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Meet Russell Moore, newly appointed SBC ERLC President

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November 24, 2017, 07:52:34 pm tennis shoe says: What happened to BA? He seems to have vanished.
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October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
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September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Author Topic: Meet Russell Moore, newly appointed SBC ERLC President  (Read 1012 times)
Psalm 51:17
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« on: April 04, 2013, 12:22:18 pm »

CFR Richard Land stepping down in this position wasn't a bad thing at all(this guy has done much more harm than good to the SBC Churchianity crowd), but nonetheless here are a few eye-popping things about the guy who is replacing him...(and no, I don't endorse the heavily leavened SBC either)

Russell Moore Elected as Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission President
3/26/13
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2013/march-web-only/russell-moore-elected-as-erlc-president.html?start=2

Excerpts:

Speaking of distinctives, you personally have been a key voice as adoption and orphan care have come even more to the forefront of evangelical passions in recent years. Will we see this be an increasing part of ERLC activity?

Yes, yes, yes! I believe firmly what Jesus said in Matthew 25, that when we encounter the "least of these," the most vulnerable among us, we are encountering his brothers and sisters. I hope to be an advocate for all of those who are marginalized and oppressed, including the orphan, the unborn child, the immigrant, and all of those who would be de-humanized and de-personalized by the spirit of the age.


Will ERLC work with American Catholic bishops, such as Archbishop Dolan?

Yes, I hope to work very closely with the Catholic bishops. We have much in common, and that common effort and dialogue will continue and grow.


What will ERLC do to advocate for religious freedom among key U.S. allies such as Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt?

We as Baptists believe that religious liberty is not simply an American ideal. It's grounded in the image of God. We will advocate for religious freedom everywhere in the world. We believe blasphemy laws are evidence of a religion that is [oppressive]. We oppose blasphemy laws and other ways [of suppressing] freedom of belief.


Well, on a lighter note, you've been hosting a podcast called "The Cross and the Jukebox," looking at Christian themes in Americana music. Are there any particular songs or lyrics going through your head as you take this job?

"Walk The Line" [by Johnny Cash]. I hope to walk the line—and to call all of us to walk the line of God's wisdom and grace together.
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2013, 12:35:53 pm »

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctliveblog/archives/2013/03/russell-moore-replaces-richard-land-as-leader-of-ethics-and-religious-liberty-commission-erlc.html
March 26, 2013
Russell Moore Replaces Richard Land as Leader of Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission
(UPDATED) ERLC selects Southern Baptist dean as voice of nation's largest Protestant body on political issues.

Excerpts:

Moore will follow Richard Land as the eighth president of the ERLC, which is the Southern Baptist agency dedicated to addressing social and moral concerns and their implications on public policy issues. Moore will begin his new responsibilities June 1. At that time, Land will become the entity’s president emeritus, an honor bestowed on him by trustees in September. Land announced his impending retirement in July 2012.

Moore, a native of Biloxi, Miss., has served since 2004 as Dean of the School of Theology and Senior Vice President for Academic Administration at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., where he is also Professor of Christian Theology and Ethics.

-----------------------------------------------------------

“I am honored and humbled to be asked to serve Southern Baptists as ERLC president,” Moore said. “I pray for God’s grace to lead the ERLC to be a catalyst to connect the agenda of the kingdom of Christ to the cultures of local congregations for the sake of the mission of the gospel in the world.”

------------------------------------------------------------

A widely-sought cultural commentator, Moore speaks frequently to issues of ethics, evangelical engagement and religious liberty, having been quoted or published by many of the nation’s leading news agencies and periodicals. He also writes frequently at his Moore to the Point website and hosts podcasts, including The Cross and the Jukebox, a program that examines country music from a gospel perspective.

Prior to entering the ministry, Moore served former U.S. Rep. Gene Taylor (D-Miss.) in a variety of roles during Taylor’s service in Congress.

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Endorsements

“Never before has our nation needed Christian leaders in the Church who are both faithful and compassionate. Russell Moore embodies the honesty, integrity and fortitude of a man deeply rooted in the ways of God and of his Kingdom. His presence of mind and keen insights as a theologian and pastor are such that his work has not only benefited me personally, but many who serve our nation in public life. I have never read anything by Russell Moore that did not leave me with a strong impression that this was a man who could speak carefully and powerfully to the public square. I am deeply grateful for his life and look forward to his many future years of service.” Bobby Jindal, Governor of the State of Louisiana

**FYI, Jindal is a Roman Catholic

“I can think of no one more qualified in experience, in temperament, in passion and in doctrine to represent us as Southern Baptists on the most critical ethical issues of our day, and on the all-important issue of religious liberty, which I believe may be the civil rights issue of this next decade in America. . . .” Rick Warren, Pastor, Saddleback Church

“I can think of no one more highly qualified to lead the Commission than Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Of Dr. Moore’s intellectual gifts, one need say no more than that they are formidable indeed. I have often said, and I repeat here, that he is the most brilliant theologian of his generation in any of the Christian traditions. Similarly, of his leadership skills, one need say no more than that they are exceptional. What he has accomplished at Southern Seminary is nothing short of amazing. He is truly a leader of men. . . .” Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence, Princeton University and Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School

“The choice of Dr. Russell Moore to guide the work of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission comes at a strategic moment in both American and Baptist history. He has uniquely prepared himself spiritually, theologically, academically and politically for just such a moment as this. Placing a leader with the right convictions, a razor-sharp mind, and a moral compass that will not fail paints a bright picture for Southern Baptists’ future. He will have our full support and prayers.” Paige Patterson, President, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2013, 12:37:33 pm »

Eph 4:4  There is one body, and one Spirit, even as ye are called in one hope of your calling;
Eph 4:5  One Lord, one faith, one baptism,
Eph 4:6  One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.
Eph 4:7  But unto every one of us is given grace according to the measure of the gift of Christ
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2013, 10:04:48 pm »

http://www.randywhiteministries.org/2013/04/08/what-southern-baptists-can-expect-from-russell-moore-and-the-erlc/
What Southern Baptists can expect from Russell Moore and the ERLC
4/8/13

On June 1, 2013, Dr. Russell Moore will become President of the influential Ethics and Religious Liberties Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention (ERLC).  Whether or not you are Southern Baptists, Moore will have huge influence on the Christian worldview and expression of Christianity for many years to come.

It is not hard to discern where Moore will lead, what he will emphasize, and what his values are, and this Southern Baptist is concerned.

The concern is not over traditional social issues like abortion, homosexuality, and Judeo-Christian morality. Moore will be constantly conservative on these issues. His conservative positions on these issues will illicit lots of “amens” from the average person in the pew, making Moore look like a wonderful gift to the Southern Baptist’s efforts to protect life, marriage, and morality.

Signs of Coming Trouble

I’ve read enough of Moore’s works and know enough of his core theology, however, to have grave concerns. When I read an interview of his plans for the ERLC, my concerns went to the “red alert” level.  There were three statements that especially concern me.

“The time has come to replace moral majoritarianism with moral communitarianism.”

If you’ve had your ear to the ground in recent years, the word “communitarian” is a power-packed word from which you should run. It is a worldview in which the community becomes the transformational unit in society. To learn more about it, simple go to any search engine and search “communitarianism.” The basic idea of this philosophy is that the individual is minimized and collectivism is emphasized.  The word is not used accidently, but describes the core beliefs of Russell Moore.

“The locus of the kingdom of God in this age is within the church, where Jesus rules as king. As we live our lives together, we see the transforming power of the gospel and the inbreaking of the future kingdom.”

First, this is a very communitarian statement. In addition to the emphasis on living our lives together, Moore uses the term, “transforming power,” a communitarian buzzword.  But what I really want to emphasize here is that this collective living and the transforming power of the Gospel will bring “the inbreaking of the future kingdom.”

That last sentence is hugely post-millennial.
In seminary I was taught that post-millennialism was a thing of the past, but I am now convinced that it has been repackaged for a new day. The large group of Christians who believe in “inaugurated eschatology” (also known as “Already/Not Yet” theology) is constantly talking about “the expansion of the Kingdom” in such a way that the end result will be “the inbreaking of the future kingdom.” This talk has a moralism that seems appealing at first, but it goes against a Biblical worldview of a future inauguration of the Kingdom with the sudden arrival of the King. This “take the world for Jesus” view is held by the New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) and other dominionist groups. I believe that Moore is part of a neo-NAR group that is more conservative in their approach but has the same core Kingdom beliefs.

“The United States, after all, is but a vapor in the vast sweep of cosmic time. Our churches, however, point to the future kings and queens of the universe, where there are no term limits.”

This statement concerns me on several levels. First, Moore comes from a line of theology that is notoriously pointing out the flaws of Americanism. In part, I agree. However, the communitarian crowd loves talk of global empires, so this worries me.  My bigger worry, however, is this statement on future kings and queens of the universe. What kind of doctrine is this? This Mormon-sounding idea has been spoken by Moore previously, such as in a 2007 article in which he was encouraging hard work for the Kingdom and—surprise—spoke a very communitarian word, speaking of, “a laziness that refuses to toss aside individual glory for the unity of the church.” Such refusal is inappropriate for “future Kings and Queens of the universe.”

What We Can Expect

From what I’ve read of Moore’s works, here is what I believe Southern Baptists can expect out of the ERLC under Moore’s direction.

Anti-Israel or Israel-phobia

When Moore writes about Israel, it is often with a negative tone. He says things like, “Israel’s American critics on both the left and the right of the political spectrum have been frustrated by what they consider to be the political carte blanche given by evangelicals to the Israeli state.”  He goes on to say, “it is rather obvious that contemporary evangelical support for Israel draws its theological grounding from the dispensational/Bible conference tradition, not from the Reformed/Princeton tradition.”  As you read his works, Moore is clearly not a fan of this “dispensational/Bible conference tradition.  He is, however, an avowed covenant theologian, and he says that such theologians “have maintained that the church, not any current geo-political entity, is the ‘new Israel,’ the inheritor of all Israel’s covenant promises.” [1] (This is, by the way, a perfect definition of replacement theology).

If there is any good news in Moore’s position on Israel, it is that “Evangelical public theology would be in error, however, if it sought to remedy past errors by abandoning support for Israel.” I hope you note that evangelical support in the past has been built on “errors.” It would be a mistake to remove this support, but Christians should “ground such support in a quest for geo-political stability and peace in the Middle East, not in the “Thus saith the Lord” of the prophecy charts.”[2]

My word to Southern Baptists who may hope for a powerful pro-Israel denominational stance coming from the ERLC:  Good luck! There is no hint Moore would allow it. My prediction is subtly anti-Israel messages or Israel-phobia. Moore is too much the politician to throw Israel under the bus, but he is not a supporter of Israel as a modern Jewish state unless it serves the purposes of the new Israel’s expansion and well-being.

Ecumenical Cooperation

His theology demands a one-world religion. Moore holds doggedly to “inaugurated eschatology,”  and he refers to gospel ministers as “pioneers of a coming global empire.”[3] In his worldview, the New Testament church is not “a place to encourage one another in discipleship and to pool together missions offerings. It is a declaration of war. In the church, the triumphant Warrior-King has established an outpost of the kingdom—a colony of the reign that will one day engulf the world.”[4]

Because the church is this “outpost of the kingdom,” it can do nothing less than work together with other outposts to take more territory for the Warrior-King. In order to do this, watch for Moore to be increasingly involved in ecumenical dialogue for the advance of social agenda. He is friendly with the Roman Catholic church already, and I suspect to hear a lot of praise for Catholic virtue in the years to come.

Social Justice in Conservative Clothes

Moore will preach amnesty, equality, and justice every opportunity he gets. He will do it in a “compassionate conservative” way, but it will be the same message that liberal social justice proponents have been teaching for years. As you watch for this social justice, you will find that he never says Jew without saying Palestinian or rich without saying poor. His statements of people and their conditions in life will always be carefully balanced.

Kingdom Advance

Moore’s ethic is Kingdom Advance.  He believes the Kingdom has been inaugurated in the church and that advancing the Kingdom is the church’s primary agenda.  For those unfamiliar with a position that does not believe the Kingdom has begun, read my article, “The Kingdom Error.” Moore will do all that he can to “advance the Kingdom” by developing “transformational communities” that affect society on the religious, corporate, and governmental realm (see Rick Warren’s Three-legged stool approach, which will become the Kingdom Advance approach of Moore).

Conclusion

I think that Southern Baptists have made a disastrous choice in selecting Russell Moore as director of the ERLC. Bad kingdom theology, so pervasive in the church today, will continue to produce leaders like Moore, and followers who think this worldview is Biblical.  Watch for an ever-increasing insignificance of the denomination as it seeks to make an ever expanding impact on culture through Kingdom advance.
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2013, 02:37:27 am »

Quote
The basic idea of this philosophy is that the individual is minimized and collectivism is emphasized.

Hmm, just like the commercial now running on MSNBC that is promoting that kids are raised by the "community" and not the parents.

http://www.mommyish.com/2013/04/10/melissa-harris-perry-kids-belong-to-communities/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+b5media%2FMommyish+%28Mommyish%29

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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2013, 01:12:44 pm »

Hmm, just like the commercial now running on MSNBC that is promoting that kids are raised by the "community" and not the parents.

http://www.mommyish.com/2013/04/10/melissa-harris-perry-kids-belong-to-communities/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+b5media%2FMommyish+%28Mommyish%29



The perverted bible versions, in particular the NIV, uses the word "community".

Judgment must begin at the house of the Lord...
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2013, 02:36:39 am »

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-07-16/national/40606733_1_trayvon-martin-martin-family-george-zimmerman
7/16/13

Zimmerman was “wrong,” says Southern Baptist Convention official

By Michelle Boorstein,July 16, 2013

In sharp contrast to remarks made by his predecessor a year ago about the Trayvon Martin case, the new head of the politics and policy office for the Southern Baptist Convention said Tuesday that Florida neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman was wrong and that there are “systemic” racial injustices in the U.S. legal system.

“Regardless of what Trayvon Martin was doing or not doing that night, you have someone who was taking upon himself some sort of vigilante justice, even by getting out of the car. Regardless of what the legal verdict was, this was wrong,” said Russell Moore, 41, who took over this spring from Richard Land as the public face of the Convention, the country’s largest Protestant denomination. “And when you add this to the larger context of racial profiling and a legal system that does seem to have systemic injustices as it relates to African-Americans with arrests and sentencing, I think that makes for a huge crisis.”
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« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2013, 02:37:33 am »

http://www.blackchristiannews.com/news/2013/07/russell-d-moore-says-black-and-white-americans-need-to-have-a-conversation-on-race-in-light-of-the-t.html
Russell D. Moore Says Black and White Americans Need to Have a Conversation on Race In Light of the Trayvon Martin Case
7/21/13

Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), addressed the divide between many blacks and whites as reactions mounted to the July 13 not-guilty verdict for George Zimmerman in the Florida shooting death of Martin, a 17-year-old African American.

Blacks look at the trial "macroscopically," while whites view it "microscopically," he said.

"African Americans tend to speak about the case in broad social and political terms," Moore said in Newsweek's July 17 cover story, "but we rarely get to hear their own quiet, personal stories."

"[M]any white Americans deal in particulars, without realizing it's larger than that," Moore said. "It's not just about this individual case; it's about the fabric of American history. We have to recognize that African Americans see Trayvon Martin's face alongside Medgar Evers, Emmett Till and others that most people will never know. We have to acknowledge that in our conversations."

Evers was a civil rights leader who was shot dead in 1963 in the driveway of his Jackson, Miss., home. Till, 14, was brutally beaten and shot to death in 1955 in rural Mississippi after reportedly whistling at a white woman.

Moore acknowledged he, as a white man, didn't appreciate an important aspect of the case.

"The real message of the Martin case didn't hit me until an African American pastor, a friend of mine, told me that there are some places he doesn't want his young son to go, because he's 'afraid of him becoming another Trayvon,'" Moore told Newsweek.

"This man was fearful for his son's personal safety," Moore continued. "That hits home for me, as a father and as a man. And it's the type of personal story that can shatter the myth that everything is OK."

Read more here
http://www.bpnews.net/BPnews.asp?ID=40762
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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2013, 05:25:49 am »

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says Southern Baptist Convention official

The SBC needs to shut up and focus on the beam that's in their own eye!
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« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2013, 03:41:34 pm »

While some of what Moore is saying is blatant heresy, the other stuff he's saying is VERY subtle!

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324769704579010743654111328.html?ru=yahoo?mod=yahoo_itp
Russell Moore: From Moral Majority to 'Prophetic Minority'

The new leader of the Southern Baptist political arm says Christians have lost the culture and need to act accordingly.

8/16/13

'The Bible Belt is collapsing," says Russell Moore. Oddly, the incoming president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission doesn't seem upset. In a recent visit to The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Moore explains that he thinks the Bible Belt's decline may be "bad for America, but it's good for the church."

Why? Because "we are no longer the moral majority. We are a prophetic minority."

The phrase is arresting coming from such a prominent religious leader—akin to a general who says the Army has shrunk to the point it can no longer fight two wars. A youthful 41, Mr. Moore is among the leaders of a new generation who think that evangelicals need to recognize that their values no longer define mainstream American culture the way they did 50 or even 20 years ago.

**Moore should know better - Jesus Christ said 2000 years ago that the world hateth believers b/c they hateth him first.

On gay marriage, abortion, even on basic religious affiliation, the culture has moved away. So evangelicals need a new way of thinking—a new strategy, if you will—to attract and keep believers, as well as to influence American politics.

The easy days of mobilizing a ready-made majority are gone. By "prophetic minority," he means that Christians must return to the days when they were a moral example and vanguard—defenders of belief in a larger unbelieving culture. He views this less as a defeat than as an opportunity.

To illustrate his point, Mr. Moore tells the story about a friend from college two decades ago, an atheist, who asked for the name of a church that wasn't very demanding of its congregation. When Mr. Moore inquired why, the friend said he needed a church to attend because he planned to run for governor some day. Mr. Moore says the story shows that in the past you had to join a church even if you had no belief because everyone else belonged. But today his friend wouldn't feel so obliged because "the idea that to be a good person, to be a good American, you have to go to church" has largely disappeared.

Vigorous, cheerful and fiercely articulate, Mr. Moore will take on one of evangelical America's most prominent jobs when he is officially installed next month. He succeeds the influential Richard Land, who served in that role for a quarter of a century. Like his predecessor, Mr. Moore is deeply knowledgeable about religion, American history and politics. He has been an ordained pastor and worked as an aide in Congress to former Rep. Gene Taylor (D., Miss.).

Most recently Mr. Moore was dean of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, where his cultural savvy gained him a following among coreligionists and the secular media. He is a regular on Twitter and Facebook, with posts that range from serious theology to self-deprecating jokes: "My toe is broken. My car is broken down. A lifetime of country music has prepared me for this." The cover story he wrote for the May issue of Christianity Today was called "W.W. Jay-Z? How Christian hip-hop could call the American church back to the gospel—and hip-hop back to its roots."

He is definitely pushing a new tone for this generation of evangelicals. "This is the end of 'slouching toward Gomorrah,' " he says. Not only is the doomsaying not winning Christians any popularity contests, but he doesn't think it's religiously appropriate either. "We were never promised that the culture would embrace us."

He also questions the political approach of what was once called "the religious right." Though his boyish looks bring to mind the former Christian Coalition leader Ralph Reed, Mr. Moore is decidedly not a fan of the "values voter checklists" the group employs. "There is no Christian position on the line-item veto," Mr. Moore says. "There is no Christian position on the balanced-budget amendment."

**Again, this is very subtle - this is the Hegelian Dialectic the religious "right" vs. the religious "left" play off each other - one says "Christians should be politically active", while the other says "No they shouldn't".

Which is not to say that Mr. Moore wants evangelicals to "turn inward" and reject the larger U.S. culture. Rather, he wants to refocus the movement on serving as a religious example battling in the public square on "three core issues"—life, marriage and religious liberty.

**WHAT?? Not the gospel of Jesus Christ, who gives the gift of eternal life to those who believe in his name, and the works he did on the cross?

On protecting the unborn, Mr. Moore says he is a "long-term optimist" but "a short-term pessimist." He doesn't get excited every time a poll shows that more Americans are pro-life than pro-choice. He worries that the whole issue may be changed soon "by technology"—that is, chemically induced abortions may soon become the norm, with abortion clinics no longer the focal point of the debate. He also worries that the fight for the unborn has become a one-party battle, hardened along a Democrat and Republican divide. "The letterhead of Democrats for Life," Mr. Moore says, "doesn't include the names of any current members of Congress."

***Hhhhmmm...seriously, maybe that explains the 42 abortion clinics being closed this year, and the growing number of states passing anti-abortion restrictions? Did Moore just telegraph something here? Undecided

But he also believes that this battle will not be won in Washington: "You have to take it to a personal level." He touts the many faith-based pregnancy crisis centers that not only try to talk women out of having abortions, but also help with child-care, job trainingand housing—"all of the things that have brought them there in the first place."

Mr. Moore is also deeply involved in the evangelical adoption movement. Eleven years ago, he and his wife, Maria, adopted two year-old babies, both boys, from a Russian orphanage. When the couple (who have three other sons) arrived at the orphanage, he says, they were struck by the "creepy silence" in a building filled with babies. The children had stopped crying because they had learned that no one would respond.

In evangelical churches across the U.S., adoption—foreign and domestic—has become increasingly common. "You don't need a canned adoption ministry program," Mr. Moore says. As members of the congregation get to know families who have adopted, the example spreads.

He says the same dynamic has made evangelicals more favorable to immigration. "The immigration debate has become personalized," he says. "In the Midwest and South and Southwest, our churches now have large immigrant populations. These are our brothers and sisters in Christ." The people in the pews "understand we're not going to deport 11 million people without a big government police state"—something his coreligionists do not want.

Though the Southern Baptist Convention 2011 resolution on immigration opposed "amnesty," it also says: "The Scriptures call us, in imitation of God Himself, to show compassion and justice for the sojourner and alien among us." Mr. Moore notes the importance of keeping families together and says that "self-deportation is not a solution."

His cultural revival plan is also to focus more on local churches. When the Supreme Court's decisions on gay marriage came down in June, Mr. Moore sent a message to pastors to help them talk with their congregants about the Southern Baptist opposition to the law. "We don't hate our gay and lesbian neighbors," he says, but redefining marriage on their behalf is another matter.

There are a couple of reasons why Christians are losing the debate over gay marriage, Mr. Moore says. One is that even many Christians don't have a real understanding of what marriage is. "We have embraced certain aspects of the sexual revolution," he says, like the "divorce culture."

**Does this mean the SBC will ex-communicate Charles Stanley for being a divorced pastor? Will Rick Warren also be ex-communicated for bringing in sexual entertainment into his Saddleback Church, and allowing Rupert Murdoch being a member? Roll Eyes

Another is that many people assume "my marriage is my business"—why should they care if their neighbors marry someone of the same sex? Mr. Moore says the part of the marriage ceremony when the pastor asks if anyone knows of a reason why the couple should not wed is like a "vestigial organ." No one ever objects "except in romantic comedies," but there was a time when a couple's marriage decision was thought to be of church concern. He would like it to be again.

As a "prophetic minority," Mr. Moore thinks his most profound political task will be defending religious liberty from the assaults of a secular government. The cause is at the heart of his plan to fight the contraception mandate in ObamaCare. President Obama may have thought that religious employers would accept being forced to pay for contraception, the morning-after abortion pill or sterilization under the law. "But we are not adjusting to the new normal," Mr. Moore avers. "We are not going to go away or back down."

**Look at that ecumenical buzzword again - "religious liberty". As for "not backing down", I'm surprised you and the rest of the SBC stood down when Reagan and Bush Jr either passed pro-abortion bills or funded Planned Parenthood.

On Aug. 7, Colorado Christian Universitybecame the first nonprofit to sue the Department of Health and Human Services for its "final" rule on the issue. The HHS rule requires organizations opposed on religious grounds to specific contraceptives, sterilization or abortion to "designate" a third party to provide those services.

Mr. Moore sees this as a chance to unite believers of many faiths, and last month he joined Archbishop William Lori of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and other religious leaders in writing to Mr. Obama: "The HHS policy is coercive and puts the administration inthe position of defining—or casting aside—religious doctrine. This should trouble every American."

Mr. Moore says he hopes to make the ObamaCare mandate a major issue in the 2016 election. By then, it will have become clear how intrusive the health-care law has become, he says, and the American people will side with religious groups that protest having to act against their beliefs. "The separation of church and state," Mr. Moore says, "is not a liberal issue."

**Hate to say it, but too little, too late - largely thanks to a George W. Bush USSC appointee(whom YOU supported), Obamacare was made law of the land last year.

In this task, he adds, the Baptists are returning to their roots as a minority at America's founding. He mentions how 17th century Virginia passed a law requiring that all ministers be ordained by the Anglican church—then the established church of the colony. Many Baptist preachers were jailed for resisting the law, which is said to have influenced James Madison's views on religious liberty.

One of the jailed preachers was the prominent evangelist Jeremiah Moore, who wrote in 1773: "God himself is the only one to whom man is accountable for his religious sentiments simply, nor has he erected any tribunal on earth qualified to judge whether the man worships in an acceptable manner or not."

History turns, but the fight for religious liberty is eternal. Says another Moore, 240 years later, "We are not going to go quietly into the night."

**Nope, the world will continue to spiral out of control until Jesus Christ comes back and establishes his 1000 year millennial kingdom.

2Tim_3:1  This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
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« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2014, 05:27:03 am »

Russell Moore Blasts Russia's Attempt to Promote 'Pro-Family' Values

Russell Moore... hypocrite  Cheesy

Russell Moore spoke out adamantly against Russia's attempt to paint itself as a champion of traditional values.

unlike the great family values in America? right?

"I have heard over the past couple years, many, many times, Vladimir Putin and his regime, seeking to lecture America and the rest of the world about family values and I'm just not buying it," the President of the Southern Baptist Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, said on a podcast released on Wednesday.

Moore, who along with his wife, have adopted two sons adopted from Russia, addressed the topic in light of the Sochi Winter Olympics and a Washington Times article headlined "Who's 'godless' now? Russia says it's U.S."

"It really kind of makes my blood boil when I hear Vladimir Putin claiming to be pro-family values," said Moore, who proceeded to point out the country's high abortion rates and lack of "adoption culture."

Unlike America where we have a LOW abortion rate right? Im also pretty sure there are thousands of "colored" children in Americas foster homes that need a family. But you went to Russia to get a "WHITE" child. Right?

"I'm not buying a country ... that has the sort of rampant abortion rate that Russia has. The sort of country that has orphanages filled with children, not allowing other countries to adopt," said Moore. (Russia passed a law in 2012 that banned Americans from adopting its children and last week passed a law banning gay couples and singles from countries where gay marriage is legal from adopting their children.)

"[There's] nothing being done that I'm seeing being done in Russia to encourage [Russians to adopt.] So you have children that are languishing in orphanages, they're aging out of the orphanages, and then they're just left to fend for themselves, often in prostitution, or substance abuse or even suicide. Don't tell me that that's pro-family values," he added.

Unlike America right? I mean with all the adopting going on.  Roll Eyes

Moore said that Christians should we be wary of taking the "stance that the enemy of our opponents' is our friend."

Christians should be wary of Russell Moore.

"Just because somebody says, 'We think that some things that you think are bad are bad too, so we're going to use the power of the state to run those people out of here' — that is not a Christian ethic," he said. "The scripture does not give us a KGB to seek to maintain biblical Christian ethics. It gives to us the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God."

Moore also attacked Russia for backing Bashir Al-Assad's government in Syria, which in August allegedly used chemical weapons on civilians.

"Remember that Russia and the Russians are the ones supporting, behind the scenes, what's happening in Syria, a regime that's gassing children. Don't tell me that that's pro-family values," he said.

I bet Russell Moore is a John McCain guy...  Cheesy hypocrite

Moore also called out the Russian Orthodox Church for being complicit in the Kremlin's anti-human rights stance.

Despite "heroic figures in Russian Orthodox life," "the Russian Orthodox church has historically often lined itself up with the government," he said.

Unlike the 501c3 churches in America right? oh SNAP isnt the SBC a 501c3? and most of you heretics are free masons? Also isnt the SBC yoked up with the UN? 
https://sites.google.com/site/501c3churchesbewarned/

"I am very nervous when any government starts using Christian terms evacuated of Christian content for political purposes," said Moore.

"This is that sort of 'Constantinian temptation' that we see over and and over and over again in the history of the church. People that want to use the language of Christianity, but without any real concern for the content of Christianity to use as a political tool. That's not what the gospel of Jesus Christ is all about," he added.

Unlike America right? I mean the Gov here doesn't do that at all. Right?

Moore did not address Russia's position toward its LGBT population, including 2013 legislation that banned the distribution of "propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations" among minors, and made it illegal for citizens to organize gay pride events or equate gay relationships to heterosexual relationships.

Well of course he didnt, because that would be Russia promoting PRO-Family values, unlike America right Russ?

http://www.christianpost.com/news/russell-moore-blasts-russias-attempt-to-promote-pro-family-values-114831/
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« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2014, 12:02:35 am »

While I don't support any of the secular medical industry, at the same time it's pretty obvious Moore's true colors are slowly coming out of the woodwork...

http://www.religionnews.com/2014/10/28/evangelical-leader-russell-moore-denounces-ex-gay-therapy/
10/28/14
Evangelical leader Russell Moore denounces ex-gay therapy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (RNS) Southern Baptist leader Russell Moore denounced reparative therapy at a conference here, saying the controversial treatment that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation has been “severely counterproductive.”

Moore, who serves as president of the Southern Baptists’ Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, spoke to a group of journalists Tuesday (Oct. 28) covering the group’s national conference.

“The utopian idea if you come to Christ and if you go through our program, you’re going to be immediately set free from attraction or anything you’re struggling with, I don’t think that’s a Christian idea,” Moore told journalists. “Faithfulness to Christ means obedience to Christ. It does not necessarily mean that someone’s attractions are going to change.”

**Uhm...Romans 1:18-32 says sodomy is a JUDGMENT OF GOD! And forget about all of those Christian testimonies of former sodomites who find this lifestyle disgusting.

Moore said evangelicals had an “inadequate view” of what same-sex attraction looks like.

“The Bible doesn’t promise us freedom from temptation,” Moore said. “The Bible promises us the power of the spirit to walk through temptation.”

**Uhm, no - scripture says this...

1Corinthians 10:13  There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.

1Thes 5:22  Abstain from all appearance of evil.


Moore gave similar remarks to an audience of 1,300 people at the conference. The same morning, the conference featured three speakers who once considered themselves gay or lesbian.

Moore joins a chorus of psychologists and religious leaders who have departed from the once-popular therapy.

In 2009, the American Psychological Association adopted a resolution urging mental health professionals to avoid reparative therapy. Since then, California and New Jersey have passed laws banning conversion therapy for minors, and several other states have considered similar measures.

Earlier this year, the 50,000-member American Association of Christian Counselors amended its code of ethics eliminating reparative therapy and encouraging celibacy instead.

John Paulk, who was once a poster boy for the ex-gay movement, apologized in 2013 for the reparative therapy he used to promote. Earlier this year, Yvette Schneider, who had formerly worked for groups such as the Family Research Council, Concerned Women for America and Exodus International, published a “coming out” interview with GLAAD calling for bans on reparative therapy. In addition, nine former ex-gay leaders have denounced conversion therapy.

“There were utopian ideas about reparative therapy that frankly weren’t unique to evangelicalism,” Moore said. “That was something that came along in the 1970s and 1980s about the power of psychotherapy to do all sorts of things that we have a more nuanced views about now.”

Some pastors, like John Piper, a respected Minneapolis preacher and author, still encourage the possibility of change for those who have same-sex attractions.

Exodus International, one of the most prominent ex-gay ministries shut down in 2013. While other ex-gay groups such as Restored Hope Network still exist, many religious leaders are now encouraging people with same-sex attraction to consider celibacy.

“The idea that one is simply the sum of one’s sexual identity is something that is psychologically harmful ultimately,” Moore said. “And I think also we have a situation where gay and lesbian people have been treated really, really badly.

**But have you read Romans 1:18-32 and 1st Corinthians 6:9-10?

Moore said the ERLC is working with parents of those who are gay and lesbian.

“The response is not shunning, putting them out on the street,” he said. “The answer is loving your child.”


**What about the prodical's son in the book of Luke? His father LET HIM GO to the pig-pen(and ultimately his son returned and repented, after being in such dire desperation). So are you saying these parents should FOLLOW their children to the pig pen?

For years, gay evangelicals had three options: leave the faith, ignore their sexuality or try to change. But as groups such as Exodus became unpopular, a growing number of celibate gay Christians have sought to be true to both their sexuality and their faith.

**Celibate gay Christians? Uhm...1st Corinthians 7 is written to MAN/WOMAN married people!

A newer question among some Christians is whether those with same-sex attraction should self-identify as gay.

In his address Monday, traditional marriage advocate Sherif Girgis plugged the website Spiritual Friendship, intended for Catholics and Protestants who identify as gay and celibate. Some Christians are debating whether identifying as gay or having a same-sex orientation is itself unbiblical.

“It’s not the way I would articulate it because I think it puts on an appendage to a Christian identity,” Moore said. “So I don’t see them as enemies who are trying to be destructive; I just don’t think it’s the best way to approach it.”

Rosaria Butterfield, a former lesbian who rejects the “ex-gay” label and the movement behind it, said Christians should not use “gay” as a descriptive adjective. Moore interviewed Butterfield, whose address at Wheaton College generated protests earlier this year, during Tuesday’s conference.

“There is no shame in repentance because it simply proves that God was right all along,” Butterfield told Moore.


Another conference speaker and Moody Bible Institute professor Christopher Yuan teaches a more traditional message of celibacy for those who, like him, are attracted to the same sex. He shuns labels, but he believes more younger Christians are self-identifying as gay and celibate.

“I’m kind of label-less,” Yuan said before his address. “I think I’m a dying breed, though.”

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It's not only a matter of if, but when persecution comes via the 501c3 corporate church opening their doors to sodomites.
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« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2014, 06:31:46 am »

Russell Moore, Rick Warren to Join Vatican Conference on Marriage and Family Life

 The Vatican will host religious leaders from across the religious spectrum later this month for a conference where they are expected to defend traditional marriage as between a man and a woman.
 
While hosted by Vatican officials and scheduled to open with an address by Pope Francis, the conference will include Muslim and Jewish representatives, as well as American leading evangelicals like megachurch pastor Rick Warren and Southern Baptist ethicist Russell Moore.
 
The gathering comes just weeks after Pope Francis and senior Catholic leaders wrapped up a two-week Vatican Synod on the Family, which highlighted tensions within the Catholic hierarchy over gays and lesbians and cohabiting couples.
 
Despite initial overtures toward gay and lesbian Catholics and the “gifts and qualities” they had to offer the church, the final synod report scaled back that language. Conservative and traditionalist Catholics said any attempts to soften the church’s teaching on homosexuality was a “betrayal” and akin to heresy.
 
Organizers say the new conference will show that while the Catholic hierarchy is split on how to address contemporary challenges to marriage and family life, the church can nonetheless seek common ground with religious leaders outside the Vatican.
 
“I am willing to go anywhere, when asked, to bear witness to what we as evangelical Protestants believe about marriage and the gospel, especially in times in which marriage is culturally imperiled,” said Moore, who heads the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.
 
The Nov. 17-19 conference, “An International Interreligious Colloquium on The Complementarity of Man and Woman,” will feature about 30 speakers from 23 countries and 14 religions.
 
The conference has been in the works for at least a year, said Helen Alvare, a law professor at George Mason University who is handling communications for the gathering. But the Vatican’s blockbuster family summit laid a good foundation for a larger discussion, she said.
 
“The drive we have for new language is a huge part of this,” Alvare said. “People fear complementarity means women are second, and their fears are somewhat justified. There’s a need to educate, to inspire, to show and tell about the beauty of the relationship between men and women.”
 
Cohabitation, nonmarital parenting and same-sex marriage are dominating the global conversation on the family, Alvare said.
 
“Same-sex marriage takes up a great deal of oxygen,” she said. “It’s a controversial question that’s going to be out there. Positive stories are difficult. But I’m hopeful because I’ve seen that with the work with Pope Francis.”
 
The conference will include Wael Farouq, a Muslim and president of the Tawasul Cultural Center in Cairo; Henry B. Eyring, a top-ranking apostle in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; and Manmohan Singh of the World Sikh Council.
 
“Marriage is your personal project, but it effects the world,” Alvare said. “The message is aimed at those who are there, that those in their own religious traditions and societies can have more language to work with and also that they have more hope.”
 
The gathering will be sponsored by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and co-sponsored by the Pontifical Council for the Family, the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, and the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

http://www.christianheadlines.com/blog/russell-moore-rick-warren-to-join-vatican-conference-on-marriage-and-family-life.html
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« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2017, 07:54:51 pm »

Will Russell Moore Be Defunded? Southern Baptists Decide

Southern Baptists will decide this week whether they will reduce funds for the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission headed by Russell Moore in part because of his anti-Trump rhetoric and characterizations of fellow Southern Baptists who supported the president during the elections.

The Southern Baptist Executive Committee meeting began Monday in Nashville, Tennessee, and representatives from across the nation are convening to plan and budget for the upcoming year. In what has been a tumultuous year for many evangelicals, the SBC is experiencing some notable theological and generational differences, and where the money goes will in part determine the overall direction of the largest Protestant denomination in the United States.

But moves to pressure Moore with reduced funding will be hard to pull off, according to sources knowledgeable of the inner workings of SBC institutions who spoke with The Christian Post on condition of anonymity.

The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, of which Moore is president, receives 1.65 percent of funds from the denomination's Cooperative Program. If individual churches are unhappy with Moore and want to withhold financial support from the ERLC they can earmark their giving with a "negative designation" from their contributions.

But that money could be easily recouped from other churches supportive of Moore to make up the difference or even exceed what was withheld.

In the 2016 election cycle, Moore was an outspoken critic Trump, a position at odds with many Southern Baptists. Though the number is disputed by some, exit polls suggest that upwards of 80 percent of white evangelicals backed Trump for president over his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

But the real issue, sources say, was Moore's characterization of fellow Christians as compromising the Gospel, much to the chagrin of older Southern Baptists. His efforts to "re-brand" the denomination, to the delight of many millennial Christians, including conservative-leaning ones, did not yield an accurate representation of Southern Baptists as a whole and cost them a proverbial seat at the table to engage the new president, they argue.

Meanwhile, left-wing secularists were content to showcase Moore, as were media elites opposed to Trump who invited him onto their platforms to speak, sources insist. Moore's words provoked Trump himself, who sent tweets to Moore, one of which called him a "nasty guy with no heart."

Insiders tell CP that the Executive Committee is not likely to defund Moore's budget and that the real issue that has upset so many Southern Baptists was not so much the ERLC leader's expressed distaste for Trump, but for the way he impugned the motives of Trump-supporting Southern Baptists. Moore had previously intoned that those Southern Baptists who were supporting Trump were essentially denying the Gospel and that they cared more about having political influence than sharing the Good News of salvation through Jesus.

Such remarks have deeply offended evangelism-minded Southern Baptists, particularly some in Louisiana, whose pastors emphasize winning people to Christ and have implemented ministry plans to do so vigorously.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/will-russell-moore-be-defunded-southern-baptists-sbc-executive-committee-175519/
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