last few months. In September alone I worked with ten organizations across five states.

What do I talk about to all these organizations? Well, many things. My keynotes and workshops have recently covered how to sell to Gen Y, the importance of feedback, how to coach employees rather than manage them, emotional intelligence, our country's ever present gender bias, listening skills, energy management, managing Generation X (born between 1965-1980), and Generation Y  (born between 1981 and 2001), and the four major workforce trends headed our way.

That's a lot of topics to digest, but today I only want to focus on one: Managing Generation X and Generation Y.

So take a seat next to the podium and listen to the most frequently asked questions about managing Gen X and Gen Y (also known as Millennials):

FAQs From Those Who Manage Generation X and Y

1. Do I have to hire Gen Y?

The answer is yes.

By the way, Gen Y has now surpassed the Baby Boomers as the largest living generation. So pay attention to this generation!

2. How can I communicate with Gen Y if I don't text?

This is an easy one--just send them cat videos! I'm kidding--sort of.

communicating with gen y

If you don't text, don't worry. Send Millennials videos on a topic they are interested in, engage in conversations via Skype, FaceTime or similar (it's almost face-to-face), or send them fun pictures of interesting places and people to start a conversation. You'll most likely enjoy this interaction too!

3. How will reading someone's body language help me get ahead at my job?

Reading the nonverbal cues will help you read between the lines of what's being said.

For example, if you ask someone to do something and they say yes with their arms crossed and a frown on their face, that may be a clue they're not happy about your request. Unhappy and disengaged team members are more likely to do a poor job.

nonverbal communication

Sometimes the person may say yes, but his body language is saying no. If you can notice nonverbal cues like this, you are then able to ask what's going on and address any problems before they well up into a larger conflict. You will also be able to better navigate relationships and build trust--all necessary skills for that sought-after promotion.

This question was asked by a scientist; read more about that here.

4. How do we adjust our organizational culture to Gen Y?

You don't. Your organizational culture is created by core values and behaviors. You don't change your values for a group of people. Instead, focus on the behaviors that match the organization's values, with Gen Y in mind.

For example, in the medical industry, patient focus is a value. Knowing that Gen Y likes to connect, what behavior do you want your employees to do to show that patients come first?

5. How do we best internally communicate with Gen Y & Gen X?

When it comes to either of these generations, short, quick messages benefit communication outcomes. Using videos and podcasts is also effective.

Long emails or voicemails might seem thoughtful and informative, but they aren't the best way to connect with these two generations.

6. What do we do when Gen Y comes to work late all the time?

Coming to work late is not a generational issue--it's about human behavior and motivation.

If an employee of any generation is always late, focus on clearly communicating your expectations to them, and always hold them (and yourself) accountable for those expectations.

7. How do we train Gen Y?

If you want to reach Gen Y in the most effective way possible, take into account that they are all individuals who learn best in their own way. If you cover all of your bases while training, you have a much higher chance at success.

The best way to do this is to incorporate the seven learning styles into your training program. There are spatial learners, linguistic learners, intrapersonal learners, interpersonal learners, musical learners, bodily-kinesthetic learners, and logical-mathematical learners.

Aren't these questions fun? Of course this list is just the tip of the iceberg...

In closing, here's a great quote from a workshop participant. This is good advice!

Don't be afraid of Gen X. They are not as scary as they seem.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Titus 2:9  Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things; not answering again;
Tit 2:10  Not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

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« Reply #134 on: January 25, 2016, 12:32:52 pm »

https://www.yahoo.com/realestate/celebrity-chefs-feed-cleveland-real-142800822.html
Cleveland Embraces Foodie Culture, Feeds Millennial Real Estate Market
CNBC
January 21, 2016

CLEVELAND — You can’t buy a great cheeseburger on the Internet, and that is the simple fact behind the new driver of downtown real estate development. Restaurants are the new retail, and celebrity chefs today are fast becoming just as powerful as names like Macy’s and Neiman Marcus were a half century ago.

“I think these days you’re finding our developers lead at the ground floor with the restaurant, and everything fills out around it. Retail these days as we all know because of the Internet, is a fairly precarious proposition,” said Chris Ronayne, president of University Circle Inc., a development, service and advocacy organization in this Ohio city.

Cleveland has embraced the “foodie” culture, as young millennials move downtown. They are the force behind a 70 percent jump in the city’s downtown population to over 13,000, according to the Downtown Cleveland Alliance. Apartment growth is already robust, with 4,000 units in the planning stages, and job growth in professional services and technology is helping to fill more and more housing. There is one common denominator in all the growth.

“We’ve got a dozen great-happening vibrant retail centers in Cleveland that are really part of the resurgence, and they seem to be over and over again led by the chefs,” said Ronayne.

Cleveland housing is also the most affordable in the nation, with an average sale price of $74,502, according to Coldwell Banker’s 2015 Home Listing Report. That is prompting more young residents to move back home after college. One of Cleveland’s celebrity chefs, Zack Bruell, said these are the people filling his restaurant tables and his kitchens.

“The kids that left Cleveland to be educated somewhere else would stay in Chicago, they’d go to San Francisco, Los Angeles or New York. Now those people are coming back to Cleveland. That’s the future,” said Bruell. “Look at what the cost of living in Cleveland is. It’s really affordable, and there is a sophistication here that exists in those markets, so you can practice your craft here and maybe buy a house, save some money and raise a family, which would be very difficult there.”

Bruell, who owns and operates 10 Cleveland-area restaurants, from a French brasserie to an Asian fusion eatery, said restaurants are driving downtown development and employment, and names like his are at the heart of it. Bruell said he has expanded his staff from 250 to 470 in just the past two years.

“The developers or the landlords come to me, so I’ve got, sort of have, an upper hand in choosing where I go. I’m going to transform a neighborhood or help transform a neighborhood. I’m part of that,” said Bruell, standing in L'Albatros, one of his restaurants that already had a good crowd seated around the bar on a cold Wednesday afternoon.

While brick-and-mortar retail is flailing across the nation, restaurant sales are growing. Stronger employment also means more people are eating out for lunch.

“Americans are using their [gas] pump price savings to go out to eat,” said Chris Christopher Jr., director of consumer economics at IHS Global Insight.

Cleveland has also benefited from a new government program that has awarded more than $160 million in tax credits to the city’s development projects, leveraging almost $1.5 billion in redevelopment, according to CBRE, a commercial real estate services company. Abandoned office buildings are being converted to apartments and hotels.

“As this wave of new residential properties has swelled, it has been a catalyst for development activity downtown. As more young workers are moving downtown, businesses have taken note, choosing to remain in the CBD rather than expand to the suburbs,” researchers wrote in a recent report by CBRE titled, “Resurgence in Midwest Secondary Markets.”

Restaurant growth is fueling downtown commercial property prices as well. Office vacancies are down and rents are up. Occupancy in apartments is at 97 percent, according to CBRE, which estimates downtown Cleveland has seen $5.5 billion of new investment since 2010.

“We look at neighborhoods these days as experience districts. Of course they’re housing, they’re also the return, 100 years later, to mixed use. They call it new urban, but it’s really true urban of 100 years ago, on these old street car corridors in these Midwest cities, where the retail commercial ground floors were at the base, the residents lived right above, and you’re finding that they’re both live/work 24/7 districts, but they’re also destination districts,” said Ronayne.

Cleveland may not seem like a destination city, but as more millennials struggle to afford big-city life, they are heading to the next best thing. Vibrant downtowns are no longer exclusive, and affordability is beginning to trump location. In a fast-changing economy, food still works, and if you cook it, foodies will come.

“Cleveland is no different than anywhere in the United States,” Bruell said as he put on his chef’s jacket and headed into the kitchen to whip up a cassoulet.
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« Reply #135 on: February 17, 2016, 05:08:09 pm »

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/personalfinance/the-real-reason-many-millennials-aren%e2%80%99t-saving-for-retirement/ar-BBpBeEV?ocid=spartandhp
The real reason many millennials aren’t saving for retirement
2/16/16

Millennials are oft-maligned as a flighty, entitled generation saddled with debt and too obsessed with food and travel to worry about saving for retirement. But that doesn’t match the reality.

Young people are just as likely — or even more likely — than other generations to sock their money away. And new research points to one major reason more 20- and 30-somethings aren’t creating a nest egg, even if they might want to.

Their employer doesn’t offer a workplace retirement plan.

Just 43% of millennials without an employer-sponsored retirement plan say they’re saving money consistently, according to a poll of 800 18-to-34-year-old voters released Wednesday by Young Invincibles, or YI, a millennial advocacy group. That’s compared with roughly three-quarters of millennials with a 401(k) or other employment-sponsored retirement plan, who are consistently saving, the poll found.

In other words, a millennial’s propensity to save may have more to do with his job status than his personality. This is particularly troubling given that past YI research indicates that the bulk of 18- to 24-year-olds work in sectors like retail and hospitality that don’t typically provide benefits to their lowest level workers, said Colin Seeberger, YI’s strategic campaign adviser.

“Millennials really do want to save,” he said. “We should be doing everything in our power to empower more young workers to be able to do the saving that is going to be so important to their financial futures.”

In the report, YI highlights one possible way to help more young adults save: state-sponsored retirement plans, which a handful of states have already adopted. By way of example, Illinois’ program, which will take effect in 2017, works like employer-sponsored retirement plans -- with contributions automatically deducted from workers’ paychecks — but workers can easily take the benefit from job to job. Most state-sponsored plans don’t match contributions, a typical benefit of an employer-sponsored retirement program.

Still, these types of programs have broad-based appeal among young voters, YI found. Nearly 80% of millennial republicans, 85% of millennial independents and nearly 90% of millennial democrats said they would support a state-sponsored retirement programs.

Increasing access to higher education through initiatives like free community college could also help more millennials save for retirement, Seeberger said. Young adults with more education are more likely to have access to employer-sponsored retirement programs, the poll found.

In the meantime, millennials with federal student loans who are hoping to save more for retirement should investigate their repayment options, Seeburger said. In some cases, they may qualify for programs that allow them to pay less money per month and they could put the savings toward their nest egg.

Young people without access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan can also turn to myRA, a “starter” retirement savings program launched by the federal government last year.

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« Reply #136 on: February 20, 2016, 01:28:37 am »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2016/02/19/young-evangelicals-south-carolina-primary-ted-cruz/80603326/
2/19/16
Young evangelicals in South Carolina scrutinize Bible talk on stump

GREENVILLE, S.C. — Trey Parker, 22, has devoted his life to God, but that doesn’t mean he thinks his president should invoke scripture on the stump.

Parker, who works at Clemson University’s campus ministry, said he is skeptical of Bible talk from candidates as Saturday's South Carolina primary neared.

“It’s a little bit odd when they go to New Hampshire and completely, totally ignore it, and then come here and they’re devout Christians,” he said. “It’s really easy to see through that.” Parker said he is undecided which of the GOP candidates he will support.

White evangelical voters made up about 65% of South Carolina primary voters in 2012, according to exit polls. The upstate region — which is home to 35% to 40% of voters statewide — has the largest concentration of religious conservatives in the state, said Jim Guth, a political science professor at Furman University in Greenville.

But Matthew Thomas, chairman of the South Carolina Federation of Young Republicans, said the importance of religious appeals from candidates may have less resonance among young South Carolinians. Having worked for years with politically minded college students across the state, Thomas said the top issues on their minds tend to be civil liberties and student loans — not whether a candidate shares their faith.

“We always discuss the evangelical bloc as this one bloc and they move together,” he said. “But it’s not moving in one solid direction. I don’t think it ever has.”

At a rally in Anderson, S.C., on Tuesday, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who has emphasized outreach to evangelicals, concluded with a verse from Second Chronicles that had the packed civic center whispering the verse in unison. Ben Carson used scripture twice during a Greenville town hall hosted by CNN on Wednesday. But at a rally in the same city on Thursday morning, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio stuck to more secular messages.

Anna Edwards, an 18-year-old evangelical Christian high school student who attended the Rubio rally, said although a candidate’s faith is important to informing her vote, she appreciates that Rubio reins it in.

“It’s a hard balance of not wanting to come across as too forceful with your religion but also letting your voters know that your religion is important to you,” said Edwards, who is from Greenville. “When you shout condemnation at people it doesn’t work very well.”

The front-runner in South Carolina, Donald Trump, has stumbled at times when discussing his faith, as when he referred to Second Corinthians as 2 Corinthians in a speech at Liberty University last month.

A recent CBS/YouGov showed that while 42% of South Carolina Republicans said they supported Trump, his support was much lower among those ages 18 to 29.

Although some young evangelicals are turned off by the injection of faith into their state’s primary, Elliott Kelley, a sophomore at Bob Jones University, said Cruz’s displays of religious devotion were a large part of the reason he began volunteering for the senator’s campaign.

“It’s not just a talking point. It’s something he believes in,” said Kelley, who is a national co-chair for Millennials for Cruz.

And while Kelley said he knows voters are not tasked with electing a “preacher in chief,” he sees a candidate’s religion as something that informs every aspect of his policies.

But to Parker, the Clemson graduate without a clear favorite, the future president’s faith should be left outside the doors of the Oval Office.

Asked whether a candidate needs to at least identify as Christian to receive his vote, Parker answered with scripture: “Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar’s and unto God the things that are God’s.”
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« Reply #137 on: March 22, 2016, 04:14:31 pm »

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« Reply #138 on: April 04, 2016, 08:52:05 pm »

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« Reply #139 on: April 25, 2016, 03:56:29 pm »

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« Reply #140 on: April 25, 2016, 06:39:30 pm »

IT'S OFFICIAL: Millennials are now America's largest living generation
http://www.businessinsider.com/millennials-are-the-largest-american-generation-2016-4
4/25/16

The Pew Research Center recently analyzed US Census Bureau population estimates of America's population as of July 1, 2015, and they found that last year, millennials outnumbered baby boomers for the first time ever.

There is no formal definition of where the cutoffs lie for different generations, but Pew identifies five major living adult US generations:
•The Greatest Generation, born before 1928
•The Silent Generation, born between 1928 and 1945
•The Baby Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964
•Generation X, born between 1965 and 1980
•Millennials, born between 1981 and 1997

Using those definitions, Pew estimated that as of last year, there were about 75.4 million millennials, outnumbering the approximately 74.9 million baby boomers.

Pew noted that this crossover occurs as the millennial population continues to grow in size because of young immigrants moving to the US, while the boomers are aging and beginning to die off.

Here's Pew's chart showing projections for the sizes of the different generations going forward. For more, check out Pew's full report:

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« Reply #141 on: May 27, 2016, 03:58:16 pm »

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2016/0527/Millennials-living-with-parents-It-s-not-just-a-weak-economy
Millennials living with parents? It's not just a weak economy.

For the first time on record, more Americans age 18 to 34 are living with their parents than with a spouse or significant other.
   
5/27/16

For the first time since at least 1880, more young adults are living with their parents than with a spouse or significant other.

That stunning shift, reported this week by the Pew Research Center, reflects twin patterns of economic change in America.

It's partly a barometer of the economic challenges facing the Millennials as they navigate launching careers and households in a more difficult economy. But it's also driven by a longer-term story of greater gender equality and the way women’s rising earning power has made them less focused on early marriages.

“This turn of events is fueled primarily by the dramatic drop in the share of young Americans who are choosing to settle down romantically before age 35,” writes Richard Fry in Tuesday’s Pew analysis, which was based on US Census surveys.

The analysis finds that in 2014, 32.1 percent of adults age 18 to 34 were living with their parents. This inched above those who were married or cohabiting (31.6 percent), the heads of single households or with roommates (14 percent), or those in some other living arrangement such as living with another relative or in a dormitory (22 percent).

The share of young people living with parents isn’t actually at record levels. It’s higher than in 1960 but below a 1940-era peak of about 35 percent.

The big change is that the share of age 18-to-34 adults living with a spouse or partner has fallen sharply from a peak of 62 percent around 1960. That reflects later marriages, an overall decline in marriage, and economic shifts. (Some couples who are married or cohabiting can’t afford to live on their own.)

Cultural or social factors are at work alongside the economic ones.

​For one, as a Monitor cover story on "Singles nation" noted, young Americans nowadays often ​have​ an extended period after college when life revolves as much around a tribe of friends as the search for a soul mate.

The report also notes that about 1 in 4 young people may never marry – a projection based on prior Pew research using 2012 data. 

Although the decline or slowdown in marriage is a broad trend, the patterns for men and women are somewhat different.

For men, living with parents reflects that they are doing relatively worse in the job market than they used to. Overall, employment among age 18-to-34 men has been falling since it peaked in 1960 at 84 percent. In 2014, only 71 percent had jobs. And adjusted for inflation, their wages also been eroding since 1970 and fell significantly during the 2000 to 2010 period.

For women, the same decades since 1970 have seen rising labor participation, education opportunities, and pay. That has coincided with a decline in early marriage.

"Women have opportunities today and they’re looking for different kinds of relationships and [staying] in school,” says Barbara Schneider, a University of Michigan sociologist.

Even with the general decline in marriage, women age 18 to 34 are still (unlike men) a bit more likely to live with a spouse or partner than with their parents.

Other social trends could be at work, too, such as the rise of single-parent families. "Not only are single-parent families far more common and socially acceptable than they were in the past, but scholars studying low-income or working-class communities have discovered that the women in these communities no longer think it is realistic to depend on the men in their lives," wrote economist Isabel Sawhill in a 2014 New York Times opinion article. "They have seen or experienced too much divorce, infidelity, substance abuse and other bad behavior to trust or fully rely on their partners."

For many Millennials, the delay of marriage or cohabiting means waiting longer to have children, and in that Mr. Fry sees a possible up side: Parents may have increased maturity or financial security to provide a stable home for their children.

Financial security, though, isn’t easy to come by these days. The Great Recession made it harder for many Millennials to forge out on their own. College enrollments spiked, partly as an escape from the flagging labor market. But that added to the weight of college debt.

Even today, the labor market is tight, housing costs in many cities are high, and young people are still racking up student loans.

All this dispels the notion that Millennials are just taking the easy route of moving back home to mommy and daddy, says Professor Schneider. In many cases, it makes sense to stay home longer if parents’ living situations permit.

“They have a breakup with a boyfriend or a girlfriend, or their roommates are really awful or they may get a job in another city and they need to come back to their parents house to get a little bit of time,” she says. “This isn’t a case that they’re running home to be coddled by their mother and their father.”
   
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« Reply #142 on: May 31, 2016, 03:25:47 pm »

https://gma.yahoo.com/tell-kid-might-addicted-cellphone-144342992--abc-news-parenting.html#
How to Tell If Your Kid Might Be Addicted to the Cellphone
5/27/16

Kids who’re overly attached to their phones, possibly crossing the line into addiction, can be a problem for many families.

Jason Clark, 15, of Little Rock, Arkansas, is no different. He loves his smartphone, but he’s so attached to it that his family worries he might one day need therapy to get his habit under control.

“Good Morning America” asked Jason to put an app on his phone to track his phone use.

For two days in a row, he clocked in at six hours of screen time.

His mom, Tomika Clark, said there are days her son will spend eight or even 12 hours on the phone morning, noon and night, at home, at school, and even at the library.

Between social media, music, texting and gaming, the hours add up.

Clark said she thinks his phone use has crossed a line.

“When you’re talking about addiction, you’re talking about, ‘I can’t live without it,’” she explained, adding that she “knows he is” dependent on his phone.

Cellphone addiction isn’t officially designated as a clinical disorder like drug or alcohol addiction, but licensed Maryland psychologist Ed Spector, an expert on the healthy use of technology, thinks it should be.

He treats people who have what he calls “compulsive use of technology.”

“Their brains change in similar ways to real chemical-addicts,” Spector told ABC News. “If you talk to the parents of my clients, they come in and they say, ‘My kid’s like a junkie.’ They feel like it’s an addiction.”


But when does it go from being normal, acceptable teenage behavior to a problem that needs to be addressed?

Spector said not to just focus on the hours.

“When we talk about compulsion, it’s not the behavior, it’s whether you have control over it,” he said.

Clark says she worries Jason fits the definition and his compulsion is taking away from other parts of his life. She said as his smartphone use has gone up, his grades have gone down and she has noticed changes in his behavior.

“When somebody freaks out because you’re taking something they have an emotional attachment to, it is an addition,” she said.

Jason said he sees nothing wrong or abnormal about his phone use and doesn’t believe it has a major effect on other parts of his life, though he admits he could probably stand to cut back.

Caroline Knorr, parenting editor for Common Sense Media, outlined several phone-obsession warning signs: Depression, slipping grades, hostility, highly sensitive, strong preoccupation with phone and not being interested in activities they used to love.

Knorr also provided tips for parents to limit their kids’ phone use: Set up screen-free times and zones, limit multitasking, prohibit phones in the bedroom at night and be a good digital role model.
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« Reply #143 on: May 31, 2016, 06:35:58 pm »

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/starbucks-ceo-on-presidential-election---what-don-t-need-is-division-145805041.html

Quote
“What would we say to all of the young people in America watching the behavior of the candidates over the last few months in the presidential primary season?” he said. “Is that the kind of behavior we want to model for young children in America? We clearly have such significant, substantive problems that require civility, a high level of intellect, and what we don’t need is division and vitriol and the kind of things that would divide us.”
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« Reply #144 on: June 07, 2016, 05:18:41 pm »

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/06/07/southern-baptists-see-th-year-membership-decline.html
6/7/16
Southern Baptists see 9th year of membership decline

NASHVILLE, Tenn. –  The Southern Baptist Convention lost more than 200,000 members in 2015.

It's the ninth straight year of decline for the nation's largest Protestant denomination, which also saw baptisms drop by more than 10,000 in 2015.

According to denomination statistics released on Tuesday, membership stands at 15.3 million, down from 15.5 million in 2014. Baptisms fell to just a little more than 295,000.

Baptisms are an important measure for the Nashville-based denomination because of its strong commitment to evangelism.

Some denominational leaders emphasized an increase in the number of Southern Baptist churches in 2015, mostly due to new churches started by SBC pastors.

But Executive Committee President and CEO Frank Page refused to put a positive spin on the declines, exclaiming in a news release, "God help us all!"
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« Reply #145 on: June 09, 2016, 03:36:56 pm »

Pro 19:15  Slothfulness casteth into a deep sleep; and an idle soul shall suffer hunger.

http://nypost.com/2016/06/08/shocking-study-reveals-millennials-dont-like-doing-stuff/
6/8/16

They’re the greatest generation — of couch potatoes.

A growing number of 18- to-34-year-olds, the world’s largest age group, prefer to unwind by staying in, watching Netflix and ordering Seamless, rather than by getting down at a club or bellying up to a bar.

“The weekend is my time to relax and not do all that stuff,” says Brandon Gillespie, 32, who works in media production. “Once I’m home, I don’t want to go out.”

He’s not alone. More young people are choosing to spend a quiet evening at home.

A study by Taylor Nelson Sofres, a consumer research agency, found that, on average, millennials stream 2.7 hours of TV shows a day, while the earlier generation, Gen X, does about 1.8 hours.


Millennials, it seems, have discovered that the need to socialize face-to-face is waning, as food, shopping, friends, entertainment and even sex are all an app tap away.

The study also found that millennials spend about 3.1 hours a day on their mobile devices, compared with Generation X’s 1.7 hours.

Gillespie, a Harlem resident, watches Netflix and YouTube clips on his phone or computer in his one-bedroom apartment.

As for the challenges of dating, the bachelor says society is moving away from the traditional, “meet cute” mold.

“You know, the whole ‘Netflix and chill,’ whatever you think about it . . . it’s kind of a trend,” he says.

For some, the price of nightlife isn’t worth the payoff.

“It’s cheaper to just stay home,” says Kimberly Pena, 21, a junior at Montclair State University in New Jersey. “Nowadays, $20 won’t get you too far.”

One thing millennials are not bingeing on is booze.

A 2016 survey by Heineken found that when millennials do bother to venture outside, 75 percent drink in moderation.

**Alchohol is forbidden in scripture, PERIOD!

Proverbs 31:4  It is not for kings, O Lemuel, it is not for kings to drink wine; nor for princes strong drink:
Pro 31:5  Lest they drink, and forget the law, and pervert the judgment of any of the afflicted.
Pro 31:6  Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish, and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts.
Pro 31:7  Let him drink, and forget his poverty, and remember his misery no more.


A study by Child Trends Data Bank also found that binge drinking among teens is at an all-time low: Only 19 percent of high school seniors admitted to binge drinking in 2014, compared with a record high 41.4 percent in 1980.

But experts say staying indoors can hurt a person’s emotional well-being.

“They’re not consuming alcohol, but they’re consuming a lot of media — and it’s depressing them
,” says Manhattan clinical psychologist Dr. Michael Brustein.

“I can’t tell you how often I hear [patients] say, ‘I did nothing this weekend and I feel terrible.’ ”

Some might be chained to their beds because of a penchant for sleepiness, too.

Dr. Sanjeev Kothare, a neurologist at NYU Langone Medical Center, says the increase in cases of exhaustion among young people could be as high as 50 percent.

Brooklyn theater artist Misha Lambert, 22, finds her work very exhausting.

“[It] requires me to really go out and to be really social, which is very tiring for me,” she says. “I just want to turn off that part of me and I just want to sit around and be comfortable.”

Gillespie admits that while many of his friends are “homebodies,” some do worry about his hermit-like tendencies.

“I have to convince people that it’s OK,” he says.

“I enjoy not having to interact with people.”
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« Reply #146 on: June 09, 2016, 10:15:16 pm »


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« Reply #147 on: June 19, 2016, 03:01:47 pm »

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« Reply #148 on: June 21, 2016, 08:11:40 pm »

http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article55621.html
Believe it or Not: More Kids Live At Home Now than Since The Great Depression
6/21/16

We all know the situation in the markets is dire.
 Like, really, everyone knows.
 There’s an old phrase from Margaret Thatcher’s day (and mine, I suppose) that has recently come back into use: There is no alternative.
 There’s even an acronym: TINA.

There is no alternative example of a campaign advertising material of the CDU for the 1994 election for the Landtag of Thuringia.

That’s quaint, and all, but this meatily numbered piece shows the heart of what that phrase means.

 There is no alternative, the markets will correct. They have to, regardless of how hard the Fed fights.

 We’re long overdue, and the heart of this piece is the fact that we haven’t been here, in this way, since a year or so, after the Great Depression.

 More 18- to 34-year-olds are now living with their parents than at any time since 1960, when the number hit an all-time low of 20%.

 It’s now jumped up to 32.1%, and is as high as 36% for those with a high school education or less. The number jumped to 28% in 2007, with the Great Recession catapulting it to 32% in just seven years.

 For the first time in history, living with parents has surpassed living with a spouse or partner, with over 30% of children now living with parents, as the chart below from Pew Research shows. Fourteen percent live alone or as a single parent, with more women at 16% than men at 13%.

The “other” category includes living with siblings, friends, and grandparents, or in dormitories.

 The reason for this long-term trend is the decline of romantic coupling, and couples – once they do form – holding off on tying the knot.

 The median age of marrying couples rose from 21.3 years old (22 for men, 20 for women) in 1956 to 27.8 today (28.3 for men, 27.2 for women). It has jumped two years just since the Great Recession of 2008.

 Twenty percent today have never married and Pew says that 25% of adults will never get married… at any age! Financial security and a steady job is a prime reason for the holdouts. Men with only a high school education, or less, see 23% never married versus 17% for women.

 For those with a high school, or less, education, it’s 25% versus post grad degrees at 14% for men, and 20% and 16%, respectively, for women.

 With higher joblessness, the rate of unmarried men sits at 36% for blacks and 26% for Latinos. Asians are at 19% and whites at only 16%.

 There was only one time in modern history where a higher percentage of kids lived with parents and that was 35% in 1940 – in the late years of the Great Depression.

I am confident this rate will exceed that in the Great Depression ahead by 2022.

 Not surprisingly, divorced people have less interest in marrying again than people who have never gotten married in the first place. Almost half, or 45%, say “no thanks” to ever getting married again.

 The most telling charts are the following ones. The most dramatic shift has come from non-college grads, falling from 60% of those married or living together in 1960, down to 27% in 2014, with 36% living with parents.

For the college-educated, people who were married or living together peaked in 1960 at 79% and has declined to only 46%, with 19% living with parents.


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« Reply #149 on: July 03, 2016, 10:13:34 pm »

http://www.refinery29.com/2014/12/80029/millennials-not-having-kids
7/2/16
This Is Why Millennials Aren't Procreating

Quick question: Do you currently have over $245,000 in your bank account? That's how much the U.S. Department of Agriculture projected it would cost a middle-income couple to raise a child to the age of 18 in 2013. For higher-income families, that cost ballooned to $455,000. Those numbers are officially sending many millennials to take their birth control pills.

The Centers for Disease Control released data earlier this year which showed that birth rates for teenagers and women in their 20s hit record lows in 2013. Meanwhile, birth rates for women in their 30s and 40s rose. In a recent The New York Times op-ed, writer Jessica Grose argues that this data indicates not a sign of millennial selfishness, but one of selflessness.

"This is not because millennials are stuck in a state of perpetual adolescence and unwilling to make the sacrifice that children entail," Grose says. "On the contrary: putting off children is one of the most financially responsible decisions that a young person can make."

Grose mentions how much child care costs, plus the fact that many millennials are still swimming in student loan debt. "Millennials, like most groups of millions of people, are rational actors. They just don’t want to have kids they can’t afford," she concludes.

It looks like millennials might be the "cost generation," rather than the lost. (The New York Times)
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