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We Are Now One Year Away From Global Riots, Complex Systems Theorists Say

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September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
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http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
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Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Author Topic: We Are Now One Year Away From Global Riots, Complex Systems Theorists Say  (Read 3160 times)
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« on: June 18, 2013, 08:00:51 am »

We Are Now One Year Away From Global Riots, Complex Systems Theorists Say

What’s the number one reason we riot? The plausible, justifiable motivations of trampled-upon humanfolk to fight back are many—poverty, oppression, disenfranchisement, etc—but the big one is more primal than any of the above. It’s hunger, plain and simple. If there’s a single factor that reliably sparks social unrest, it’s food becoming too scarce or too expensive. So argues a group of complex systems theorists in Cambridge, and it makes sense.
 
In a 2011 paper, researchers at the Complex Systems Institute unveiled a model that accurately explained why the waves of unrest that swept the world in 2008 and 2011 crashed when they did. The number one determinant was soaring food prices. Their model identified a precise threshold for global food prices that, if breached, would lead to worldwide unrest.
 
The MIT Technology Review explains how CSI’s model works: “The evidence comes from two sources. The first is data gathered by the United Nations that plots the price of food against time, the so-called food price index of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN. The second is the date of riots around the world, whatever their cause.” Plot the data, and it looks like this:
 
Pretty simple. Black dots are the food prices, red lines are the riots. In other words, whenever the UN’s food price index, which measures the monthly change in the price of a basket of food commodities, climbs above 210, the conditions ripen for social unrest around the world. CSI doesn’t claim that any breach of 210 immediately leads to riots, obviously; just that the probability that riots will erupt grows much greater. For billions of people around the world, food comprises up to 80% of routine expenses (for rich-world people like you and I, it’s like 15%). When prices jump, people can’t afford anything else; or even food itself. And if you can’t eat—or worse, your family can’t eat—you fight.
 
But how accurate is the model? An anecdote the researchers outline in the report offers us an idea. They write that “on December 13, 2010, we submitted a government report analyzing the repercussions of the global financial crises, and directly identifying the risk of social unrest and political instability due to food prices.” Four days later, Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire as an act of protest in Tunisia. And we all know what happened after that.
 
Today, the food price index is hovering around 213, where it has stayed for months—just beyond the tip of the identified threshold. Low corn yield in the U.S., the world’s most important producer, has helped keep prices high.
 
“Recent droughts in the mid-western United States threaten to cause global catastrophe,” Yaneer Bar-Yam, one of the authors of the report, recently told Al Jazeera. “When people are unable to feed themselves and their families, widespread social disruption occurs. We are on the verge of another crisis, the third in five years, and likely to be the worst yet, capable of causing new food riots and turmoil on a par with the Arab Spring.”
 
Yet the cost of food hasn’t quite yet risen to the catastrophic levels reached last year. Around the time of the riots cum-revolutions, we saw the food price index soar through 220 points and even push 240. This year, we’ve pretty consistently hovered in the 210-216 range—right along the cusp of danger. But CSI expects a perilous trend in rising food prices to continue. Even before the extreme weather scrambled food prices this year, their 2011 report predicted that the next great breach would occur in August 2013, and that the risk of more worldwide rioting would follow. So, if trends hold, these complex systems theorists say we’re less than one year and counting from a fireball of global unrest.
 
But the reality is that such predictions are now all but impossible to make. In a world well-warmed by climate change, unpredictable, extreme weather events like the drought that has consumed 60% of the United States and the record heat that has killed its cattle are now the norm. Just two years ago, heat waves in Russia crippled its grain yield and dealt a devastating blow to global food markets—the true, unheralded father of the Arab Spring was global warming, some say.
 
And it’s only going to get worse and worse and worse. Because of climate change-exacerbated disasters like these, “the average price of staple foods such as maize could more than double in the next 20 years compared with 2010 trend prices,” a new report from Oxfam reveals. That report details how the poor will be even more vulnerable to climate change-induced food price shocks than previously thought. After all, we’ve “loaded the climate dice,” as NASA’s James Hansen likes to say, and the chances of such disasters rolling out are greater than ever.
 
This all goes to say that as long as climate change continues to advance—it seems that nothing can stop that now—and we maintain a global food system perennially subject to volatile price spikes and exploitation from speculators, without reform, our world will be an increasingly restive one. Hunger is coming, and so are the riots.


Read more: http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/we-are-now-one-year-and-counting-from-global-riots-complex-systems-theorists-say--2#ixzz2UmpMWopa
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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2013, 08:01:26 am »

Biggest protests in 20 years sweep Brazil


As many as 200,000 demonstrators marched through the streets of Brazil's biggest cities on Monday in a swelling wave of protest tapping into widespread anger at poor public services, police violence and government corruption.
 
The marches, organized mostly through snowballing social media campaigns, blocked streets and halted traffic in more than a half-dozen cities, including Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte and Brasilia, where demonstrators climbed onto the roof of Brazil's Congress building and then stormed it.

Monday's demonstrations were the latest in a flurry of protests in the past two weeks that have added to growing unease over Brazil's sluggish economy, high inflation and a spurt in violent crime.

While most of the protests unfolded as a festive display of dissent, some demonstrators in Rio threw rocks at police, set fire to a parked car and vandalized the state assembly building. Vandals also destroyed property in the southern city of Porto Alegre.

Around the country, protesters waved Brazilian flags, dancing and chanting slogans such as "The people have awakened" and "Pardon the inconvenience, Brazil is changing."

The epicenter of Monday's march shifted from Sao Paulo, where some 65,000 people took to the streets late in the afternoon, to Rio. There, as protesters gathered throughout the evening, crowds ballooned to 100,000 people, local police said. At least 20,000 more gathered in Belo Horizonte.

The demonstrations are the first time that Brazilians, since a recent decade of steady economic growth, are collectively questioning the status quo.

BIG EVENTS LOOM

The protests have gathered pace as Brazil is hosting the Confederation's Cup, a dry run for next year's World Cup soccer championship. The government hopes these events, along with the 2016 Summer Olympics, will showcase Brazil as an emerging power on the global stage.

Brazil also is gearing up to welcome more than 2 million visitors in July as Pope Francis makes his first foreign trip for a gathering of Catholic youth in Rio.

Contrasting the billions in taxpayer money spent on new stadiums with the shoddy state of Brazil's public services, protesters are using the Confederation's Cup as a counterpoint to amplify their concerns. The tournament got off to shaky start this weekend when police clashed with demonstrators outside stadiums at the opening matches in Brasilia and Rio.

"For many years the government has been feeding corruption. People are demonstrating against the system," said Graciela Caçador, a 28-year-old saleswoman protesting in Sao Paulo. "They spent billions of dollars building stadiums and nothing on education and health."

More protests are being organized for the coming days. It is unclear what specific response from authorities - such as a reduction in the hike of transport fares - would lead the loose collection of organizers across Brazil to consider stopping them.

For President Dilma Rousseff, the demonstrations come at a delicate time, as price increases and lackluster growth begin to loom over an expected run for re-election next year.

Polls show Rousseff still is widely popular, especially among poor and working-class voters, but her approval ratings began to slip in recent weeks for the first time since taking office in 2011. Rousseff was booed at Saturday's Confederations Cup opener as protesters gathered outside.

Through a spokeswoman, Rousseff called the protests "legitimate" and said peaceful demonstrations are "part of democracy." The president, a leftist guerrilla as a young woman, also said that it was "befitting of youth to protest."

WIDE ARRAY OF GRIEVANCES

Some were baffled by the protests in a country where unemployment remains near record lows, even after more than two years of tepid economic growth.

"What are they going to do - march every day?" asked Cristina, a 43-year-old cashier, who declined to give her surname, peeking out at the demonstration from behind the curtain of a closed Sao Paulo butcher shop. She said corruption and other age-old ills in Brazil are unlikely to change soon.

The marches began this month with an isolated protest in Sao Paulo against a small increase in bus and subway fares. The demonstrations initially drew the scorn of many middle-class Brazilians after protesters vandalized storefronts, subway stations and buses on one of the city's main avenues.

The movement quickly gained support and spread to other cities as police used heavy-handed tactics to quell the demonstrations. The biggest crackdown happened on Thursday in Sao Paulo when police fired rubber bullets and tear gas in clashes that injured more than 100 people, including 15 journalists, some of whom said they were deliberately targeted.

Other common grievances at Monday's marches included corruption and the inadequate and overcrowded public transportation networks that Brazilians cope with daily.

POLICE SHOW RESTRAINT

The harsh police reaction to last week's protests touched a nerve in Brazil, which endured two decades of political repression under a military dictatorship that ended in 1985. It also added to doubts about whether Brazil's police forces would be ready for next year's World Cup.

The uproar following last week's crackdown prompted Sao Paulo state Governor Geraldo Alckmin, who first described the protesters as "troublemakers" and "vandals," to order police to allow Monday's march to proceed and not to use rubber bullets.

The protests are shaping up as a major political challenge for Alckmin, a former presidential candidate, and Sao Paulo's new mayor, Fernando Haddad, a rising star in the left-leaning Workers' Party that has governed Brazil for the past decade. Haddad invited protest leaders to meet Tuesday morning, but has so far balked at talk of a bus fare reduction.

The resonance of the demonstrations underscores what economists say will be a challenge for Rousseff and other Brazilian leaders in the years ahead: providing public services to meet the demands of the growing middle class.

"Voters are likely to be increasingly disgruntled on a range of public services in a lower growth environment," Christopher Garman, a political analyst at the Eurasia Group, wrote in a report.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/18/us-brazil-protests-idUSBRE95G15S20130618
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2013, 08:02:23 am »

Police arrest dozens in raids across Turkey after protests


Police raided addresses across Turkey on Tuesday and detained dozens of people after nearly three weeks of anti-government protests, local media reported.
 
State media TRT said 25 people had been detained in the capital Ankara, 13 in Eskisehir to the west and "many" in Turkey's biggest city Istanbul.

A police source confirmed the operation and said: "For now, only provocateurs will be taken for questioning."

Turkey has been rocked by demonstrations that began in and around Istanbul's Taksim Square and turned violent after police sought to clear protesters using teargas and water cannon.

Clashes have erupted in cities across the country, as people protest against Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's leadership.

Erdogan has struck a defiant tone in the face of the biggest public challenge to his 10-year rule, during which he has overseen an economic boom and enjoyed broad popularity.

At a speech on Sunday before hundreds of thousands of supporters in Istanbul he said the disturbances had been manipulated by "terrorists".

Ankara's police anti-terror department said it had no information on the reports of Tuesday's raids.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/18/us-turkey-protests-arrests-idUSBRE95H05120130618
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2013, 12:23:38 pm »

This has been the whole agenda of the "truth movement" - to get everyone to think that it's THE BANKERS(and MOSTLY the bankers) that are doing all of the damage.

But all Alex Jones, Jeff Rense, Ron Paul, etc are doing are making you THINK you are fighting against the NWO being lead by the banking system, but ultimately the intentions(or deceptions, take your pick) are only going to lead into the GRAND deception of them all. Look at the whole Occupy Movement - they really made themselves known by wearing masks of Guy Fawkes(that high level Jesuit agent who tried to assassinate King James).

With that being said, the NWO banking system is only being used as tools by the higher levels in the food chain.(ie-Vatican, Jesuits, etc)
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2013, 12:34:48 pm »

But dont think that it is all a staged event for the shock jocks of the world.

Luk 21:25 And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; 

and upon the earth distress of nations, can be taken as forms of civil unrest, the people turning against the governments of the world and just a basic break down of society, like we have today. And "with perplexity" means they dont know why or how and it just keeps growing.... enjoy  Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2013, 12:47:38 pm »

But dont think that it is all a staged event for the shock jocks of the world.

Luk 21:25 And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; 

and upon the earth distress of nations, can be taken as forms of civil unrest, the people turning against the governments of the world and just a basic break down of society, like we have today. And "with perplexity" means they dont know why or how and it just keeps growing.... enjoy  Smiley

Ah...I see and understand now...

Rom 13:10  Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Rom 13:11  And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed.
Rom 13:12  The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.
Rom 13:13  Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.
Rom 13:14  But put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make not provision for the flesh, to fulfil the lusts thereof.
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2013, 12:07:47 am »

President Rousseff salutes Brazil protests, cities cut bus fares
http://news.yahoo.com/rousseff-salutes-brazil-protests-cities-cut-bus-fares-012236677.html
6/18/13

SAO PAULO (Reuters) - President Dilma Rousseff on Tuesday sought to defuse a massive protest movement sweeping Brazil, acknowledging the need for better public services and more responsive governance as demonstrations continued in some cities around the country.

Speaking the morning after more than 200,000 Brazilians marched in more than a half-dozen cities, Rousseff said her government remains committed to social change and is listening attentively to the many grievances expressed at the demonstrations.

"Brazil woke up stronger today," Rousseff said in a televised speech in Brasilia. "The size of yesterday's demonstrations shows the energy of our democracy, the strength of the voice of the streets and the civility of our population."

Monday's demonstrations were the latest in a flurry of protests in the past two weeks that have fed on widespread frustration with poor public services, police violence and government corruption.

more
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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2013, 08:49:34 am »

Teen dies as a million protesters take to streets in Brazil
http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/06/21/19070917-teen-dies-as-a-million-protesters-take-to-streets-in-brazil?lite

Brazil's president grasps for answer to protests, violence
http://news.yahoo.com/brazils-president-grasps-answer-protests-violence-115545564.html
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2013, 02:46:29 pm »

Sound Familiar?

Quote
Communism (from Latin communis - common, universal) is a revolutionary socialist movement to create a classless, moneyless[1][2] and stateless social order structured upon common ownership of the means of production, as well as a social, political and economic ideology that aims at the establishment of this social order.[3] This movement, in its Marxist–Leninist interpretations, significantly influenced the history of the 20th century, which saw intense rivalry between the "socialist world" (socialist states ruled by communist parties) and the "Western world" (countries with capitalist economies).[4]
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« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2013, 03:17:25 pm »

^^ Notice the word "revolutionary" in its definition - Alex Jones, Ron Paul, Chuck Baldwin, and the "truth" movement love to use this word. Isn't Baldwin supposed to be a pastor, BTW, who's exposed the 501c3 system? Roll Eyes

The "truth" movement is really no different from any of these socialist groups, to be frank - they have the same ideology that people of all faiths and beliefs need to work together for the common good, albeit to fight the NWO.
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« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2013, 03:51:42 pm »

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« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2013, 12:11:52 am »

Surprise, surprise! Problem, Reaction, Solution...

http://news.yahoo.com/brazils-president-pledges-hold-dialogue-protesters-012739241.html
6/21/13
Brazil's president pledges to hold dialogue with protesters

SAO PAULO/BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff promised on Friday to hold a dialogue with members of a protest movement sweeping the country, but also said she would do whatever is necessary to maintain order in the wake of widespread vandalism and looting.

"We cannot live with this violence that shames Brazil," she said in a nationally televised address. "All institutions and public security forces should prevent, within the limits of the law, every form of violence and vandalism."

Rousseff spoke even as new demonstrations broke out on Friday, including one that for several hours blocked most passengers from entering or leaving the country's busiest international airport, outside Sao Paulo.

The protests have come out of seemingly nowhere over the past week. More than 1 million people took to the streets on Thursday in the biggest demonstrations in Brazil in 20 years.

The nameless, leaderless movement - composed largely of students and the middle class - has pulled together a wide range of grievances including bad public transport and healthcare, corruption, and the billions of dollars that the government is spending to host next year's World Cup.

Rousseff, a former guerrilla who herself protested a military rule during the 1960s, praised the peaceful majority of protesters and said she would listen to their demands.

Speaking calmly but firmly, she said Brazil has a "historic opportunity" to harness the energy from the protests and make improvements. But she warned the movement could be ruined by violence like that seen on Thursday, when protesters smashed buildings, looted stores and set fires in a dozen cities.

Rousseff said it was her "obligation to listen to the voice of the streets, as well as dialogue with all segments" of society peacefully protesting.

The president, who is not known for initiating talks, did not specify what such a process would look like.

After her speech, the hashtag #calabocadilma - "Shut up, Dilma" in Portuguese began trending on Twitter accompanied by withering comments attacking her government.

Friday's protests were much smaller than those on Thursday. There were signs of a backlash against the movement on Friday, and one prominent leftist group said it would stop organizing marches for now because of discord and violence.

Unlike other recent protest movements such as the Arab Spring, Brazil's demonstrators are not targeting individual politician and Rousseff remains relatively popular.

Many are part of the middle class, which benefited from a recent economic boom. But they are upset about paying European-level taxes for what some describe as African-level public services.

Rousseff made a specific appeal for calm during a warm-up event underway for the World Cup. Clashes between protesters and police have occurred outside stadiums, terrifying many fans and tourists.

OPTIONS LIMITED

A recent economic slowdown and rising inflation has crimped the government's budget, meaning it probably cannot offer a major public investment plan without making painful spending cuts elsewhere - unlikely with an election looming next year.

Rousseff in her speech cited plans such as setting aside future oil royalties for education and importing doctors from abroad. She has previously made these proposals and they have faced resistance in Congress and elsewhere.

Mayors of several cities tried to yield to one of the protesters' main demands this week by rolling back a recent hike in bus and subway fares, but the demonstrations only grew.

The festive atmosphere that had attracted many students and even their parents to demonstrations over the past week took a big and possibly lasting hit on Thursday night.

TV images showed masked youths looting stores, setting fires and defacing buildings including the foreign ministry in Brasilia, which had its windows smashed. The violence was widespread, occurring in at least a dozen cities, and appeared to be fueled by fringe movements and common criminals taking advantage of the disorder.

Two people died as a result of the protests, local media reported, including one death caused by a car plowing into a crowd. More than 60 were injured in Rio de Janeiro alone.

BACKLASH

Radio, TV, Twitter and other social media crackled on Friday with condemnations of the violence, while the unity that had prevailed among protesters at the heart of the movement also showed signs of breaking down.

The Free Fare Movement in Sao Paulo, an activist group that was instrumental in the rise of the protests, said it would stop organizing new demonstrations for now after street fights broke out among protesters with different objectives on Thursday.

Douglas Belome, a bank teller and member of the Free Fare group, said things turned ugly when some protesters sought to prevent left-wing political parties from waving their flags.

"At least for now, there are no new demonstrations scheduled," he told Reuters, expressing regret for the violence.

World soccer body FIFA on Friday condemned the recent violence but said it had not considered cancelling either the warmup tournament, known as the Confederations Cup, or the big event next year.

Italy coach Cesare Prandelli told reporters that his team was banned from leaving the hotel because of the unrest.

Polls have shown that a large majority of Brazilians support the protesters and their aims. But the demonstrators' primary tactic of blocking main roads has begun to wear on some people.

"I support these (protests), but I think it's out of control," said Nilson Chabat, a 31-year-old gas station attendant on his way to work on Friday in Sao Paulo. "Many of us are angry but you can't just go make a mess every day."

(Additional reporting by Silvio Cascione and Caroline Stauffer; Editing by Todd Benson and Xavier Briand)
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« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2013, 04:23:16 am »

Turkish Germans hold anti-Erdogan protests in Cologne

The march was organised by Germany's Alevi community to show their solidarity with activists in Turkey and to call for the resignation of Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan.

http://www.euronews.com/2013/06/22/turkish-germans-hold-anti-erdogan-protests-in-cologne/
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« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2013, 09:52:21 pm »

If this happened at all, it would be a Gov and media operation.

Schumer predicts mass demonstrations if House blocks path to citizenship

A senior Democratic senator predicted Sunday there could be massive demonstrations in Washington if House Republicans try to block a bill to grant legal status to millions of immigrants.

Sen. Charles Schumer (N.Y.), the lead Democratic sponsor of the Senate immigration reform bill, said House Republicans would likely spark massive civil rights rallies if they try to quash measures to create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country.

“This has the potential of becoming the next major civil rights movement. I could envision in the late summer or early fall if Boehner tries to bottle the bill up or put something in without a path to citizenship — if there’s no path to citizenship, there’s not a bill — but if he tries to bottle it up or do things like that, I could see a million people on the Mall in Washington,” Schumer said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Schumer said business leaders, evangelical leaders and CEOs of high tech companies would join the public call for action by the House on immigration.

Schumer has counted about 67 votes for the Senate immigration bill and believes close to 70 will support final passage later this week.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/307223-schumer-predicts-mass-demonstrations-if-house-blocks-path-to-citizenship#ixzz2X69cyMvv

I think he is full of lies, mostly as being a liberalism is a punishment from the Lord

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« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2013, 10:11:01 pm »

Schumer predicts mass demonstrations if House blocks path to citizenship

More fearmongering - remember Henry Paulson pulled the same stunt when trying to get that massive bank bailout bill passed in 2008.

But that's pretty much expected of the lost world - they have the spirit of fear.

2Tim_1:7  For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.
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« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2013, 11:52:01 pm »

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/22/italy-unemployment-protest-idUSL5N0EY05Y20130622
6/22/13
Tens of thousands march in Rome against unemployment

* Italian unemployment at record high

* Union chiefs attack Letta government for lack of action

* Government to present package to create jobs for young

By Cristiano Corvino

ROME, June 22 (Reuters) - Thousands of workers and unemployed people marched in Rome on Saturday to protest against record unemployment and call on Enrico Letta's two-month-old government to deliver more than empty rhetoric on the issue.

The rally, organised by the country's three largest union confederations, CGIL, CISL and UIL, was the first major protest since Letta's broad, left-right coalition took office following an inconclusive election in February.

Italian unemployment hit 12 percent in April, the highest level on record, and joblessness among people under 24 is at an all-time high above 40 percent.

Union chiefs, speaking before a flag-waving crowd estimated at more than 100,000 by the organisers, criticised Letta for what they called a lack of action on an urgent problem.

"We can't accept these continuous promises that aren't translated into decisions that give a change of direction," said Susanna Camusso, leader of the country's largest union CGIL.

Luigi Angeletti, head of the UIL, said the country could not afford the piecemeal approach to policy adopted so far, especially when the ruling coalition is so fragile.

"In a country where the main concern is betting on how long the government will last, the message is that there is no more time for promises and announcements," he said in Piazza San Giovanni, the traditional venue of left-wing protests.

Letta's cabinet is due to unveil a package aimed at tackling youth unemployment next week, but Angeletti said the measures being mooted, such as tax breaks for firms hiring young people, were "useless".

Italy's economy has contracted in every quarter since mid-2011 - its longest post-war recession - and companies are steadily shedding staff.

The unionists called on the government to intervene to prevent plans by white goods maker Indesit to lay off 1,400 workers in one of the most recent labour disputes.

"Indesit isn't in crisis, it just wants to use its profits to make investments in Turkey and Poland," Camusso said.

One marcher, Lorenzo Giuseppe, told Reuters he had turned out "to send a message to the government that jobs have to be the top issue on the agenda. If we have work we can move ahead."

Millions of Italians are so convinced they have no chance of finding work that they have given up looking altogether, meaning official figures severely understate the number of unemployed, according to national statistics office ISTAT.
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« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2013, 03:35:30 am »

Quote
“This has the potential of becoming the next major civil rights movement.

Only because you people are making it that way.

What Washington needs to fear is a major uprising of natural born citizens in protest against the tyranny of their politicians. There SHOULD be a bunch of politicians in handcuffs for treason.
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« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2013, 06:16:27 pm »

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10892468
How mass protests around the globe have become the 'new social network'
6/24/13

The demonstrations in Brazil began after a small rise in bus fares triggered mass protests. Within days this had become a nationwide movement whose concerns had spread far beyond fares: more than a million people were on the streets shouting about everything from corruption to the cost of living to the amount of money being spent on the World Cup.

In Turkey, it was a similar story. A protest over the future of a city park in Istanbul - violently disrupted by police - snowballed too into something bigger, a wider-ranging political confrontation with Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, which has scarcely been brought to a close by the clearing of Gezi Park.

If the scenes have seemed familiar, it is because they shared common features: viral, loosely organised with fractured messages and mostly taking place in urban public locations.

Unlike the protest movement of 1968 or even the end of Soviet influence in eastern Europe in 1989, these are movements with few discernible leaders and with often conflicting ideologies.

Their points of reference are not even necessarily ideological but take inspiration from other protests, including those of the Arab Spring and the Occupy movement.

The result has been a wave of social movements - sometimes short-lived - from Wall St to Tel Aviv and from Istanbul to Rio de Janeiro, often engaging younger, better educated and wealthier members of society.

What is striking for those who, like myself, have covered these protests is how discursive and open-ended they often are. People go not necessarily to hear a message but to take over a location and discuss their discontents (even if the stunning consequence can be the fall of an autocratic leader such as Egypt's Hosni Mubarak).

If the "new protest" can be summed up, it is not in specifics of the complaints but in a wider idea about organisation encapsulated on a banner spotted in Brazil last week: "We are the social network."

In Brazil, the varied banners underlined the difficulty of easy categorisation as protesters held aloft signs expressing a range of demands from education reforms to free bus fares while denouncing the billions of public dollars spent on stadiums for the 2014 World Cup and the Olympics two years later.

"It's sort of a Catch-22," Rodrigues da Cunha, a 63-year-old protester, said. "On the one hand we need some sort of leadership, on the other we don't want this to be compromised by being affiliated with any political party."

As the Economist pointed out last week, while mass movements in Britain, France, Sweden and Turkey have been inspired by a variety of causes, including falling living standards, authoritarian government and worries about immigration, Brazil does not fit the picture, with youth unemployment at a record low and the country enjoying the biggest leap in living standards in its history.

Paul Mason, economics editor of BBC2's Newsnight and author of Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions, has argued that a key factor, largely driven by new communication technologies, is that people have not only a better understanding of power but are more aware of its abuse, both economically and politically.

Mason believes we are in the midst of a "revolution caused by the near collapse of free-market capitalism combined with an upswing in technical innovation" - but not everyone is so convinced. What does ring true, however, is his assertion that a driving force from Tahrir Square to Occupy is a redefinition of notions of both what "freedom" means and its relationship to governments that seem ever more distant.

It is significant, too, that many recent protests have taken place in the large cities that have been most transformed by neoliberal policies.

Tali Hatuka, an Israeli urban geographer whose book on the new forms of protest will be published next year, identifies the mass mobilisations against the Iraq war in 2003 as a turning point in how people protest. Hatuka argues that, while previous large public protests had tended to be focused and narrow in their organisation, the Iraq war protests saw demonstrations in 800 cities globally which encompassed and tolerated a wide variety of outlooks.

She said last week: "Up to the 1990s protests tended to be organised around a pyramid structure with a centralised leadership. As much effort went into the planning as into the protest itself."

She points to how the new form of protest tends to produce fractured and temporary alliances. "If you compare what we are seeing today with the civil rights movement in the US - even the movements of 1989 - those were much more cohesive. Now the event itself is the message. The question is whether that is enough."

She suspects it is not, pointing to how present-day activism - from the Iraq war demonstrations onwards - has often failed to deliver concrete results with its impact often fizzling out. Because of this, current forms of protest may be forced to change.

Another key feature of the new protests, argues Saskia Sassen, a sociology professor at Columbia University, New York, is the notion of "occupation" - which has not been confined to the obvious tactics of the Occupy movement. Occupations of different kinds have occurred in Tahrir Square, Cairo, in Gezi Park, Istanbul, and during social protests in Tel Aviv, Israel, in 2011. "Occupying is not the same as demonstrating. Many of the [recent] protests made legible the fact that occupying makes novel territory, and thereby a bit of history, using what was previously considered merely ground," Sassen wrote. "Whether in Egypt, the US, or elsewhere, it is important that the aim of the occupiers is not to grab power. They were and are, rather, engaged in the work of citizenship, exposing deep flaws and wrongs in their polity and society."

She argues that one distinguishing factor is that many of the new protest movements have involved what she calls "the modest middle class". She says: "Often what people are saying is that you are the state. I'm a citizen. I've done my job. You're not recognising that."

Hatuka says: "The old pyramid way of organising protests does have its limitations, but so too do the new ways of organising. Often it does not feel very effective in the long run. People will often go for a day or two and these protests are not necessarily offering an ideological alternative."

- Observer

Social media 'wakes giant'

The protests for better living conditions rocking Brazil's streets have spilled over into social media, with a deluge of tweets, Facebook comments and thousands of pictures posted on Instagram.

For the past two weeks, hundreds of thousands of mainly young people have been marching across the country, a placard in one hand and in the other a smartphone to share their protests with the world.

As with the 2011 Arab Spring protests and recent unrest in Turkey, activists have used social media to mobilise supporters while authorities have monitored it to try to stay one step ahead.

On Twitter, a young woman exulted as more than 1.2 million people flooded the streets in scores of cities on Thursday to rail against the billions of dollars spent on the 2014 World Cup, as well as corruption and inadequate transport.

"This is what pride looks like. That was beautiful yesterday," she tweeted, adding the trademark slogan keywords #ogiganteacordou (A giant woke up) and #vemprarua (Come down to the streets).

Yesterday, online networks were abuzz with comments on President Dilma Rousseff's televised address on Saturday in which she pledged to listen to the "voices of the streets" and offered a plan to improve public services.

In Sao Paulo the Free Pass Movement , which began the protests over higher mass transit fares, said on Facebook that the demonstrations would go on.
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« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2013, 06:05:14 am »

Nine killed in Brazil slum violence

Alleged criminals and police in deadly gun battle in Rio de Janeiro, as protests over poor governance continue.


At least nine people, including a police officer, have been killed in the Nova Holanda favela in Rio de Janeiro, authorities have said.
 
Authorities said on Tuesday the deaths occured following a gun battle between police officers and criminals taking advantage of protests sweeping through the city, to loot and steal.
 
Al Jazeera's correspondent Adam Raney, reporting from the favela, said he saw blood splattered on the walls of the homes of the dead.
 
"It's unclear if it was a gunshot that killed these suspects in these houses or if it was something more in closed quarters," he said.
 
He said people in the neighbourhood would not speak to him because police there were feared rather than respected.
 
The violence in Rio occurred as Brazil remained in the grip of fierce protests over poor governance.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2013/06/201362692028184987.html?
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« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2013, 07:27:21 am »


China Riots: Mobs Attack Police In Xinjiang

Local officials and civilians were stabbed and police vehicles set alight in China's autonomous Xinjiang region.


At least 27 people have been killed and three others injured after knife-wielding gangs went on the rampage through a town in far western China, according to state media.

 The Xinhua news agency said mobs attacked police stations, a local government building and a construction site in the Turpan Oasis in the Turkic-speaking Xinjiang region.

 Nine police officers and security guards, as well as eight civilians, were killed before police shot dead 10 of the attackers.

 The death toll from the unrest was the worst in the restive region since July 2009, when nearly 200 people were killed in riots in the regional capital Urumqi, involving local predominantly Muslim Uighurs and ethnic Han Chinese.

 Xinhua said Wednesday's unrest erupted at about 6am in the remote township of Lukqun, about 120 miles southeast of Urumqi.

 Gangs attacked officials and civilians, stabbing people and setting fire to police vehicles, Xinhua reported.

 Residents told Sky News there was a heavy police presence in the township. Search results for the words Xinjiang and Lukqun, in both English and Chinese, were unavailable on Chinese search engines.

rest: http://news.sky.com/story/1108240/china-riots-mobs-attack-police-in-xinjiang
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« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2013, 01:01:20 pm »

It's inevitable. People can live under communist rule only for so long before it breaks down.

And I'd say we aren't getting all the story either. It's likely more widespread than they are admitting to.

Once the people actually get up the nerve to take on the authorities, that line will be reached real quick. Then the government will have to decide what's next. If they can keep the unrest local, they'll just deal with it. IF it spreads, they got a problem. They couldn't handle 100 million people taking to the streets. That's less than 10 percent of their population. The numbers get too big too fast. It would mean serious military crackdown, or the government crumbles.
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2013, 03:26:02 pm »

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_CHINA_XINJIANG_RIOT?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-06-28-09-20-40
6/28/13
China's west erupts in violence 2nd time in 3 days

BEIJING (AP) -- A tense minority region in China's far west erupted in violence Friday for the second time in three days, barely hours after the government called the earlier unrest a "terrorist attack" and raised the death toll to 35.

State media gave few details in a brief dispatch about Friday's unrest, saying it was "a violent attack" that took place on a pedestrian street in Hotan, a city in Xinjiang, a region that has seen China's minority Uighurs clash with the ethnic Han majority. No details on casualties were released.

But a woman reached by phone in Hotan said that young men rioted on a pedestrian street near Tuanjie Square, or Unity Square, at around 3 p.m., setting fires.

The woman, who said she lived a bus stop away from the street where the unrest took place, refused to give her name out of fear of government reprisal. She said people were not being allowed out of their homes or to gather on the streets.

Armed police and riot police were guarding intersections and have ordered residents to stay at home and shopkeepers to close early, and the area around the square has been sealed, said a man surnamed Jia, who works in real estate.

"At the time, I saw a lot of police cars and military vehicles on the roads headed in that direction, and I heard that there was trouble over there," Jia said. "Then they told us to close our office and go home because it's too dangerous."

Jia said that mobile phone services within Hotan were disrupted in the afternoon for a few hours. Calls to several government agencies could not get through.

The latest unrest to rock Xinjiang came as the government said that Wednesday's attacks on police and other government buildings in Turpan prefecture's Lukqun township had killed 35 people, up from an earlier toll of 27.

State-run media had said that knife-wielding assailants launched early-morning attacks Wednesday targeting police stations, a government building and a construction site - all symbols of Han authority and influx in the region.

An exiled Uighur activist disputed that account, saying the violence started when police raided homes overnight. It was impossible to independently confirm the conflicting accounts.

The updated death toll included some of the severely injured dying in the hospital. It also included 11 assailants shot dead in Lukqun, the state-run Xinhua News Agency reported. Two police officers were among the 24 people they killed, Xinhua said.

"This is a terrorist attack, there's no question about that," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Friday at a regular news briefing. "As to who masterminded it, local people are still investigating."

State news reports did not identify the ethnicity of the attackers, nor explain what may have caused the conflict in the Turkic-speaking region, where Uighurs complain of suppression and discrimination by Han people. The report also said police captured four injured assailants.

Wednesday's violence - also described as a terrorist act by state media - was one of the bloodiest incidents since unrest in the region's capital city, Urumqi, killed nearly 200 people in 2009.

Photos released in state media show scorched police cars and government buildings and victims lying on the ground, presumably dead.

The Global Times newspaper said police set up many checkpoints along the 30-kilometer (19-mile) road to Lukqun and dissuaded reporters from traveling there due to safety concerns. It said heavy security has been necessary because some suspects remained on the run.

An official who gave only his family name of Bao and works at the news office for the Xinjiang Public Security Bureau said Friday that he had no more information than in state media. Calls to the region's party propaganda office and the regional government's news office were not answered.

Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the Germany-based World Uyghur Congress, said residents in Lukqun were prevented from entering mosques for Friday prayers. He questioned Beijing's account of the event, saying local residents had told him police had forcefully raided homes at night, triggering the deadly conflicts.

Xinjiang (shihn-jeeahng) is home to a large population of minority Muslim Uighurs (WEE'-gurs) in a region that borders Central Asia, Afghanistan and Pakistan and has been the scene of numerous violent acts in recent years, including the riots in the capital four years ago.

Critics have attributed the violence, including Wednesday's deadly clashes, to Beijing's oppressive and discriminatory ethnicity policies. Many Uighurs complain that authorities impose tight restrictions on their religious and cultural life.

The Chinese government says that it has invested billions of dollars in modernizing the oil- and gas-rich region and that it treats all ethnic groups equally.
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2013, 06:37:27 pm »

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/middle-class-rage-sparks-protest-movements-in-turkey-brazil-bulgaria-and-beyond/2013/06/28/9fb91df0-df61-11e2-8cf3-35c1113cfcc5_story.html
6/28/13
Middle-class rage sparks protest movements in Turkey, Brazil, Bulgaria and beyond

As protests raged in Turkey and were set to explode in distant Brazil, Asen Genov sat in his office in Bulgaria’s capital on the cloudy morning of June 14, about to strike the computer key that would spark a Bulgarian Spring.

Only months earlier, public outrage over high electricity bills in the country had brought down a previous government, but Genov saw more reason for anger when the new administration tapped a shadowy media mogul to head the national security service. Furious, Genov posted a Facebook event calling for a protest in Sofia, the nation’s capital, though he was dubious about turnout for a demonstration focused not on pocketbooks but on corruption and cronyism in government.

“We made bets on how many would come. I thought maybe 500,” said Genov, a 44-year- old who helps run a fact-checking Web site.

But as he arrived in Sofia’s Independence Square, they were streaming in by the thousands, as they have every day since, with the snowballing protests aiming to topple the government.

“We are all linked together, Bulgaria, Turkey, Brazil. We are tweeting in English so we can understand each other, and supporting each other on other social media,” said Iveta Cherneva, a 29-year-old author in Sofia, who was one of the many peopleprotesting for the first time. “We are fighting for different reasons, but we all want our governments to finally work for us. We are inspiring each other.”

Around the globe, this is the summer of middle-class discontent, particularly in the developing world. From Istanbul to Rio de Janeiro, from Bulgaria to Bosnia, the pent-up frustrations of an engaged citizenry are being triggered by a series of seemingly disparate events.

Government development of a park in Turkey has erupted into broad unrest over freedom of expression in a society that, under a devout and increasingly authoritarian leader, is witnessing the encroaching power of Islam. A hike in bus fares in Brazil, meanwhile, has touched off an uproar over official waste, corruption and police brutality. But what do they have in common? One small incident has ignited the fuse in societies that, linked by social media and years of improved living standards across the developing world, are now demanding more from their democracies and governments.

In the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, thousands of furious residents across ethnic lines united on the streets this month, at one point blockading lawmakers inside parliament for 14 hours to protest government ineptitude in clearing a massive backlog of unregistered newborns. Public anger erupted after a Facebook posting — about a 3-month-old baby whose trip to Germany for a life-saving transplant had been delayed by the backlog — went viral.

Thousands of protestors, including an outpouring of middle-class citizens, are expected in Cairo’s Tahrir Square this Sunday. They return to the touchstone plaza of the Arab Spring in a nation that exchanged a dictator for what many Egyptians now see as a new government unwilling or unable to fix a corrupt bureaucracy and inefficient economy.
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« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2013, 06:09:16 am »

Egypt protest: Crowds gather for big anti-Morsi rally

Crowds have been gathering in Cairo's Tahrir Square ahead of a mass rally to demand the resignation of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. Thousands spent the night the square, focus of the protests which brought down former leader Hosni Mubarak. Sunday is the first anniversary of Mr Morsi's inauguration as president.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23115821
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« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2013, 02:49:41 am »

Having been in India over the last week, couldn't tell you how POOR this country is - even livestock like cows were wandering alone on the streets. Even it was the norm for people to use bathrooms on the side of the roads in public b/c they couldn't afford one themselves.

Honestly, while America is under judgment and is heading India's direction, don't think they will ever reach the 3rd world level b/c they will RIOT before anything else. Not that I'm trying to praise India here, but these citizens having grown up in a poor environment, they know how to survive in terms of putting food on the table and clothes on their backs(ie-saw motorcycle riders carrying large amounts of farm food stuff all by themselves). Here in America, this country has been spoiled with way too many goodies in this "consumerism" economy, that the least spark of any kind of crisis like Katrina can potentially make people snap.
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« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2013, 04:43:09 am »

The cows running loose is a Hindu thing. They worship cows!

And India wonders why they have so many poor!  Roll Eyes

As a result, India is one of the filthiest places on earth.
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« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2013, 07:13:22 pm »


Colombia president's approval plunges as nationwide protests show growing discontent with economy - @BloombergNews


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-04/colombian-president-s-approval-plunges-as-protests-roil-nation.html
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« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2013, 09:25:08 pm »

Luke 21:26-28
(26)  Men's hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken.
(27)  And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory.

Though their are plenty of verses which give hope during trials and tribulations..this is one, which, in the end times gives the most hope (in my opinion). It gives a how-to (look up = look to God; lift up your heads = don't be scared/frightened, hopeless; redemption drawing near = Second Coming) on how to manage through these days, spiritually and mentally.

(28)  And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.
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« Reply #28 on: September 07, 2013, 12:27:22 pm »


Protesters in Rio de Janeiro interrupt military parade to mark Brazil's Independence Day; at least 5 injured in clashes with police - @AJELive


http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2013/09/201397155828242788.html
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« Reply #29 on: September 21, 2013, 08:39:38 am »

About 50,000 garment industry workers hold largest protest so far in Bangladeshi capital - @Reuters

http://www.breakingnews.com/

Mexican Riots: Riot Police Fire Tear Gas at Teacher Protest
IBTimes.co.uk-Sep 14, 2013
Teachers and protesters stand near a burning barricade before they are evicted from Zocalo Square by the riot police in Mexico City.
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/506034/20130914/riot-police-striking-teachers-mexico-water-cannon.htm


'Hard to breathe': Anarchists, riot police clash outside Athens as ...
RT (blog)-Sep 18, 2013
'Hard to breathe': Anarchists, riot police clash outside Athens as nation ... Some 5,000 demonstrators took to the streets of Keratsini in protest, ...
http://rt.com/news/greece-strike-public-sector-013/


Akhilesh faces angry protesters as he visits riot-hit Muzaffarnagar
IBNLive-Sep 15, 2013
Muzaffarnagar: Days after riots in Muzaffarnagar claimed 48 lives; Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav faced angry protesters as he ...
http://ibnlive.in.com/news/akhilesh-faces-angry-protesters-as-he-visits-riothit-muzaffarnagar/422115-37-64.html


Protest Turns Into Clash With Police in Cambodia
New York Times-Sep 15, 2013
The violence came during a day of mass protests in the capital of Phnom Penh led by Sam Rainsy, a former finance minister and the leader of ...
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/16/world/asia/cambodia-police-use-water-cannons-on-protesters.html?_r=0


Troops patrol Colombian capital after rioting
The Guardian-Aug 30, 2013
Masked youths began hurling rocks and bricks and fought riot police, ... and potato farmers protesting against everything from high fuel prices to ...
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/31/colombia-troops-patrol-streets-bogota


Riot police use tear gas to disperse protesters in Turkey
PanARMENIAN.Net-Sep 13, 2013
PanARMENIAN.Net - Riot police used tear gas to disperse pockets of anti-government demonstrators in several Turkish cities for a third night ...
http://www.panarmenian.net/eng/news/169941/


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