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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Psalm 51:17
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« Reply #270 on: March 19, 2013, 10:53:07 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/severe-storms-large-hail-pummel-125131207.html
Severe storms, large hail pummel parts of South

Severe thunderstorms, some packing high winds and large hail, pummel parts of the South

3/19/13

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) -- Severe thunderstorms Monday raked across a wide area of the South, packing strong winds, rain and some baseball-size hail.

In Mississippi, authorities reported two people were hit on the head by large hail as the enormous storm front crossed the region. Fire official Tim Shanks said baseball-sized hail smashed windows in several vehicles in Clinton, where the two people were hit. He had no immediate word on their condition.

National Weather Service meteorologist Anna Weber said there were reports of hail the size of softballs in some areas around Jackson.

"This is the time of year that we get hail storms, but hail this size is pretty rare," Weber said.

Emergency officials said there were reports of downed trees or other damage in 14 Mississippi counties.

Roads throughout the Jackson area were littered with broken limbs and pine needles, from the hail driving through trees. Cars could be seen driving along the interstate with broken windows and cracked windshields.

"What I found interesting is that hail is the threat that we don't talk about that much," said Mississippi Emergency Management Agency spokesman Jeff Rent. "But you can see how destructive it can be in a short amount of time. We got a tough lesson today."

Glenn Ezell and his son were putting tarps on the metal roof of their mobile home in Brandon after the storm swept through the area.

"It started hailing big enough that it come through the roof and broke the sheetrock. It was as big as your fist," he said.

Meteorologists issued tornado warnings for parts of northwest Georgia and severe thunderstorm warnings around the state.

Flights were delayed by more than an hour Monday afternoon at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport after officials there ordered a ground stop, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Georgia Power officials said 73,000 customers were without power Monday night, and of that number, 31,000 were in northwest Georgia.

In neighboring Alabama, the storms knocked out power to more than 200,000 customers.

Etowah County officials said a person had to be removed from a house in Rainbow City after a tree fell onto it. Nearly two dozen trees had toppled onto Alabama Highway 77.

"I think most of it was caused by straight line winds, we just won't know really until tomorrow when the National Weather Service comes and does an assessment," said Gadsden-Etowah County EMA director Mike Bryant.

Bryant said eight people in the Gadsden area and five others in the county were hospitalized Monday night, but he did not know the extent of their injuries.

Meteorologists recorded wind speeds of 80 mph in some areas, and DeKalb County EMA director Anthony Clifton said the roof was ripped from a school in Collinsville, about 15 miles southwest of Fort Payne.

In Tennessee, heavy rain helped firefighters contain a wildfire that burned nearly 60 rental cabins in a resort area outside the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The fire forced up to 200 people who had been staying in cabins in the area to evacuate.

Fire officials had worried earlier that wind-whipped flames might jump a ridgeline and threaten Pigeon Forge, a popular tourism destination that's home to country star Dolly Parton's amusement park, Dollywood.
 
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« Reply #271 on: March 19, 2013, 01:48:02 pm »

Quote
The fire forced up to 200 people who had been staying in cabins in the area to evacuate.

Fire officials had worried earlier that wind-whipped flames might jump a ridgeline and threaten Pigeon Forge, a popular tourism destination that's home to country star Dolly Parton's amusement park, Dollywood.

Sorry, no sympathy. Rental cabins for vacationers, and a carnal playground to waste money on that leads children astray from the truth? Nope, not a drop.

Just like with the fires in California, they have these neighborhoods of $300,000+ homes burn up and everybody is boohooing. Well, for one, it's their own greed that built or bought those homes which are an excess, and two, they are living in a known fire hazard area (but it has a great view! Roll Eyes). again because of their own lusts of the flesh.

While Jesus tells us that we shall have tribulation in the flesh, much of "their' tribulations are self-imposed.

1  Go to now, [ye] rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon [you].
2  Your riches are corrupted, and your garments are motheaten.
3  Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the last days.
4  Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth.
5  Ye have lived in pleasure on the earth, and been wanton; ye have nourished your hearts, as in a day of slaughter.
6  Ye have condemned [and] killed the just; [and] he doth not resist you.
7  Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.
James 5:1-7 (KJB)
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« Reply #272 on: March 21, 2013, 06:42:23 pm »

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/448960/20130321/chinese-tornado-hailstones-dead-dongguan.htm
3/21/13
China: Giant Hailstones and Tornado Kill 24, Injure Hundreds

A tornado that ripped through southern China has caused widespread devastation, killing at least 24 people and leaving scores more injured.

The storm hit the Daoxian province in south of the country on Wednesday, said Zhou Jingzhong, head of the county government's publicity office.
 
Strong tornado winds - which can reach speeds of 300 mph - caused a ferry to overturn in a river in the south-eastern province of Fujian, causing the deaths of 11 people, with four still missing, said local website qq.com.
 
Nine people were killed in the town of Dongguan, with images showing shattered car windscreens, apparently smashed by egg-sized hailstones.
 
Many of the dead were trapped inside collapsed buildings. A further 148 people were also injured, including 11 who are on the critical list.
 
Other areas affected by storms and torrential rain were in the nearby Jiangxi and Hunan provinces of central China and Guizhou, in the southwest region of the country.

Around 1.5 million residents have been affected by the severe weather and 215,000 people have been forced to relocate, according to the Xinhua news agency.
 
Southwest China is still recovering from thunder and hailstorms which swept Guizhou province seven days ago. Some 24 counties and cities were hit by the storms which damaged houses and 8,700 hectares of farmland.
 
More storms bringing rain, wind and hail are forecast for the south of the country over the next three days, according to reports by Xinhua, the Chinese news agency.
 
Wang Li, director of the Hunan Meteorological Administration's division of emergency and disaster relief, said: "This kind of weather frequently occurs during spring in Hunan, but such severity is rare."
 
Wang said the provincial meteorological authorities had issued orange storm alerts in 40 cities and counties across the province on Tuesday night, the second-highest level in China's three-tier colour-coded warning system.
 
"Given that the spring crop sowing season has just started in our province, the damage to plants is likely to be limited," he told China Daily, although adding that vegetable and tobacco growers may suffer economic losses.
 
Labourers clean up the debris of a shed which was destroyed by a thunderstorm and hail in Dongguan, Guangdong province March 20, 2013. At least eight people died and 136 others were injured after a thunderstorm and hail hit the city in south China's Guangdong Province, local authorities said Wednesday, Xinhua News Agency reported.
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« Reply #273 on: March 21, 2013, 06:49:13 pm »

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/hurt-as-tornado-hits-victorias-northeast/story-e6frf95f-1226602134758

20 hurt as tornadoes and powerful storms hit Victoria's northeast

Erin Marie, AAP
From:Herald Sun
March 22, 2013

RESIDENTS have told of their terror after tornadoes and powerful storms smashed Victoria's northeast, leaving 20 people injured including two critically.

The severe storms hit several towns including Yarrawonga, Mulwala, Bundalong, Rutherglen and Euroa about 8pm, the SES said.

Caravans were overturned, roofs were ripped off homes and buildings were damaged as tornadoes travelling up to 50km/h ripped through the area.

Dozens of residents remained unable to return home this morning while the clean-up effort is expected to take days.
 
One man was filling his car with petrol in Euroa when the tornado caused the Shell service station to collapse.

“The tornado came to my car - I actually thought it was going to pick my car up," the man, Daniel, told 3AW.
 
"I was stuck inside the car outside the actual service station, and everything around me just collapsed on top of my car”.
 
Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Richard Carlyon said video footage confirmed there were tornadoes in the region.
 
"We may have had tornadoes running for around 20km/h or 50km/h, causing extensive damage across a 100m-200m path. It’s hard to estimate how strong the winds were," he said.

Ambulance Victoria spokesman Peter Swan said paramedics responded to dozens of calls, with some people suffering serious injuries from flying debris.
 
"We are on standby expecting that there may be other patients around this morning," he said.
 
"This is certainly a very unusual event to occur in Victoria."

Manager of Emergency Management Jon Byrne said paramedics treated and transported 20 people to Yarrawonga Hospital, including four who were then taken to Melbourne by air ambulance.
 
A man in his 50s is in a critical condition in the Royal Melbourne Hospital with head, pelvis and abdominal injuries.

Yarrawonga District Health Service chief executive officer Terry Welch said the hospital had put patients up in hotel rooms to free up beds.
 
"We've really pulled on every resource we can," he said.

"We've paid for hotels for those that we could because we needed the bed capacity.
"

 
The SES received more than 150 calls for help in the region, and about 1000 from across the state.

The main streets of Rutherglen and Yarrawonga both suffered widespread damage, a SES spokesman said.
 
"This is certainly some of the fiercest weather I've seen, and some of the more experienced hands have echoed that view," he said
.
 
Wild winds also battered other parts of the state yesterday.
 
A Knox boy had a close escape on his way to school when a tree fell in his path.
 
The SES was also called to remove a large gum tree that fell on a car after hitting a power line in The Basin's Old Forest Rd.
 
One driver was being checked by paramedics after a tree crushed his car in Kilmore  during high wind gusts.
 
A woman called for help after a tree fell on her vehicle in Kew, bringing down live power lines on the ground around the car.
 
She was told not to leave the vehicle for fear she could be electrocuted. Firefighters, SES and ambulance officers were on the scene to safely remove her from the car.
 
St Kilda recorded a top gust of 100km/h. Tullamarine reached a top of 94km/h with other suburbs had winds between 70km/h and 90km/h.
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« Reply #274 on: March 22, 2013, 01:38:28 pm »

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/australia/9948045/Tornado-rips-through-two-states-in-Australia-injuring-at-least-20-people.html
Tornado rips through two states in Australia, injuring at least 20 people

Two caravan parks and a forest in Victoria and part of New South Wales were hit by the tornado which touched down around 8pm local time, leaving scenes of devastation which witnesses likened to a warzone.


A tornado ripped through parts of Australia on Thursday injuring 20 people, local media reported.

The storm struck around 8pm local time in the northeast of Victoria, razing two caravan parks and destroying a forest, according to local emergency officials.

It also affected parts of New South Wales, where another caravan park appeared largely destroyed. One young driver in the state had a lucky escape. Footage filmed from inside his car shows the tornado touching only metres from the road, with power lines exploding as they were hit by the twister. Daniel Clarke, 24, was forced to accelerate away at speed in a bid to escape.

Visitors to the caravan park and witnesses likened the scene in Mulwala to a war zone.

"Everyone's lost everything," one woman, who arrived on Friday morning, after the tornado struck, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

An elderly woman, who did not give her name, recalled "bits of timber and trees and pieces of caravan just flying past, I don't think I'll ever forget it. It's dreadful."

She said she and her husband were lucky that the tornado did not hit their caravan, where they were at the time.

Earlier, an ambulance team manager in Victoria said 19 people were first airlifted to a local hospital, and five of them were later flown to Melbourne for medical treatment.

Local media said initial reports suggested winds picked up to between 180 and 250kmh (111-155mph).
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« Reply #275 on: March 25, 2013, 04:00:35 pm »

Tornado kills 23, injures over 500 in Bangladesh
3/23/13

Dhaka: The death toll from a tornado that swept through some 25 villages in eastern Bangladesh, rose to 23 with rescuers finding three more bodies in debris, a day after the deadly storm which also left nearly 500 people injured.

The storm which hit the area on Friday, left a trail of destruction in 20 villages of Brahmanbaria sadar, Bijoynagar and Akhaura upazilas.

- See more at: http://post.jagran.com/tornado-kills-20-injures-over-1364009803#sthash.qOLzQaxr.dpuf
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« Reply #276 on: March 30, 2013, 10:37:35 am »

http://weather.yahoo.com/storm-became-big-enough-span-atlantic-165848194.html
How a Storm Became Big Enough to Span the Atlantic
3/29/13

There is currently a massive storm churning over the Atlantic that spans the entire ocean basin, stretching all the way from Canada to Europe, and from Greenland to the Caribbean.

It's the same weather system that brought a massive spring blizzard to much of the United States and Canada earlier this week (on Tuesday (March 26), 44 of 50 states had some snow on the ground), and which has now ballooned in size, according to Jason Samenow, chief meteorologist with the Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang.

Robert Oszajca, lead forecaster for the National Weather Service's Ocean Prediction Center, explained that the storm got this big by merging with several low-pressure systems that were hanging out over the Atlantic Ocean. The merging weather systems gave it more power, which was accentuated by a gradient between warm moisture from the southeast, delivered by the Gulf Stream, and frigid air from the north. This intensified the storm, causing it to spin, elongate and grow in size, Oszajca told OurAmazingPlanet.

Normally, the system would have drifted into Europe several days ago. However, a high-pressure system over Greenland blocked the low-pressure system's advance, which allowed it to strengthen further, fed by cold air from the north. This created winds (which move from high pressure to low pressure) up to 75 mph (120 km/h), equivalent to a Category 1 hurricane, Oszajca said.

"We're impressed with the size of this storm," he said. Nevertheless, storms this big form about once or twice every winter.

The storm, which looks like a large comma whose tail stretches into the Caribbean, ranges from Eastern Canada all the way to Spain and north to Greenland. It has created waves up to 42 feet (13 meters) high, Oszajca said.

The storm has already begun to weaken, however, as the high-pressure "blocking" system to the north has eased. Oszajca said the central low-pressure system that has powered the storm will soon break up into several separate centers, and the storm will fragment before hitting Portugal in about four days. The storm isn't expected to be very intense by the time it reaches Europe, he added.

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« Reply #277 on: April 04, 2013, 06:34:57 pm »

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/major-storm-potential-next-week-for-west-plains/9383056
4/3/13
Major Storm Potential Next Week for Plains, West

A major storm is likely to impact a million square miles over the Plains and West with areas of rain, snow and severe weather next week.

As a large storm begins to spread rain across the South this week, a new and even larger storm is forecast to impact parts of the West beginning this weekend and continuing into the middle of next week with significant moisture for some very needy areas.

The pattern of chilly air in parts of the East and warmth in the West is about to flip long enough to allow a large storm to roll in from the Pacific with moisture and potentially tap Gulf of Mexico moisture.

The storm would begin to gather moisture and strength over the weekend and would reach its peak during the first part of next week.

In addition to impacting the Northwest, areas of low-elevation rain and high-elevation snow could reach building drought areas of Wyoming, Colorado, southern Montana, Utah, Nevada and southern Idaho.



There is the potential that drenching rain could even reach across parts of big drought areas of Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas next week.

Like many storms in the West, the greatly diverse terrain will play a role on enhancing the precipitation in some areas and diminishing it in others.



Where winds are blowing uphill and Gulf of Mexico moisture gets involved, such as the eastern slopes of the Rockies and parts of the High Plains, there is the potential for an inch of rain or more.

Enough cold air could arrive on the scene to make for a heavy snowfall instead of rain over portions of the Plains of Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle as well as the Black Hills area.
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« Reply #278 on: April 08, 2013, 01:40:54 pm »

4/8/13
Tornadoes, hail and high winds target the Plains
http://local.msn.com/tornadoes-hail-and-high-winds-target-the-plains-3

The curtain will open Monday for a dangerous, multi-day severe thunderstorm outbreak across the nation as a major storm system emerges from the Rockies.

A few storms on Sunday across Kansas already brought hail up to the size of golfballs near Wichita. There was even a weak, rope-shaped tornado that damaged a barn and radio tower near Paradise.

Unfortunately, Sunday's severe storms were just a taste of what is to come this week.

Instead of cooler and drier air replacing Sunday's violent weather, the stage has become set for several widespread rounds of potentially damaging thunderstorms to erupt Monday afternoon, and continue pushing slowly eastward each day though midweek.

On Monday afternoon, AccuWeather.com meteorologists are especially concerned for numerous severe thunderstorms, including a few tornadoes, to target places in and around northwestern Kansas -- home to the communities of Goodland and Colby.

A few violent thunderstorms are also expected to erupt eastward to Omaha, Neb., and just north of Kansas City, Mo., and southward across Altus, Okla., and Junction, Texas.

The severe thunderstorms that erupt Monday afternoon should shift to northern Missouri, southern Iowa and central Kansas at night, but will diminish after Monday evening across western Oklahoma and north-central Texas.

The caboose of this multi-day severe weather danger for the central and southern Plains will come on Tuesday, and could lead to one of the worst severe weather outbreaks so far this season.

Tuesday's outbreak will commence from far southeastern Nebraska and central Kansas to north-central Texas in the afternoon.

Severe thunderstorms will then increase in coverage through Tuesday night as the danger zone expands across more of central Texas, eastern Oklahoma, eastern Kansas, western Arkansas and western Missouri.

"Cities that could be hit by dangerous and damaging weather conditions during Tuesday [also spanning the overnight hours] include Dallas/Fort Worth, Oklahoma City and Wichita, Kan.," stated AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski when he warned of the danger last week.

Springfield and Joplin, Mo., and Tulsa, Okla., are among the other cities in harm's way.

Thunderstorms on Tuesday could bring strong tornadoes, hail as large as baseballs, and wind gusts as high as 60 or 70 mph.

On Wednesday, the severe weather danger will focus on places from St. Louis and Cape Girardeau, Mo., to Tyler and Houston, Texas.

Residents throughout the central and southern Plains should continue to check back with AccuWeather.com for the latest updates on the impending violent and dangerous weather.

Those living in places where the severe weather, including the danger of tornadoes, will occur at night should figure out a plan of how to avoid sleeping through potentially life-saving warnings.
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« Reply #279 on: April 08, 2013, 02:59:15 pm »

REALLY windy here! Most of the state is quite breezy today. Grin
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« Reply #280 on: April 10, 2013, 05:31:07 am »

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« Reply #281 on: April 10, 2013, 08:58:47 pm »

It's been VERY cold here in North Texas today - which probably explains why the streets in Oklahoma(which is only a 2-3 hour drive from NT) is ice coated.

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/10/17683528-storm-system-to-bring-more-snow-from-south-dakota-to-minnesota?lite=
4/10/13
Storm system to bring more snow from South Dakota to Minnesota

A vast storm system Wednesday night may bring snow from eastern South Dakota into northeast Nebraska, northwest Iowa, and central and southern Minnesota, to include the Twin Cities, The Weather Channel reported. Four to eight inches of snow could fall Wednesday night alone in the Sioux Falls to Minneapolis corridor.

Light snow could reach as far east as northern Wisconsin, The Weather Channel reported.

Farther east, in upstate New York, Buffalo could see a brief period of freezing rain Thursday morning.

Earlier Wednesday, the storm pounded the Dakotas with snow, coated Oklahoma with rare spring ice and took aim at parts of the Mid-Atlantic and South.

Snow, freezing rain and strong winds snapped trees, broke power poles and left cars sheathed in ice in South Dakota, and the city of Sioux Falls declared a state of emergency.

Farther south — and much more unusually — ice coated roads in Oklahoma, all the way down to the Red River border with Texas.

“For April, that is really amazing,” said Tom Niziol, a meteorologist and winter weather expert for The Weather Channel.

It all made for a messy day of travel in the Great Plains and the Midwest. Chicago O’Hare, a hub airport for the central United States, reported almost 500 flight cancellations.

As the storm system lumbers eastward, powerful thunderstorms are expected later Wednesday and overnight in Pennsylvania and Maryland, including Philadelphia and its suburbs.

It has been unusually cold this week in the West and unseasonably warm in the East, including temperatures pushing 90 degrees Wednesday in Washington. That warm air makes the weather system more dangerous.

“There will be more than enough fuel for these storms,” said Carl Parker, another meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

A line of late-day storms was expected to sweep across Arkansas on Wednesday afternoon, threatening to dump damaging hail and perhaps spawn tornadoes before pushing out of the state in the evening.

The same storm system has already produced bizarre weather elsewhere in the country.

Earlier this week, the temperature fell 55 degrees in Denver in less than 24 hours. Gusty wind nudged 21 cars of a freight train off the tracks in Nebraska. And snowflakes the size of cotton balls fall in Marshall, Minn., NBC affiliate KARE in Minneapolis reported.
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« Reply #282 on: April 11, 2013, 10:58:52 am »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/11/17699889-homes-leveled-as-storms-rip-through-missouri-arkansas?lite=
4/11/13
Homes leveled as storms rip through Missouri, Arkansas

A forceful storm system whipped tornadoes and severe thunderstorms across Missouri and Arkansas late Wednesday, wrecking homes, downing power lines and injuring multiple people in both states.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency as the severe storm system that he said included tornadoes walloped suburbs west and southwest of St. Louis. He planned to tour affected areas Thursday.

"This was a strong system of storms that caused damage to communities in several areas of our state," Nixon said in a statement. "We will continue to work closely with local officials to assess damages and provide any needed assistance."

While authorities in Arkansas could not confirm that any tornadoes struck their state, three homes were destroyed and more than 50 damaged along with a church, according to Tommy Jackson, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Emergency management. An unknown number of people were trapped inside their home when a tree fell on it in the southeast county of Lincoln, Jackson said.

The National Weather Service announced it would send response teams to survey an area near Clinton, Ark., to determine whether one or more tornadoes had touched down.

Van Buren County, in the central north of the state, was reportedly among the hardest hit as the storm swept over Arkansas. More than 30 homes were damaged, six were destroyed, and a fire department was heavily damaged, according to county judge Roger Hooper. Four people were treated for non-life threatening injuries.

The Weather Channel received four reports of tornadoes in Van Buren County, all of them within 24 minutes, said meteorologist Kevin Roth – which could mean that one tornado was reported multiple times in the county.

The storm made a plaything of an 18-wheeler in Botkinburg, Ark., tossing the truck and causing damage to a house, Roth said.

About 24,000 customers were without power in Missouri on Thursday morning and close to 1,000 more were in the dark in Arkansas, according to utility firms.

The storms popped up as a cold front clashed with the warm, humid southern climate, causing a more than 40-degree temperature difference in some parts of the state, according to weather.com.

The threat of strong winds, hail, and possible tornadoes moved east into the Ohio Valley and southeastern states, forecasters reported before sunrise on Thursday, with the possibility for storms stretching in a wide swath from Indiana to Georgia during the day.

Other parts of the country, including South Dakota and Minnesota, were punched with a mix of snow and ice, and Gov. Mark Dayton called out the National Guard on Wednesday to help ice-bound Minnesotans. Freezing rain and ice yanked down power lines and tree limbs in southeastern Minnesota, with more foul weather and up to a threat of snow on Thursday.

Minneapolis could get up to 10 inches of snow as the storm moves east, with up to a foot predicted for parts of Wisconsin and Michigan. The late wintry weather could make a final pass over northern New York and New England before it finally eases out over the Atlantic on Friday.
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« Reply #283 on: April 12, 2013, 09:22:33 am »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/12/17719227-strong-storms-march-toward-east-coast-after-killing-3-and-tearing-apart-homes?lite
4/12/13
Strong storms march toward East Coast after killing 3 and tearing apart homes

A vast storm system that spawned tornadoes and killed three people marched toward the East Coast on Friday, delivering spring snow and ice to New England and promising to drench some of the country’s most populous cities.

On Thursday, storms tore through the Great Plains, Midwest and South. Tornadoes were reported in Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi, and tens of thousands of people were left without power.

Storms blew the steeple off a church and killed someone in Mississippi, and a utility worker was electrocuted repairing damage in Missouri. Earlier in the week, a Nebraska woman died trying to trudge through a vicious snowstorm from her car to her home.

In Shuqualak, Miss., Kathy Coleman said she was outside her home Thursday, signing for a delivery of dialysis medication, when the storm hit. The deliveryman rushed her into the house, and the two of them huddled with the housekeeper in the bathroom.

“All I could hear was trees breaking and falling and glass,” she said. “He started praying and I started praying. Thank God he was here.”

Umbrellas bloomed at the Masters golf tournament in Georgia, and elsewhere in the state roofs were ripped off buildings and wrapped around trees like pieces of paper, one witness said.

In Rome, Ga., a wooden beam shot through a house 3 feet from where Tim Crouch was standing.

“I’m lucky,” he said. “I’m sure there are some folks out there who can’t go back to their home.”

On Friday, the system still had remarkable reach — bending from the Canadian border in snowy North Dakota through the Great Lakes and punishing the East Coast with storms all the way to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Tornado watches were in effect in eastern Virginia and North Carolina. Parts of New Hampshire were expected to get 3 to 5 inches of snow, according to meteorologists for The Weather Channel. New York City, Boston and Washington were expecting heavy rain.

Forecasters said a similar storm pattern was taking shape for next week, probably Tuesday through Thursday, packing both snow and severe thunderstorms as it plows east.

The Rockies, parts of the Plains and Upper Midwest could get snow again, The Weather Channel said, and severe storms could rip through the southern Plains and the Mississippi Valley.
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« Reply #284 on: April 18, 2013, 07:40:59 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/storm-woes-range-sinkhole-snow-twisters-140808526.html
4/18/13
Storm woes range from sinkhole to snow to twisters

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Middle America was overwhelmed by weather Thursday, with snow in the north, tornadoes in the Plains, and torrential rains that caused floods and transportation woes — and a sinkhole in Chicago.

Seemingly every community in the Plains and Midwest was under some sort of watch or warning. Up to a foot of snow was expected in parts of Minnesota and the Dakotas. Snow and ice closed highways in Colorado. Rivers were surging beyond their banks from downpours in Missouri, Iowa and Illinois. Tornadoes caused scattered damage in Oklahoma. Frost warnings were in effect in Kansas and Oklahoma as a cold front pushed out warmer air.

"It's a classic spring storm in many ways," Mark Fuchs of the National Weather Service said. "There's a wide variety of weather, a big temperature difference."

Consider St. Louis. On Wednesday the temperature reached 85 degrees. Strong storms passed through on Thursday, and by Friday, the temperature is forecast to be around 40 degrees.

There were no immediate reports of deaths related to the vast array of foul weather around the country.

Chicago was pummeled by an all-night rainstorm that ripped open a sinkhole large enough to swallow three cars and injuring one driver badly enough that he had to be hospitalized. Police spokesman Mike Sullivan said the gaping hole opened up in a street on the city's South Side, near Lake Michigan.

The injured man was driving when the road buckled and caved in. He was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries. The other two cars were parked.

Flooding has also forced authorities to close sections of several major expressways around Chicago, canceled classes at some schools and scrapped around 550 flights at O'Hare International Airport. The gauge at O'Hare showed 5 inches of rain, and 2 more inches were expected Thursday.

Winds, possibly from a tornado, damaged dozens of homes in Spavinaw, Okla., injuring one person. Another twister damaged a few buildings near Paris, Mo. High winds also blew two tractor-trailers off a highway near Monroe City, Mo.

Up to a foot of new snow was expected in northern Minnesota. Duluth has already received 24 inches of snow this month, and the additional snowfall could push it past the April record of 31.6 inches set in 1950. Winter storm warnings were also posted for parts of North Dakota and South Dakota.

Snow and ice forced closure of sections of Interstate 70 and Interstate 25 in Colorado. The Wyoming Department of Transportation warned drivers to watch for black ice.

Flash flooding was reported in many places. In north-central Illinois, fire departments and rescue crews helped stranded motorists and residents. In Utica, the fire department evacuated a mobile home park. In Marshall County, boats were needed to rescue morning commuters trapped in flash flooding.

In Ava, Mo., a school bus carrying several children stopped because of water on the road. The driver turned around to go back, only to find flooding behind him, too. The driver and kids waited at a nearby home until help arrived. Outside the small town, an elderly couple was rescued from their mobile home after a fast-rising creek encircled the trailer.

"There were places around here this morning that like in 45 minutes got 3 inches of rain," Douglas County Sheriff Chris Degase said.

Roads in Oklahoma, Iowa and Michigan were shut down because of flash flooding.

Several rivers were lapping over their banks, including the biggest one, the Mississippi. In Hannibal, Mo., the flood gates were installed in open sections of the levee that protects the Mark Twain sites and the rest of downtown. Emergency management director John Hark said he was in "full flood fight" mode
.

The river was expected to climb nearly 10 feet above flood stage by the middle of next week several spots north of St. Louis, including tiny Clarksville, Mo.

Many of the town's 442 residents were filling sandbags Thursday as floodwaters began rising toward the unprotected downtown. City Clerk Jennifer Calvin said the Federal Emergency Management Agency was bringing in 500,000 additional sandbags, the effort speeding up because the crest of the flood is expected over the weekend.

"This is a short time frame we have to prepare for it," Calvin said. "That doesn't make it any easier."

Strong storms rolled through the St. Louis area during the morning rush Thursday, snarling traffic with water over several roadways. Winds up to 60 mph caused scattered damage.

In Chicago, the storm-swollen Chicago River was being allowed to flow into Lake Michigan, in part to relieve sewer backups downtown and in neighborhoods. The river was diverted away from the lake more than a century ago to keep pollution out of the lake, the source of the city's drinking water. Meanwhile, workers were furiously filling sandbags and putting up barricades along the north branch of the Chicago River in the Albany Park neighborhood.

Making flood concerns even worse: Forecasters are calling for the heavy rain to continue in many places into Friday morning.
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« Reply #285 on: April 19, 2013, 12:04:04 pm »

Floodwaters rising after storms deluge heartland
4/19/13
http://news.yahoo.com/floodwaters-rising-storms-deluge-heartland-072052919.html

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Mississippi River quickened its ominous rise on Friday after parts of the Midwest were soaked by heavy rains this week, with some towns hurriedly building sandbag levees to protect homes and businesses. Several communities in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri could see near-record flooding this weekend — a sharp contrast to just two months ago when the river was at near-record lows. In central Illinois, a flood-swollen river topped a levee and prompted authorities to evacuate about half of a small town. The Mississippi was among many rivers lapping over the banks in those states and central Indiana, where heavy overnight rains also flooded rivers, streams and streets, driving some people from their homes and prompting school districts to cancel or delay the start of classes.

In Missouri, most of the 442 residents in Clarksville have pitched in on a furious effort to build a makeshift levee of gravel, plastic overlay and sandbags, trying to keep the murky Mississippi from inundating the handful of downtown businesses. "This just shocked us all because it just came up so quickly," alderwoman Sue Lindemann said. "We found out about the crest prediction Wednesday and we started sandbagging that night. It's going to be touch and go but we're hoping." Volunteers worked into the night to stack sandbags against rising floodwaters and evacuate people in the path, or rescue those already in danger. National Weather Service hydrologist Mark Fuchs said the swiftness of the rise has been stunning.

"To go from below flood stage to close to 10 feet above is unusual," he said. "Pretty amazing. It's just been skyrocketing." In Quincy, Ill., the Mississippi jumped nearly 10 feet in 36 hours. By the time it crests Sunday at 11 feet above flood stage, a bridge over the river may have to be shut down and the sewage plant for the community of 40,000 residents could be threatened. The torrential rains caused widespread flash-flooding, too. An 80-year-old woman died in De Soto, Mo., about 40 miles southwest of St. Louis, when a normally docile creek flooded a street and swept away her car. About 50 residents had to be rescued by boat in a low-lying area of town, said De Soto City Manager Dave Dews.

Some of the worst flooding was in the Chicago area, where up to 7 inches fell within 24 hours Wednesday night and Thursday. A massive sinkhole opened and swallowed two parked cars and one that was driving through. The driver was hospitalized but was expected to survive. In suburban Chicago, Nick Ariano helped rescue a friend's grandmother, who became trapped in a home filling with water after a branch of the flooding DuPage River spilled over its levee. Ariano, his friend and another man raced to a sporting goods store to buy inflatable rafts, then paddled out to the home and got Mille Andrzejewski, in her mid-80s, to safety. The three friends got some enjoyment out of the raft ride, despite the eeriness of floating over submerged cars and mailboxes. "As kids growing up, we used to raft down the river," Ariano said with a laugh.

About 60 miles southwest of Chicago, a Grundy County hospital evacuated 47 patients after a nearby creek and the Illinois River rose and water crept into the basement, spokeswoman Janet Long said. National Weather Service hydrologists are projecting flooding along several smaller rivers in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri. The Illinois River — a major tributary of the Mississippi — will have major flooding for the next week to 10 days, as will the Rock River in western Illinois. Meanwhile, the Mississippi and Missouri rivers were already at flood stage and rising fast. Buyouts since the 1993 flood, flood walls and reinforced flood levees have gone a long way to limiting damage from Mississippi River flooding. Still, tens of thousands of acres of farmland are under water, several roads are closed, and town sewer systems are threatened if water gets high enough.

The National Weather Service in Indianapolis issued a flood warning for Tippecanoe County and part of Carroll County because of rising waters from the Wabash River following heavy rain on Thursday. Parts of Michigan got up to 4 inches of rain through Friday morning, causing flooding along the Grand River in Grand Rapids, the Saginaw River in eastern Michigan, and the Pine River at Alma. The one silver lining in all the rain: The drought that had the Mississippi dangerously low throughout the winter is all but over in some of the major crop-growing states, including Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota and Wisconsin, according to a weekly drought monitor. Small portions of Nebraska also saw improvement. Now farmers are hoping for a dry spell to allow them to get into the fields for spring planting.
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« Reply #286 on: April 21, 2013, 09:23:01 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/crests-approaching-several-towns-midwest-070600592.html
Crests approaching in several towns in Midwest
4/21/13

CLARKSVILLE, Mo. (AP) — An all-too-familiar springtime ritual played out around the nation's heartland this weekend as volunteers, National Guardsmen and even prison inmates joined together in an effort to ward off fast-rising floodwaters.

Dangerously high waters dotted at least six Midwestern states following torrential rains this past week that dumped up to 7 inches in some locations. Record flooding was possible in some places as dozens of rivers overflowed their banks.

The water levels forced evacuations, closed roads, swamped hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland and shut down much of the upper Mississippi River to barge traffic. Even two Mississippi River bridges were closed. Several Mississippi River towns north of St. Louis were expected to see crests sometime Sunday, including Clarksville, Mo.

Volunteers in the tiny community have worked endlessly since Wednesday to build a makeshift sandbag levee that seemed to be holding as the crest— expected to be 11 feet above flood stage — approached. Even prisoners from far-away Jefferson City were brought in to help.

After four 12-hour days of sandbagging, Trish Connelly, 57, was exhausted but optimistic the town would beat back the river. Her plan to open a new fine arts gallery downtown this weekend were on hold "until we know what the river is going to do," she said.

"This is frustrating for people," Connelly said. "This isn't as bad as 2008, but thank God it stopped raining."

Gov. Jay Nixon on Saturday toured the unprotected-by-choice town that was also flooded in 2008, 2001, 1998, 1995 and many times before that.

"The water is continuing to rise but it is our full hope and expectation that these walls will hold," Nixon said of the sandbag levees. Clarksville has a flood protection system in which a temporary levee — aluminum slats filled with sand — can be built if the river rises, but the Mississippi was too quick this time.

Mississippi River levels vary greatly but are typically highest in the spring, so minor flooding is not uncommon. But when river levels exceed flood stage by several feet, serious problems can occur.

Travel was at a standstill on most of the Mississippi between the Quad Cities and St. Louis. The Army Corps of Engineers closed several locks, halting barge traffic. Recreational traffic was halted, too, including the Mark Twain Riverboat that offers excursions at scenic Hannibal, Mo. Owner and pilot Steve Terry has moored the ship since Thursday, with no end in sight.

Even crossing the river was difficult. One of two bridges at Quincy, Ill., closed Friday, and the narrow two-lane bridge at the Missouri town of Louisiana was shut down Saturday. To get across, people in the Louisiana, Mo., area either had to drive 35 miles north to Hannibal, Mo., or 50-plus miles south to suburban St. Louis.

Penny Scranton's normal 13-minute commute from Rockport, Ill., to the BP convenience store in Louisiana turned into an hour and a half.

"There are others worse off," she shrugged.

Among those worse off was Louisiana resident Erica Campbell, whose rented home in a low-lying area of town was flooded for the second time in three years. She's had enough. Campbell, her husband and their eight kids are packing up.

"We're planning to move to the country — as far away from water as I can get," Campbell, 35, said.

Smaller rivers across the Midwest were swelling, too. In Illinois, heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar will shut down its East Peoria, Ill., factory Sunday as the Illinois River approaches an expected 30-foot crest early next week.

Several Indiana towns were threatened by high water, forcing hundreds of evacuations. The Wabash River in Tippecanoe County reached more than 14 feet above flood stage on Saturday, the highest level since 1958. Indiana Gov. Mitch Pence took a helicopter tour Saturday of damage in Kokomo, Tipton and Elwood.

The mayor of Grand Rapids, Mich., declared a state of emergency Saturday, the same day high water forced the evacuation of the Courtyard Marriott Hotel and an apartment building.
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« Reply #287 on: April 21, 2013, 11:22:58 pm »

http://local.msn.com/rivers-crest-across-midwest-but-rain-in-forecast
4/21/13
Rivers crest across Midwest, but rain in forecast

CLARKSVILLE, Mo. (AP) -- Those fighting floods in several communities along the Mississippi River were mostly successful Sunday despite the onslaught of water, but an ominous forecast and the growing accumulation of snow in the upper Midwest tempered any feelings of victory.

The surging Mississippi was at or near crest at several places from the Quad Cities south to near St. Louis -- some reaching 10-12 feet above flood stage. Problems were plentiful: Hundreds of thousands of acres of swamped farmland as planting season approaches; three people died; roads and bridges closed, including sections of major highways like U.S. 61 in Iowa and Missouri and crossings at Quincy, Ill., and Louisiana, Mo.the M

The U.S. Coast Guard said 114 barges broke loose near St. Louis on Saturday night, and four hit the Jefferson Barracks Bridge in St. Louis County. The bridge was closed about six hours for inspection but reopened around 8 a.m. Sunday. Most of the runaway barges were corralled but at least 10 sank and two others were unaccounted for, Coast Guard Lt. Colin Fogarty said.

Two of the confirmed flood-related deaths occurred near the same spot in Indiana; another was in Missouri. In all three cases, vehicles were swept off the road in flash floods. High water could be responsible for two more, both in Illinois, where a decomposed body was found Thursday in an Oak Brook creek and a body was found Saturday in the Mississippi River at Cora. Investigations continue.

And the danger is far from over, as spots south of St. Louis aren't expected to crest until late this week. Significant flooding is possible in places like Ste. Genevieve, Mo., Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Cairo, Ill.

Adding to concern is a forecast that calls for heavy rain Monday night and Tuesday throughout much of the Midwest. National Weather Service meteorologist Julie Phillipson said an inch of rain is likely in many places, some places even more. Rain is projected from Wisconsin through Missouri.

"That's not what we want to see when we have this kind of flooding, that's for sure," Phillipson said.

Harley-Davidson riders and bicyclists zipped through Grafton, Ill., a tourist town 40 miles north of St. Louis, many pausing to snap pictures of the swollen river.

Floodwaters were lapping against the side of Grafton's Artisan Village, a flea market-type business for artists. Owner Marty Harp, 53, sipped a Miller Lite as he cast a wary eye to the sky.

"If we can hold off the crest and it doesn't rain for a couple of days, it'll be OK," Harp said.

But anxiety looms regarding the heavy snow the northern Midwest has received this month and what happens when it melts and makes its way into tributaries of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Forecasters said up to 6 inches of new snow was possible in the Black Hills area of South Dakota through Monday morning.

Hundreds of miles to the southeast, in La Grange, Mo., Lewis County emergency management director David Keith wasn't bothered by the soggy forecast. Sandbags were holding back the murky Mississippi from La Grange City Hall, a bank and a handful of threatened homes. The water was receding.

"What we're worried about now is all that snow melt in North and South Dakota and Minnesota," Keith said.

AccuWeather meteorologist Alan Reppert said the timing of the snow melt could prove lucky: It may stay cold long enough up north to make for a gradual melt, giving the rivers time to thin out. Of greater concern, he said, is the Red River in North Dakota, which could see significant flooding in the coming weeks.

Along the Mississippi, a handful of river towns are most affected by the high waters -- places like Clarksville, Mo., and Grafton that have chosen against flood walls or levees.

By Sunday, sandbagging had all but stopped in Clarksville, evidence of the confidence that the makeshift sandbag levee hurriedly erected to protect downtown would hold. Volunteers, including nearly three dozen prison inmates, worked since Wednesday, using 6,000 tons of sand and gravel.

The river was at 34.7 feet Sunday, nearly 10 feet above the 25-foot flood stage -- a somewhat arbitrary term the NWS defines as the point when "water surface level begins to create a hazard to lives, property or commerce" -- and expected to rise another foot before cresting Monday.

"We believe we'll have a successful conclusion," said Jo Anne Smiley, longtime mayor of the 442-resident hamlet.

Richard Cottrell, a 64-year-old antique shop owner, was hopeful, but nervous. After two days of endless sandbagging, Cottrell thought he could rest Saturday night, but the constant beeping of heavy equipment outside and flood worries kept him up.

"I had a rough night last night. I had an anxiety attack," he admitted
.

Many towns on smaller rivers in other states were dealing with floodwaters, too.

In Grand Rapids, Mich., Mayor George Heartwell declared a state of emergency as the flooding Grand River poured into the basements of several hotels and other downtown buildings.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn declared at least 41 counties disaster areas from flooding. The Fox River in northern Illinois reached record levels, and several record crests were possible along the Illinois River.

Indiana officials were still determining whether flooded communities like Kokomo, Tipton and Elwood will be eligible for disaster aid.
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« Reply #288 on: April 22, 2013, 11:42:39 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/more-rain-snow-could-lead-more-flooding-082906026.html
More rain, snow could lead to more flooding
4/22/13

GRAFTON, Ill. (AP) — The Mississippi River started its slow decline at some problematic spots Monday, but the spring flood is far from over. The Mississippi and countless other Midwestern rivers were still significantly above flood stage, spurred by heavy rain last week. Levee breaks caused problems in Indiana, and floodwaters flirted with the Michigan State University campus. Flooding is blamed in three deaths and could be responsible for two more. A woman last seen stranded along a flooded bridge was missing in Illinois, and a boy was in critical condition after being pulled from a river in Missouri. The Mississippi River was at or near crest at several places Sunday between the Quad Cities and near St. Louis. Some towns in the approximate 100-mile stretch of river from Quincy, Ill., to Grafton, Ill., reached 10-12 feet above flood stage. Adding to concern is the forecast of an inch of rain Monday night into Tuesday over much of the Midwest. National Weather Service hydrologist Mark Fuchs said the new rain could bump up the Mississippi River up to a foot from Clarksville, Mo., to points south.

"The level of concern is high," Fuchs said. "It does look like we're going to see a bit of a bump up from this rainfall event." The current flooding is bad enough. In scenic Grafton, a small tourist town 40 miles north of St. Louis, floodwater 3 inches deep seeped into the basement of Pam and Dennis Bick's home where they've lived for four decades. "We have time to figure out what to do, where we would go and where we would put everything," Pam Bick, 57, said. "I don't want it to come up any more. But I can't stop it." Spots south of St. Louis aren't expected to crest until late this week, and significant flooding is possible in places like Ste. Genevieve, Mo., Cape Girardeau, Mo., and Cairo, Ill. To the north, the snow hasn't stopped in Minnesota and the Dakotas, and flood watchers along both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers know once that snow — record levels in some cases — melts, a lot of it ends up in the big rivers. But AccuWeather meteorologist Alan Reppert said the timing of the snow melt could be fortuitous: It may stay cold long enough to the north to make for a gradual melt that occurs after the current flood level goes down.Of greater concern, he said, is the Red River in North Dakota, which could see significant flooding in the coming weeks. Sandbagging was beginning this week in Fargo and Cass County to prepare for possibly record amounts of high water.

Sandbagging had all but stopped in Clarksville, Mo., on Sunday, evidence of the confidence in the makeshift sandbag levee hurriedly erected to protect downtown. The river was expected to rise to 11 feet above flood stage — a somewhat arbitrary term the National Weather Service defines as the point when "water surface level begins to create a hazard to lives, property or commerce" — before cresting Monday. "We believe we'll have a successful conclusion," said Jo Anne Smiley, longtime mayor of the 442-resident hamlet. Authorities in LaSalle, Ill., were searching for a missing woman after her van was found near the Shippingsport Bridge over the flooded Illinois River. A pilot alerted authorities Friday after seeing a person stranded near a van in water near the bridge. In Leadwood, Mo., about 65 miles south of St. Louis, a 12-year-old boy was swept into the flooding Big River as he tried to walk across a flooded bridge. Robert Salsberry jumped in to save him. "I chased him down the river and he was just floating lifelessly," Salsberry told the Park Hills Daily Journal. "I dragged him to a little island inside the river and I gave him CPR. His face was all blue, and I gave him CPR and brought him back to life."

Two Wabash River levees failed in southwestern Indiana. A breach about 3 a.m. Monday near Prairieton, Ind., flooded farmland. About two dozen homes were high enough to stay out of the water but became reachable only by boat. The other levee failure, in Dresser, near Terre Haute, pushed water into the basements of a few homes. In Michigan, the Grand River crested Sunday night at Grand Rapids, topping the old record by more than 2 feet. Several downtown buildings, including hotels and apartments, were affected. At East Lansing, Mich., the Red Cedar River flooded parts of the Michigan State University campus, leaving some athletic fields waterlogged.
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« Reply #289 on: April 23, 2013, 01:22:53 pm »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/23/17874908-deadly-river-floods-set-to-continue-through-weekend-storm-dumps-snow-on-central-us?lite=
4/23/13
Deadly river floods set to continue through weekend, storm dumps snow on central US

Rivers including the Mississippi and Illinois are expected to remain in “major flood stage” through this weekend, the National Weather Service warned as rain and snow continued to fall on much of the central U.S. Tuesday.

A number of flood warnings were in place as ongoing rain and runoff from last week’s intense downpours continued to keep the water levels high in rivers across Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Indiana and Michigan in particular, the NWS added.

“The larger rivers, such as the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, will take longer to recede and will remain in major flood stage through this weekend,” the weather service said.

“Do not drive through flowing water. Nearly half of all flood fatalities are vehicle related. As little as 6 inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Two feet of water will carry most vehicles away,” it added in a flood warning for several rivers in Missouri.

More snow
There were some heavy snowfalls overnight in parts of the central U.S. and snow was continuing to fall Tuesday morning but was expected to gradually diminish, the weather service said.

The worst-affected area was expected to be the foothills and eastern slopes of the Front Range Mountains, which could see up to 16 inches.

Duluth, Minn., has this month seen a record total of 50.2 inches for any month of the year, weather.com said. The figures go back to 1870.

The weather service warned that in areas where the snow was wet, travel would be “especially hazardous."

Rain and floods
There was also a risk of severe storms from the Ohio Valley to the lower Mississippi Valley, weather.com said on Tuesday, with “localized damaging winds and large hail.”

The floods have been blamed for at least five deaths since Thursday and have also forced evacuations, swamped homes and shut down bridges.

Barge traffic on the Mississippi was brought to a near standstill. On Sunday at least one sank and others ran aground or were half-submerged because of the floods.

States of emergency have been declared in Missouri and Illinois.

In Grafton, Ill. -- about 40 miles northeast of St. Louis -- Mayor Tom Thompson said his small community along the Mississippi River was managing, despite the water reaching 10 feet above flood stage by Monday afternoon.

"If it gets another foot (higher), it's going to become another issue," Thompson said, reported The Associated Press. Many businesses "are kinda watching and holding their breath. ... Some things are going to really be close to the wire."

Prison inmates were bused in to work alongside the National Guard and volunteers to build a floodwall of sand and gravel in Clarksville, Mo., but the barrier was showing signs of strain on Monday, according to The AP.

Areas south of St. Louis are not expected to crest until late this week.

Meanwhile, smaller rivers were causing big evacuations elsewhere. In Grand Rapids, Mich., the Grand River rose to a record 21.85 feet --  breaking 1985's record of 19.64 feet -- and driving hundreds of residents outs of their homes while flooding parts of downtown. Flood stage for the Grand River is 18 feet, according to Detroit's Lansing State Journal.

We have prepared for the worst,” Grand Rapids Mayor George Heartwell said, reported The Lansing State Journal.
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« Reply #290 on: April 24, 2013, 12:34:07 pm »

Flooding threatens already drenched Midwest, South
By Ed Payne, CNN
updated 12:39 PM EDT, Wed April 24, 2013

CNN) -- A powerful spring cold snap is bringing more rain and snow to a soggy U.S. heartland Wednesday, putting more pressure on riverside communities from the upper Midwest to the Deep South. The additional precipitation will further delay flooding recovery. The residents of Grafton, Illinois, north of St. Louis, will see the worst of the floodwater through Friday as the Mississippi River peaks at more than 11 feet above flood stage, the National Weather Service says. Many along the river's edge decided to evacuate, but Jerry Eller thought he would wait it out. "I've got water coming up through cracks in the floor, so I have about 3,000 gallons an hour of pumps running down the basement keeping water out, and that seems to be keeping it down to about an inch," Eller told CNN affiliate KPLR. Floodwater has ravaged dozens of counties in Illinois, forcing thousands of residents from their homes.

Widespread flooding

As rivers across the heartland swelled during the past two weeks, rising water was blamed for four deaths. Flooding threatens rivers in Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Indiana, North Dakota, Mississippi and Michigan, the National Weather Service said. The Mississippi River at St. Louis on Wednesday was above flood stage and expected to remain so through Sunday, the CNN weather team said. The Illinois River at Peoria was experiencing major flooding, which is expected to last through the weekend. Moderate flooding through the weekend is expected north of Chicago at the Des Plaines River. Along the Mississippi River, flood watches stretch as far south as Louisiana. Although flooding is expected along the river, experts don't expect the catastrophic levels of two years ago, when levees were breached. The flooding was so grave in 2011 that authorities purposely flooded thousands of square miles of Louisiana to spare city centers. Residents in North Dakota are bracing for flooding, too, along the Red River in Fargo. The city has begun a three-day push to truck sandbags into low-lying areas. Police cars are escorting the semitrailer trucks as they head to the locations, affiliate KVLY reported. Conditions could get worse. The additional rain could speed up the melting of snow, making the river rise even faster.

Volunteer help

In Clarksville, Missouri, some 500,000 sandbags and more than 8,000 tons of sand and rock are being used to keep most of the floodwater at bay. Mayor Jo Anne Smiley said the worst is over, but the city isn't out of the woods yet. Volunteers from around the area played a key role in protecting the town. "The only way this community in particular survives these kinds of events is volunteer help, because we've had more volunteers in town than we have people who live here," Smiley told affiliate KSDK. "And the people who live here are for the most part aged." Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency last week after many areas of the state were stricken by flash flooding. "The sustained periods of heavy rainfall (have) swollen creeks and streams and is pushing the Mississippi River over flood levels, endangering river communities," Nixon said. Record floodwater on the Rock River is dampening the mood at Rick Wyffels' Christmas tree farm in Moline, Illinois. "This is going to be bad," Wyffels told CNN affiliate WQAD. "This is the highest water I've ever seen down here." The Wyffels family has farmed along the Rock River for more than 60 years. About a quarter of his crop is under water. "We'll just have to wait and see whether these trees make it or not," he said. Back in July, it was a different story for Wyffels as the region was locked in a drought. He lost some 900 trees in the parched soil.

Deadly consequences

The rain and flooding caused three deaths last week and a fourth Sunday, local authorities reported. In DuPage County, Illinois, a body was found floating in Salt Creek last week, the local sheriff's office said. Authorities were working to identify it. A woman in De Soto, Missouri, drowned last week after her vehicle washed off a road, KSDK reported. Two fatalities were reported in Arcadia, Indiana. On Thursday, a 64-year-old man died after attempting to cross high water in his car. The water swept him off a roadway and dragged him downstream, the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office said.
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« Reply #291 on: April 24, 2013, 02:52:21 pm »

And don't they still have the "spring thaw" to deal with, seeing the cold temps are hanging on?

Whatever, some of these people need to get a clue and move out of flood zones, but no, greed keeps them coming back.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #292 on: April 25, 2013, 11:19:52 am »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/25/17908115-twister-leaves-two-mile-path-of-damage-near-new-orleans?lite=
4/25/13
Twister leaves two-mile path of damage near New Orleans

A tornado tore through the New Orleans area Wednesday, damaging homes and ripping trees out of the ground, as intense storms lashed the area with rain. The National Weather Service (NWS) said the twister was one of two that caused damage in Kenner, Louisiana, near New Orleans International Airport. No injuries were reported, according to the Times Picayune’s website NOLA.com, but about 5,000 Entergy Louisiana customers lost electrical service. The first tornado's path stretched two miles and 75 yards wide and packed winds of 75 mph. The second's path was a half a mile long and 50 yards wide and recorded winds of 90 mph. Residents posted pictures on social media of torn roofs, fallen trees and flash floods caused by torrential rains, weather.com reported.
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« Reply #293 on: April 28, 2013, 09:20:54 pm »

Israel's heat wave results in fires nationwide

Fire departments prepared for expected heat rush to fires in Rosh Ha'ayin, Ben Shemen Forest, Rishon Lezion, Haifa; residents in Rosh Ha'ayin instructed to stay indoors
4/27/13
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4372949,00.html

Fires broke out Saturday across Israel, as the result of a heat wave.

A fire broke out in Rosh Ha'ayin in an industrial compound. According to the firefighters, the structure in which the fire originated is in danger of collapsing. 20 firefighting teams have been called to the scene, and rescue forces instructed residents of the area to remain indoors.

Five teams of fire fighters were on the scene of a fire that broke out on Mount Sansan in the Elah Valley, south of Bet Shemesh. The Jerusalem Fire Department said that there was no danger to area settlements.

Three teams of firefighters are at the scene of a briar patch fire that broke out in Holon; they are attempting to extinguish the flames.

In Rishon Lezion, firefighters overcame two fires: one near the Volcani Institute of Agricultural Research and the second near the Superland amusement park. 

The cause of fire at the amusement park appeared to be the ignition of equipment that was in a container belonging to one of the park’s vendors.



Earlier Saturday, two tourists sustained burns in a fire at Ben Shemen Forest and were taken to Assaf Harofeh Medical Center for treatment.

Firefighters from the Ayalon station arrived at the scene and worked to extinguish the flames.



Firefighter planes were also called to the scene of a fire near Yavne'el in the north, even as firefighters were called to the scene of a briar patch fire in Haifa's Kababir neighborhood. Firefighters overcame the flames within a short time, and no injuries or damage were reported.

Three firefighting teams from the Haifa station were on the scene at Kababir, together with the shift commander.

Another fire erupted north of the Kinneret, near Moshav Almagor, where residents who live nearby were evacuated as a precaution, but police allowed them to return to their homes within the hour.   
 
Once firefighters overcame the fires in the north, Spokesman of the Upper Galilee and Golan Fire Department, Nathan Ben Shimon, said: "Things are looking better. Two additional teams arrived at the scene."

According to Shimon, dozens of dunams caught fire, and flames almost reached residential areas.

Fire departments have been prepared for fires nationwide, due to the expected heat wave, peaks of which were reported to have reached 37 degrees Celsius (98.6 Fahrenheit).

The nation is marking the holiday of Lag B'Omer Saturday evening, when bonfires are expected to be lit as part of the holiday tradition.
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« Reply #294 on: May 04, 2013, 12:01:59 pm »



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« Reply #295 on: May 06, 2013, 04:16:47 pm »

Lately, it seems like So. California hasn't been able to catch a break...

Rain Leaves Thousands Of LADWP, SoCal Edison Customers Without Power
May 6, 2013 11:18 AM

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — Thousands of Southland residents were without power Monday morning, primarily due to weather.

More than 11,000 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers and more than 5,000 Southern California Edison customers were powerless as of 9:45 a.m.

LADWP customers in Mar Vista, Palm, Venice, South Los Angeles, Rancho Park and Cheviot Hills were primarily affected.

SoCal Edison customers without power include those living in El Toro, Corona Del Mar, Hacienda Heights, West Covina, Valinda and Hawthorne.

Both companies are actively working on restoring power to all residents.

Anyone in need of more information, can visit the LADWP or SoCal Edison outage pages.
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« Reply #296 on: May 07, 2013, 11:16:24 am »

Super-storm in California - worse than "the big one" EQ?(VIDEO)
http://msnvideo.msn.com/?channelindex=4&from=en-us_msnhp#/video/df430c45-75c1-429c-b07f-cfbfcf4273eb
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« Reply #297 on: May 08, 2013, 02:59:04 pm »

Weather Extremes Flip-Flop in Denver
5/8/13
http://local.msn.com/WeatherArticle.aspx?cp-documentid=257672684

On April 29, Denver neared its record high for the date when it hit 80 degrees. By the next night, temperatures dove to 38 degrees. A snowstorm dumped 3.2 inches on the city through May 1.

This was not the first extreme jump for Denver this spring. April 7 and 8 brought temperatures in the 70s and 80s before plunging to 22 degrees and receiving almost a foot of snow. Temperatures then warmed into the 60s before more cold and an additional 7 inches of snow moved through for April 15 to the 17. More warm air settled into the city again, before 4 inches of snow accumulated on April 22 and 23.

Denver's location makes it no stranger to weather extremes.

"Springtime can be very volatile on the Front Range of the Rockies," said AccuWeather.com meteorologist Ken Clark.

Clark explained that westerly flows off the Rockies create warmth, but quick-moving cold fronts are able to send temperatures into a dive. Cold fronts from Canada are pushed off the east side of the Rockies and drain into the Denver area.

These drastic swings are common for Denver. Clark said that they will typically get the most snow in the late fall and early winter, then again in mid-spring rather than in the traditionally main winter months. However, despite the usual variations in weather, this year has been more extreme than most.

"It's been about 6.5 degrees below normal since April 1," Clark said. "Some days have been 20 degrees above average, but many others have been 20 degrees below average."


Low temperature records have been set this year on April 9, 10, 16, 22 and May 2. Clark cites an active storm track as the force behind the extremes. Moisture from the southeast is pulled into cold air coming down from Canada, creating conditions for snow.

It's not only snow and cold that Denver needs to look out for. Summer thunderstorms are also very common, and the area has high occurrences of hail.
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« Reply #298 on: May 08, 2013, 03:03:07 pm »

Flooding In Brooklyn: Torrential Downpours Brings Flash Flooding To Brooklyn And New York City Boroughs [PHOTOS]
5/8/13
http://www.ibtimes.com/flooding-brooklyn-torrential-downpours-brings-flash-flooding-brooklyn-new-york-city-boroughs-photos

Normally, a New Yorker's only worry about a rainy day is focusing on playing "Minesweeper" with the countless bottomless puddles throughout city streets. However, on May 8, heavy rain in the Northeast United States caused flash flooding in Brooklyn and parts of the New York metropolitan area. Staten Island Railway service was disrupted as well. Check out some of these photos from Twitter of all angles of the flooding in New York City.











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« Reply #299 on: May 08, 2013, 04:21:22 pm »

1  Ask ye of the LORD rain in the time of the latter rain; [so] the LORD shall make bright clouds, and give them showers of rain, to every one grass in the field.
2  For the idols have spoken vanity, and the diviners have seen a lie, and have told false dreams; they comfort in vain: therefore they went their way as a flock, they were troubled, because [there was] no shepherd.
Zechariah 10:1,2 (KJB)
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