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New Tick-Borne Illness Could Be Worse Than Lyme Disease

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« on: July 03, 2013, 05:35:06 am »

New Tick-Borne Illness Could Be Worse Than Lyme Disease

A new disease spread by deer ticks has already infected 100,000 New Yorkers since the state first started keeping track.
 
As CBS 2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported, the new deer tick-borne illness resembles Lyme disease, but is a different malady altogether – and it could be even worse.
 
The common deer tick is capable of spreading dangerous germs into the human bloodstream with its bite. However, Lyme disease is one of many diseases that ticks carry.
 
The latest disease is related to Lyme, and an infected person will suffer similar symptoms.
 
“Patients with this illness will develop, perhaps, fever, headache, flu-like symptoms, muscle pains — so they’ll have typical Lyme-like flu symptoms in the spring, summer, early fall,” said Dr. Brian Fallon of Columbia University. “But most of them will not develop the typical rash that you see with Lyme disease.”


 
Fallon, a renowned expert on Lyme disease at the New York Psychiatric Institute, said the importance of the new bacterium – called Borrelia miyamotoi — is that it might explain cases of what looked like chronic Lyme disease, but did not test positive for Lyme.
 
“The problem is that the diagnosis is going to be missed, because doctors aren’t going to think about Borrelia miyamotoi because they don’t know about it. And number two, if they test for Lyme disease, it will test negative, and the rash won’t be there,” Fallon said. “So they are not going to treat with the antibiotics, so the patient will have an infection staying in their system longer than it should.
 
While there is no test yet for the germ, the good news is that it appears the same antibiotic that kills Lyme disease also works – if it is given in the right doses and started early in the infection.
 
Remember, it takes a tick bite to get Lyme disease or the new bug, and the tick usually has to feed on your blood for at least 24 hours.
 
If you have been outdoors, have someone else do a full body check, Gomez advised. Ticks are small – only about the size of a sesame seed.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/07/02/new-tick-borne-illness-could-be-worse-than-lyme-disease/
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2013, 09:36:03 am »

A tick-ing time bomb that has Schumer asking for fed help
 
Senator Chuck Schumer is requesting federal aid to combat Powassan, a tick-borne illness that is deadly in 30% of cases.


There’s currently no treatment for the virus, which is fatal in 30% of cases, Schumer said.
 
Here's a tick-ing time bomb the feds better not ignore.
 
Sen. Chuck Schumer called Sunday for federal help to combat tick-borne illnesses after the deadly Powassan virus was discovered upstate and in the Hudson Valley region close to the city.

Powassan virus is a rare but dangerous disease now present in New York and we haven’t done nearly enough at the federal level to tackle it,” Schumer (D-N.Y.) said.
 
There’s currently no treatment for the virus, which is fatal in 30% of cases, Schumer said.
 
He’s pushing for more resources to combat the illness.


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/serious-tick-sickness-schumer-fed-article-1.1423999#ixzz2blX41QA6
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 01:23:14 pm »

And this is the same federal government that started this scam "war on drugs" war since the 1980's. Seriously, medical marij could easily cure these kinds of diseases for these people, and at MUCH less cost.
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 01:54:39 pm »

Well it was the federal government that created and released tick-born diseases.

Plum Island, Lyme Disease
And Operation Paperclip -
A Deadly Triangle


http://rense.com/general67/plumislandlyme.htm

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« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2013, 08:00:16 am »

Lyme, tick-borne illnesses get even more terrifying

The height of tick season generally brings a spate of scary stories about Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses, and this year's seem especially high on the heebie-jeebies scale.

Lyme disease itself has long been confounding, but the Boston Globe today zeroes in on an especially vexing fact: About 25% of patients continue experiencing symptoms — debilitating headaches, sore joints, nausea, etc. — long after they finish the standard month-long treatment of oral antibiotics.

Medically speaking, they should be fine, but they're nowhere near it. Did the bacteria dodge the antibiotics and infiltrate the body's nervous system? Maybe the Lyme triggered a different illness? Should patients stay on antibiotics long-term?

Most specialists thinks the latter is a bad idea for a host of reasons, but it's the only relief for some patients, including the woman featured in the Globe story.

If Lyme sounds awful, it's nothing compared to the emerging threat of the Powassan virus. It is rarer — about 6% of ticks in New York's Hudson Valley were found to carry it in a recent study, compared to about 50% for Lyme — but far more lethal, reports the Poughkeepsie Journal. About a third of those afflicted die.

Last week, Sen. Chuck Schumer called on the CDC to launch a study of Powassan and to expand research into all tick-borne diseases.

At LiveScience, Robin Diamond writes that such research can't come soon enough. Doctors for too long have resorted to a "knee-jerk diagnosis" of Lyme, often to their patients' detriment, but the new studies show that we need a much broader view of "all the illnesses tiny ticks can carry, the big problems they can create, and what doctors and patients can do to stem the tide."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/08/18/newser-lyme-disease-tick-borne-illnesses/2668655/
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« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2014, 08:00:53 am »

Ticks Carrying Lyme-Like, Mystery Bacteria Found In Bay Area Parks

A newly-discovered mystery bacteria with unknown health effects is being carried by ticks and found in Bay Area parks, according to a Stanford University study.

The bacteria, Borrelia miyamotoi, has been found on ticks also carrying the bacteria which causes Lyme disease, B. burgdorferi, researchers said in a study to be published in the March issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Disease.

While only two percent of the samples were infected, ticks carrying one or both pathogens were found in nearly every one of 12 recreational areas along the Peninsula they looked at, according to the researchers.

Lyme disease is transmitted to humans from the bite of a tick infected with B. burgdoferi and is named for Lyme, Conn. where it was first identified in 1975. Symptoms include flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, swollen lymph nodes and a skin rash. If untreated, infection can cause secondary health problems, such as arthritis, joint pain and immune system deficiencies.

The first known human case of B. miyamotoi infection was discovered in 2013 and aside from Lyme-like symptoms, little is known about the pathogen, according to researchers.

Most patients recover from Lyme disease with antibiotics, but not everyone finds relief and researcher Dan Salkeld said the new pathogen may not be getting accurately diagnosed. “People who have difficulty getting diagnoses – maybe this is involved,” Salkeld told the Stanford News Service.

While Lyme disease is much more prevalent in the Northeast than in California – only two percent of local ticks carry the Lyme bacteria compared to 35 percent in the Northeast – Salkeld said researchers were surprised to ticks infected with the new pathogen at slightly higher rates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says confirmed or probably Lyme cases are growing nationwide and researchers believe the cases will continue to increase as doctors become more familiar with it.

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2014/02/18/ticks-carrying-lyme-like-mystery-bacteria-found-in-bay-area-parks/
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2014, 01:08:59 pm »

Oklahoma: Man dies after acquiring Heartland virus

An Oklahoma man has died after acquiring the Heartland virus, making him the second person in the U.S. to die after coming down with the illness, state health officials said Tuesday.

The state Department of Health released few details but said the man was from Delaware County in northeast Oklahoma, was over the age of 65 and died recently from complications of the virus, which is found in the lone star tick and is likely spread through tick bites. The virus was first identified in 2009, in Missouri.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said the other patient who died after acquiring the virus had other health conditions. The CDC did not immediately respond to a telephone call seeking more information late Tuesday.

Other cases have been diagnosed in Missouri and Tennessee, but those patients recovered. Like previous cases, the Oklahoma victim had a history of outdoor activities and exposure, said Becky Coffman, an epidemiologist in acute disease with the Oklahoma Health Department.

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, loss of appetite, nausea, bruising easily and diarrhea. There is no vaccine or drug to prevent or treat the illness.

Coffman said people who become ill after spending a lot of time outdoors should disclose to physicians if they have a history of tick bites to help reach a correct diagnosis. The incubation period before the onset of symptoms of the Heartland virus is unknown, but symptoms caused by other tick-borne illnesses generally begin two weeks after infection, Coffman said.

"We need to help doctors," she said. "We need to give them as much information as we can to give them some clues."

Coffman said campers and others who spend a lot of time outdoors should check themselves "at least daily" for ticks.

Although there is no routine testing available for Heartland virus, protocols are in place for investigational diagnostic testing. The state Health Department recommends using insect repellents, wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants when outdoors, avoiding bushy and wooded areas where ticks thrive, and conducting thorough tick checks after spending time outside.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_HEARTLAND_VIRUS_OKLAHOMA?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-05-27-19-10-28
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2015, 04:21:06 pm »

Newly Found Virus Linked to Kansas Death After Tick Bite

 U.S health officials are investigating a new strain of virus linked to the death of a Kansas man, who fell ill after being bitten by a tick, then went into organ failure and died about two weeks later.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that it’s working with Kansas officials to find any other cases. They’ve named the virus “Bourbon” after the county where the man lived.

The pathogen belongs to a group known as thogotoviruses. The Kansas man’s death is the first time a thogotovirus is known to have caused human illness in the U.S., and only the eighth time one is known to have caused symptoms in people, according to an article published Friday in the CDC’s Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.

The Kansas man was doing outdoor work in Bourbon County last year, the CDC said, when he went to the doctor after finding an engorged tick on his shoulder and falling ill a few days later. He had a fever and headache, according to the article, and was given an antibiotic commonly used against tick-borne diseases. The man’s condition didn’t improve, however, and his kidney function deteriorated and he couldn’t breath on his own. On day 11 of his illness, he died.

Kansas officials said in December that they were investigating the virus with the CDC, and that it resembled other tick-borne illnesses.

Before he became sick, the man, who was more than 50 years old, was considered healthy, the CDC said in the report. CDC researchers identified the virus by looking for genetic traces in the man’s blood.

The recent discovery of Heartland virus in Missouri, also possibly linked to ticks, led the CDC to say that “that the public health burden of these pathogens has been underestimated.” Next-generation sequencing, a fairly new technology that can scan blood samples for many viruses or bacteria at once, will help health researchers make similar discoveries in the future, the CDC said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-02-20/newly-found-virus-linked-to-kansas-man-s-death-after-tick-bite
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2016, 05:19:59 pm »

Lyme disease–carrying ticks are now in half of all U.S. counties

The ticks that transmit Lyme disease, a debilitating flulike illness caused by Borrelia bacteria, are spreading rapidly across the United States. A new study shows just how rapidly. Over the past 20 years, the two species known to spread the disease to humans have together advanced into half of all the counties in the United States.

Lyme disease cases have tripled in the United States over the last 2 decades, making it the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere. The disease now affects around 300,000 Americans each year. If diagnosed early—a rash commonly appears around the site of the tick bite—Lyme can be effectively treated with antibiotics, but longer term infections can produce more serious symptoms, including joint stiffness, brain inflammation, and nerve pain.

To get a comprehensive map of where the two species—the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the western blacklegged tick (I. pacificus)—were living, Rebecca Eisen and colleagues from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Fort Collins, Colorado, combined data from published papers with state and county tick surveillance data going back to 1996. They counted reports of tick sightings in each of the 3110 continental U.S. counties to determine whether those counties hosted an established population or just a few individuals. Ticks were considered “established” when sightings of at least six ticks, or two of the three life stages, had been reported in a year.

Their results, published in the Journal of Medical Entomology, show that the blacklegged tick has undergone a population explosion, doubling its established range in less than 2 decades. It is now reported in 45.7% of U.S. counties, up from 30% in 1998. Blacklegged ticks are found in 37 states across the eastern United States. The rarer western blacklegged tick, restricted to just six states, has shown only modest increases in established populations, from 3.4% to 3.6% of counties. Combined, these two Lyme disease vectors are now found in half of all U.S. counties.

“Since the late 1990s, the number of counties in the northeastern United States that are considered high-risk for Lyme disease has increased by more than 320%,” Eisen says. “The tick is now established in areas where it was absent 20 years ago,” she adds.

Perhaps most worrying, the tick-dense northeast is where Lyme disease is most common. Although the blacklegged tick is found from Florida to Minnesota, 95% of confirmed cases come from just 14 states in the northeast and upper Midwest. “Although our map shows a wide distribution … the risk of people getting Lyme disease is not equal across areas of the country,” Eisen says.

A study published in PLOS ONE last year might hold the answer. Parasitologist Isis Arsnoe from Michigan State University in East Lansing and colleagues found that populations of blacklegged ticks behave differently in the north and the south of the United States. Nymphs of the blacklegged tick in the north are bolder and more active in seeking out hosts, a behavior known as questing. Arsnoe and her team found that that tick nymphs originating from Wisconsin and Rhode Island were 20 times more likely to emerge from leaf litter, putting them in the path of passing humans, than nymphs from Tennessee and Florida. "Questing behavior is a key factor affecting the risk of tick bites,” Arsnoe explains. "Ticks that stay buried in the leaves are not likely to have an opportunity to bite passing humans—and unless they bite they cannot transmit disease.” Arsnoe is concerned that the ticks found in the north may also expand into southern states, taking their questing behavior with them.

But despite the wide distribution of the vectors, a tick’s chances of coming into contact with a human are still relatively low. Avoiding areas of thick vegetation, using a strong repellent, and bathing after hiking are usually enough to avoid contact, CDC says. Eisen says that the most important thing now will be to carefully monitor the spread of the blacklegged tick, so that that people can educate themselves about the potential disease vectors in their area and take steps to protect themselves.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/01/lyme-disease-carrying-ticks-are-now-half-all-us-counties
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2017, 08:10:26 pm »

WARNING: Man BITTEN BY TICK DIES DAYS LATER From NEW DISEASE That Has SCIENTISTS BAFFLED …

BOREDOM THERAPY Reports: It’s a scary idea to consider, but even as our modern medical science makes huge advances, new types of bacteria and viruses that could cause us serious harm are always evolving. Like all life forms, these disease-causing agents change and adapt constantly.

Most of the time our understanding of health and science outpaces the development of new types of illnesses, and we can stop bacteria and viruses in their tracks. Sometimes, though, they get a leg up on us.

Just look at this unusual incident in Kansas. A farmer who’d recently been bitten by ticks went to the hospital with symptoms that doctors thought indicated Lyme Disease, but when they looked at his blood work, they were shocked to find a type of virus that had never ever been seen before.

In 2014, a farmer from Bourbon County, Kansas went to the hospital with a high fever, nausea, and a rash. He told doctors he had gotten several tick bites recently, so they assumed he had Lyme disease.

His blood-work, however, showed no trace of Lyme disease, although he did have another virus, presumably transmitted by the ticks, which appeared to be causing his symptoms.

Further research revealed that this was an entirely new kind of infection that was distinct from anything else humans have ever contracted. His doctors named it the “Bourbon virus” after the area he was from.

In some ways it was similar to the Bakten thogotovirus which is endemic to Asia, but was distinct in several important ways that meant doctors couldn’t treat it. Unfortunately, the farmer ended up passing away from its complications.

Doctors thought perhaps the Bourbon virus was a one-time evolutionary fluke, but a year later another person who had been bitten by a tick in nearby Stillwater, Oklahoma contracted it. Thankfully though, this patient made a full recovery.

At this time doctors still don’t fully understand the unique virus, and there’s no specific vaccine to prevent it or treatment to cure it. The best advice researchers have regarding it is simply to avoid tick bites.

http://viralliberty.com/warning-man-bitte/
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« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2017, 05:27:28 pm »

Prepare for a Bad Summer for Ticks
Mild winters and big deer and mice populations mean more ticks and higher rates of Lyme disease diagnoses

Milder winters, burgeoning mice and deer populations and a bumper acorn crop from two years ago mean this year’s tick season is expected to be bad and more widespread, experts say. With that comes the threat of more tick-borne diseases, including the most common, Lyme disease.

States like Connecticut—home to the town of Old Lyme where the disease was first diagnosed—are already reporting a higher number of ticks infected with the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium, which causes Lyme disease, as well as other tick-borne pathogens. The deer or blacklegged tick can transmit up to seven pathogens that cause human diseases, including Lyme disease.

The state collects ticks from residents, and of the more than 800 received thus far this year, nearly 38% have tested positive for Lyme disease, compared with an average of about 27% in the past five years for the full season, said Goudarz Molaei, a research scientist at the Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases, part of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, a state-owned research facility.

rest: https://www.wsj.com/articles/prepare-for-a-bad-summer-for-ticks-1493050961
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« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2018, 06:58:29 pm »

Tick paralysis: 5-year-old Kailyn Griffin paralyzed by feeding tick



Kailyn Griffin, 5, experienced temporary paralysis following a tick bite in Grenada, Miss., discovered on June 6. (WLBT)

As soon as Kailyn Griffin's feet hit the floor Wednesday morning, she collapsed in a heap.

The 5-year-old kept trying to stand but fell every time. She was also struggling to speak, said her mother, Jessica Griffin.

Her daughter had been fine when the family went out to a T-ball game the night before, NBC-affiliate WLBT in Jackson, Miss., reported. Maybe Kailyn was having a hard time waking up Wednesday morning, or perhaps her legs were asleep.

Then Griffin saw the tick.

She had gathered Kailyn's hair to put it in a ponytail when she spotted the insect, embedded in the girl's scalp, swelled with the girl's blood.

She pulled the tick out and placed it in a plastic bag, then rushed to the hospital with Kailyn, WTXL reported. Doctors told Griffin it was an uncommon condition called tick paralysis.

“After tons of bloodwork and a CT of the head UMMC has ruled it as tick paralysis! PLEASE for the love of god check your kids for ticks! It’s more common in children than it is adults!” Griffin, of Grenada, Miss., wrote in a Facebook post Wednesday that seemed a mixture of worry and relief. “Scary is a UNDERSTATEMENT!”

Griffin could not be immediately reached for comment. It was unclear where or when she thought her daughter had acquired the tick, or how long it had been on her body. Ticks are most active from April through September, The Washington Post has reported.

Tick paralysis is caused by female ticks on the verge of laying eggs. After the tick eats a blood meal and is engorged, it secretes a neurotoxin into the host, according to the American Lyme disease Foundation.

The symptoms can occur five to seven days after the tick starts feeding.

Paralysis begins in the legs, then spreads to the upper extremities. It can manifest as fatigue, numbness and an increasing inability to move, according to the foundation.

In the later stages, it is harder for the victim to move her face or tongue. If nothing is done, the toxin ultimately makes it impossible for a person to breathe, resulting in respiratory failure.

The paralysis is more common in animals, which are unable to check themselves for the ticks.

But human children also are susceptible because of their smaller body mass. Girls get tick paralysis more frequently because the ticks can easily hide in long hair, according to the foundation.

The CDC reported a cluster of cases of the extremely rare disease in 2006. One of the victims was a 6-year-old girl who had trouble walking a week after visiting her grandmother in the mountains of Larimer County. A nurse bathing her after she was admitted to the hospital found a tick along her hairline.

And last year, Amanda Lewis woke up and found that her 3-year-old daughter, Evelyn, couldn't stand no matter how hard she tried, according to the La Grande Observer.

Lewis, of La Grande, Ore., posted a video on Facebook, hoping family members or friends could help figure out what was causing the girl's sudden strange ailment. They couldn't, but the video was watched about 22 million times and shared more than 600,000 times.

At the hospital that day, physician John Page saw that a 3-year-old had been admitted with ataxia and suspected that it might be tick paralysis.

He scoured the girl's scalp and found the insect, which was embedded in the skin and could have been easily dismissed as a red bump.

Once it was removed, Evelyn was walking the next day.

In Mississippi last week, Kailyn Griffin had a similarly quick recovery.

Her mom's last picture of the incident showed the girl grasping two balloons in a hospital hallway.

“Look who is WALKING out of the hospital! Everything is completely back to normal!” Griffin wrote, including a raised hands emoji. “GOD IS GOOD!!”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2018/06/11/a-5-year-old-girls-sudden-paralysis-was-a-mystery-then-her-mother-checked-her-scalp/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.b05403b4ebba
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