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The MARK, HEADLINES!!!

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Author Topic: The MARK, HEADLINES!!!  (Read 8021 times)
Kilika
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« Reply #30 on: November 25, 2012, 12:29:53 pm »

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But only the parents of kids who receive subsidized child care have to do the scans

There you go! More of this move by government mandating that people on the government doll be forced into various things to remain on the government teet. It started with drug testing, now biometric scans, and who knows what else they will require of people who are on any government assistance.

Eventually, I see them adding a DNA requirement once the technical security experts claim that bioscans are not secure enough to protect people's privacy. Which technically, they aren't as secure as DNA, so it makes their sales pitch easy to upgrade to a "new and improved" system.

Basically, it's pretty much here already..."Take the Mark, or your on your own".
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« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2013, 05:27:41 am »

Painless 'Tattoo' To Deliver Radical New DNA-Altering Vaccines

Applying patches loaded with these needles onto the skin instantly embeds the coatings into the body, much like the application of a tattoo. These microneedles can be designed to disrupt only the most superficial layers of the skin to avoid nerve endings and blood vessels, making them painless and safer than hypodermic needles. This type of vaccine delivery would also eliminate the need to inject vaccines by syringe, says Darrell Irvine, an MIT professor of biological engineering and materials science and engineering. 'You just apply the patch for a few minutes, take it off and it leaves behind these thin polymer films embedded in the skin,' he says. The microneedles are set to be used to deliver a new generation of 'DNA vaccines' the researchers say. Scientists are now developing DNA vaccines that deliver genes from contagions into patients; the cells of vaccinated people then produce molecules from those potential intruders that function like wanted signs...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2270170/The-end-injections-Painless-tattoo-apply-DNA-vaccines-stick-patch.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490


Will "Super Social Security Cards" Lead To Biometric Mark Of The Beast? US Lawmakers Like The Idea Of The Slippery-Slope To 666

If one part of some lawmakers' plan for comprehensive immigration reform goes through, Social Security cards could soon come with a fingerprint. Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said on Thursday that their Senate framework for immigration reform, recently endorsed by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), could require biometric information to check employment status. Asked whether he favored "a super Social Security card that would have some sort of biometric thing like a fingerprint" by Politico's Mike Allen at a Politico Playbook breakfast on Wednesday, McCain said, "I'm for it." McCain said he was not sure "exactly how" such a proposal would play out in any legislation, "but there is technology now that could give us a Social Security card, people a Social Security card, that is tamper-proof."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/immigration-reform-biometric-id_n_2594285.html


Flashback Yesterday: Professor Argues To U.S. Congress That Americans Want A National ID Based On Head & Hand Biometric Scanning

The solution to the problem is for Democrats to accept that voter IDs are important, and for Republicans to accept that all eligible voters should receive free national biometric cards, which would have unique identifiers for each person based on fingerprints or an iris scan. In the 1990s, Mexico provided biometric IDs to all of its citizens in just three years, using Kodak and IBM technology. Mexicans now use them for many purposes. If the U.S. were to provide such a card to all citizens, it would address Republican concerns about ballot integrity while assuring Democrats that everyone would have a card and could vote. Indeed, the process could add as many as 50 million eligible but currently unregistered people to voter rolls.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-pastor-immigration-biometric-id-20130129,0,2155557.story
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« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2013, 01:04:10 pm »

SD College Tests Fingerprint Purchasing Technology

Futurists have long proclaimed the coming of a cashless society, where dollar bills and plastic cards are replaced by fingerprint and retina scanners smart enough to distinguish a living, breathing account holder from an identity thief. What they probably didn't see coming was that one such technology would make its debut not in Silicon Valley or MIT but at a small state college in remote western South Dakota, 25 miles from Mount Rushmore. Two shops on the School of Mines and Technology campus are performing one of the world's first experiments in Biocryptology – a mix of biometrics (using physical traits for identification) and cryptology (the study of encoding private information). Students at the Rapid City school can buy a bag of potato chips with a machine that non-intrusively detects their hemoglobin to make sure the transaction is legitimate.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130222/us-living-fingerprint-experiment
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« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2013, 01:07:19 pm »

Freescale’s Insanely Tiny ARM Chip Will Put The Internet Of Things INSIDE Your Body

Chipmaker Freescale Semiconductor has created the world’s smallest ARM-powered chip, designed to push the world of connected devices into surprising places. Announced today, the Kinetis KL02 measures just 1.9 by 2 millimeters. It’s a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit — everything a body needs to be a basic tiny computer. The KL02 has 32k of flash memory, 4k of RAM, a 32 bit processor, and peripherals like a 12-bit analog to digital converter and a low-power UART built into the chip. By including these extra parts, device makers can shrink down their designs, resulting in tiny boards in tiny devices. How tiny? One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers.

http://www.wired.com/design/2013/02/freescales-tiny-arm-chip/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired/index+(Wired%3A+Top+Stories)&utm_content=Google+Reader


Supreme Court Weighs DNA ‘Fingerprinting’

The Supreme Court debated Tuesday whether Maryland’s decision to collect DNA samples from people arrested for serious crimes represents an unconstitutional invasion of privacy or a crime-solving breakthrough with the potential to be the “fingerprinting of the 21st century.” Either way, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. said, the case is “perhaps the most important criminal procedure case that this court has heard in decades.” At issue are laws in 29 states and on the federal level that allow some version of DNA collections. And the oral argument highlighted the difficulty the court sometimes has in squaring emerging or potential technological advances with centuries-old constitutional protections. “How can I base a decision today on what you tell me is going to happen in two years?” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. asked Maryland Chief Deputy Attorney General Katherine Winfree. “Don’t I have to base a decision on what we have today?”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/supreme-court-weighs-dna-fingerprinting/2013/02/26/5eb3c5b6-804e-11e2-b99e-6baf4ebe42df_story.html?wprss=rss_national
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Kilika
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« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2013, 02:38:30 pm »

SD College Tests Fingerprint Purchasing Technology

Futurists have long proclaimed the coming of a cashless society, where dollar bills and plastic cards are replaced by fingerprint and retina scanners smart enough to distinguish a living, breathing account holder from an identity thief. What they probably didn't see coming was that one such technology would make its debut not in Silicon Valley or MIT but at a small state college in remote western South Dakota, 25 miles from Mount Rushmore. Two shops on the School of Mines and Technology campus are performing one of the world's first experiments in Biocryptology – a mix of biometrics (using physical traits for identification) and cryptology (the study of encoding private information). Students at the Rapid City school can buy a bag of potato chips with a machine that non-intrusively detects their hemoglobin to make sure the transaction is legitimate.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130222/us-living-fingerprint-experiment

And that was a decision made totally by design. Out of the way, small group, few would even know what they were doing there. Roll Eyes
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« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2013, 04:19:05 am »

Business Insider: We're Getting Closer Than Ever To The Mark Of The Beast

If you’ve ever wanted to pay for groceries with the touch of a finger, look no further than the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City, South Dakota. Two locations – a coffee shop and convenience store – on the school’s campus recently began testing fingerprint purchasing technology that allows students to buy goods with their fingerprint. The technology is called Biocryptology, and not only does it identify a person’s unique fingerprint, but detects levels of hemoglobin, or the oxygen in red blood cells, to make sure the person has a pulse. Thus, criminals looking to fool the system with severed fingers will be unsuccessful (yes, the developers thought of that). Fifty students and four faculty members have enrolled by providing their bank information, name, birth date, address, student ID, and of course, scanned fingerprints.

http://www.businessinsider.com/forget-credit-cards-2013-2
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« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2013, 08:50:42 am »

The schools seem to be the testing ground with all of this - probably not surprising as the youth is probably the demographic most easily to be deceived. No, I'm not belittling them or anything, b/c I myself was in their shoes years ago(and fell for alot of the NWO PC junk going on).
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« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2013, 11:21:52 pm »

Microchip Markets RFID Technology that Transmits via the Human Body

The company says its BodyCom active tags and readers are more secure than RFID technology that transmits signals through the air, making it suitable for controlling access to cars, buildings, power tools, computers and firearms.

"Several companies are currently beta-testing a radio frequency identification system from Microchip Technology that uses the human body as a conduit for transmissions between an interrogator and a tag. Microchip's platform, known as BodyCom, can be utilized to control access to a building, or to control the usage of a device, such as a computer or a weapon. The companies, located in various parts of the world, are testing ways in which to integrate the technology into their own solutions, such as keyless vehicle-entry systems.

While traditional RFID systems transmit data through the air, simply requiring a tag or a receiving unit to come within transmission range of an interrogator, the BodyCom solution requires that both tag and interrogator be within close proximity to a person's body. By leveraging the body to transmit a signal, BodyCom does not need as much power, nor does it require a conventional RFID reader antenna, according to Edward Dias, the embedded-security business-development manager of Microchip's MCU8 (8-bit microcontroller) division. This would mean the battery life of a device such as a remote control or an ID tag would be longer, he explains, and that the transmission itself would be more secure, since there would be no over-the-air RF signals that could be intercepted.

The system's base unit (reader) employs a capacitive coupling pad instead of a conventional reader antenna to transmit a 125 kHz signal (or "challenge") via the human body—which acts as a secure communication channel—to a tag (or "mobile unit"). The mobile unit then responds by transmitting an 8 MHz signal, encoded with that tag's unique ID number. The tag's transmission also travels along the body and back to the base unit, which responds by triggering an action, such as unlocking the door of a car or building.

For approximately 15 years, Microchip has provided wireless technology used in such devices as garage door openers and keyless-entry car locks consisting of a radio receiver and a transmitter. However, Dias says, those systems typically communicate via a low-frequency (LF) inductive field, resulting in an over-the-air signal that car thieves or other individuals can tamper with. There are devices available on the market that can, for example, capture transmissions from a car lock over the air, and relay that signal farther away to a vehicle owner's remote controller, thereby tricking the system into thinking the remote is within close proximity to the door lock.

Consequently, in order to combat that security concern, traditional RFID systems may require a user to enter a password or provide some other manual action to prompt a response, such as unlocking a door. Using human conductivity makes such protective measures unnecessary, Dias says, since the transmission is secure.

According to Dias, the BodyCom base station is designed to respond to touch in order to commence communication. When the base station detects that someone is touching its capacitive coupling pad—which resembles a printed circuit board antenna—it sends a low-power transmission, using the body's exterior as a capacitive coupler. The battery-powered mobile unit in the user's pocket or hand has an antenna that picks up this 125 kHz transmission (the system can be set either so that the tag must be in contact with a person, or so that it can be positioned several inches from a user's skin and still send and receive data), and responds by transmitting an 8 MHz signal encoded with its own unique identifier. The tag's signal travels along the exterior of the user's body until being received by the base station.

In the case of a vehicle's keyless-entry system, the base unit's capacitive coupling pad could be attached to the car's door handle or bumper, and the user carrying a BodyCom tag in his or her hand or pocket would simply touch the pad. This contact would prompt the mobile unit to communicate with the tag and trigger the lock to release, allowing that person to enter his or her car and start the ignition.

The system could also be used to identify an individual before that person operates a piece of equipment. In the case of a computer, a BodyCom base station, including its capacitive coupling pad, would be integrated within the computer, which would fail to operate until the base station received transmission from an approved mobile unit. The same setup could be used for power tools or firearms, rendering them inoperable to all but those with the approved mobile unit on their person. In such applications, the base unit's capacitive coupling pad could be built into the handle of a tool or weapon, for instance.

The technology could also be used with gaming consoles, identifying an individual and linking him or her to that person's gaming history if he or she, for example, visited a friend possessing the same gaming system.

Additionally, the solution could be deployed to control access to a home's pet door. In such a scenario, a BodyCom base station's capacitive coupling pad would be installed at the pet door's entranceway. If a dog or cat wore a BodyCom tag (which could be designed to be as small as a quarter) on its collar, the animal would simply need to come within 4 or 5 inches of the capacitive coupling pad, or touch it directly, in order to prompt the system to unlock and allow that animal entrance. In the meantime, users could be assured that other pets or wild animals would not be able to enter the house through that same door.

Although conventional radio frequency identification could be used to accomplish many of the same functions, Dias notes, RFID transmissions traveling through the air would not be as secure, since they could theoretically be intercepted by an unauthorized user equipped with the appropriate RFID reader. What's more, he says, the solution is simpler to implement since the technology does not require antennas, as a standard RFID system would. Conventional RFID, he adds, would require greater power to create inductive fields when transmitting a signal.

The reason why BodyCom base unit employs 125 kHz to transmit a signal to the tag is that this particular frequency is the one most typically used for other keyless-entry technologies. The base unit can be powered externally or be connected to a battery to power that transmission. The mobile unit, powered by a small replaceable cell battery, can remain dormant until receiving a 125 kHz signal from the base station, at which time it would transmit an 8 MHz signal.

The BodyCom technology has been in development for about a year, Dias says, and is now being tested by companies that he declines to name or describe. The most common use cases, he indicates, are initially in access control.

"The technology can be configurable by the user," Dias states. "You could have proximity on both sides," in which case, a user's hand would only need to come within a few inches of the base station, while the mobile unit could be close enough to the user when stored in a purse or a briefcase to still utilize the human body to complete the transmission. Alternatively, the system could be configured so that both the base station and the mobile unit must be in direct contact with a user's body.

Dias says the company receives calls daily from businesses with new ideas for how the technology could be implemented. For example, some firms are considering employing the technology for easy access control by installing a base station in a floor pad that users would walk over. The base unit's transmission could travel through a person's shoe and over that individual's body to the mobile unit in the user's pocket, or around his or her neck on a lanyard, thereby triggering the door to open so that the person would not need to touch anything to prompt the door to open. Moreover, the system could operate in a motorcycle helmet, requiring contact between a mobile unit in the helmet and the individual's head in order to trigger the bike's ignition to activate.

Microchip Technology is offering a BodyCom development kit for $149, including a single base unit and two mobile units with the necessary firmware to operate. "When you introduce this kind of technology to a room full of engineers," Dias says, "you can see the wheels start spinning" as they generate more ways in which it could be used."

http://www.rfidjournal.com/articles/view?10489/3
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Kilika
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« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2013, 03:46:15 am »

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The system could also be used to identify an individual before that person operates a piece of equipment. In the case of a computer, a BodyCom base station

That's the big use right there; computer/internet access.

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...while the mobile unit could be close enough to the user when stored in a purse or a briefcase...

...or even in the body itself!

This is the "new and improved" sales pitch I expected. They really pump up all the "advantages" that are no advantage at all.
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« Reply #39 on: March 27, 2013, 07:03:50 pm »

I'll admit, a lot of this new technology stuff is really making my head spin! Shocked

When all is said and done, we'll see how all of this gets implemented - not just the mark of the beast, but wouldn't surprise me as well if America gets implemented into a new system before all is said and done.
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« Reply #40 on: April 04, 2013, 04:49:31 pm »

I was reading about that long-time famous film critic(Roger Ebert) passing away today, and it reminded me of a video someone showed me a couple of years ago...over Ebert going on O'Reilly's show to promote this...



This show may have aired in the late 90's, early 00's(both of them look much younger than now) - but nonetheless as you can see, it's not so much that everything is really being put in place now, but look how these types are not only heavily pushing it, but EMBRACING these agendas like they're grandma's apple pie.(it's as if they're speaking for the world, and not necessarily trying to deceive the world, per se)
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« Reply #41 on: April 04, 2013, 05:27:01 pm »

Having an electronics background, I can say that the "evolution" of electronics, the way it operates, basically demands they get smaller, faster, cooler, cheaper, less complicated, and easy to use. For management of electronics, which primarily is security-based due to software's copyright issues, the evolution of security protocols demands it become more and more secure, always looking to make the system as secure as possible for the user. Typing in a password wasn't enough they found, so off to make something better, like say retina scans or fingerprint scans, and so it goes.

All of that leads to an ultimate conclusion; an inter-body device that is your own personal access point to all things digital in the world, using some kind of system that physically ties you to a database of identities to verify that you are the person your digital profile says you are. And it all evolves at a certain pace, based on Moore's Law, so that we see industry moving with "advances" at a fairly predicable pace.

As I've said in the past, all the parts are in operation now. They have the technology, have had it for some time now, but the tying it all together (haggling between greedy money handlers) into a world-wide interconnected system is the last step (even the backbone of such a system already exists and is in operation; the internet!), then I believe the real mandates will come down on the people.
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« Reply #42 on: May 01, 2013, 09:19:38 am »

California Schools Testing Palm Scanners On Children That Converts Veins In Their Right Hands To Numbers (Do Their Foreheads Come Next?)

Schools in California are testing palm scanners in their cafeterias in an attempt to speed up lunch service. “Right now, we are serving about 65 percent of the students and we would like to see that go up to 80 percent,” Apoian told CBS2′s Kristine Lazar. Under the old system, students entered a 5-digit pin code to verify their identity and receive lunch, allowing the school to process 150 students in about 15 minutes. The palm scanner works by taking a two-inch image of the vein paths on students’ hands and converts these images to a numerical sequence. “Once that palm is scanned the image is taken and broken down into 1′s and 0′s. It is a unique number for that student,” said Reggie Cancel, Network Manager of the School District.

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2013/04/25/hawthorne-schools-speed-up-lunch-line-with-palm-scanners/
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« Reply #43 on: May 01, 2013, 11:36:28 am »

Aren't computer bits/bytes 1's and 0's? Hhhhmmm...
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« Reply #44 on: May 01, 2013, 05:12:18 pm »

Yeah, well, it takes 8 bits of 1's and 0's to equal a byte of data. So technically, no and yes!  Wink

From what they describe, each having an image taken and then converted to 1's and 0's is a given, as that is how all data is stored, whether text, or media, and regardless of storage device.

I guess they think describing it that way makes it sound more secure? The 'ole "baffle them with bs" trick.  Roll Eyes
 
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« Reply #45 on: June 10, 2013, 02:17:56 pm »

Meet the World's First Bitcoin Baby
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/meet-the-world-s-first-bitcoin-baby-161558653.html
6/10/13

SAN JOSE — Dr. C. Terence Lee, a fertility specialist based in Brea, Calif., flashes a photo of a beaming infant across a projection screen and announces: "This baby was bought with bitcoins."

No, this isn't a black-market deal brokered in the Internet's shadowy corners. The child was born thanks to a frozen embryo transfer cycle paid for with bitcoins. Lee says it's the first time he's aware of that anyone has paid for fertility treatments that way.

The baby is the biggest -- and definitely the cutest -- victory yet for Lee in his campaign to persuade his patients to pay him for his services with bitcoins, the experimental digital currency that caught Wall Street's attention recently when its trading price shot up.

There are 11 million bitcoins in circulation right now with a collective "market value" of around $1.4 billion. You can spend bitcoins online at shops like BitcoinStore.com, but they're not exactly a mainstream currency for everyday transactions.

Lee would love to change that. He's an early pioneer in the Bitcoin retail economy, and a sign on his clinic door advertises his accepted forms of electronic payment: Visa, MasterCard or Bitcoin.

The sign alone hasn't generated any business, Lee admits.

"We see 10 to 40 patients a day, and nobody even bothered to ask what the sign meant," he said in recent presentation at Bitcoin 2013, a conference dedicated to the fledgling currency.

So Lee escalated. Determined to find a patient willing to pay him in bitcoins, Lee put an ad up on Reddit last year offering a "male fertility evaluation" -- basically, a sperm test -- in return for 15 bitcoins, which at the time were worth around $5 each.

The customer who finally took up the offer didn't actually care about his sperm count, Lee said. He just wanted to participate in what may have been the world's first bitcoin-funded medical transaction. ("It turned out he had really good sperm!" Lee said happily while recounting the deal.)

Lee is something of an accidental Bitcoin evangelist. An ob/gyn with a geeky streak, he came across Bitcoin around a year ago while poking around on the Internet. The community's passion drew him in.

"I thought it was interesting -- people supporting it as a way for the common man to take back hold of finance," Lee told CNNMoney after his talk. "I was like, 'OK, let me support them.' And then I became part of them."

It took a few months to find his sperm-test guinea pig. After that, Lee grew bolder. He broached the subject with a few of his clients. If he offered a big discount, he asked, would they consider paying him with bitcoins?

"In some cases they reacted like I said I wanted to be paid in vials of crack ****," he recalled.

Eventually, though, a few agreed to try it out. And then he hit the jackpot: A couple whom he helped conceive three previous babies came back to try for number four.

"They said, 'Dr. Lee, we don't understand this Bitcoin thing,' but bless their hearts, they were willing to play along out of loyalty," he said. "I offered them a 50% discount."

But actually completing a large bitcoin transaction isn't as simple as slapping down a credit card.

Lee's clients owed him around $1,000 for his services. Lee had to do some digging to find out where they could safely send off such a large sum of cash and have it converted into bitcoins.

"There were nowhere near as many options then as there are today," he says of his experience late last year. "It was like the blind leading the blind."

Lee picked CryptoXChange -- a now-defunct exchange service based in Australia -- and helped his clients create and fund their account, using the international money-transfer services of a local bank. The entire process took several days.

In the end, it paid off on all fronts: Lee got his bitcoins, and the fertility treatment worked.

Bitcoin's volatility has worked in Lee's favor, so far. The 30 bitcoins he collected for aiding in Baby #4's conception are now worth around $3,600 -- easily offsetting the heavy discount he offered.

What goes up, though, can also crash. In April, the value of 1 Bitcoin briefly hit a record high of $266 before plunging back to $165 just hours later. For merchants that rely on their sales for cash flow, that kind of volatility is a huge risk.

Lee claims he wouldn't care if his bitcoins lost their value entirely -- he and his staff are having fun figuring out the technology, meeting new people, and enjoying the economic novelty of a whole new kind of currency. He's even managed to convert a few more of his clients.

"On the Friday before I came here, we did an ultrasound on a patient who paid with bitcoin," he said at the Bitcoin conference. "We may also have the world's first bitcoin twins."
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« Reply #46 on: June 26, 2013, 08:37:21 am »

Ready For The Mark: Nearly Half Of All Surveyed Want To Buy And Sell Via Head And Hand Scanning ... NOW!

Almost half of consumers said they would be prepared to pay for goods by using fingerprint, palm print and iris scanners. The survey of more than 2,000 shoppers revealed 49 per cent would prefer a biometric test over other payment options. The study is likely to alarm civil liberties campaigners concerned about the rise of a ‘Big Brother’ society. The survey also asked what shoppers thought of other ways of verifying identity such as smartphone PIN codes, text messages or online wallets – websites that let users store logins, passwords, shipping addresses and credit card details in one place. But they were not as popular as biometrics. Card services firm WorldPay, which commissioned the survey, said the responses were based as much on convenience as security fears.

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-2346557/Almost-half-shoppers-prefer-biometric-test-forms-payment.html?ito=feeds-newsxml


Soon You'll Ingest A Microchip ID Or Have Sensors Embedded In Your Arm, Head Or Hand

The pill is being championed by Regina Dugan, who has been called "America's smartest engineer". She told a conference last month that Motorola was looking at "ingestibles" as well as "wearables" such as glasses and tattoos to turn the human body into a "wired being". "People have to authenticate themselves (to machines) on average 39 times a day, or log into their phone 100 times a day, and coming up with hacker-proof passwords has become more insane," said the famously plain-spoken Ms Dugan. She argues that technology such as the password pill will give people more power over their online lives... A Motorola source said: "Regina is wearing a tattoo on her lower left arm which has an antenna and sensors embedded in it, broadcasting her security details to her phones. She wants us to program it so the patch can open doors and turn on her car too. "It's crazy, mad-scientist stuff, blurring the line between man and machine, but it's happening."
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/paranoid-about-passwords-just-take-a-pill/story-fnb64oi6-1226668473057


Apple Fingerprint Scanner Patent Hints Biometric Scanner On iPhone

Since the iPhone 5 is expected to use the same case design as the current iPhone 5, Apple is believed to be adding a new killer feature in the form of a biometric fingerprint scanner. A newly issued patent awarded to Apple adds further fuel to the fire. When Apple introduced the iPhone 4S, it appeared almost identical to the iPhone 4. It had the same aluminum and glass case found on its predecessor but there was a new feature the company added that would only be on that device - it was Siri. Siri was the exclusive killer feature that Apple used to tempt current and new iPhone users to want to purchase the iPhone 4S. The company is expected make a similar move with the iPhone 5S in the form of a biometric fingerprint scanner.   
http://www.itechpost.com/articles/10656/20130623/apple-fingerprint-scanner-patent-hints-biometric-iphone-5s.htm


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« Reply #47 on: June 26, 2013, 01:40:49 pm »

Quote
Soon You'll Ingest A Microchip ID Or Have Sensors Embedded In Your Arm, Head Or Hand

This morning local news had a story on a device you swallow, and it monitors your health, vitals, etc, and then relays that info to a doctor's phone (theoretically, anybody's phone!).

And with NFC technology, if it had it, you could walk into a doctor's office and it would automatically download your files, take readings, etc., before you even sign the register, and all that data would be live updating your patient record for HIPAA reasons.

At some point though, regardless of all the various "entry points" of the digital system, somewhere they will have to take that next step, to mandate a standard of identity worldwide for all people. At first I think it will be like it is now, which is a choice, LOTS of choices in mobile devices alone. All kinds of ways to access your digital profile. Eventually, during the second half of the tribulation period, it will be mandated with a penalty of death for refusal.

For now, we must decide for ourselves what is edifying and expedient, and use it in moderation. It may be better to look for old school "analog" ways, and avoid the digital system in general. Think about it, who really needs internet service on their phone? And texting has destroyed social interaction.

Less digital might be better.
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« Reply #48 on: June 29, 2013, 06:28:16 am »

Multiple Government Agencies Are Keeping Records Of Your Credit Card Transactions

Were you under the impression that your credit card transactions are private?  If so, I am sorry to burst your bubble.  As you will see below, there are actually multiple government agencies that are gathering and storing records of your credit card transactions.  And in turn, those government agencies share that information with other government agencies that want it.  So if you are making a purchase that you don't want anyone to know about, don't use a credit card.  This is one of the reasons why the government hates cash so much.  It is just so hard to track.  In this day and age, the federal government seems to be absolutely obsessed with gathering as much information about all of us as it possibly can.  But there is one big problem.  What they are doing directly violates the U.S. Constitution.  For those that are not familiar with it, the following is what the Fourth Amendment actually says: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."  Unfortunately, the Fourth Amendment is essentially dead at this point.  The federal government is investigating all of us and gathering information on all of us all day, every day without end.

(Read More....) http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/multiple-government-agencies-are-keeping-records-of-your-credit-card-transactions
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« Reply #49 on: July 10, 2013, 06:26:03 am »

Experts: DNA Ruling Could Lead to National ID
Indiana law enforcement officials could find it easier to fight crime if a national database holding DNA profiles of everyone born in the United States is created as the result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last month, experts say.  The prospect has had investigators and privacy advocates abuzz since the high court's June 3 decision that police could take a DNA swab from anyone arrested for a serious crime without violating Fourth Amendment limits on search and seizure.  Currently, DNA profiles of felons or arrestees are entered into a national database that is managed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and used to match evidence left at a crime scene. Twenty-eight states and the federal government now take DNA swabs after arrests.    MORE http://www.sfgate.com/news/crime/article/Experts-DNA-ruling-could-lead-to-national-ID-4650165.php


Polls Show People Like Buying Via Head & Hand Scanning: Coming Mark Of The Beast?
Out of 900 consumers involved in a recent pilot scheme, 94% said that they were ready to use finger print based technology when purchasing goods and services.
http://www.economicvoice.com/people-like-buying-with-a-fingerprint/50038161#axzz2YAnSdnmE

Majority of Europeans Support Biometrics for ID Cards or Passports, Survey Says
According to a new survey conducted by Steria, the majority of European citizens support the use of biometrics for criminal identification and for identity documents and passports, though slightly less than half are supportive of the technology replacing PIN numbers for bank cards.
http://www.biometricupdate.com/201307/majority-of-europeans-support-biometrics-for-id-cards-or-passports-steria-survey/
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« Reply #50 on: July 12, 2013, 03:04:23 am »

Quote
Polls Show People Like Buying Via Head & Hand Scanning: Coming Mark Of The Beast?
Out of 900 consumers involved in a recent pilot scheme, 94% said that they were ready to use finger print based technology when purchasing goods and services.
http://www.economicvoice.com/people-like-buying-with-a-fingerprint/50038161#axzz2YAnSdnmE

Majority of Europeans Support Biometrics for ID Cards or Passports, Survey Says
According to a new survey conducted by Steria, the majority of European citizens support the use of biometrics for criminal identification and for identity documents and passports, though slightly less than half are supportive of the technology replacing PIN numbers for bank cards.
http://www.biometricupdate.com/201307/majority-of-europeans-support-biometrics-for-id-cards-or-passports-steria-survey/

Saw a lot of this predictive programming in entertainment in the 90's - no surprise at this present day.
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« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2013, 10:44:25 am »

Will Head & Hand Scanning Be Part Of YOUR Child's Future? Systems Nationwide Sooner Than You Think

Should we be concerned? The simple answer is YES. Some schools in Florida have started collecting biometric information for various school applications — to speed up lunch lines, check out a library book, record attendance, track students' movements on campus and for boarding the school bus. Will testing, evaluation and health care information be added to the mix? The Polk County school district has already collected iris scans of approximately 750 schoolchildren without parental consent, so they could board the school bus. The Pinellas County school district has collected 50,000 palm scans so school children could pass through the lunch line. Is this only a Florida problem? No. Texas, California and New York have tried “smart” ID cards, which use radio frequency identification (RFID) chips to track a student's location on campus at all times. Maryland used palm scanners to access students accounts in cafeteria lines. Is this only a U.S. problem? No, countries throughout the world are...

http://www.ocala.com/article/20130804/OPINION/130809908/1001/news01?Title=Will-iris-scans-be-the-way-our-children-see-their-future-&tc=ar


The Mark Of The Beast Is Right Around The Corner: Here Comes The Brave New World Of Biometric Identification

Professor Margaret Hu’s important new article, “Biometric ID Cybersurveillance” (Indiana Law Journal), carefully and chillingly lays out federal and state government’s increasing use of biometrics for identification and other purposes. These efforts are poised to lead to a national biometric ID with centralized databases of our iris, face, and fingerprints. Such multimodal biometric IDs ostensibly provide greater security from fraud than our current de facto identifier, the social security number. As Professor Hu lays out, biometrics are, and soon will be, gatekeepers to the right to vote, work, fly, drive, and cross into our borders. Professor Hu explains that the FBI’s Next Generation Identification project will institute "a comprehensive, centralized, and technologically interoperable biometric database that spans across...

http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2013/08/brave-new-world-of-biometric-identification.html
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« Reply #52 on: August 07, 2013, 11:01:51 am »

Well, you know things are drawing nigh when pretty much the whole world is asleep to this - 20-30 years ago, this would have gotten a lot of backlash by this same world.
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« Reply #53 on: August 07, 2013, 03:39:30 pm »

The tracking of students won't fly, and quite frankly, they don't need to track them on campus. Just have access points, such as security doors they must pass though.

It's been done in high security facilities for really, decades now. If you narrow down to a small area, specific tracking isn't needed. There is only one lunchroom or library on a campus, so if the student has entered the door of the library, you know when, so you look in the library! And cameras can show you if you are there currently.

Security in technology requires verification of facts/variables, and will continue to demand more and more proof of variables, because the base "nature" of programming in it's simplest form is "on" or "off", a "1" or a "0", current, or no current in a circuit.

The digital system by it's own design will require you to prove who you really are, based on the system's database of variables to see if you have access authority to the system, and what level of access you have, all the way down the chain of access authority down to the coders themselves who write the source code.

No doubt there is some tweaking that will continue to take place how all this plays out, but the basics are in place. All that's left is getting the public to participate in some way. Maybe with iris scans, or DNA swabs, but eventually, they WILL get you in the system if you insist on using their system in the world.

Wanna drive a car? Go to the store? Have a phone? Rent a house?

Guess what? It's decision time folks!

People REALLY need to get their houses in order, and face what Jesus is telling us, and be prepared with all your heart to "love not the world", to be willing to give up your life in the world as you have known it.

If your not sure you are prepared, just do a simple thing...Ask yourself this, are you prepared to walk away from your house, right now, not a thing in your hands, leaving all possessions, family, and friends behind? Now take note of how that thought makes you feel inside? Anxiety? Hesitation? I suspect so.

I know how that feels, and I know how it feels to actually be confronted with that very scenario. I did it in my life years ago. I forsook everything as best I knew how then, and thank you Jesus, I'm still here. He made sure I was okay, and opened doors that I didn't even know was there at times. I experienced run-ins with police both on the street corner, on highways, and at night being woke up with flashlights and guns pointed at me. And then there was having to deal with heathen railers, as well as the "scribes and Pharisee".

I had my own anxiety of walking by faith, especially at that time not really understanding how it all works, but I can say that I definitely felt compelled to go, so I went, believing that if God is telling the truth, then by me wanting to know what I believe in, to get to know who Jesus really is and what this whole Christian thing is, then I'll be okay.

"Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid." John 14:27 (KJB)

As Jesus says, "I will never leave thee nor forsake thee". And through it all, I've seen peace result because of "agree with thine adversary quickly...".
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« Reply #54 on: August 07, 2013, 03:54:37 pm »

^^ Don't forget this one too...

Jer 29:11  For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the LORD, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.

The NIV and the other false versions distort this greatly - they say how the Lord "has plans for your life, to make your prosper, etc"(para).

Yes, I agree 100% - the time is coming...but nonetheless the just shall live by faith...
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« Reply #55 on: August 24, 2013, 05:00:18 am »

From USA Today: SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg late Tuesday announced on his Facebook profile page the formation of a partnership with Samsung Electronics, Nokia, Qualcomm and others to make Internet access available to everyone on Earth.

The group — Internet.org — intends to make the Internet an option for the 5 billion people who don’t have it. Only about one-third of the world’s population – 2.7 billion – has Internet access.

“Everything Facebook has done has been about giving all people around the world the power to connect,” Zuckerberg said in a post on his timeline. “There are huge barriers in developing countries to connecting and joining the knowledge economy. Internet.org brings together a global partnership that will work to overcome these challenges, including making internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it.”

The founding members of Internet.org – which also includes Ericsson, MediaTek and Opera — will develop joint projects, share knowledge, and mobilize industry and governments to bring the world online, according to Zuckerberg.

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/blog/?p=14680
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« Reply #56 on: August 24, 2013, 08:13:44 am »

Remember Digital Angel? Well, They're Ba-a-ack! VeriTeQ Receives First Order for Its "Q Inside" Implantable Microchip

VeriTeQ's "Q Inside," a passive radio frequency identification ("RFID") microchip, enables implantable medical devices to be quickly and safely identified from outside the body. Motiva Breast Implants(R) with "Q Inside" are designed to enable a manufacturer, physician or patient to access a secure online database and retrieve implant-specific data such as serial number, manufacturer name, date of manufacture, lot number, volume, size, and other data. In September 2012, VeriTeQ entered into a development and supply agreement with EL, a global provider of breast implants under the Motiva Implant Matrix(R) brand name, to build next-generation breast implants that contain VeriTeQ's Unique Device Identifier ("UDI") called "Q Inside."

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130814-907679.html
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« Reply #57 on: August 24, 2013, 03:18:38 pm »

From USA Today: SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg late Tuesday announced on his Facebook profile page the formation of a partnership with Samsung Electronics, Nokia, Qualcomm and others to make Internet access available to everyone on Earth.

The group — Internet.org — intends to make the Internet an option for the 5 billion people who don’t have it. Only about one-third of the world’s population – 2.7 billion – has Internet access.

“Everything Facebook has done has been about giving all people around the world the power to connect,” Zuckerberg said in a post on his timeline. “There are huge barriers in developing countries to connecting and joining the knowledge economy. Internet.org brings together a global partnership that will work to overcome these challenges, including making internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it.”

The founding members of Internet.org – which also includes Ericsson, MediaTek and Opera — will develop joint projects, share knowledge, and mobilize industry and governments to bring the world online, according to Zuckerberg.

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/blog/?p=14680

"working together for the common good" - not only is this an end times deception(which the Emergent Church is pushing), but N@zi Germany also pushed this idea as well.
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« Reply #58 on: August 29, 2013, 06:40:26 am »

What did this man put in his hand?

From cartoon characters to celebrities faces and misspelled sayings, there are some strange tattoos out there. But one man may have made it to the top of the list.

Artist Anthony Antonellis barely winced as a Brooklyn body modification specialist cut open the skin between his thumb and index finger with a 0.75 inch blade and inserted a small RFID chip.

The RFID chip is the size of a grain of sand and was encased inside of a glass capsule before being placed under Antonellis' flesh.

"I Eternal Sunshine'd that entire hour of my life," Antonellis told Animal New York who filmed the procedure.

So why did Antonellis go through 30 minutes of pain to have a chip inserted in his hand that is completely invisible from the outside?

The chip stores 1KB of data and contains information for a GIF that is readable by cell phones.

Photo of Routeburn Flats, on the Routeburn Track in New Zealand.

"Think of it as a changeable, digital net art tattoo vs. fixed information," Antonellis said.

The GIF is of pixelated rainbow colors and appears on screen when a compatible smartphone is held two centimeters from the chip.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2013/08/28/what-did-this-man-put-in-his-hand/?intcmp=features#ixzz2dHDbHG9I

Read more: http://www.myfoxdc.com/story/23277646/what-did-this-man-put-in-his-hand#ixzz2dMDr5uHI
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« Reply #59 on: August 29, 2013, 10:39:17 am »

You know, the real tease for people I think is in the technology being quite handy at times (pun intended). On the surface, it seems and is much easier, quicker, etc, so people like the idea. In many respects, it's an easy sell as people use digital technology more and more.

It does sound good to be able to walk into any store, grab what you want, and leave, payment automatically taken care of via wireless payment. By itself, it's completely innocent.

The problem is with the people who run the digital system.
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