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Matthew 24:34

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January 11, 2018, 06:31:04 am teppezuhodd says: That is the best technology we have now
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
September 11, 2017, 03:40:40 am Christian40 says: those in america should better repent or things will only get worse
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« Reply #150 on: July 04, 2016, 01:20:12 pm »

I disagree. This is one of the most emotionally immature,
lazy, irresponsible generations ever, thanks to psychology-taught-dumbed-down parenting that scorns spankings and exalts enabling with material junk.
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« Reply #151 on: July 13, 2016, 05:14:28 pm »

GENERATION JOB-SHY Millennials are lazy, self-indulgent and lack the initiative to be successful, warns lifestyle guru Martha Stewart

Millionaire slams feckless, molly-coddled youngsters who live off the bank of mum and dad

The millionaire lifestyle guru Martha Stewart has issued a stinging criticism of the millennial generation and claimed youngsters are too LAZY to get ahead.

Too many members of “Generation Snowflake” are still living with their parents rather than getting out into the world and making something of their lives, the celebrity businesswoman raged.

She is the latest person to rail against a mollycoddled generation who have turned universities into “safe spaces” to avoid testing their ideas in the crucible of debate and called on conference attendees to “make jazz hands” because clapping is too traumatic for their sensitive souls.

“I think every business is trying to target millennials,” she said in an interview with Luxury Listings.

“But who are millennials? Now we are finding out that they are living with their parents.

“They don’t have the initiative to go out and find a little apartment and grow a tomato plant on the terrace.

“I understand the plight of younger people. The economic circumstances out there are very grim. But you have to work for it. You have to strive for it. You have to go after it.”

Martha’s career began when she landed a job as a model. She then went on to become a stockbroker before launching a cookbook which turned her into a lifestyle expert and TV personality.

She is now worth about £166million.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1436480/millennials-are-lazy-self-indulgent-and-lack-the-initiative-to-be-successful-warns-lifestyle-guru-martha-stewart/
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« Reply #152 on: July 14, 2016, 01:24:53 pm »

Eze 16:49  Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fulness of bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters, neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy.
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« Reply #153 on: August 02, 2016, 10:25:34 am »

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« Reply #154 on: August 02, 2016, 11:31:33 am »

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« Reply #155 on: August 09, 2016, 05:49:04 pm »

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/article94525187.html
8/9/16

August 9, 2016 11:21 AM
 
Poll: Young Americans overwhelmingly favor LGBT rights

Young people in America overwhelmingly support LGBT rights when it comes to policies on employment, health care and adoption, according to a new survey.


FILE - In this June 26, 2016, file photo, a woman holds a rainbow flag during the NYC Pride Parade in New York. Young Americans overwhelmingly say they support LGBT rights when it comes to employment, health care and adoption. That’s according to a new GenForward survey, which finds 92 percent of young adults support HIV and AIDs prevention, 90 percent support equal employment, and 80 percent support LGBT adoption. Across ethnic groups, large majorities of Americans aged 18 to 30 favor training police on transgender issues, government support for LGBT youth organizations and insurance coverage for transgender health issues.
     

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« Reply #156 on: August 15, 2016, 01:24:15 pm »

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/c3ea98a1-2529-390a-8113-5c1a920e856f/for-millennials%2C-a-consensus.html
For Millennials, a consensus on transgender bathroom use
8/15/16

Millennials have reached a broad consensus on an issue that divides the nation: By nearly 2-1, they say transgender individuals should be able to use public bathrooms designated for the gender they identify with, not the sex they were born. A new USA TODAY/Rock the Vote survey of those 18 to 35 years
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« Reply #157 on: August 16, 2016, 07:27:42 pm »

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« Reply #158 on: August 18, 2016, 12:23:10 pm »

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« Reply #159 on: August 20, 2016, 07:28:43 pm »

http://www.inc.com/matthew-jones/13-ways-millenials-are-transforming-the-world.html
13 Ways Millenials Are Transforming The World
 
Watch out, Millenials are here to stay.


8/16/16

Older generations throw a lot of shade at Millenials and overlook the way Millenials are transforming the world for the better.

They say that Millenials are entitled because we received participation trophies, but if you want to point fingers, blaming toddlers for the values they inherited seems a lot saying, "I did not have sexual relations with that woman." See, we 20-somethings grew up with adults lying to us to evade responsibility.

Millenials are a product of what came before and a lot more than that. We 20-somethings face a lot of social pressures, not the least of which is fixing the economy, climate, and the political atmosphere that previous generations ruined.

We are in a unique time in history, and we've learned several things that give us advantages over the elder generations.

Here are 13 ways that Millenials that are transforming the world:

1. Dedication to the local and digital community.

20-somethings are raising global and local consciousness through engagement with their community.

Using tools like social media to highlight local issues, Millenials are involved and spreading information to other communities so that they can create positive change in their surroundings.

2. Knowing that actions matter more than words.

Many things that we were told as children didn't end up being true - going to college isn't a necessity and it doesn't guarantee job security like it used to.

Our generation learned that we have to take action - we need to protest the status quo if we want lasting change, and we don't want to waste our time on activities that don't add values to our lives.

3. Believing that self-expression is a necessity.

Selfies may look selfish, but 20-somethings were the first age group to have immediate and easy access to the internet--a place where we could invent a new self-image. As technology became integrated into our lives, we discovered new possibilities for self-expression and connecting to people around the world.

4. Improving research.

Unlike older generations, Millenals learned how to utilize Google to learn anything and everything. Instead of attempting to memorize information that's freely available, 20-somethings have perfected the ability to learn new data in a few short clicks.

5. Believing is love free of judgment.

Millenails understand love and don't allow their own biases to place restrictions on other people. 20-somethings have sex prior to marriage, split household chores, encourage women to work, and want the LGBTQ community to have the same rights as straight couples.

6. Recognizing that connecting and disconnecting is important.

Millenials are a sandwich generation that acknowledges the importance of being connected and has the autonomy needed to unplug and recharge--something that the generation after us or following lacks.

7. Appreciating the gift of portable music.

20-somethings were around when there were things called cassette players, then saw the evolution of cool-looking portable CD players, then experienced the magic of mp3 files, then finally enjoyed the iPod and the free music of LimeWire before it corrupted your entire family's home computer.

8. Improving the entrepreneurial spirit.

Millenials recognize that being an entrepreneur is a mindset, not just a role. Having mastered the art of personal branding, 20-somethings are creating new streams of revenue and developing products that are having an immediate and lasting impact on the world.

9. Shifting the focus away from television.

Older generations were glued to the television, but Millenials know that the computer in their hands leads to quicker gratification and better quality shows on the move. We place less importance on the television and cable than any preceding generation, and are responsible for the streaming innovation.

10. Making an impact in elections.

Millenials are responsible for the massive transmission of information on social media during election season.

20-somethings spread knowledge that creates dialog and challenges older family members to recognize the importance of social issues. These young-adults create the passion and grass root campaigns that shape political discourse.

11. Mastering the personal brand.

In middle and high school, Millenials started learning the art of personal branding, but back then, they just called them Xanga, Myspace, and eventually Facebook.

20-somethings are the first generation to master the craft of creating brand awareness, which is one reason so many entrepreneurs are pioneering diverse industries.

12. Being very health conscious.

Where did all of the vegans, vegetarians, and gluten free friends come from? That's right, Millenials are thinking about the impact of food on their bodies, the environment, and the livestock.

20-somethings are one of the most health-conscious generations because they grew up with excessive amounts of sugars that resulted in the so-called obesity epidemic. Thanks mom and dad.

13. Knowing that money isn't the only measure of success.

While Millenials know that money is important, most don't believe that it's the only way to measure success.

Due to the troubled economy in our young adulthood, many 20-somethings were forced to learn that there's more to life than making big purchases.

With all of these positive traits, Millenials will continue changing the world for a long time coming. The only question is when we'll start acknowledging and celebrating their accomplishments.
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« Reply #160 on: August 21, 2016, 11:48:01 pm »

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« Reply #161 on: August 25, 2016, 06:18:29 pm »

University of Chicago Warns Freshmen Not to Expect ‘Trigger Warnings’ and ‘Safe Spaces’

The  University of Chicago has warned incoming freshmen not to expect a culture of ‘safe spaces’ and ‘trigger warnings’ during their time at university.
In a letter, the school warns students that the university is characterised by its “commitment to freedom of expression,” and therefore the university “does not support trigger warnings,” “does not cancel speakers because their topics might prove controversial,” and “does not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces’ where students can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own.”

The letter is written by the University’s Dean of Students, Dr. John Ellison, who also cites one of the university’s most distinguished professor’s recounting of Chicago University’s commitment to academic freedom, resulting in a history of debate and even scandal.

The warning is likely to come as a shock to incoming social justice warriors, who regularly attempt to shut down events, speeches, and discussion across American college campuses, citing their need for ‘safe spaces’ from dangerous ideas.

Breitbart Tech editor Milo Yiannopoulos’s Dangerous **** Tour  has clashed with this campus culture, leading to numerous controversies across American college campuses.

The full letter can be read below:

Dear Student,

Welcome and congratulations on your acceptance to the college at the University of Chicago. Earning a place in our community of scholars is no small achievement and we are delighted that you selected Chicago to continue your intellectual journey.

Once here you will discover that one of the University of Chicago’s defining characteristics is our commitment to freedom of inquiry and expression. Members of our community are encouraged to speak, write, listen, challenge, and learn, without fear of censorship. Civility and mutual respect are vital to all of us, and freedom of expression does not mean the freedom to harass or threaten others. You will find that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion, and even disagreement. At times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.

Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support so called ‘trigger warnings,’ we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces’ where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own.

Fostering the free exchange of ideas is a University priority – building a campus that welcomes people of all backgrounds. Diversity of opinion is a fundamental strength of our community. The members of our community must have the freedom to espouse and explore a wide range of ideas.

I am enclosing a short paragraph by Dean John W. Boyer, the Martin A. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor in History and Dean of the College, which provides a helpful primer. This monograph, entitled ‘Academic Freedom and the Modern University: The Experience of The University of Chicago,’ recounts the history of debate, and even scandal, resulting from our history of academic freedom.

Again, welcome to the University of Chicago. See you in September!

Sincerely,

John (Jay) Ellison, PhD

Dean of Students in the College

http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/08/25/university-chicago-warns-freshmen-not-expect-trigger-warnings-safe-spaces/
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« Reply #162 on: August 27, 2016, 07:43:09 am »

https://pjmedia.com/faith/2016/08/26/is-trump-hysteria-driving-millennials-away-from-evangelicalism/
Is Trump Hysteria Driving Millennials Away from Evangelicalism?

8/26/16

It is no secret that many faithful Christians have struggled to support Donald Trump. Yet some, most notably the Bible scholar Wayne Grudem, have not only endorsed the Republican nominee, but declared it a "moral imperative" to do so.

In "How Evangelicals are Losing an Entire Generation," lifestyle theology blogger Amy Gannett explains why the increasing worship of Trump among Christian leaders is alienating many in the millennial generation. She strongly identifies as an evangelical, but she warns, "I fear that we're going to lose an entire generation because of the actions, words, and teachings of some evangelicals. Including Wayne Grudem."

Gannett points out that millennials and Baby Boomers have more than a generation gap — they have a morality gap.

Grudem's article argues that it is morally constraining on the Christian person to vote for Donald Trump, particularly citing things like Trump's upholding of religious rights for Christian schools and businesses, support of traditional marriage, and pro-life support of the rights of the unborn. Grudem dismisses accusations of Trump being a racist, anti-(legal) immigrant, and misogynistic. He feels Trump has been misunderstood, quoted out of context, and the victim of an unfair media.

What Grudem does, then, is sets [sic] up a hierarchy of morality. He is willing to hold some moral values (religious rights for Christian schools and businesses, support of traditional marriage, and pro-life notions) above others (the equality of races, genders, and ethnicities). All are moral concepts, all require a moral stance, and Grudem has chosen which he prefers over others.

Gannett acknowledges that most people have moral hierarchies — this is not unique to Grudem. But he "has chosen to be old guard, predominantly upholding political issues that are less felt by our generation."

The lifestyle theology blogger does not reject these moral issues — such as the rights of the unborn — but she explains that millennials prioritize other issues as well. "Millennials feel the daily pangs of racial tension, a deep desire for equality for all, and a propensity toward the social justice issues surrounding the refugee crisis."

"Evangelical leaders like Grudem are using their political and social weight on issues close to their generation, and are neglecting the moral imperatives to seek justice, peace, and equality for the Black community, the immigrant community, and the refugee community (and a slew of others)," Gannett declares. Neglecting these issues is suicide for millennial outreach.

"We cannot call a candidate 'good,' as Grudem does with Trump, who has made racist remarks. We will not call a candidate 'good' who has demoralized and dehumanized women on national television. We will not buy into the hierarchy of Grudem's proposed morals over others," she writes. This millennial emphasis on racial diversity can partially be explained by liberal indoctrination in school, but it should not just be dismissed because of that.

The Christian message — and the American ideal, for that matter — is not limited to any particular race or nation. The Gospel is for all people, and by allying with Trump's apparent racism and misogyny, Christian leaders weaken their witness to the many who consider The Donald's campaign bigoted. This is a serious concern, not to be dismissed by considering anti-Trump millennials or racial minorities or women a lost cause. Trump will come and go, but these groups can have long memories.

Gannett also notes another age gap on attitudes to "progress." She notes that evangelical leaders warn against progressivism, but she responds that "we actually like the progress." She praises changes like these: "We actually like that women are on their way to equal pay, we like that you can't make a racist comment as a public figure and go unnoticed, and we like that there are more female theologians and teachers and professors than ever before in American history."

There are many problems with the "equal pay" argument, but Gannett has a strong point here. There are social changes that millennials like (for good or ill). Christians should be willing to praise some changes while still standing by a biblical and scientific understanding of humanity (on issues like homosexuality and transgenderism). Unfortunately, the political correctness she mentions as positive has also had bad consequences — which is one of the driving factors of Trump's campaign.
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« Reply #163 on: September 02, 2016, 12:43:39 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-why-millennials-buying-gift-113000203.html
Here's Why Millennials Are Buying Gift Cards for Themselves
9/2/16

Young folks have found a new use for refillable gift cards. They are buying them for themselves.

A new report issued this week by analyst firm Mercator Advisory Group found a big jump in purchase of these "retailer-specific" cards among millennials.

"Nearly 3-in-5 young adult respondents indicated they bought them during the previous year, up from less than half of young adults who did so in the 2015 survey," the report said.

The intermingling of these gift cards and apps seems to be behind the trend.

Increases in overall retail refillable gift card sales were particularly sharp in the 18- to 24-year-old age range, which saw an increase from 44% to 53%; and among those ages 25 to 34, which jumped from 48% to 57%. The rise is even more dramatic when a three-year trend is considered — among the 18- to 34-year-old set, the jump was from 39% to 57% from 2013 to 2016. During that same stretch, gift card sales actually dropped among those over age 65, and were nearly flat for 35- to 64-year-olds.

Why the increase among young people? Gift cards aren't just for gifts anymore. Young folks are loading gift cards onto retailer apps, and using the money on themselves, said report author Karen Augustine.

"Retailers are introducing more mobile-based apps and offers when using their loyalty and prepaid programs, which may be fueling this growth in retailer gift card purchases," Augustine said. "Young adults continue to lead this mobile revolution and growing use of prepaid cards as a money management tool."

The Starbucks Effect

Starbucks continues to lead the way with its coffee cash app, which is little more than a gift-card management tool with a quirky loyalty program sprinkled on top. Still, the Starbucks app is a raging success. About $1.2 billion of customer cash is now loaded on the app/gift card tool, which means Starbucks holds more cash than some banks. About one-quarter of all transactions at U.S. Starbucks stores is now conducted via app. That serves customer loyalty, and it also saves Starbucks a killing on credit card transaction fees.

Meanwhile, the Starbucks app offers a huge advantage to busy young adults — those who pay via the app can skip to the end of the line, pick up their drink, and go.

"I believe that millennials are taking advantage of the plethora of mobile apps that retailers have introduced that support their prepaid cards, and they start using more prepaid cards in general for their own use," Augustine told me via email. "We see more prepaid cards being bought for personal use, not just for gifts."

Other retailers, like coffee competitor Dunkin' Donuts, have noticed Starbucks' success, and now allow consumers to store value via gift cards on their own apps — a feature sometimes called "digitized stored value."

"The discount retailers are doing well in this space, despite their late entry," Augustine said. "Dunkin' is a regional brand that we do track, but national fast food chains are popular, too."

Plenty of Room to Grow

On the other hand, a Forrester report issued last year suggests there's plenty of room for retail-specific apps to grow. It found that 60% of consumers who use a smartphone to shop online have fewer than two retailer-specific apps on their phone; and only 18% of app users have used that app to store gift card value.

While plenty of store apps let users check gift card balances, or even buy and send gift cards, a study by RSR Research called the Digital Gifting Benchmark Study found that few popular apps complete the cycle and let consumers store and spend money via the app.

"Too many retailers still offer no option to buy gift cards via mobile web or app," the report said. Only 12 out of 100 retailers studied allowed consumers to load a gift card into their app.

The study showed Sephora, Starbucks, Dunkin' Donuts, Home Depot, and Amazon as the retailers with the best digital gift card experience.

Prepaid refillable gift cards can be a great way to gift people, not just yourself, but they won't help if you need to improve your credit scores as cardholder use is not typically reported to the credit reporting agencies.

If you're looking to build credit but don't think you'll qualify for a traditional credit card, you may want to consider a secured credit card, which requires a cash collateral deposit that serves as a credit line for the account. (You can see where your credit currently stands by viewing your two free credit scores each month on Credit.com.)
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« Reply #164 on: September 12, 2016, 11:27:59 am »

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« Reply #165 on: November 21, 2016, 08:42:46 am »

https://www.yahoo.com/celebrity/m/6e0a58b0-b247-31c7-87dc-95f3061e3b30/ss_why-%26%2339%3B80s-babies-are.html
Why '80s Babies Are Different Than Other Millennials
11/19/16

Anyone born in the late '70s or early '80s probably has memories of huddling around a bulky desktop with five (or more) friends to play Oregon Trail. This article, titled "The Oregon Trail Generation: Life Before and After Mainstream Tech" and originally featured on Social Media Week, discusses what life was like for that generation who grew up at the cusp of modern technology.

We're an enigma, those of us born at the tail end of the '70s and the start of the '80s. Some of the "generational" experts lazily glob us on to Generation X, and others just shove us over to the Millennials they love to hate — no one really gets us or knows where we belong.

We've been called Generation Catalano, Xennials, and The Lucky Ones, but no name has really stuck for this strange micro-generation that has both a healthy portion of Gen X grunge cynicism, and a dash of the unbridled optimism of Millennials.

A big part of what makes us the square peg in the round hole of named generations is our strange relationship with technology and the Internet. We came of age just as the very essence of communication was experiencing a seismic shift, and it's given us a unique perspective that's half analog old school and half digital new school.

You Have Died of Dysentery

If you can distinctly recall the excitement of walking into your weekly computer lab session and seeing a room full of Apple 2Es displaying the start screen of Oregon Trail, you're a member of this nameless generation, my friend.

We were the first group of kids who grew up with household computers, but still novel enough to elicit confusion and wonder. Gen X individuals were already fully-formed teens or young adults when computers became mainstream, and Millennials can't even remember a time before computers.

But, when we first placed our sticky little fingers on a primitive Mac, we were elementary school kids whose brains were curious sponges. We learned how to use these impressive machines at a time when average middle class families were just starting to be able to afford to buy their own massive desktops.

This made us the first children to grow up figuring it out, as opposed to having an innate understanding of new technology the way Millennials did, or feeling slightly alienated from it the way Gen X did.
An AOL Adolescence

Did you come home from middle school and head straight to AOL, praying all the time that you'd hear those magic words, "You've Got Mail" after waiting for the painfully slow dial-up Internet to connect? If so, then yes, you are a member of the Oregon Trail Generation. And you are definitely part of this generation if you hopped in and out of sketchy chat rooms asking others their A/S/L (age/sex/location for the uninitiated).

Precisely at the time that you were becoming obsessed with celebrities, music and the opposite sex, you magically had access to "the Internet," a thing that few normal people even partially grasped the power of at the time.

We were the first group of high school kids to do research for papers both online and in an old-fashioned card catalogue, which many millennials have never even heard of by the way (I know because I asked my 21-year-old intern and he started stuttering about library cards).

Because we had one foot in the traditional ways of yore and one foot in the digital information age, we appreciate both in a way that other generations don't. We can quickly turn curmudgeonly in the face of teens who've never written a letter, but we're glued to our smartphones just like they are.

Those born in the late '70s and early '80s were the last group to have a childhood devoid of all the technology that makes childhood and adolescence today pretty much the worst thing imaginable. We were the last gasp of a time before sexting, Facebook shaming, and constant communication.

We used pay-phones; we showed up at each other's houses without warning; we often spoke to our friends' parents before we got to speak to them; and we had to wait at least an hour to see any photos we'd taken. But for the group of kids just a little younger than us, the whole world changed, and that's not an exaggeration. In fact, it's possible that you had a completely different childhood experience than a sibling just five years your junior, which is pretty mind-blowing.

Napster U

Thanks to the evil genius of Sean Parker, most of us were in college in the heyday of Napster and spent many a night using the university's communal Ethernet to pillage our friends' music libraries at breakneck speeds. With mouths agape at having downloaded the entire OAR album in under five seconds, we built our music libraries faster than any other dorm-dwelling generation in history.

We were the first to experience the beauty of sharing and downloading mass amounts of music faster than you can say, "Third Eye Blind," which made the adoption of MP3 players and music streaming apps perfectly natural. Yet, we still distinctly remember buying cassette singles, joining those scam-tastic CD clubs and recording songs onto tapes from the radio. The very nature of buying and listening to music changed completely within the first 20 years of our lives.

A Youth Untouched by Social Media

The importance of going through some of life's toughest years without the toxic intrusion of social media really can't be overstated. Myspace was born in 2003 and Facebook became available to all college students in 2004. So if you were born in 1981-1982, for example, you were literally the last graduating class to finish college without social media being a part of the experience.

When we get together with our fellow Oregon Trail Generation friends, we frequently discuss how insanely glad we are that we escaped the middle school, high school and college years before social media took over and made an already challenging life stage exponentially more hellish.

We all talked crazy amounts of sh*t about each other, took pictures of ourselves and our friends doing shockingly inappropriate things and spread rumors like it was our jobs, but we just never had to worry about any of it ending up in a place where everyone and their moms (literally) could see it a hot second after it happened.

But unlike our older Gen X siblings, we were still young and dumb enough to get really into MySpace and Facebook in its first few years, so we understand what it feels like to overshare on social media and stalk a new crush's page.

Time after time, we late '70s and early '80s babies were on the cusp of changes that essentially transformed modern life and, for better or worse, it's shaped who we are and how we relate to the world.
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« Reply #166 on: November 21, 2016, 10:48:28 am »

I believe the big picture in the end times is that people are just NUMBED to sin, to the point where they don't feel anything anymore over any abomination.

20-30 years ago, even lost people, and Apostate christianity, to some extent discerned right from wrong. Now? There's just no shock and awe over anything. I remember the 1980's when co-habitation outside of marriage started getting accepted, and there were so many discussions about it b/c of the shock and awe. Now? It seems like noone remembers the USSC sodomite marriage ruling 1.5 years ago, nor hear a peep about the bathroom transgender wars anymore.

Again, forget about Martial Law, FEMA Camps, 501c3 churches, cities getting nuked, and what not. It's SIN that DESTROYS people, PERIOD.
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« Reply #167 on: November 28, 2016, 11:04:50 am »

http://www.forbes.com/sites/causeintegration/2016/11/28/get-ready-for-generation-z/#559d8f931dfe
11/28/16
Get Ready for Generation Z

Millennials. They’re our youngest generation of employees and a colossal consumer base that dwarfs the size of their predecessors, Gen X. So it’s natural that cultural analysts and trend prognosticators have been trying for years to size up Millennials and make sense of what they want and where they plan to take us when they rule the world.

But peeking right behind those Millennials is a tribe that’s even bigger and more mysterious: Generation Z. Defined as those born between 1996 and 2010, Generation Z outsizes the 60 million Millennial clan by a cool one million, making this toddler-to-teen army (born between 1996 and 2010) the next wave of employees that companies must understand in order to harness their talents and attract their interest.

I find it fascinating to examine not only generational behaviors, but the drivers behind these behaviors. Millennials grew up amidst the relative peace and prosperity of the 90s only to have their expectations shattered by the 9/11 attacks and financial crashes of 2000 and 2008. When you consider how much the Great Depression of the 20s and 30s informed the mindset and habits of our forebears, it’s easy to see how the Great Recession etched itself into the character of those coming of age during this bewildering time. As Alex Williams observed for The New York Times, “Theirs is a story of innocence lost.”

Generation Z never had the luxury of a threat-free perspective so they’ve been forced to view life through a more guarded lens from the start. One generational expert, Neil Howe, even suggests that they be called the “Homeland Generation” and defined by a post-9/11 birth date beginning in 2004. The wary worldview of this group is further shaped by Generation X parents, who came of age in the post-Watergate and Vietnam years amidst a time of economic and global uncertainty and who are now obsessed with creating a safer world for their kids.

In many ways, Gen Z shares similarities with Millennials but there are key distinctions as well:

    Technology. Gen Z has never known a world without smartphones and social media, so it’s even more ingrained for them than Millennials. They gobble up information quickly and are ready to move on to the next thing in an eyeblink. When it comes to Gen Z, seconds count. As Dan Schwabel, managing partner of Millennial Branding told Williams in The New York Times piece, “we tell our advertising partners that if they don’t communicate in five words and a big picture, they will not reach this generation.”

    Privacy. Unlike the more showy Millennials, Gen Z is less interested in sharing their lives for the public record. Anonymous social media platforms like Secret and Snapchat are more appealing to Gen Z than Facebook and similar platforms that leave permanent records which can come back to haunt users later on.

    Cultural diversity. With skyrocketing growth in biracial and minority populations, Generation Z embraces multiculturalism as a touchstone of who they are, and this also informs their attitudes on social issues. They’ve come of age when same-sex marriage and a black president are a given and they expect continued social progress to reflect the ethnic diversity that is tightly woven throughout their lives.

    Pragmatism. Growing up in an uncertain world, and being raised by Gen X parents whose own prospects seemed stunted by less exuberant times, Gen Z is drawn to safety. Like the Silent Generation who grew up amidst war and the Depression, Gen Z is a more cautious class that steers away from risky behaviors and towards more sensible careers and choices. Stats on lower underage drinking and higher seatbelt wearing for this group are just a couple of data points for this characteristic, as well as anecdotal evidence of job paths that are forged less by passion and more by practical realities.

What does this all mean? The future of work lies with Generation Z and employers need to get ahead of the shift that this group will represent. According to Dan Keldsen, author of The Gen Z Effect, there are six main forces from Gen Z shaping the future of business. As reported by Jacob Morgan for Inc., this includes taking the good characteristics of each generation and bringing them together for a cohesive team environment; teaching employees how to learn by harnessing the vast amount of information available today to adopt the world as a classroom; changing the rules and breaking tradition to achieve great results; and disentangling ourselves from hyperconnectivity so that we are not always online.   
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« Reply #168 on: January 09, 2017, 03:28:55 pm »

http://madamenoire.com/745759/waiting-to-marry/

Sound Reasons Millennials Are Waiting To Marry
1/9/17

People are getting married older. Since the 1970s, the median age for women marrying for the first time has increased by nearly five years. Today, the average age women get married is 29 and the average age men tie the knot is 31. That’s a far-cry from our grandparent’s generation, during which people would marry immediately out of college and even high school sometimes. What perplexes many parents of millennials today isn’t necessarily that they get married later, but that they carry on committed relationships, with live-in partners, for years before getting married. Many parents (perhaps yours) may feel that if you’re doing that, then why not just get married? You can answer your parents’ concerns with these sound reasons millennials are waiting to get married later. And honestly, if you’re going to walk down the aisle at some point or another, your parents could probably relax about it, right?

Their parents are divorced

This fact may sting a little, but a lot of millennials come from divorced parents! So they are wary about rushing into anything.

They can live together

Since living together before marriage is no longer viewed as the big sin it used to be (for most, at least) a lot of couples think they should take the opportunity to see how living together goes, for quite some time, before getting married.


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« Reply #169 on: March 21, 2017, 02:48:19 pm »

http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=321171113253
Homosexuality exploding among youth-How it happened!
Series:  News In Focus  · 5 of 5
3/21/2017 (TUE)
Audio: http://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/playpopup.asp?SID=321171113253
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« Reply #170 on: March 24, 2017, 04:25:24 pm »

http://www.charismamag.com/life/culture/22494-how-the-new-christian-left-is-twisting-the-gospel

Here's How the New Christian Left Is Twisting the Gospel
12:00PM EDT 3/15/2017 Chelsen Vicari   

Peek behind the curtain of some "progressive" or "hip" evangelical churches, past the savvy technology and secular music, and you will find more than just a contemporary worship service. You'll find faith leaders encouraging young evangelicals to trade in their Christian convictions for a gospel filled with compromise. They're slowly attempting to give evangelicalism an "update"—and the change is not for the good.

It's painful for me to admit, but we can no longer rest carefree in our evangelical identity—because it is changing. No doubt you have seen the headlines declaring that evangelicalism is doomed because evangelical kids are leaving the faith. It is no secret that there is an expanding gulf between traditional Christian teachings and contemporary moral values. But the sad truth is that the ideological gulf between America's evangelical grown-ups and their kids, aka the millennials, seems to be widening too.

Somehow the blame for this chasm is being heaped on traditional churches. They are accused of having too many rules as well as being homophobic and bigoted. Yes, we've heard those false claims from popular culture in its desperate attempt to keep Christianity imprisoned within the sanctuary walls. But now popular culture is being aided by Christ-professing bedfellows whose message to "coexist," "tolerate" and "keep out of it" is more marketable to the rising generation of evangelicals.

The seasoned Christian soldiers are noticing these distortions of the gospel. But for young evangelicals, the spiritual haze is harder to wade through. Desperate for acceptance in a fallen world, many young evangelicals (and some older ones) choose not to take Christ out of the chapel, and so they are unwittingly killing the church's public witness. In this uphill cultural battle, mired by scare tactics and fear, three types of evangelical Christians are emerging:

    Couch-potato Christians: These Christians adapt to the culture by staying silent on the tough culture-and-faith discussions. Typically, this group will downplay God's absolute truths by promoting the illusion that neutrality was Jesus' preferred method of evangelism.
    Cafeteria-style Christians: This group picks and chooses which Scripture passages to live by, opting for the ones that best seem to jive with culture. Typically, they focus solely on the "nice" parts of the gospel while simultaneously and intentionally minimizing sin, hell, repentance and transformation.
    Convictional Christians: In the face of the culture's harsh admonitions, these evangelicals refuse to be silent. Mimicking Jesus, they compassionately talk about love and grace while also sharing with their neighbors the need to recognize and turn from sin.

I know about these three types of Christians because at one time or another, I have fallen into each of these three categories. My parents will tell you that even though I was raised in church, I morphed into a full-fledged feminist, told my parents they were ignorant for not endorsing homosexuality and bought into the distorted social justice rhetoric that confuses caring for the poor with advancing socialist or big government systems and demonizing the United States for its free-market system.

I'm not ashamed to share my story because my experiences and those of my fellow bold evangelicals are a testimony of God's awesome, transforming power. Being countercultural for Christ isn't easy. What does the Great Commission say? Jesus commanded us to go, "teaching them to observe all things I have commanded you" (Matt. 28:20a).

Where Did We Go Wrong?

I see so many parents scratching their heads trying to figure out where they went wrong with young evangelicals. Following the instructions of Proverbs 22:6—"Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it"—many evangelical parents took their children to church and prayed with them every night before bed. Yet the values those children now hold dear do not reflect the traditional teachings of Jesus.

To be perfectly clear, I want to let you know up front that this isn't a parenting how-to guide that, if followed, will lead your loved ones to salvation. Instead, what I can offer you is a glimpse into the world of a 20-something who sees thousands of young evangelicals being spiritually and emotionally targeted on Christian university campuses, in college ministries and at churches nationwide by a growing liberal movement cloaked in Christianity.

Research tells us evangelicals are drifting further away from the orthodox truths their parents and grandparents held dear.   

Our churches have rarely—if ever—faced the exodus we are seeing today. This will have a direct effect on the spiritual and moral values that will shape the nation in the coming years. That is why it is urgent that concerned Christians start acting now before the situation gets worse.

The Collision of Faith and Culture

Faith and culture will continue to collide in America. The culture wars, the growth of family, the success of missions, the prosperity of our great nation—the future rests on millennial evangelicals' worldview. And that is cause for concern, because something has gone wrong with young evangelicals' theology.

The millennial generation's susceptibility to "feel-good" doctrine is playing a big part in America's moral decline. Millennials' religious practices depend largely on how the actions make us and others feel, whether the activities are biblical or not. For example, we only attend churches that leave us feeling good about our lifestyle choices, even if those choices conflict with God's clear commandments. We dismiss old hymns that focus on God's transforming salvation, love and mercy and opt for "Jesus is your boyfriend" songs. Or we contribute to nonprofits that exploit and misuse terms such as justice, oppressed and inequality because tweaking the language makes us feel more neutral, less confrontational.

Popular liberal evangelical writers and preachers tell young evangelicals that if they accept abortion and same-sex marriage, then the media, academia and Hollywood will finally accept Christians. Out of fear of being falsely dubbed "intolerant" or "uncompassionate," many young Christians are buying into theological falsehoods. Instead of standing up as a voice for the innocent unborn or marriage as God intended, millennials are forgoing the authority of Scripture and embracing a couch potato, cafeteria-style Christianity, all in the name of tolerance.

This contemporary mindset is what Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the German theologian whose Christian convictions put him at odds with the Nazis and cost him his life, called "cheap grace." In his book The Cost of Discipleship Bonhoeffer wrote: "Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate."

Right now, cheap grace theology is proliferating around evangelical Bible colleges, seminaries and Christian ministries.

Christian Doctrine Hijacked

It is not that millennial evangelicals were not taken to church by their parents. It is that their training has been hijacked by ineffective and sometimes intentionally distorted doctrine.

As constant and pervasive as the attacks on Christianity are at public universities, it is important to remember that millennials' worldviews do not start taking shape after they move out of their parents' houses. Their understanding of Jesus' teachings and cultural convictions begins to form while they are still at home and under the influence of their local church.

What I hope and pray evangelical parents and leaders come to realize is that the church has been too trusting. In our jam-packed lifestyles, parents have treated Sunday school as they do softball or ballet class—drop off the kids for an hour, then pick them up and hope they learned something.

Early on in my Sunday school teaching days, my co-teacher and I followed the curriculum pretty narrowly, the exception being that my co-teacher had an outstanding knowledge of biblical history that he imparted to the kids.

We taught all about Jesus' birth, resurrection and saving grace. Thinking the fluffy kids ministry curriculum covered all of the necessary bases, I felt confident these kids had a firm grasp on their Christian worldview. Boy, was I wrong!

One day my co-teacher and I decided to play "True or False." We casually went down a list of worldview questions with our class, sure that our little evangelicals would nail every question correctly.

No. 1: Jesus is God. "True." Great job.

No. 2: Jesus sinned. "False." Bingo!

No. 3: Jesus is one of many ways to heaven. "True." What?!

Shocked is the only way to describe how I felt. Hadn't they been listening to us? When I asked who taught them that, one girl said, "Coexist." Yes, these young evangelicals had been listening to their Sunday school teachers and their parents, but they had also been listening to their public school teachers, TV celebrities and rock stars.

Youth ministers, volunteer leaders and pastors also have to start preparing these kids to deal with the very real hostility that faces young evangelicals. 

If we never talk about abortion in church, how can we expect the rising evangelical girl to calmly explain the option of adoption to her frightened best friend who just admitted she is pregnant?

What will surprise you is how much young evangelicals actually crave honest discussions about abortion, sexuality, sexual exploitation, feminism and radical Islam. My friend and Evangelical Action adviser Richmond Trotter has two non-negotiable topics when addressing youth: creation and life. Having volunteered in church youth ministry since 1996, Richmond is not afraid to have serious discussions about what Scripture says about abortion, evolution and homosexuality. Make no mistake: The trend away from biblical truth is not concentrated in the hipster city limits. It is unfolding in the crevices of America's plains, hills, mountains and swamplands. All across this nation, "old-fashioned" conservative evangelicalism is being traded in for a bright and shiny, mediocre Christianity.

If America's evangelicals disengage from the public square and fail to engage the rising generation of Christian leaders, then we risk losing our public voice, then our religious liberty, then liberty altogether.

What Happened to the Religious Right?

The last several decades witnessed tremendous evangelical influence in the United States. Leaders such as Billy Graham, Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, Tim and Beverly LaHaye, Paige and Dorothy Patterson, James Dobson and James and Betty Robison made a bold impact on America's families, churches and government. Now that those few leaders are aging or retiring, or have died, there are very few traditional evangelical leaders left holding the torch, and even fewer candidates to whom they can pass it.

But religious convictions in America are not on the verge of disappearance just yet. There is still hope. In the book God Is Alive and Well: The Future of Religion in America, Gallup Inc. Editor-in-Chief Frank Newport opines: "Christianity will prevail in the U.S. America will remain very much a Christian nation in the decades ahead, albeit less so than in the past because of an increase in Americans who don't have a religious identity."

Heed the Warning Signs

Evangelicals and culture warriors in the U.S. do not have to look far to discover what happens when Christian denominations give up on their traditional convictions and teachings. All we have to do is look at the dwindling memberships of mainline Protestant denominations.

In order to safeguard the trajectory of young evangelicals, we must uphold the authoritative Word of God. It is imperative that those in a position to influence millennials have transparent and honest discussions about the culture wars in which evangelical youth are already engaging. Otherwise they will be silent and accepting in the face of persecution and false doctrine.

The importance of arming the next generation of evangelicals cannot be overstated. If we continue to follow the example of mainline Protestants, evangelicalism will have a gloomy future. We must offer sorely needed leadership, but before we can do that, we need to know exactly whom and what we are up against.
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« Reply #171 on: April 24, 2017, 09:52:33 am »

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« Reply #172 on: May 09, 2017, 09:56:41 am »



http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=58172115269
Millennials Are Liberal, Why?
Series:  News In Focus  · 15 of 15
5/8/2017 (MON)
Audio: http://www.sermonaudio.com/playpopup.asp?SID=58172115269
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« Reply #173 on: May 29, 2017, 06:11:46 pm »

STUDY : Millennials Spending on Dining, Travel, Fitness, Ignoring Retirement Savings
5/29/17

A new study shows Millennials are living as if they will never have to retire.

While they enjoy spending on “lifestyle,” they do not save for the eventuality of retirement.

A recipe for disaster.

From ZeroHedge

Millennials save more of their income than older generations. Don’t believe it? Look at a recent survey by Merrill Edge, which found millennials say they save 36% more than their general population counterparts report as over a third stash away more than 20% of their salary per year.

As for what they’re saving for, that’s another story. Whereas baby boomers save for retirement, millennials want financial freedom and save for a desired lifestyle rather than exiting the workforce. Millennials would rather spend money on travel, dining, and fitness than save for their financial future. They are also more focused on certain milestones like landing their dream job or traveling the world, and are less worried about getting married or having kids. Bottom line, millennials are saving, just for shorter-term goals as compared to their parents.

Where were you thirty years ago? My parents and many of our readers likely remember the stock market’s ascension to record highs before the sudden crash of 1987. A few decades later the capital market is back to flirting with another peak, but the loss-averse nature of people leaves past financial crises clearly imprinted into memory.

The Atlantic put together 41 pictures for a glimpse into 1987 that captured a wide variety of figures and events during that year. One such portrait included passengers on the F train in New York reading the newspaper after “Black Monday.” The front cover of the New York Post read “Wall St. Bloodbath” in huge bold letters and “Panic selling sweeps market: P.5” at the bottom of the page. Six clocks sat between the two texts, reflecting the event’s global reach.

Here are some other descriptions of pictures from that time to highlight just how different our world is three decades on:

Now-President-but-then-private-citizen Donald Trump greets Liza Minelli backstage at Carnegie Hall, along with his then wife Ivana Trump, and Henry and Nancy Kissinger. Fast forward 30 years (almost to the month) and likely much to his disbelief at that time he’s currently representing the free world by traveling abroad and meeting with foreign leaders. Far cry from real estate deals, that.
The vice president of marketing for Compaq Computer Corporation shows off the new Compaq Portable III at the Mark Hellinger Theater in New York, which weighs just 18 pounds so that it’s easy (!) to carry. Now not only our computer but phone capabilities rest in just one device and fit right in our pockets, with the iPhone 7 weighing as light as between 5 to 7 ounces.
Then First Lady Nancy Reagan watches an anti-drug musical, Just Say No, at a high school in Alexandria, Virginia. Tough to imagine now about two-thirds of Americans live in a state where some form of marijuana is legal. The momentum continues in that direction as well, with 60% of Americans favoring legalization of the drug according to a 2016 Gallup poll.
About 200,000 people (according to US Park Police estimates) rally on the National Mall in support of gays and lesbians. Fast forward and we now have marriage equality.
Bernie Sanders, then Mayor of Burlington, Vermont, records songs and a conversation about his philosophy on tape: “Sanders feels music is a powerful way to communicate with the masses.” Little did people see just how much he would connect with the masses this past presidential election, particularly among the politically hard to reach millennial cohort.
For more photographs down memory lane, here’s a link to the article with everyone from David Bowie and Princess Diana to Pee-wee Herman and Howard Stern:

Thirty years ago, baby boomers were in their twenties and up, and now their kids’ ages span from nearly twenty to their mid-thirties. As those old photographs show, however, millennials’ experience in their twenties and thirties vastly differs from their parents socially, culturally, and economically. We therefore have different values and goals, which even extends to our financial lives.

A recent survey of over 1,000 Americans conducted from March 21st to April 5th by Merrill Edge showed a stark generational divide about different groups’ life priorities. Some of these findings may come as a surprise. Here are the results:

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http://truthfeed.com/study-millennials-spending-on-dining-travel-fitness-ignoring-retirement-savings/76988/
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« Reply #174 on: July 03, 2017, 10:39:51 am »

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