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Philippine typhoon deaths climb into thousands

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Author Topic: Philippine typhoon deaths climb into thousands  (Read 711 times)
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« on: November 07, 2013, 10:34:57 am »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24846813
11/7/13
Philippines braces for Typhoon Haiyan

Authorities in the Philippines are bracing for the arrival of Typhoon Haiyan, which is expected to strike central parts of the country on Friday.

The category five storm is moving towards the South East Asian nation with winds of up to 278 km/h (173mph).

Haiyan - known as Yolanda in the Philippines - is the strongest storm to hit the Pacific this year.

Schools and offices have already been closed in the region and thousands of people are being evacuated.

Typhoon Haiyan is expected to make landfall at around 09:00 local (01:00 GMT) on Friday between Samar and Leyte, two of the Visayan Islands in central Philippines.

It is then forecast to move over to the South China Sea north of Palawan Island on Saturday, meteorologists say.

In its path are areas already struggling to recover from a 7.3-magnitude earthquake last month, including the worst-hit island of Bohol.

Around 5,000 people are still living in tents in Bohol after losing their homes in the quake, which killed more than 200 people.

The military says its transporting food packages and relief goods to remote communities, and has helicopters on stand-by. Ferry operations have already been suspended and fishing boats ordered back to port.

Thousands of people from villages at risk have been evacuated across several provinces, while schools and offices have shut.

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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2013, 05:41:01 pm »

Jeff Masters of Weather Underground says Haiyan made landfall as the most powerful typhoon or hurricane in recorded history - via @usatodayweather

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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 10:15:05 pm »

Jeff Masters of Weather Underground says Haiyan made landfall as the most powerful typhoon or hurricane in recorded history - via @usatodayweather



The weather, earthquakes, etc have been pretty active around the world recently - but on the contrary, it's been rather quiet here in the USA.

Don't know if this means anything, but nonetheless I was thinking about this recently.
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2013, 12:21:08 pm »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/11/08/21362576-most-powerful-storm-ever-to-make-landfall-batters-philippines-4-deaths-confirmed?lite
11/8/13
'Most powerful storm ever to make landfall' batters Philippines; 4 deaths confirmed

The most powerful storm ever to make landfall battered the Philippines with winds approaching 200 mph early Friday, killing at least four people and raising fears of widespread damage.

More than one million people fled in search of safety ahead of category-five super typhoon Haiyan, which caused mudslides, flash flooding and a storm surge with waves of up to 30 feet. One expert said that the storm's winds had the potential to "obliterate poorly constructed homes."

At least four people were killed, according to The Associated Press. But with the country’s lines of communication cut, officials feared the toll could rise dramatically.

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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2013, 07:48:43 pm »

http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-typhoon-haiyan-superstorm-sandy-katrina-20131108,0,4183555.story#axzz2k5dytxS3
Typhoon Haiyan makes Sandy, Katrina look like weak cousins
11/8/13

What may be the fiercest typhoon in recorded history smashed into the Philippines early Friday morning, carrying winds that make Superstorm Sandy look like a weak relative. Even Hurricane Katrina, the modern measure of nature’s disastrous force on the United States, pales when compared to the punch and expected devastation from Typhoon Haiyan.

According to the latest report, Haiyan, also known as Yolanda in the Philippines, was packing winds in excess of 200 mph as it homed in on the island nation in the western Pacific Ocean. The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center said maximum sustained winds in the Category 5 storm were 195 mph with gusts to 235 mph.

When Haiyan made landfall in the city of Guiuan, the winds dropped to about 165 mph, a common occurrence for such storms when traveling over land. About 12 million people were in the path of the storm that has already forced hundreds of flights to be canceled and pushed a rising storm surge that imperiled all low-lying areas.

By comparison, Superstorm Sandy, which wobbled its way across the Caribbean, carried winds of about 115 mph and around 95 mph when it hit the coast of New Jersey a year ago. Katrina, the deadliest storm of the 2005 season, was as dangerous as a Category 5 storm, the top designation, with winds of 175 mph. But by the time it hit land, its strength had decreased to a Category 3, with winds less than 129 mph.

According to Philippine emergency officials speaking to various wire services, the death toll from the typhoon was just four, but they cautioned the weather event was still in its early stages.

Already, at least 748,000 people were evacuated and many are staying in about 664 evacuation centers, officials said. Electricity was cut off, homes and commercial buildings already flattened and communication with outlying areas was strained to non-existent.

Haiyan was believed to be the most powerful typhoon to hit the Philippines, where at least 20 such storms usually land each year. Last December, Typhoon Bopha caused more than 1,000 causalities due to flash floods and storms.

And the Philippines is just the beginning.

Haiyan is expected to pick up force as it crosses the waters of the South China Sea and continues to move to the west-northwest. Eventually, forecasters say, it will hit Vietnam and Laos by Sunday into Monday.

Sandy’s claim to fame was its size. The hurricane combined with two other weather fronts to create what meteorologists called a superstorm that damaged 24 states, including the eastern coast of the United States. At least 286 people died in seven countries, of whom about 160 were in the United States.

Though only slightly more than half of the deaths were in the United States, the overwhelming property destruction, $65 billion of the $68-billion total damage, was in the U.S. By definition, the value of property in a highly developed nation like the United States is always worth more than in the Third World, and Sandy tore through some of the most expensive property in the country--metropolitan New York and its suburbs.

Repair is also easier in the First World than in the Third as emergency aid can be transported along better roads and the cost of cleanup and repair is more easily borne by a wealthy society than a poor one.

Both Sandy and Katrina – and likely Haiyan as well – will prove the difference between the power of a storm and its impact. Though all carried high-velocity winds, the real damage comes later.

What made Katrina so deadly was the pressure it brought on the levee system, which failed in New Orleans. Flood waters rushed in and the scene of people trapped on rooftops and an entire city virtually underwater became the enduring images and brought comparisons with how storms affect the Third World.

More than 1,800 people were confirmed dead in Katrina. The cost of damage hit $108 billion and recovery efforts are still ongoing.

Sandy, too, carved its place into history with massive floods along low-lying areas of New York, Long Island and New Jersey. The U.S. government has already approved more than $60 billion for recovery efforts.
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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2013, 06:28:32 am »

Jeff Masters of Weather Underground says Haiyan made landfall as the most powerful typhoon or hurricane in recorded history - via @usatodayweather




'Massive destruction' as typhoon flattens Philippine city, kills at least 100

TACLOBAN, Philippines (Reuters) - One of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall churned through the Philippine archipelago in a straight line from east to west and devastated central provinces, killing at least 100 people in a surge of flood water, ...

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/09/us-philippines-typhoon-idUSBRE9A603Q20131109



Body bags rushed to devastated areas after super typhoon hits the Philippines

Tacloban, Philippines (CNN) -- A day after Super Typhoon Haiyan roared into the Philippines, officials found more than 100 bodies scattered on the streets of one devastated coastal city.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/asia/philippines-typhoon-haiyan/
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2013, 12:20:20 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/typhoon-haiyan-flattens-houses-triggers-floods-philippines-least-011653699.html
11/9/13
'Massive destruction' as typhoon kills at least 1,200 in Philippines, says Red Cross

TACLOBAN, Philippines (Reuters) - One of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall devastated the central Philippines, killing more than 1,000 people in one city alone and 200 in another province, the Red Cross estimated on Saturday, as reports of high casualties began to emerge.

A day after Typhoon Haiyan churned through the Philippine archipelago in a straight line from east to west, rescue teams struggled to reach far-flung regions, hampered by washed out roads, many choked with debris and fallen trees.

The death toll is expected to rise sharply from the fast-moving storm, whose circumference eclipsed the whole country and which late on Saturday was heading for Vietnam.

Among the hardest hit was coastal Tacloban in central Leyte province, where preliminary estimates suggest more than 1,000 people were killed, said Gwendolyn Pang, secretary general of the Philippine Red Cross, as water surges rushed through the city.

"An estimated more than 1,000 bodies were seen floating in Tacloban as reported by our Red Cross teams," she told Reuters. "In Samar, about 200 deaths. Validation is ongoing."

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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2013, 11:56:33 pm »

Philippine super typhoon kills at least 10,000, official says
By Manuel Mogato

TACLOBAN, Philippines  Sun Nov 10, 2013 12:11am EST

(Reuters) - One of the most powerful storms recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines, a senior police official said on Sunday, with huge waves sweeping away entire coastal villages and devastating the region's main city.

Super typhoon Haiyan destroyed about 70 to 80 percent of the area in its path as it tore through Leyte province on Friday, said chief superintendent Elmer Soria, a regional police director.

Most of the deaths appear to have been caused by surging sea water strewn with debris that many described as similar to a tsunami, leveling houses and drowning hundreds of people in one of the worst natural disasters to hit the typhoon-prone Southeast Asian nation.

The national government and disaster agency have not confirmed the latest estimate of deaths, a sharp increase from initial estimates on Saturday of at least 1,000 killed.

"We had a meeting last night with the governor and the other officials. The governor said, based on their estimate, 10,000 died," Soria told Reuters. "The devastation is so big."

Witnesses and officials described chaotic scenes in Leyte's capital, Tacloban, a coastal city of 220,000 about 580 km (360 miles) southeast of Manila, with hundreds of bodies piled on the sides of roads and pinned under wrecked houses.

The city and nearby villages as far as one kilometer from shore were flooded by the storm surge, leaving floating bodies and roads choked with debris from fallen trees, tangled power lines and flattened homes. TV footage showed children clinging to rooftops for their lives.

Many internet users urged prayers for survivors in the largely Roman Catholic nation on social media sites such as Twitter.

"From a helicopter, you can see the extent of devastation. From the shore and moving a kilometer inland, there are no structures standing. It was like a tsunami," said Interior Secretary Manuel Roxas, who had been in Tacloban since before the typhoon struck the city.

"I don't know how to describe what I saw. It's horrific."

Mila Ward, an Australian citizen and Filipino by birth who was in Leyte on vacation visiting her family, said she saw hundreds of bodies on the streets.

"They were covered with blankets, plastic. There were children and women," she said.

Six people were killed and dozens wounded during heavy winds and storms in central Vietnam as Haiyan approached the coast, state media reported, even though it had weakened substantially since hitting the Philippines with winds gusts of up to 275 kph (170 mph).

LOOTERS TAKE WHAT THEY CAN

Vietnam authorities have moved 883,000 people in 11 central provinces to safe zones, according to the government's website. Despite weakening, the storm is likely to cause heavy rains, flooding, strong winds and mudslides as it makes its way north in the South China Sea.

Looters rampaged through several stores in Tacloban, witnesses said, taking whatever they could find as rescuers' efforts to deliver food and water were hampered by severed roads and communications.

"They are taking everything, even appliances like TV sets. These will be traded later on for food," said Tecson John Lim, the Tacloban city administrator.

"We don't have enough manpower. We have 2,000 employees but only about 100 are reporting for work. Everyone is attending to their families."

Lim said city officials had so far only collected 300-400 bodies, but believed the death toll in the city alone could be 10,000.

International aid agencies said relief efforts in the Philippines are stretched thin after a 7.2 magnitude quake in central Bohol province last month and displacement caused by a conflict with Muslim rebels in southern Zamboanga province.

The World Food Programme said it was airlifting 40 tons of high energy biscuits, enough to feed 120,000 people for a day, as well as emergency supplies and telecommunications equipment.

Tacloban city airport was all but destroyed as seawaters swept through the city, shattering the glass of the airport tower, leveling the terminal and overturning nearby vehicles.

A Reuters reporter saw five bodies inside a chapel near the airport, placed on pews.

Airport manager Efren Nagrama, 47, said water levels rose up to four meters (13 feet).

"It was like a tsunami. We escaped through the windows and I held on to a pole for about an hour as rain, seawater and wind swept through the airport," he said. "Some of my staff survived by clinging to trees. I prayed hard all throughout until the water subsided."

(Reporting by Manuel Mogato; Additional reporting by Rosemarie Francisco; Editing by Stuart Grudgings and Nick Macfie)
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« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2013, 04:41:34 am »

10,000? Wow. Now the numbers are starting to come in that might be expected from a storm like that.
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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2013, 11:09:02 am »

Philippine typhoon deaths climb into thousands

 As many as 10,000 people are believed dead in one Philippine city alone after one of the worst storms ever recorded unleashed ferocious winds and giant waves that washed away homes and schools. Corpses hung from tree branches and were scattered along sidewalks and among flattened buildings, while looters raided grocery stores and gas stations in search of food, fuel and water.

Officials projected the death toll could climb even higher when emergency crews reach areas cut off by flooding and landslides. Even in the disaster-prone Philippines, which regularly contends with earthquakes, volcanoes and tropical cyclones, Typhoon Haiyan appears to be the deadliest natural disaster on record.

Haiyan hit the eastern seaboard of the Philippine archipelago on Friday and quickly barreled across its central islands before exiting into the South China Sea, packing winds of 235 kilometers per hour (147 miles per hour) that gusted to 275 kph (170 mph), and a storm surge that caused sea waters to rise 6 meters (20 feet).

It wasn't until Sunday that the scale of the devastation became clear, with local officials on hardest-hit Leyte Island saying that there may be 10,000 dead in the provincial capital of Tacloban alone. Reports also trickled in from elsewhere on the island, and from neighboring islands, indicating hundreds, if not thousands more deaths, though it will be days before the full extent of the storm's impact can be assessed.

"On the way to the airport we saw many bodies along the street," said Philippine-born Australian Mila Ward, 53, who was waiting at the Tacloban airport to catch a military flight back to Manila. "They were covered with just anything - tarpaulin, roofing sheets, cardboards." She said she passed "well over 100" dead bodies along the way.

In the storm's aftermath, people wept while retrieving the bodies of loved ones from inside buildings. On a street littered with fallen trees, roofing material and other wreckage, all that was left of one large building were the skeletal remains of its rafters.

The airport in Tacloban, about 580 kilometers (360 miles) southeast of Manila, was a muddy wasteland of debris, with crumpled tin roofs and overturned cars. The airport tower's glass windows were shattered, and air force helicopters were flying in and out as relief operations got underway. Residential homes lining the road into Tacloban city were all blown or washed away.

"All systems, all vestiges of modern living - communications, power, water - all are down," Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said after visiting Tacloban on Saturday. "There is no way to communicate with the people."

Haiyan raced across the eastern and central Philippines, inflicting serious damage to at least six of the archipelago's more than 7,000 islands, with Leyte, neighboring Samar Island, and the northern part of Cebu appearing to take the hardest hit. It weakened as it crossed the South China Sea before approaching northern Vietnam. It was forecast to hit land Monday morning.

rest: http://apnews.myway.com/article/20131110/DA9VLS880.html
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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2013, 12:37:27 am »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/11/10/21389125-it-was-like-a-tsunami-philippines-stunned-by-typhoon-haiyans-devastation-as-us-forces-head-to-islands?lite
11/10/13
'It was like a tsunami': Philippines stunned by Typhoon Haiyan's devastation as US forces head to islands

American forces were dispatched to the Philippines as the Pacific island country struggled to cope Sunday after one of the most powerful storms in recorded history killed thousands — possibly as many as 10,000 — and wreaked damage far worse than expected.

“At the request of the government of Philippines, Secretary Hagel has directed U.S. Pacific Command to support U.S. government humanitarian relief operations in the Philippines in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan,” the Department of Defense said in a statement late on Saturday night. 

The first wave of U.S. force  — a team of 90 Marines and sailors — flew to Philippines on Sunday to assist with search and rescue operations and provide air support, the Marines said in a statement.

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« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2013, 05:56:55 am »

Christian Relief Agencies Responding as Over 10,000 Filipinos Feared Dead in Typhoon Aftermath

A number of international Christian relief agencies are reaching out to provide food, medicine and shelter to the many Filipinos affected by super typhoon Yolanda as death tolls are expected to climb into the thousands in the days ahead.

As many as 10,000 people are feared dead in the aftermath of of the disaster, which tore through the Philippines at speeds exceeding 150 mph on Friday. Officials reported on Sunday that the majority of deaths were due to drownings and collapsed buildings, and that at least 100 bodies have been discovered in Tacloban City alone.

“The rescue operation is ongoing. We expect a very high number of fatalities as well as injured,” local government Secretary Mar Roxas told the Philippines Sun Star. “All systems, all vestiges of modern living—communications, power, water—all are down. Media is down, so there is no way to communicate with the people in a mass sort of way.”

“The devastation is—I don’t have the words for it,” he added. “It’s really horrific. It’s a great human tragedy.”

Entire villages were flattened by Yolanda and other areas experienced severe devastation. High flooding also ravaged the islands as some watched in horror while their loved ones were swept away by the water.

“The hardest thing is … seeing your mother floating in the flood and you don’t know what to do. You just see her there and the only thing
is you have to save yourself,” Maryann Tayag, 29, told USA Today. “I could not save her because she drowned already, and it was not just water from the sea but mixed with dirty water—the color was black, like it came from the river, and it smelled like the canal.”

Airport manager Efren Nagrama, 47, told Reuters that the floods rose as high as 13 feet at the airport.

“It was like a tsunami,” he said. “We escaped through the windows and I held on to a pole for about an hour as rain, seawater and wind swept through the airport. Some of my staff survived by clinging to trees. I prayed hard all throughout until the water subsided.”

A number of Christian relief agencies are now reaching out to assist those who are without food, shelter or clean water. Convoy of Hope, headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, states that it already has teams on the ground ready to help.

“Our children’s feeding initiative serves more than 20,000 children in the Philippines and as a result, four containers of food and supplies were already en route and will be available as needed,” the organization outlines. “Convoy of Hope will be distributing food, water filters, shoes and other supplies to survivors.”

World Vision is also among those who are providing aid to the now ravaged country.

“World Vision is gathering resources to assist 1.2 million people (240,000 families) with food, non-food items, hygiene kits, emergency shelter, and protection, especially for children and women,” the organization explained on a special relief page on its website. “We are mobilizing more than 500 local staff. … At more than 100 evacuation centers in the affected area, the greatest needs include food, clean water, and emergency shelter supplies.”

The Phoenix-based relief organization Food for the Hungry said that it is likewise helping to provide food and shelter.

“While the rains and winds are beginning to subside, landslides will continue to unsettle communities,” it outlined. “We want to see the children of the Philippines thrive. And despite the tragedy of natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan, we have faith that together, in prayer, God will provide.”

U.S. ships and aircraft have also been deployed to assist with search and rescue operations, as well as to help deliver emergency goods and supplies. Other organizations such as the Red Cross, the Salvation Army and Samaritan’s Purse are on the ground aiding those in need of assistance as well.

“Please continue to uphold in prayer our responding staff and the suffering people in the Visayas and other typhoon-stricken areas,” said World Vision Philippines director Josaias dela Cruz. “Now is the time to join our hearts, extend our helping hands, and work together to rebuild and uplift our fellow peoples’ lives.”

If death toll calculations are as feared, super typhoon Yolanda, also known as Haiyan, will be the deadliest storm to hit the Philippines in the nation’s history.



http://christiannews.net/2013/11/10/christian-relief-agencies-responding-as-over-10000-filipinos-feared-dead-in-typhoon-aftermath/
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2013, 09:33:22 am »

While what they're doing may be all and good - doesn't sound like they're going there to preach the gospel to the lost.

Reminded me of New Orleans after Katrina(moved out a year later) - churches in the area pretty much acted like secular relief agencies, and nothing more.
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2013, 12:23:18 pm »

They need to define "Christian relief agencies", and many of them I suspect will be Catholic, seeing the Philippines are heavily Catholic.
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« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2013, 12:54:56 pm »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/11/13/21434681-typhoon-haiyan-desperation-triggers-anarchy-in-storm-devastated-areas?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1
11/13/13
Typhoon Haiyan: Desperation triggers anarchy in storm-devastated areas

TACLOBAN, Philippines -- Desperation triggered anarchy in communities flattened by Typhoon Haiyan as survivors of one of the most violent storms ever to hit land struggled to find food, clean water and medicine Wednesday.

Police were working to keep order across the region devastated by 195 mph winds and huge storm surges amid reports of armed gangs roaming the streets. 

ANC Television said security forces exchanged fire with armed men amid widespread looting of shops and warehouses for food, water and other supplies in the village of Abucay in Leyte province. The report could not be verified by NBC News.

Eight people were crushed to death as thousands of people stormed a rice warehouse in Alangalang and carted away up to 100,000 sacks of rice, National Food Authority spokesman Rex Estoperez told The Associated Press.

Soldiers sent to restore order also fired into the air to scatter crowds scavenging through the ruins in Tacloban, where an NBC News crew spotted dozens of uncollected bodies in the streets on Wednesday.

Residents had turned to ransacking houses because warehouses were empty, Tacloban city administrator Tecson John Lim told Reuters.

"The looting is not criminality. It is self-preservation," he said.

Lim said 90 percent of Tacloban had been destroyed but only 20 percent of the city's 220,000 residents had received help.

Standing amid the rubble, Jennica Ekaya told the BBC that survivors were only looking for food.

"We can survive without these houses ... we'll sleep anywhere. But we need food. Only food," she said. "No money, no places, no televisions, no cellphones, no technology. Food, we need food."

There were signs that promised help was at least arriving in Tacloban on Wednesday. A stream of American military helicopters and planes arrived at the airport, and Philippine military convoys carrying aid were spotted around the city.

However, an 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew remained in place.

"We have restored order," Carmelo Espina Valmoria, director of the Philippine National Police special action force, told The Associated Press. "There has been looting for the last three days, (but) the situation has stabilized."

Aid officials blamed the shortage of aid on not enough trucks and the roads being blocked.

"There's a bit of a logjam to be absolutely honest getting stuff in here," said Sebastian Rhodes Stampa, from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

“We are not looters, what we were looking for is food,” one desperate man told NBC News on Tuesday as he searched the remains of a food warehouse in the fishing village of Magallan on the hard-hit island of Leyte.

Some survivors resorted to digging up water pipes.

"We sourced our water from an underground pipe that we have smashed. We don't know if it's safe. We need to boil it. But at least we have something," Christopher Dorano, 38, told Reuters.

Many areas remained all but obliterated.

The road from Cebu city, the provincial capital, is lined with hundreds of children holding out their hands in despair or carrying crude signs reading: "We need food and water."

Meanwhile, the government downplayed initial reports that 10,000 had died in the storm. President Benigno Aquino said local officials overstated the loss of life, saying it was closer to 2,000 or 2,500 than the 10,000 previously estimated.

Officially confirmed deaths stood at 2,275 on Wednesday, but almost 7 million had been affected by the storm, according to the government.

The preliminary number of missing, according to the Red Cross, is 22,000. Gwendolyn Pang, secretary general of the Philippine Red Cross, told Reuters that figure could include people who have since been located.

United Nations humanitarian chief Valerie Amos launched an appeal for $301 million to help people affected by the storm.

Several senior U.S. military officials said two amphibious ships were preparing to go to the Philippines to help with the humanitarian relief efforts. The ships, the USS Ashland and USS Germantown, would pick up U.S. Marines and supplies in Okinawa, Japan, and arrive in the Philippines in about one week.

The United States has also sent the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington, which carries 5,000 sailors and 80 aircraft, and three U.S. Navy warships — the cruisers USS Antietam and USS Cowpens and the destroyer USS Mustin — to the Pacific islands, defense officials said. On Wednesday, the U.S. Embassy in Manila said that the USS George Washington had been delayed by bad weather and will not arrive offshore the Philippines until Thursday.

The U.S. military has dubbed their relief mission "Operation Damayan" -- which means "help" in the Filipino language.

The government also said it would provide $20 million to help in relief efforts. The Defense Department said it was continuing to work closely with the country's government to determine what, if any, additional assets may be required.

Other countries and organizations have also promised tens of millions of dollars in help. The United Nations released $25 million for aid relief on Monday from the U.N. Central Emergency Response Fund.
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« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2013, 03:59:09 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/philippine-president-says-typhoon-death-toll-overstated-034530763--sector.html
Desperate Philippine typhoon survivors loot, dig up water pipes
11/13/13

By Andrew R.C. Marshall and Stuart Grudgings

TACLOBAN, Philippines (Reuters) - Desperation gripped Philippine islands devastated by Typhoon Haiyan as looting turned deadly on Wednesday and survivors panicked over shortages of food, water and medicine, some digging up underground water pipes and smashing them open.

Five days after one of the strongest storms ever recorded slammed into cities and towns in the central Philippines, anger and frustration boiled over on Wednesday as essential supplies dwindled. Some survivors scrawled signs reading "Help us".

Controversy also emerged over the death toll. President Benigno Aquino said local officials had overstated the loss of life, saying it was closer to 2,000 or 2,500 than the 10,000 previously estimated. His comments, however, drew skepticism from some aid workers.

Some areas appeared to teeter near anarchy amid widespread looting of shops and warehouses for food, water and supplies.

There were reports of gunfire between security forces and armed men near a mass grave in worst-hit Tacloban in Leyte province, but city administrator Tecson John Lim denied the clash based on information he had received from the army.

Eight people were crushed to death when looters raided rice stockpiles in a government warehouse in the town of Alangalang, causing a wall to collapse, local authorities said.

Other looters still managed to cart away 33,000 bags of rice weighing 50 kg (110 lb) each, said Orlan Calayag, administrator of the state-run grain agency National Food Authority.

Warehouses owned by food and drinks company Universal Robina Corp and drug company United Laboratories were ransacked in the storm-hit town of Palo in Leyte, along with a rice mill in Jaro, said Alfred Li, head of the Leyte Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Tacloban city administrator Tecson John Lim said 90 percent of the coastal city of 220,000 people had been destroyed, with only 20 percent of residents receiving aid. Houses were now being looted because warehouses were empty, he said.

"The looting is not criminality. It is self-preservation," Lim told Reuters.

Some survivors in Tacloban dug up water pipes in their desperate need for water.

"We don't know if it's safe. We need to boil it. But at least we have something," said Christopher Dorano, 38.

"There have been a lot of people who have died here."

Resident Rachel Garduce said the aid - 3 kg (6 lb) of rice and 1 liter (34 ounces) of water per household a day - was not enough in her ravaged Tacloban neighborhood. Her aunt in Manila, 580 km (360 miles) to the north, was travelling by road and ferry to bring supplies. "We are hoping she won't get hijacked," she said.

Secretary Mar Roxas denied law and order were breaking down. "It is wrong to say there is lawlessness in the city," he told reporters.

THOUSANDS REPORTED MISSING

The government has been overwhelmed by the force of the typhoon, which destroyed large swathes of Leyte province where local officials have said they feared 10,000 people died, many drowning in a tsunami-like surge of seawater.

Aquino, who has been on the defensive over his handling of the disaster, said the government was still gathering information from various storm-struck areas and the death toll may rise. "Ten thousand, I think, is too much," Aquino told CNN in an interview. "There was emotional drama involved with that particular estimate.

Official confirmed deaths stood at 2,275 on Wednesday, with only 84 missing, a figure aid workers consider off the mark.

"At this time it is definitely not 10,000," Cabinet Secretary Rene Almendras told a news conference. "There has been a body count based on the dead lying in the streets but we can't be accurate because there is still, some people say, there are people buried in certain areas."

Some aid workers cast doubt over Aquino's estimate.

"Probably it will be higher because numbers are just coming in. Many of the areas we cannot access," Gwendolyn Pang, secretary general of the Philippine Red Cross, told Reuters.

The preliminary number of missing, according to the Red Cross, is 22,000. Pang cautioned that figure could include people who have since been located.

Google, which has set up websites to help people share and look for information about missing persons during catastrophes, currently lists some 65,500 people as missing from the typhoon. The Person Finder website allows anyone to list a person missing and to search the database for names.

But Google staff warned against reading too much into the data, pointing out that a similar website set up after the Japanese tsunami in 2011 listed more than 600,000 names, far higher than the final death toll of nearly 20,000.

CHAOTIC EVACUATION

There are not enough flights from Tacloban airport to cope with the exodus from this stricken town. As darkness fell on Wednesday, Philippine Special Forces held back hundreds of people, many of whom had walked for hours to reach the airport and then waited for days with little or no food or water.

When asked how she and her four children endured three days of waiting in searing heat and torrential downpours, Marivic Badilla, 41, held up a small battered umbrella. "We have been sheltering under this," she said, tears streaming down her face.

Many people complained that military families were given priority to board the C-130 cargo planes out of Tacloban. "If you have a friend or relative in the military, you get priority," said Violeta Duzar, 57, who had waited at the airport since Sunday with eight family members, including children.

"They say 'Fall in line! Fall in line!' and we all line up. Then nothing happens," she said of the soldiers presiding over chaotic scenes.

None of the aid passing through the airport had been distributed to the needy crowd at its gates.

Firming the resolve of those at the airport to get on a flight out are reports and rumors of looting and **** in the ruined city.

"It's the criminals who escaped from the prison. They're raping the women," said Duzar. "Tacloban is a dead city."

Tacloban city administrator Lim said that "less than ten" prisoners escaped from jail after the typhoon struck.

More the 670,000 people have been displaced by the storm and nearly 12 percent of the population directly affected, the United Nations said.

The World Health Organization said teams from Belgium, Japan, Israel and Norway had arrived in the Philippines to set up field hospitals.

The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington will arrive later this week, carrying about 5,000 sailors and more than 80 aircraft. It has been joined by four other U.S. Navy ships.

The United States, a close ally and former colonial ruler of the Philippines, has also provided eight C-130 cargo planes for delivering aid, said Cabinet Secretary Almendras.

Rescuers have reached some previously cut off regions, such as Guiuan, a wind-swept city of 40,000 people that was spared the storm surge that washed over Tacloban. Local officials say 85 people were killed in Guiuan, with 24 missing.

The typhoon also leveled Basey, a seaside town in Samar province about 10 km (6 miles) across a bay from Tacloban. Local officials say 80 people were killed there.

The overall financial cost of the destruction was hard to assess. Initial estimates varied widely, with a report from German-based CEDIM Forensic Disaster Analysis putting the total at $8 billion to $19 billion.

(Additional reporting by Rosemarie Francisco in Manila, Jeremy Wagstaff in Singapore and Phil Stewart and Susan Heavey in Washington. Writing by Jason Szep. Editing by Dean Yates and Nick Macfie)
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« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2013, 12:05:50 pm »

http://www.timesofisrael.com/first-baby-born-in-idf-field-hospital-in-philippines-named-israel/
First baby born in IDF field hospital in Philippines named ‘Israel’

Humanitarian mission to typhoon-struck country, which departed Wednesday with over 100 tons of supplies, begins treating casualties

11/15/13

The first baby boy delivered by members of the IDF mission in the field hospital set up in the typhoon-struck Philippines will be named “Israel,” the army tweeted Friday morning.

“It’s a boy!” wrote IDF Spokesman Peter Lerner on Friday, “amazing news coming out of the IDF field hospital. First baby delivered. The thankful mum named him Israel.” 

The IDF humanitarian mission completed the set-up of the hospital earlier Friday, after departing for the storm-ravaged city of Daanbantayan, in the northern province of Cebu, late Wednesday with about 100 tons of supplies. Casualties were already being brought in for treatment, according to reports.

The 147-member group, comprising national search-and-rescue unit officials and senior doctors in the IDF medical corps, was tasked with rapidly setting up a “multi-department medical facility” to provide medical care for casualties of the disaster.

The facility has children’s, women’s and ambulatory care departments, as well as a general admission department, and is “equipped with approximately 100 tons of humanitarian and medical supplies from Israel.”

The IDF also posted a video of the mission’s activities on their first day upon arrival.

Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon spoke with the Philippines’ Secretary of National Defense Voltaire Gazmin Friday to express his condolences for the lives lost in the storm.

“The Israeli people feel the pain of the Filipino people and stands by you at this difficult hour,” Ya’alon said, according to a statement released by the Defense Ministry. “I am hopeful that the IDF mission to the Philippines will do as much as it can to save lives.”

The death toll from the typhoon, which made landfall in the central Philippines last Friday, could be at least 10,000, according to reports, though the official death toll currently stands at more than 4,000.

The United Nations says the storm affected 11 million people in all, more than 670,000 of whom lost their homes. The enormity of the task of helping them all has pressed the resources of the Philippines hard.
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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2013, 12:11:33 pm »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24954011
Typhoon Haiyan: Philippines death toll up as aid arrives
11/15/13

The number of people in the Philippines confirmed dead from Typhoon Haiyan now stands at 3,631, officials say.

UN and local agencies have issued conflicting tolls, and the final figure is likely to rise still higher.

One week after the storm, food and supplies are now beginning to reach survivors, but aid agencies say the logistics of distribution are enormous.

The Philippine government has defended its response to the disaster, one of the strongest storms ever on land.

more
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« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2013, 12:10:25 pm »

Why wasn't the Philippines better prepared for the typhoon? Corruption, shoddy buildings to blame
11/16/13
http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/11/16/21477014-why-wasnt-the-philippines-better-prepared-for-the-typhoon-corruption-shoddy-buildings-to-blame?lite

As the Philippines grapples with the devastating aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, Filipinos are asking why the country wasn’t better prepared to deal with the super storm.

Government officials claim they were ready, broadcasting warnings of a potential 20-foot storm surge on the hour, starting two days before the typhoon hit.

Jerry Yaokasin, Tacloban's vice mayor, told Reuters that "some people just didn't believe us because it was so sunny. Some were even laughing." Many local men reportedly stayed in their homes to protect their belongings from looters.

"People were warned about the storm surge," said Toby Monsod, an economics professor at the University of the Philippines in Manila. "Though, many probably thought that it would be one meter high, not five. This storm was off the scales," she told NBC News.

Many are now blaming not just the reportedly 175 mph winds, but the flimsy construction of homes and buildings in the Philippines – and the years of government corruption which prevented the building of anything better.

He's also watched every video clip he could find on TV and YouTube of Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most devastating storms ever to hit land. Lilles says he was shocked to see Alfred Romualdez, the mayor of Tacloban – the worst-hit city within the disaster zone – telling the BBC that he and his family decided to ride out the storm in their sea-level beach house.

"What really angers me is that, if the mayor didn't think seriously about evacuating Tacloban himself, I assume he didn't ask his [220,000] people to evacuate either and seek higher ground
,"
Lilles said. He noticed the rolling hills in the background of many of the apocalyptic images. "Why didn't people, especially car owners, drive up the slopes or away from the coast? It must mean they didn't know about the 15-foot tsunami heading their way, or just didn't care."

Even Monsod admitted that lessons need to be learned if the Philippines is to avoid – or at least limit – such devastating loss during future typhoons. "Historically, Filipinos adapt to the climate," she said. "They get through the storms and rebuild if they have to. But this is not sustainable in the long run."

Recalling the eerie Tacloban images of a few reinforced concrete structures jutting out from a morass of twisted metal and smashed plywood, she said: "We need to invest in technological solutions like low-cost housing with climate-proof materials. We've seen this in places like Guam."

Roberto Lilles, Antonio's older brother and a successful architect, agrees that much of the wreckage from dozens of typhoons that strike each year could be greatly reduced if low-cost, brick-and-mortar housing replaced the traditional flimsy wood and tin-roof homes. 

"There is low-cost housing that can resist the storms. But most people in those rural areas are so poor, they still can't afford them," he explained.

But if private builders like the Lilles brothers find low-cost housing schemes unprofitable, why doesn't the Philippine government subsidize them?

History of government corruption

President Benigno Aquino III, known as "Noynoy," the scion of two political families some compare to the Clinton or Bush dynasties, was elected in 2010, above all, to eradicate the endemic corruption that drains some $50 billion a year from state coffers.     

He was seen as the only man for the job: his father, Senator Benigno Aquino Jr., was assassinated in a plot by alleged loyalists of then-dictator Ferdinand Marcos; his mother, Corazon Cojuangco Aquino, led the "People Power" revolt that toppled Marcos and became both the nation's first female president and a living symbol of democracy.

But Noynoy Aquino now finds himself implicated in his own "pork barrel" scam. While there's still no smoking gun, Aquino has been accused by association of using more than $500 million in public funds – including money meant for local infrastructure, like roads and bridges, in the very areas that took the brunt of Haiyan – to buy off key senators' loyalty. Last week there were nationally televised hearings on the scandal just as the storm was barreling toward the Philippines

Aquino has strongly denied the accusations, but his approval rating has plummeted. And critics say the scandal has left him too distracted and on the defensive to deal with the nation’s perennial problems – poor urban planning, an exploding population, climate change and systemic poverty – all contributing factors to the death and destruction left in the super typhoon's wake. 

For his part, Aquino stands by his record, telling CNN earlier this week that Haiyan's death toll would have been much higher without his government's evacuation of more than 750,000 people. "But, of course, nobody imagined the magnitude that this super typhoon brought on us," he said.

But it must be said that the roots of the Philippines' losing battle against infamously bad weather long predates this Aquino administration. Imelda Marcos, the larger-than-life former first lady who is notorious for her elaborate shoe collection, hails from Leyte province, ground zero for the storm surge.

But during some 20 years of the Marcos regime, while Leyte was blessed with a massive shrine (where Mrs. Marcos kept her shoes) and a big pink church, no one built low-cost housing or paved roads for the people.

Unnecessary disaster?
Antonio Lilles doesn't deny that Typhoon Haiyan – or Yolanda, as Filipinos call it – was a perfect storm.

"Can you imagine if those winds had hit Manila, with all the scaffolding and construction materials flying around from hundreds of sites?" he asked.   

But he bristled at the unnecessary tragedy. "When I built my beach house I used the US NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) storm surge guide for coastal buildings and built the house twice as high as the recommended 17 feet above sea level for storm surges. And then added two more feet for extra measure," he recalled. "It's just common sense and a little research."

For Toby Monsod, the economist, there's no better time than now to do better: "There's no question that Haiyan could have been much less disastrous."

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« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2013, 12:15:33 pm »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/11/16/21491646-typhoon-haiyan-aid-begins-trickling-into-desperate-philippines-communities?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1
11/16/13
Typhoon Haiyan: Aid begins trickling into desperate Philippines communities

CEBU, Philippines -- International aid began to trickle into some of the hardest-hit areas of the typhoon-ravaged Philippines Saturday, more than a week after the most powerful storm ever to hit land devastated the islands and killed thousands.

Navy helicopters from the USS George Washington warship were dropping food and water supplies to isolated communities in and around Tacloban, the city hit hardest by Typhoon Haiyan.

Relief from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Israel and Australia has also arrived, but it wasn't clear if the assistance was making it to farther-flung communities also desperate for help. It is a monumental task, with around 7,000 islands in the Philippines to account for.

Typhoon victims line up to get relief aid Saturday from a U.S. Navy Sea Hawk helicopter on the typhoon-devastated remote island of Manicani in Eastern Samar, Philippines.

Eight days after the typhoon, survivors were still picking through the wreckage of the storm, hoping to salvage anything to help them rebuild their lives, as the United Nations more than doubled its estimate of homeless to nearly 2 million.

The relief effort was picking up steam, but the situation remained grim for survivors in many hard-hit communities.

Residents of Tanauan, a fishing town about 9 miles southeast of Tacloban, said they only started receiving substantial aid on Friday after being forced to survive on biscuits and dispose of dead bodies on their own for days.

On the remote island of Bantayan, residents said they hadn't received enough local aid and hadn't seen any relief from international agencies.

"We need help. Any country, we need help, we need your help," said Glenda Despesemento, a local relief coordinator in Bantayan. "Water, especially food, first aid, medicine, clothes – because some of us only have one (set of) clothes."

With the water system destroyed, residents of Bantayan are using a well – boiling the water before they drink it.

The U.N. said Thursday that the death toll from the monster typhoon had reached 4,200. The Philippine government disputes this figure, although its count has risen from around 2,360 to 3,633, with an official tally of 1,179 people missing. Around 12,000 people are injured.

One of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed thousands of people in the central Philippines, with huge waves sweeping away entire coastal villages and devastating the region's main city.

U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said Thursday that she acknowledged that aid should have been quicker in coming and been more widely distributed.

"I think we are all extremely distressed that ... we have not managed to reach everyone," she told reporters in Manila.

Meanwhile, workers have been struggling to clean up a grim mess – burying bodies in hastily dug mass graves before even their mourning families can identify them.
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« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2013, 11:19:51 am »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/philippine-corruption-magnifies-effects-typhoon-132317505.html
11/18/13
Philippine corruption magnifies effects of typhoon

Philippine corruption magnifies effects of typhoon, from infrastructure to expat donations


TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) -- When a newspaper for Filipino workers in New Zealand told readers how to donate to the typhoon relief effort in their homeland, it mentioned agencies like the Red Cross but not a list of government bank accounts that the Philippine Embassy had sent over.

"I'm not going to mince words," said Mel Fernandez, the editorial adviser for the Filipino Migrant News. "We would like every cent to reach those poor people there rather than getting waylaid."

Corruption is a concern after any major natural disaster, as millions of dollars in cash and goods rush in from around the world. But those worries are especially acute in the Philippines, where graft has been a part of life for decades.

The government of President Benigno Aquino III, who has made fighting corruption a priority, is promising full transparency in reconstruction spending in areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Yolanda. It announced Monday that it has established a website called the Foreign Aid Transparency Hub where funds given by foreign donors can be tracked.

"There's an urgent call now for us to monitor the movement of foreign aid funds for Yolanda so they will go exactly where they're supposed to: to the survivors of the typhoon," Undersecretary of Budget and Management and Chief Information Officer Richard Moya said in a statement.

More than $270 million in foreign aid has been donated to help the victims of the Nov. 8 typhoon, which killed at least 3,976 people and left nearly 1,600 missing, according to government figures updated Monday. More than 4 million people have been displaced and need food, shelter and water. The typhoon also wrecked livelihoods on a massive scale, destroying crops, livestock, coconut plantations and fishing boats.

Several battered communities appeared to be shifting from survival mode to one of early recovery Monday. Markets were reopening, though with very limited wares. Some gasoline stations were pumping and residents were repairing damaged homes or making temporary shelters out of the remains of their old ones.

"The darkest night is over but it's not yet 100 percent," regional military commander Lt. Gen. Roy Deveraturda said.

On Sunday, Aquino toured the disaster area and promised to step up aid deliveries.

Aquino said he was happy to see typhoon-battered areas slowly rising from the devastation. The aid effort remained daunting, he said, adding that the government is feeding about 1.4 million people a day.

"One is tempted to despair," Aquino told reporters in Alangalang town in Leyte province, where he met with officials and survivors. "But the minute I despair, then everybody gets hampered in the efforts to get up."

Presidential spokesman Ricky Carandang said Aquino would stay for a second night in Tacloban city and visit more typhoon-battered towns on Tuesday.

In one sign of how much work is ahead, Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla pledged to restore power in all typhoon-battered regions by Dec. 24, a job that will require erecting about 160 giant power transmission towers and thousands of electrical posts toppled by the typhoon. He said he will resign if he fails.

"It's difficult to celebrate Christmas without light," Petilla said.

The government wants to show that it will be more responsible than previous administrations were following other natural disasters, when that funds intended for reconstruction were allegedly siphoned off. Prosecutors are investigating allegations that $20.7 million in government funds for rebuilding towns devastated by a 2009 storm in northern Luzon island were stolen by local officials via bogus nongovernmental agencies.

On Nov. 7, a day before Typhoon Haiyan hit, Filipinos were glued to their television screens, watching Senate testimony in which Janet Lim Napoles denied allegations that she masterminded a plot to plunder millions of dollars of government funds intended for projects to relieve poverty.

It is far too soon to say how much aid intended for victims of last week's Typhoon Haiyan might end up in the wrong hands. Foreign donors demand strict anti-graft measures in projects they fund, but privately admit that "leakage" of funds is sometimes inevitable.

Much of the assistance in the early phase of a disaster response is in the form of food, water and other supplies. Far richer opportunities for graft occur later when rebuilding occurs and contracts are up for grabs.

But corruption probably has already made this typhoon worse. Money for roads was diverted, giving people less ability to evacuate. Hospitals didn't get the resources they should have. Some houses might not have been flattened if they had been built to code.

"Petty corruption in urban areas means that building inspections don't happen and building codes are not enforced," said Steven Rood, the Manila-based representative of The Asia Foundation, a nonprofit development organization. "Even middle-class homes are not built to withstand a typhoon, much less poor homes."

Filipinos working abroad and sending money home to their families are an important source of cash in the country under any circumstances, but Fernandez, the New Zealand editorial adviser, expects that they will be skeptical about giving money to the government. He said he thinks they will simply donate to nongovernmental agencies providing aid to typhoon victims, but Rood wasn't certain even of that.

"There's a lot of cynicism, particularly in the expat community," Rood said. "People are put off. You see it in the social networks. People are saying there's no point — if they give money, it will just get stolen."

The typhoon has come at a time when some feel the Philippines might finally be cracking down on corruption. In its latest global corruption report, Transparency International found the Philippines was just one of 11 countries in which people said they were noticing an improvement in corruption levels.

Rood said he believes Philippine government agencies like the Department of Social Welfare and Development are less corrupt than they once were and can be relied on to take the lead after disasters like the typhoon.

Doracie Zoleta-Nantes, a Filipino and research fellow at the Australian National University, said the recent debate in the Philippines on corruption has been intense and people are demanding improvements. She said media scrutiny on places like Tacloban, a city devastated by the typhoon, will help ensure aid gets distributed.

"But some victims will be marginalized because they are not aligned politically," she added.

Tecson John Lim, the city administrator in Tacloban, said the city is recognized for its good governance and its accounts are transparent. He added that corruption concerns tend to center around people like cement suppliers, and "right now, you can't even buy anything."

Valerie Amos, the U.N. humanitarian chief, said in Manila that the U.N. is not expecting to find widespread corruption as it responds to the disaster. "Everyone's concern is focused on getting the maximum aid to the people who need it," she said.

Aid agencies are taking their own precautions to avoid corruption.

Chris Clarke, the chief executive of World Vision New Zealand, has visited areas affected by the typhoon. He said World Vision has its own supply chains, collects donations directly, and even issues microchips to victims to record the amount of aid delivered to them.

"It's always an issue we're asked about," he said. "Does the money get there, and does it get to the right people?"
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« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2013, 11:52:57 am »

UN Climate Summit Rejects Its Own Science – Links Typhoon Haiyan to Global Warming – UN Summit Degenerates Into Unscientific Claims to Advance Political Agenda – Climate Depot Special Report





Report Presented at UN Climate Summit in Warsaw, Poland on November 19, 2013 By Marc Morano
 
UN head Ban Ki-moon says Typhoon Haiyan due to climate change - 'We have seen now what has happened in the Philippines. It is an urgent warning. An example of changed weather and how climate change is affecting all of us on Earth.'
 
Philippines lead negotiator Yeb Sano at UN climate summit in Warsaw 'announces he will not eat during the conference, until a meaningful agreement has been achieved’
 
Jeffrey Sachs Special Advisor to UN Sec.-General Ban Ki-moon, 'Climate liars like Rupert Murdoch & Koch Brothers have more & more blood on their hands as climate disasters claim lives across the world.'
 
Typhoon Fuels Call for Global Warming Compensation Funds At UN Climate Summit – Poor nations ‘blame countries that industrialized 200 years ago for damaging the atmosphere’
 
Scientific Reality Check:   Cheesy
 
As Scientists Reject Climate Link – Claim of ‘strongest storm ever’ refuted
 
Storm expert Brian McNoldy of U. of Miami: ‘We don’t get to pick and choose which storms are enhanced by a warmer climate and which ones aren’t’
 
Meteorologist Dr. Ryan Maue: 'Over past 1,000 years, Philippines have been hit by 10-20 thousand tropical cyclones. Don't be so arrogant to believe man caused Haiyan.'
 
Maue demolishes claims that Typhoon Haiyan was ‘strongest storm ever’ – ‘Fact: Haiyan is 58th Super Typhoon since 1950 to reach central pressure of 900 mb or lower from historical records’ -- Maue: '50 of 58 Super Typhoons with pressure of 900 mb or lower occurred from 1950-1987 -- only 8 in past 25 years'
 
Strongest storm ever? ‘Haiyan ranks at number 7 among the strongest storms ever to have hit the Philippines’
 
UN IPCC: 'There is low confidence in any observed long-term (40 years or more) increases in tropical cyclone activity (ie intensity, frequency, duration).'  Its authoritative Fifth Assessment Report added in September 2013 there have been 'no significant observed trends in global tropical cyclone frequency over the past century'.
 
Prof. Roger Pielke Jr.: ‘The scientific evidence does not presently support claims of attribution of the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on tropical cyclone behavior with respect to century-long trends ‘much less the behavior of individual storms’ - "In practical terms, on timescales of decision making a signal that cannot be seen is indistinguishable from a signal that does not exist - 'I am not convinced that 3 mm/year of sea level rise is a big issue in the magnitude of disaster losses'
 
Gabe Vecchi, a research oceanographer with NOAA, said that if global warming altered Haiyan, it did not do so to a significant extent. 'I expect that the contribution of global warming to Haiyan's extreme intensity is likely to have been small, relative to other factors like weather fluctuations and climate variability.'
 
Pielke Jr.: 'Given this data, substantial research on it and a strong IPCC consensus does anyone really want to debate that typhoon disasters have become more common?'
 
Bjorn Lomborg: ‘Facts don’t support climate-change-caused-typhoon-Haiyan. Strong typhoons declining 1950-10.
 
Real Science website: ‘There have been 35 cyclones in the last 800 years that have killed more than 10,000 people. Thirty-three occurred with CO2 below 350 PPM. The deadliest one in 1970 was blamed on global cooling at the time’


http://www.climatedepot.com/2013/11/19/climate-depot-special-report-on-typhoon-haiyan-presented-at-un-climate-summit-in-warsaw/
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« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2013, 08:06:07 am »

Philippine typhoon toll rises to record 5,209: official

The death toll from super typhoon Haiyan, which slammed across the central Philippines two weeks ago, has risen to more than 5,200, the National Disaster Agency said on Friday, the most deadly natural disaster ever to hit the country.   

http://news.yahoo.com/philippine-typhoon-toll-rises-record-5-209-official-111647291.html
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« Reply #23 on: November 23, 2013, 06:45:39 am »

Pneumonia Is New Threat to Storm-Battered Philippines

Two weeks after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the east-central Philippines, a new problem has emerged: pneumonia. Hundreds of thousands of people have lost their homes and are living under tarpaulins and in makeshift huts across Leyte Island and nearby islands. These simple structures are proving no match for torrential rain and a rapid alternation of chilly breezes and sweltering heat.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/23/world/asia/pneumonia-a-new-threat-to-storm-battered-philippines.html?_r=0
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« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2014, 08:03:01 pm »

No Polio in the Philippines Since 1993, But Mass Polio Vaccination Program Targeted for 500,000 Typhoon Victims Under Age 5
http://worldtruth.tv/no-polio-in-the-philippines-since-1993-but-mass-polio-vaccination-program-targeted-for-500000-typhoon-victims-under-age-5/
12/5/13

UNICEF has purchased over $2 million dollars worth of vaccines for typhoon victims in the Philippines. Western pharmaceutical companies look to make huge sales from aggressive campaign to vaccinate over 500,000 children in typhoon affected areas.

In the aftermath of one of the strongest storms to ever strike land, the most dangerous place for children in the Philippines to be right now could very well be the evacuation centers, or living near one.

This past week, the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF began an aggressive program to vaccinate more than 500,000 children with the measles and polio vaccines in the typhoon affected areas of the Philippines. They have already vaccinated more than 30,000 children in Tacolban, one of the worst hit areas. “It is virtually unprecedented that within two and a half weeks of a disaster of this scale, with this level of devastation and these logistical challenges, that a mass vaccination campaign is already rolling out,” reported Dr. Julie Hall, WHO representative in the Philippines. The children are being vaccinated for measles and polio, in spite of the fact that measles rates are very low and declining in the Philippines, and that there has not been a single case of polio in the Philippines since 1993. In the video below, Heather Papowitz, a senior advisor for UNICEF, states that they are vaccinating children for measles even though they have already been vaccinated for the disease, because previous vaccine campaigns were,  ”not enough to protect them, so we need to get them vaccinated as soon as possible.” Is this a statement to the ineffectiveness of measles vaccines that they need to be vaccinated repeatedly, or that somehow typhoon disasters like this require higher doses of the vaccine? By either reasoning, it allows pharmaceutical companies a larger market for their products. Regarding their goal to vaccinate 500,000 children with the very dangerous oral polio vaccine, she states, “As far as polio, it was already eradicated in the Philippines, so we just want to make sure it doesn’t come back.”

According to statistics supplied by the WHO, measles is rare and declining in the Philippines. In a nation of over 90 million people, there were 6,554 confirmed cases of measles in 2011 (source), 1,536 confirmed cases in 2012, and through November 11, 2013 this year, only 951 confirmed cases. (Source - Page 6.)

If you are the parent of a Filipino child being told by western aid workers that you need to vaccinate your child for measles (regardless if your child was already vaccinated), you need to ask yourself why you should allow your child to be exposed to dangerous western vaccines when the disease has already been declining and affects so very few people in your country.

As for the oral polio vaccine, this particular vaccine contains the live polio virus, and is notorious for causing vaccine-induced polio and paralysis. It is no longer given in the United States, only in poorer countries like India, Pakistan (where many people are now rising up and resisting it), and now the Philippines. Many have called for a halt on the oral live attenuated vaccine, due to the fact that it can actually cause polio and non-polio acute flaccid paralysis.

In India, for example, the “polio eradication campaign” using the live oral polio vaccine caused 47,500 cases of non-polio acute flaccid paralysis in just one year! (Source.) Will we now start seeing cases of polio and paralysis arise in the Philippines, where currently there are none, as a result of this dangerous and outdated polio vaccine that is targeted for 500,000 children? We most assuredly will, as this is exactly what is happening in other places like India and Pakistan. (See: Paralysis Haunts ‘Polio Free’ India and Confirmed: India’s Polio Eradication Campaign in 2011 Caused 47,500 Cases of Vaccine-Induced Polio Paralysis)

The measles vaccine is hardly without risk either. Dr. Viera Scheibner points out in this excellent article looking at the history of the measles vaccine, that atypical measles outbreaks have occurred as a result of the vaccine, and that natural immunity is wiped out when the vaccine is introduced, which can lead to more incidents of measles, rather than less. As I pointed out above, measles is already on the decline in the Philippines and affects a minuscule portion of the population.

I am not sure if there is a single measles vaccine currently available in the market, as by far the majority of the vaccines for measles today are a 3-vaccine combo of mumps, measles, and rubella (MMR). Here is Merck’s MMR vaccine package insert for the MMR vaccine. Be sure to read the ingredients, as well as the sections: CONTRAINDICATIONS, WARNINGS, PRECAUTIONS, and ADVERSE REACTIONS before you agree to have your children vaccinated. These sections are seldom communicated or explained to parents prior to vaccination, and injuries and deaths do occur, as is evidenced by settlements in the U.S. vaccine court, and also by a court in Italy. (See: MMR Vaccine Caused Autism in Two Children According to Federal Vaccine Court and Italian Court Rules MMR Vaccine Caused Autism: Why is this story blacked out of the US Media?)

I know that Health Impact News has a popular readership in Manila, and I encourage people to contact President Aquino and Dr. Enrique Ona (Secretary of Health) to carefully research this topic so they can be fully informed about these issues. The dangers of the live oral polio vaccine and the terrible side effects resulting in paralysis are very well documented in the scientific literature. We have also published articles from medical doctors and PhD scientists that summarize the peer-reviewed scientific studies and history of vaccines that is not popularly covered in the U.S. mainstream media, which is for the most part pro-pharmaceutical. See for example: The REAL History Behind the Polio Vaccine by Dr
. Viera
 Scheibner
 (PhD), and Did Vaccines Really Eradicate Polio? by Suzanne Humphries, MD.

Why are Children Under 5 Dying in Countries Where UNICEF Works?

It would also be prudent to research UNICEF, which likes to present itself as an advocate for children’s health. Their track record does not match up to this image they like to project. In a report published in the Lancet (free registration required to read) in 2004, it was revealed that in the countries where UNICEF was working, deaths of children under the age of 5 actually increased! Is it a coincidence that this is the same age group UNICEF targets with their vaccine programs? The countries that experienced the greatest increase in deaths were all poor countries: India (2·4 million deaths), Nigeria (834 000 deaths), China (784 000 deaths), Pakistan (565 000 deaths), Democratic Republic of Congo (484 000 deaths), and Ethiopia (472 000 deaths). Will the Philippines now be added to this tragic list?

The largest funding entity to UNICEF is the U.S. Government. People in the Philippines and other poorer countries need to understand that the U.S. Government, unlike any other government in the world, has passed laws giving 100% legal immunity to pharmaceutical companies for any harm or damage that occurs as a result of vaccine adverse effects. This gives them unlimited opportunities to rush new vaccines into the market regardless of their safety, and often the more unpopular vaccines get distributed to poorer countries as part of “humanitarian” efforts, funded by taxpayers in various countries that support the U.N. and UNICEF. There are absolutely ZERO checks and balances to assure that your country is receiving safe and effective vaccines.

I lived in the Philippines for several years, and have been through four Super Typhoons. I have also participated in relief operations after natural and man-made disasters. The amount of fraud and corruption that occurs when millions, or even billions, of dollars are being donated for “humanitarian” purposes after a tragedy like this is always a problem, and this appears to me to be a case where pharmaceutical companies are seizing upon the Philippine Typhoon Yolanda tragedy to promote their vaccine agenda.

Pharmaceutical sales are slumping in the U.S., and they are looking for new markets, particularly in the poorer countries. Measles is declining in the Philippines and already rare, and there are no cases of polio. But that may all change now, thanks to this vaccination program that can, ironically, cause the disease for which the vaccine is supposed to prevent, resulting in even more vaccination programs in the future with the claim that these diseases are now returning, thus creating a lucrative market for the western pharmaceutical companies.

What the people in the Philippines in the typhoon affected areas need right now, especially children under the age of 5, is clean drinking water and healthy food, and then help to rebuild their homes and infrastructure. The millions of dollars being spent on dangerous vaccines could better be put to use for much healthier and safer options that will truly help the people, rather than dangerous vaccines that could end up crippling and injuring children at a time when they are most vulnerable.

Government officials and citizens in the Philippines need to understand the profit motive to distribute vaccines and how Western governments fund groups like WHO and UNICEF to promote their agendas in poorer countries. In the process, they exploit the most helpless members of your society, children under the age of 5! Throw off the mantle of Western colonialism and tell the WHO and UNICEF to stop their vaccination program in the typhoon affected areas now!
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« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2014, 12:34:54 am »

Quote
Why are Children Under 5 Dying in Countries Where UNICEF Works?

It would also be prudent to research UNICEF, which likes to present itself as an advocate for children’s health. Their track record does not match up to this image they like to project. In a report published in the Lancet (free registration required to read) in 2004, it was revealed that in the countries where UNICEF was working, deaths of children under the age of 5 actually increased! Is it a coincidence that this is the same age group UNICEF targets with their vaccine programs? The countries that experienced the greatest increase in deaths were all poor countries: India (2·4 million deaths), Nigeria (834 000 deaths), China (784 000 deaths), Pakistan (565 000 deaths), Democratic Republic of Congo (484 000 deaths), and Ethiopia (472 000 deaths). Will the Philippines now be added to this tragic list?

The largest funding entity to UNICEF is the U.S. Government. People in the Philippines and other poorer countries need to understand that the U.S. Government, unlike any other government in the world, has passed laws giving 100% legal immunity to pharmaceutical companies for any harm or damage that occurs as a result of vaccine adverse effects. This gives them unlimited opportunities to rush new vaccines into the market regardless of their safety, and often the more unpopular vaccines get distributed to poorer countries as part of “humanitarian” efforts, funded by taxpayers in various countries that support the U.N. and UNICEF. There are absolutely ZERO checks and balances to assure that your country is receiving safe and effective vaccines.

Pharmaceutical sales are slumping in the U.S., and they are looking for new markets, particularly in the poorer countries. Measles is declining in the Philippines and already rare, and there are no cases of polio. But that may all change now, thanks to this vaccination program that can, ironically, cause the disease for which the vaccine is supposed to prevent, resulting in even more vaccination programs in the future with the claim that these diseases are now returning, thus creating a lucrative market for the western pharmaceutical companies.

idiot pharmaceutical companies - scumbags!
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