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Crazy Weather Headlines!

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Kilika
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« Reply #390 on: August 16, 2013, 01:38:43 pm »

I can attest that the other side of that little dip in the jet stream is causing higher than average temperatures here in the southwest. We are just under 110 all this week and projected the same for next week.

"...thy will be done..."
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« Reply #391 on: August 23, 2013, 11:15:18 am »

http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/hail-flooding-knock-colorado-towns-154711336.html
Hail, Flooding Knock Out Colorado Towns
8/23/13

Heavy rain and hail, some golf ball-sized, combined to make it look like Christmas in August in Colorado.

Accumulations of up to two feet of hail in the Denver area Thursday evening left at least one car trapped and closed local streets until the county could get a snowplow out to the scene.

"The water just takes my car rushing up over the hood, and was like, 'Mom, I gotta go,'" Bryndon Jackson, whose car was totaled after filling with water and hail, told  ABC affiliate KMGH.

"I was forced to open the door and all the water came rushing in and I knew I had to get out of there quick," he said.

Four inches of rain feel in just over an hour, racing through neighborhoods and forcing the National Weather Service to issue a flash flood warning until 1 a.m.

In Colorado Springs, the fast-moving rain resulted in one car nearly being swallowed as its driver lost sight of the highway while trying to navigate through the storm.

"This is really bad. We've got to go through but...I don't know if I want to test my luck," the driver can be heard saying in a video posted on YouTube.  "Take it easy.  I can't see.  I can't see."

The Denver area will have a chance to recover today with only a 20 percent chance of thunderstorms forecast by the National Weather Service.

The West will be impacted, however, in the coming days by moisture from Tropical Storm Ivo now making its way through the Pacific.
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« Reply #392 on: August 24, 2013, 04:18:02 pm »

http://local.msn.com/colorado-hail-storm-turns-denver-into-dangerous-winter-wonderland
8/23/13
Colorado hail storm turns Denver into dangerous winter wonderland

A thunderstorm dumped heavy rain and hail the size of golf balls in the Denver area. Some areas saw hail accumulations of up to 2 feet.


Summer may be drawing to a close, but Colorado residents probably didn't expect it to happen quite so quickly. Heavy rain and golf ball-size hail made August look like the dead of winter in Denver, ABC News reports.

The hail accumulated up to 2 feet Thursday, trapping at least one car and closing several streets until they were cleared by Denver County snow removal equipment. Teenager Bryndon Jackson says he was on the phone with his mother when his car got stuck in the storm. He was forced to open a door after water began rushing up over the car's hood. The vehicle quickly filled with water and hail. Bryndon reportedly made it out with no injuries, but his car is totaled.

A car in Colorado Springs was nearly swallowed by the storm's fast-moving rain. In a video uploaded to YouTube, the driver can be heard saying, "Take it easy. I can't see. I can't see." The National Weather Service maintained a flash flood warning until 1 a.m. Friday. The Associated Press reports that another storm hit Colorado today, causing more flooding and closing down Interstate 70.

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« Reply #393 on: August 27, 2013, 11:49:31 am »

http://local.msn.com/millions-impacted-by-intense-heat-in-plains-1
8/27/13
Millions impacted by intense heat in Plains

Temperatures will approach the 100-degree mark through the beginning of Labor Day weekend
.

A heat wave in the Plains and parts of the Midwest will affect millions of people through this week and into the beginning of the Labor Day weekend.

This heat will impact many major cities in the country's midsection, including St. Louis, Mo., Omaha, Neb., Sioux Falls, S.D., Des Moines, Iowa and Minneapolis, Minn.

Additionally, thunderstorms riding along the northern edge of this dome of heat will bring the threat of stronger storms to parts of the Great Lakes and the Northeast.



Temperatures approaching the 100-degree mark will force residents of the Plains and Midwest to take action to avoid some of the dangers that this heat wave will bring.

The most dangerous time of day during a heat wave is the afternoon when temperatures are the hottest and when sunshine is most intense.

If you plan on being outside during the heat of the afternoon, there are several precautions that you can take to minimize the chance of heat-related injuries. Wearing light-colored clothing, drinking plenty of water and avoiding strenuous activity are just a few ways to stay safe from the heat.

Spending long periods of time out in the heat without taking the proper precautions may lead to dehydration, heat exhaustion or even heat stroke.

While temperatures will climb to near or above the 100-degree mark, several other factors can make it feel even hotter.

High humidity, blazing sunshine and other components of the weather will make it feel as high as 110 degrees in some areas
.

This extreme heat has already caused disruptions across the Plains and Midwest for many and will continue to do so through the week.

With the last week of August being the first week back at school for many students, school districts have been forced to take action.

To help kids avoid the intense heat, some schools have ended the school day early, well before the extreme afternoon heat; while others have canceled school all together.

High school sports teams have also been forced to take action, canceling practices for the safety of the players.

While some may find the heat unwelcome, others are finding it to be providing favorable conditions for some late-season swimming.

This heat wave is expected to last though the week across the Midwest and the Plains with highs in the upper 90s and lower 100s each day.

With temperatures running as much as 20 degrees above average, many daily record temperatures will be challenged.

These temperatures will also carry into the beginning of the Labor Day weekend, but will slowly ease as the weekend progresses.

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« Reply #394 on: August 30, 2013, 05:51:58 pm »

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« Reply #395 on: September 01, 2013, 05:55:21 am »

Peru snow state of emergency extended to more regions

The Peruvian government has extended to nine more regions a state of emergency called to cope with unusually cold weather and heavy snowfall.

At least two people have died and 33,000 others have been affected by the cold spell, local officials say.

Tens of thousands of animals have frozen to death over the past week.

President Ollanta Humala has travelled to Apurimac, one of the worst-hit areas, to oversee the distribution of emergency aid.

The state of emergency would be in place for 20 days, an official statement said.

The heaviest snow fall to hit Peru in a decade has killed tens of thousands of llamas, alpacas, cattle and sheep, and left farmers destitute.

A man died when the roof of his hut caved in under the weight of the snow in southern Carabaya province but the circumstances of the second death were unclear.

Three people were rescued on Saturday from the same region after their home was cut off by snow.

Rescue workers said the three, two girls and an elderly woman, were suffering from frostbite and snow blindness.

The cold front has also hit Peru's south-eastern neighbour, Bolivia, and Paraguay, where a combined total of five people have died.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-23916217
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« Reply #396 on: September 02, 2013, 01:00:04 pm »

http://news.yahoo.com/video/tornado-touches-down-near-tokyo-141234694.html
Video: Tornado touches down near Tokyo
9/2/13

A tornado touched down north of Tokyo Monday afternoon, damaging numerous structures
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« Reply #397 on: September 02, 2013, 07:40:53 pm »

Record cold strikes Alaska...

15°F IN AUGUST?


http://ak-wx.blogspot.de/2013/08/record-cold-in-northern-interior.html
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« Reply #398 on: September 03, 2013, 10:57:28 am »


Not too long ago(in May or June) they were facing record heats - to the point where it caught everyone by surprise b/c it NEVER gets hot there, meaning air conditionings are NEVER in supply there.
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« Reply #399 on: September 03, 2013, 12:19:57 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/zealand-experiences-warmest-winter-record-140939252.html
9/3/13
New Zealand experiences warmest winter on record

New Zealand experiences its warmest winter on record as Antarctic winds stay away


WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- Winter lacked its usual Antarctic chill in New Zealand this year — to record effect.

Scientists said Tuesday the South Pacific nation had its warmest winter since record-keeping began more than a century ago.

The average nationwide temperature was 9.5 Celsius (49.1 Fahrenheit) for June, July and August. That's about 1.2 Celsius above average and 0.3 Celsius above the previous record set in 1984, the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research said. Record-keeping began in 1909.

The winter had a pattern of warmer winds from the north but fewer southerly winds, which typically bring cold air from Antarctica, NIWA climate scientist Brett Mullan said. He said he believes that global weather remains variable but is in a warming pattern.

He said the weather was a boon for farmers who were recovering from a summer drought. The mild weather allowed grass to sprout in their fields, he said.

And skiers had no problem with the weather, either.

Annah Dowsett, a spokeswoman for the Whakapapa and Turoa ski fields on Mount Ruapehu, said dumps of snow early in the ski season followed by weeks of pleasant weather provided the perfect conditions. She said the fields hosted above-average numbers of skiers throughout winter and Turoa went for an unusually long stretch of 46 days without needing to close once for inclement weather.

"It's certainly been pleasant," she said. "August is usually windy and snowy and cold."
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« Reply #400 on: September 05, 2013, 10:47:07 am »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-23962191
Video: Dozens injured as Japan struck by two tornadoes in three days
9/4/13

Thousands of homes have been damaged and dozens of people injured after two tornadoes hit Japan in the space of three days.

Shelters have been opened in the areas affected and authorities have activated emergency plans.

Roopa Suchak reports.

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« Reply #401 on: September 05, 2013, 01:16:23 pm »

Wow - just what the leaking nuclear reactor needs...
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« Reply #402 on: September 09, 2013, 11:09:15 pm »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/09/09/20408755-tropical-storm-humberto-poised-to-become-first-atlantic-hurricane-of-season?lite=
9/9/13
Tropical Storm Humberto poised to become first Atlantic hurricane of season

A tropical storm cutting a westward path across the Atlantic is poised to become a hurricane within one day — which would make it the first Atlantic hurricane of the 2013 season.

Tropical Storm Humberto’s maximum sustained winds climbed to 50 mph on Monday afternoon, according to the Associated Press. It may become a full-fledged hurricane Tuesday, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

The tempest was 95 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands off the west coast of Africa late Monday but was hurtling farther away from that area, prompting officials to suspend a tropical storm advisory, according to the AP.

Before sweeping past Cape Verde, Humberto battered the southernmost flank of the islands with hard rain and wind gusts.

No coastal watches or warnings are currently looming over the region, the AP reported. Humberto is not forecasted to pose any significant threat to land, according to the hurricane center.

So far this season, no major hurricanes have cropped up in the Atlantic basin — a division that encompasses the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Humberto is the eighth tropical storm of the season, which kicked off June 1 and is slated to run until Nov. 30.

Experts said the first hurricane of the season usually forms by August 10. Since the dawn of the satellite era in the mid-1960s, the latest date for the first hurricane to arrive was set in 2002 when Hurricane Gustav formed on September 11.

If Humberto achieves hurricane status any time after 8 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, it would replace Gustav as the modern-day record holder, forecasters said.

All three previous storms named “Humberto” — in 1995, 2001 and 2007 — ultimately became hurricanes, according to The Weather Channel. The 2007 cyclone evolved from a tropical depression to a hurricane in 19 hours before slamming southeast Texas.
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« Reply #403 on: September 10, 2013, 09:38:09 pm »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/09/10/20424665-dome-of-heat-bakes-midwest-closes-some-schools?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=6
9/10/13
Dome of heat bakes Midwest, closes some schools

A surge of late-summer heat was blazing across the U.S. Midwest on Tuesday, prompting officials to shutter public schools in Illinois and Ohio as near-record high temperatures turned the region into a veritable oven.

The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory for the southern flank of Michigan, including metro Detroit, which will run through Wednesday night as temperatures are slated to reach a sizzling 96 degrees Fahrenheit (36 degrees Celsius).

“We thought the dog days of summer were behind us, but we’re having this last high heat event with temperatures above normal,” Matt Mosteiko, a Weather Service meteorologist in Michigan, told Reuters.

Detroit officials called on residents to stay indoors and said they were opening up air-conditioned cooling centers for sunbaked locals, NBC station WDIV in Detroit reported.

A heat advisory also loomed over Ohio as temperatures were forecast to near the state record high of 96 degrees, set 30 years ago. Temperatures hovered roughly 15 degrees above normal. The heat index could cross 100 degrees in some areas, according to NBC station WLWT in Cincinnati.

In Middletown, outside of Cincinnati, students were let out of school early due to the extreme heat. Meanwhile, in the Chicago area, city officials ordered the closure of some 50 schools.

At O’Hare International Airport, temperatures reached a boiling afternoon high of 92 degrees, just a few notches away from the record 95 set 30 years ago, according to NBCChicago.com.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn said more than 100 cooling centers were being opened across the state on Tuesday. He pleaded with residents to stave off dehydration and other effects of horrible heat.

Temperatures are not expected to ease overnight. Even more high heat was expected going into Wednesday, when it will work its way east, forecasters told Reuters.

But by the end of the week, a strong cold front will bring more favorable conditions to the Plains states, Midwest and East, according to The Weather Channel.
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« Reply #404 on: September 16, 2013, 11:38:57 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/big-storms-hit-mexico-opposite-112757491.html
Big storms hit Mexico on opposite coasts; 21 dead

Big storms hit Mexico from opposite directions; at least 21 dead in mudslides, floods

9/16/13

ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) -- The remnants of Tropical Storm Manuel continued to deluge Mexico's southwestern Pacific shoulder with dangerous rains while Hurricane Ingrid weakened to a tropical storm after making a Monday landfall on the country's opposite coast in an unusual double onslaught that federal authorities said had caused at least 21 deaths.

The heaviest blow Sunday fell on the southern coastal state of Guerrero, where Mexico's government reported 14 confirmed deaths. State officials said people had been killed in landslides, drownings in a swollen river and a truck crash on a rain-slickened mountain highway.

Mexico's federal Civil Protection coordinator, Luis Felipe Puente, told reporters late Sunday that stormy weather from one or both of the two systems also caused three deaths in Hidalgo, three in Puebla and one in Oaxaca.

Getting hit by a tropical storm and a hurricane at the same time "is completely atypical" for Mexico, Juan Manuel Caballero, coordinator of the country's National Weather Service, said at a news conference with Puente.

Authorities in the Gulf states of Tamaulipas and Veracruz evacuated more than 7,000 people from low-lying areas as the hurricane closed in, and the prospect of severe weather prompted some communities to cancel Independence Day celebrations planned for Sunday and Monday.

Manuel came ashore as a tropical storm Sunday afternoon near the Pacific port of Manzanillo, but quickly began losing strength and was downgraded to a tropical depression late Sunday, although officials warned its rains could still cause flash floods and mudslides. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the system dissipated early Monday.

The rains caused some rivers to overflow in Guerrero, damaging hundreds of homes and disrupting communications for several hours.

Early Monday, Manuel's remnants had maximum sustained winds of about 30 mph (45 kph) and was moving to the northwest at 8 mph (13 kph). It was about 5 miles (10 kilometers) west of Puerto Vallarta.

Manuel was expected to dump up to 10 to 15 inches of rain over parts of Guerrero and Michoacan states, with maximums of 25 inches possible in some isolated areas. Rains of 5 to 10 inches were possible in the states of Colima, Jalisco and Nayarit. Authorities said the rains presented a dangerous threat in mountains, where flash floods and mudslides were possible.

Ingrid also was expected to bring very heavy rains. It had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph) early Monday and was centered about 95 miles (155 kilometers) north-northeast of the port city of Tampico as it moved west-northwest at 7 mph (11 kph). A hurricane warning had been in effect from Cabo Rojo to La Pesca. Ingrid's maximum sustained winds weakened to near 65 mph (100kph) after landfall.

More than 1,000 homes in Veracruz state had been affected by the storm to varying degrees, and 20 highways and 12 bridges were damaged, the state's civil protection authority said. A bridge collapsed near the northern Veracruz city of Misantla on Friday, cutting off the area from the state capital, Xalapa.

A week ago, 13 people died in the state when a landslide buried their homes in heavy rains spawned by Tropical Depression Fernand.

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« Reply #405 on: September 16, 2013, 12:06:46 pm »

http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2013/09/16/colorado-braces-for-more-heavy-rain-deadly-floods/
9/16/13
Cloud cover grounds search-and-rescue helicopters in Colorado


CENTENNIAL, Colo. –  Helicopter search teams have been grounded until clouds lift in Colorado, where more than 1,000 people are unaccounted for following massive flooding.

The search teams are part of a coordinated effort between state personnel and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is sending two 80-person search-and-rescue teams to assist with continuing rescues in Larimer County and providing aid to other communities following massive flooding that began Wednesday along the Front Range. Large military vehicles were attempting to get up the mountain roads, but the key component of the search effort, helicopter crews flying out of Boulder, were suspended early Monday.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper told ABC's "Good Morning America" that 16 or 17 helicopters were to resume searching for stranded residents Monday. Noting that many people have been without any kind of phone or Internet communications since the middle of last week, he says the focus of the effort is to make sure everyone in harm's way gets "out of there."

Emergency officials say four people are confirmed dead and more than 1,200 people have not been heard from. Hickenlooper says while the death toll is expected to rise, he's hopeful that the vast majority of those people are "safe and sound."

Residents are being encouraged to use white sheets, reflective mirrors, flares and signal fires to attract the attentions of the pilots and told to have a bag of medications, clothes, and other important items ready for when help arrives.

Elsewhere, emergency officials say at least 1,000 people in Larimer County were still waiting to be rescued from the floodwaters, but adverse weather conditions had grounded helicopters and supply drops.

Type 2 Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team commander Shane Del Grosso said Sunday that many people had made contact with requests for evacuations, but authorities were in a “waiting game” due to the rain.

Nearly 15 inches of rain had been dumped on parts of Colorado since Monday. After clear weather gave rescuers a break Saturday, Sunday brought more rain — up to 4 inches of rain in Larimer County — and low-hanging fog.

At one point Sunday afternoon, 51 Colorado National Guardsmen, first responders, and civilians had to be rescued when the tactical trucks they were riding in were halted by rising waters in the town of Lyons, Colo. Thirty-six members of the group were picked up in helicopters by U.S. Army aviators before the weather turned bad enough to halt the rescue operation. The remaining 15, all first responders and Guardsmen, were waiting out the flood on higher ground, according to a statement from the Colorado National Guard.

The Larimer County Sheriff’s Office said 16 helicopters had been brought in to assist rescue efforts, but only ground crews were able to operate Sunday. Air crews were hoping to provide airlifts to residents stranded in Longmont, Fort Collins and Weld County.

The flooding has impacted parts of 15 counties in Colorado. Emergency management officials said 17,494 homes were damaged, 1,502 homes were destroyed and 11,700 people were ordered evacuated.

As of Sunday night, 1,253 remain unaccounted for, but officials said the number fluctuates as stranded residents re-establish communication with family, friends or authorities.

Office of Emergency Management spokeswoman Micki Trost told the Associated Press that the numbers were reported by affected counties and compiled by the state agency.

The Larimer County Sheriff’s office said that FEMA is bringing in two 80-person search and rescue teams to help with operations.

Rescue teams are warning people in some Colorado towns isolated by the flooding against remaining there, telling them that they could face weeks without basic supplies, including running water and electricity.

Helicopters and truck convoys of the National Guard carried the admonition Saturday into paralyzed canyon communities where thousands of stranded residents were eager to escape the Rocky Mountain foothills. But not everybody was willing to go. Dozens of people in hard hit Jamestown wanted to stay to watch over their homes.

Authorities made clear that residents who chose not to leave might not get another chance for a while. Rescuers won't go back for people who insist on staying, Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said.

"We're not trying to force anyone from their home. We're not trying to be forceful, but we're trying to be very factual and definitive about the consequences of their decision, and we hope that they will come down," Pelle said.

The Larimer County Sheriff’s Office said Sunday it had a report of an 80-year old woman in Cedar Cove who was injured and unable to leave her home when floodwaters were rising. When friends returned with help for the woman, the home was reportedly washed away.

Another 60-year-old woman in the area was reporting missing and presumed dead on Saturday. If confirmed, the two deaths would bring the total number of fatalities to six since Wednesday.

"I expect that we're going to continue to receive reports of confirmed missing and confirmed fatalities throughout the next several days," Larimer County sheriff's spokesman John Schulz said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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« Reply #406 on: September 17, 2013, 06:44:22 am »

Scotland experiences four seasons in a day: lashed by 100 mph wind gusts

Scotland experienced all four seasons in one day yesterday, as the first storm of autumn swept across the country, bringing chaos to the country’s roads. Torrential rain, accompanied by gale-force winds, gave way to sunny periods, before the wet weather returned. The Cairngorms were hit by gusts of 100 mph, with snow anticipated last night, and the Forth Road Bridge was closed to high-sided vehicles after wind speeds of 69 mph were recorded. However, not everyone was bemoaning the gales. The weather was perfect for Scottish Windfest, at Barassie Beach in Troon, where windsurfers and kitesurfers were competing. Last night, the Met Office issued a blanket “yellow” warning, forecasting blustery winds continuing into today. They said high-altitude jetstream winds from the Atlantic pushing 200 mph – almost twice the usual – triggered the storm. It brought torrential rain yesterday morning, which flooded Nitshill Road and Thornliebank Road, in the south of Glasgow, with motorists in Dumfries suffering the worst driving conditions in the country with heavy spray on main roads.

The weather also caused severe disruption to Caledonian MacBrayne’s ferry timetable on the west coast, where dozens of sailings were either delayed or cancelled. Worst affected were the routes between Oban, Coll and Tiree, the new link between Ardrossan and Campbeltown, and the Tarbert to Portavadie crossing. A spokesman for Cal Mac said: “Ferry services across the network have been badly affected by high winds. “The bad weather is expected to continue into Monday and ferry travellers are advised to check our website (www.calmac.co.uk) for the latest information. Traffic Scotland warned motorists of high winds on the Skye, Friarton, Tay and Erskine bridges. And there was rail disruption on west coast northbound routes, after a tree fell on to overhead lines between Lockerbie and Carstairs. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) issued flood warnings in Ayrshire and Arran, Dumfries and Galloway and west central Scotland. The CairnGorm funicular railway was closed all morning yesterday as 100mph winds blasted the area, but it was opened by midday. Paul Nixon, CairnGorm’s customer manager, said: “We’ve just been keeping a close eye on the weather today, making sure that visitors can come back down. “We’re expecting some snow tonight, but it’s unlikely to lie and will be restricted to the very top of the mountain. “This sort of weather usually does mark the start of winter for us really. In the past there has been skiing in October, and people are anticipating a very good season.” Tom Morgan, of the Met Office, said: “Scotland is only half-way there with the severe wind problems. –The Scotsman

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2013/09/16/scotland-experiences-four-seasons-in-a-day-lashed-by-100-mph-wind-gusts/
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« Reply #407 on: September 17, 2013, 09:52:43 am »

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They said high-altitude jetstream winds from the Atlantic pushing 200 mph – almost twice the usual – triggered the storm.

Looks like HAARP is getting out of control now, potentially.
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« Reply #408 on: September 17, 2013, 12:51:18 pm »

Two major storms lash Mexico, 41 dead amid 'historic' floods
9/16/13
(Reuters) - Two powerful storms pummeled Mexico as they converged from the Pacific and the Gulf on Monday, killing at least 41 people and forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands amid some of the worst flooding in decades.

Tropical Depression Ingrid battered Mexico's northern Gulf coast, while the remnants of Tropical Storm Manuel lashed the Pacific coast, inundating the popular beach resort of Acapulco, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

Even as they weakened, the storms continued to unleash massive rains that have killed more than three dozen people in the states of Veracruz, Guerrero, Puebla, Hidalgo, Michoacan and Oaxaca, national emergency services said.

In the popular Pacific resort of Acapulco alone, at least 21 people were killed as buildings collapsed and roads were transformed into raging rivers, said Constantino Gonzalez, an official with Guerrero state emergency services.

"Unfortunately, the majority of the deaths have occurred here in Acapulco due to landslides that completely buried homes," said Gonzalez.

Officials said thousands of tourists were stranded due to canceled flights and closed highways.

State oil monopoly Pemex said it had evacuated three oil platforms and halted drilling at some wells on land due to the storms.

President Enrique Pena Nieto, who led Mexican independence day celebrations in Mexico City on Monday, was set to inspect storm damage in Guerrero state.

HISTORIC DESTRUCTION
"The storms have affected two-thirds of the entire national territory," the interior minister, Miguel Osorio Chong, said at a news conference in Mexico City.

Chong called the flooding "historic" and said the city of Acapulco had sustained major damage. The resort's international airport remained closed due to power failure, as were two major highways, in the wake of Manuel.

In Veracruz state, along Mexico's Gulf coast, 12 people died on Monday after their bus and two nearby homes were buried by a mountain landslide near the town of Xaltepec, Governor Javier Duarte told reporters.

Across the state, 23,000 people were evacuated from their homes and 9,000 remained in emergency shelters, according to a post on Duarte's Twitter account.

Public school classes in Veracruz were canceled for Tuesday.

Ingrid, which weakened from a hurricane earlier on Monday, prompted Pemex to evacuate three platforms at its offshore Arenque field, operated by British oil services firm Petrofac, and close 24 wells in its onshore Ebano-Panuco field, a company official said.

On Pemex's Twitter page, the company said it had activated "emergency procedures" at its Francisco Madero refinery on the Gulf coast of northern Tamaulipas state, but did not provide details. The refinery has a processing capacity of 180,000 barrels per day, including crude from both the Arenque and Panuco fields.

Ingrid maintained maximum winds of 35 miles per hour and was expected to further weaken as it moved overland.

The tropical depression continued to dump heavy rains as it churned 6 miles per hour toward the west.

The NHC said isolated areas could see as much as 25 inches of rain, particularly in mountainous terrain, resulting in additional life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

The Mexican government had discontinued all coastal warnings and watches by Monday afternoon.

Manuel's maximum sustained winds stood at 30 mph as it dissipated over west-central Mexico, although heavy rainfall is expected to continue along the country's southwestern coast.

(Additional reporting by David Alire Garcia and Anahi Rama; Editing by Doina Chiacu and Philip Barbara)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/16/us-storm-ingrid-idUSBRE98D0AH20130916
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« Reply #409 on: September 21, 2013, 01:24:23 pm »

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/super-typhoon-usagi-targeting/17829643
9/21/13
Typhoon Usagi Targeting Taiwan and China

UPDATE (11 p.m. Saturday Local Time):

Usagi's threat to Taiwan is weakening as the storm moves towards Hong Kong for the second half of the weekend. Additional details about the new threat can be found here.

Usagi remains a super typhoon with winds of 150 mph as it barrels toward Taiwan, followed by Southeast China.

Maximum sustained winds of 160 mph were registered with Usagi Thursday night local time (Thursday EDT), making the dangerous storm a super typhoon.

A super typhoon is equivalent to a strong Category 4 or 5 hurricane in the Atlantic with maximum sustained winds of at least 150 mph.

However, Usagi weakened slightly Saturday, to a typhoon as it passed to the south of Taiwan. Still, the storm remains a very dangerous and potentially deadly tropical system.

The mountainous terrain of Taiwan will slightly weaken Usagi as it approaches the island, but Usagi will still be a powerful typhoon when it makes its closest approach to far-southern Taiwan Saturday local time.

Friday night conditions will deteriorate across Taiwan as wind and rain increase and the threat of coastal flooding along the eastern coast heightens.

Wind gusts as high as 120 mph threaten to cause widespread destruction across far-southern Taiwan Saturday. Such winds can lead to major damage of homes and snap or uproot many trees. Residents should prepare for lengthy power outages.

Gusts ranging from 80 to 120 mph are expected elsewhere across southern Taiwan. Winds on the higher end of this range are most likely over southeastern Taiwan.

Adding to the concern for loss of lives and property will be a devastating storm surge of 10 to 18 feet along the southeastern coast, while torrential rain also inundates Taiwan.

"Rainfall can easily total a foot in coastal areas on the south and southeast side of the island, and the mountains in the southern half of Taiwan could receive between 20 and 30 inches," stated AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Eric Wanenchak.

That amount of rain is sure to cause life-threatening flooding and mudslides.

The worst of the storm will pass south of Taipei; however, some of Usagi's outer drenching and squally rain bands will spread across the city through Saturday. Wind gusts could occasionally reach 40 mph.

Rain totals will likely be between 2 and 4 inches, heightening concerns for urban flash flooding. Most of that rain will come before Usagi's center reaches far-southern Taiwan.

The Philippines will also be spared from the worst of Usagi, but flooding rain and gusty winds will continue to affect northern Luzon through Saturday.

Flooding will actually become a concern in the capital city of Manila this weekend and into early next week as Usagi passes to the west of the Philippines and moisture from the typhoon and what was once-Tropical Depression 18W is drawn into the city.

This type of setup during previous tropical systems has led to massive flooding in Manila.

After battering Taiwan, Usagi will take aim at Southeast China with an eventual landfall very close to Hong Kong Sunday afternoon or Sunday night. Usagi could still be a Category 2 or 3 hurricane as it nears Southeast China.

Areas from Zhanjiang to Hong Kong northward to Zhangzhou should closely monitor this storm as the potential for flooding rainfall, damaging winds and coastal flooding exists Sunday into Monday.
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« Reply #410 on: September 23, 2013, 01:25:09 pm »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/09/22/20623469-death-toll-from-mexican-hurricanes-surpasses-100-as-search-for-missing-continues?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1
9/22/13
Death toll from Mexican hurricanes surpasses 100 as search for missing continues

Emergency crews in Mexico continued to search for victims of Hurricanes Manuel and Ingrid on Sunday after the death toll from the storms that battered the coast of Mexico this week rose to at least 110.

The twin storms unleashed torrential rain that led to floods and mudslides starting last Sunday.  More than 1 million people have been affected across the country, and 50,000 have been evacuated from their homes.

The official death toll was increased to 101 at a news conference late Friday, but that number did not include crew members aboard a Federal Police helicopter that disappeared Thursday while aiding rescue efforts in La Pintada, in the state of Guerrero, Mexico.

At least three crew members aboard the aircraft  were found dead, a Mexican government spokesman said on Saturday, according to The Associated Press. On Sunday two more, likely rescue workers, were reported dead in the incident.

Sixty-eight residents of La Pintada remained missing after a massive landslide, authorities said.

On Sunday, Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto said the death toll was at "110 or 115." He said Mexico's Congress would revise its budget in response to the storm.

Nieto called for a quick state-by-state evaluation of damage to be overseen by the country's interior minister that "will allow us to add resources beyond those already budgeted for contingency and disaster funds to rebuild infrastructure that has sadly been lost."

In the state of Guerrero alone, more than 22,000 homes have sustained damage in 59 principalities, Guerrero State Governor Ángel Aguirre Rivero said according to Mexican newspaper El Sol de Acapulco.  The extent of the damage in the region has left more than 20,000 people in shelters.
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« Reply #411 on: September 24, 2013, 12:26:24 pm »

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/typhoon-usagi-brings-damaging/17933482
9/24/13
Typhoon Usagi Brings Damaging Winds, Heavy Rain to China

Typhoon Usagi made landfall near Shantou, just east of Hong Kong, late on Sunday afternoon, local time, with winds over 100 mph (160 kph) and extremely heavy rainfall.

Around 12 inches of rain fell in Zhangpu, China, northeast of Hong Kong, with greater amounts over the higher terrain farther inland.

Winds in Hong Kong gusted to over 50 mph (80 kph) and nearly 4 inches of rain fell at the Hong Kong International Airport from Usagi.

According to Xinhua, the official press agency for China, at least 25 people were dead as a result of the storm with over 5 million people affected.

Usagi strengthened into a super typhoon on Thursday night, local time (Thursday morning EDT) as it barreled toward southern Taiwan.

The mountainous terrain of Taiwan caused Usagi to weaken just below super typhoon status on Saturday.

Although Usagi is no longer a typhoon, gusty winds and downpours will continue through Monday night over parts of southeastern China.

Rain will be heaviest over the mountainous terrain, which can lead to flooding and bring the threat for mudslides.

Usagi's wind threat will continue to lessen as it moves farther inland. Flooding rain, however, should continue to accompany Usagi as it tracks westward across South China and into northern Vietnam and Laos through Wednesday.

Although the brunt of the Usagi's impacts were felt in southeast China and Taiwan a few days prior, flooding rainfall also soaked the Philippines. A combination of the summer monsoon and increased moisture from Usagi caused flooding in Manila, where over 150 mm (6 inches) of rain fell through the weekend.

Elsewhere in the western Pacific, Pabuk will be a near miss for Japan. Two other areas, one in the South China Sea and one east of the Philippines, are being watched for tropical development this week.
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« Reply #412 on: September 26, 2013, 05:12:17 pm »


Snow already? Crater Lake gets 8 inches
Its the earliest appearance of the white stuff since 1986


 Crater Lake received a record-smashing 8 inches of snow in 24 hours Tuesday into Wednesday, the National Weather Service reported.

More than one month ahead of schedule, the frosty blanket made its earliest appearance since 1986, when snow fell a week earlier on Sept. 18. Before that, the earliest appearance of a winter wonderland at Crater Lake was Sept. 24, 1948.

"It looks like there were sharply higher values of snowfall above 6,000 feet," said meteorologist Shad Keene. "Crater Lake tends to get the brunt of all the precipitation, so the chance of them exceeding a forecast is higher than in most places. It'll really come down."

At elevations 6,000 feet and below, there was anywhere from 1 to 3 inches.

"The higher elevations definitely got more than we expected," Keene said.

The snowfall resulted in the closures of Crater Lake's West Rim Drive, East Rim Drive, North Entrance and Pinnacles Road Wednesday, according to the park's website. The West Entrance and South Entrance off Highway 62, Highway 62's access to the park's headquarters, and park headquarters to the Rim Village remained open.

"It looks like winter," said Marcia McCabe, park spokeswoman. "It's gorgeous. It's absolutely beautiful."

McCabe added that the road closures should be temporary, as temperatures are expected to warm up by the end of the week.

"We're not quite ready to shut them down for a whole season," McCabe said.

Keene said it is surprising to see snow accumulate on the roads, though much of it has since begun to melt.

"The ground is still relatively warm," Keene said. "Just seeing the snow accumulate on the roads was surprising that high in our area."

Snow is expected to continue falling at elevations 5,000 feet and above into as late as today.

"You could certainly see several (more) inches," Keene said.

That means some more rainfall for the Rogue Valley today and possibly early Friday, but a sunny weekend is predicted to reverse the trend, with temperatures rising back into the low- to mid-70s for the valley floor, and the low 50s for Crater Lake.

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130926/NEWS/309260314
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« Reply #413 on: September 26, 2013, 05:33:19 pm »

Looks like the Illuminati minions are losing control of HAARP!
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« Reply #414 on: September 30, 2013, 11:20:42 pm »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/09/30/20755408-record-setting-rain-drenches-northwest-even-more-than-usual?lite=
9/30/13
Record-setting rain drenches Northwest even more than usual

A massive rainstorm was setting records Monday across the perennially soggy Pacific Northwest, accompanied by damaging winds and even an extremely rare tornado that damaged a Boeing plant and tipped over rail cars in Washington state.

No injuries were reported in the tornado, which touched down about 7:20 a.m. (10:20 a.m. ET) in Frederickson, about 40 miles south of Seattle, the National Weather Service confirmed. It tunneled between two buildings at a Boeing Co. plant, damaging several warehouses and factories, a company spokesman said.

The winds overturned several rail cars and flung a passenger car and into a wooden wall board, authorities and witnesses said.

"My first instinct — I thought it was an earthquake. Honestly, I never heard of weather like this, at least in Washington state," Kirk Ransden, who was inside a nearby business when the tornado hit, told NBC station KING of Seattle.

"We were in the building, and it sounded like a vacuum starting. It was really loud, kind of high pitched," Ransden said. "I saw a ripple through the ceiling, and then everything came through. Then water starting pouring."

Tornadoes are very rare in Washington, which averages fewer than two low-intensity twisters a year statewide. There have been only 16 on record since the 1950s in the Puget Sound region of Western Washington around Seattle and Tacoma.

Although meteorologists said it was an isolated incident, the tornado that struck Monday hit as heavy rain — unusual even for the famously wet northwest corner of the country — pushed many cities in Washington and Oregon past their records for September.

Thousands of customers were without power, and flash flooding was widespread. With Monday's rainfall yet to be tallied, Portland, Ore., was already at 6.2 inches, well above its previous record of 5.52 inches in September 1927. Meanwhile, Olympia, Wash., this month had recorded 8 inches of rain — more than four times its September average.

Other cities setting records included Astoria, Ore., at 10.25 inches; Eugene, Ore., at 5.67 inches; and Salem, Ore., at 6.25 inches.

Seattle — nationally famous for its rain thanks to "Sleepless in Seattle" and the TV show "Frazier" — entered Monday at 5.44 inches this month and added another quarter-inch by midday, according to the National weather Service. It was well on track to break its record of 5.95 inches, set in 1978.

In addition to the rain, sustained winds of 50 mph to 60 mph were reported throughout the region over the weekend, with 70- to 80-mph gusts along the coasts and in the mountains of both states.

The winds downed tree branches, power lines and traffic lights throughout downtown Portland on Saturday and Sunday. Across the two states, more than 12,000 customers were without power at midday Monday, including more than 7,000 in Orting, Wash., about 15 miles southeast of Tacoma.

The National Weather Service said the storm was partly fueled by the remnants of Typhoon Pabuk in the western Pacific, which met a cool Alaskan air mass off the Pacific Northwest coast, creating a weather pattern more characteristic of November.

"We basically had conditions well offshore that were very reminiscent of late fall, early winter," Dana Felton, an NWS meteorologist in Seattle, told KING.
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« Reply #415 on: October 03, 2013, 05:34:29 pm »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/03/20802094-tropical-storm-looms-in-gulf-snowstorm-builds-in-rockies?lite
10/3/13
Tropical storm looms in Gulf; snowstorm builds in Rockies

A hurricane watch for the Gulf Coast and an early season snowstorm in the Rockies and Plains have broken the calm of a relatively quiet period of weather across the country.

Tropical Storm Karen has formed in the Gulf of Mexico, prompting a hurricane watch along the Gulf Coast from Louisiana to Florida.

Hurricane watches are in effect from Grand Isle, La., eastward to Indian Pass, Fla., according to the National Hurricane Center. The watch area does not include metropolitan New Orleans.

As Karen moves northwest and north toward the central Gulf of Mexico, the intensity of the storm remained uncertain, the Weather Channel reported.

The storm will likely make landfall with the Gulf Coast on Saturday.

“There’s a cause to be concerned any time you have a tropical cyclone,” said Nick Wiltgen, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel. “People need to be prepared for the uncertainties intensity.

“If this ends up in the higher end of expectations with a hurricane, some folks could be dealing with potentially damaging winds, and there will be some heavy rainfall as well” he added.

Wiltgen added that it was extremely unlikely that the storm would be “catastrophic,” adding that people in affected areas could have “some peace of mind that the more catastrophic scenarios don’t seem to be in the cards for this one.”

In anticipation, the White House said it would recall employees of the Federal Emergency Management Agency who have been placed on furlough because of the federal government shutdown.

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency on Thursday afternoon in response to the storm forecasts. Under the declaration, the Governor's Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness is authorized to carry out any steps necessary to prepare for the storm and respond to emergencies resulting from it.

The tropical storm is just one weather system ready to rev up what a quiet early autumn.

An early season winter storm is set to strike from the Northern Rockies to the Northern Plains over the next several days, also triggering severe weather in the Midwest, according to the Weather Channel.

Snow, strong winds and rain are predicted to stretch from Idaho to Nebraska.

“It’s a very early winter storm, especially for parts of the Plains States, such as South Dakota, northern Nebraska, and potentially North Dakota,” said Wiltgen.

The heaviest snow will fall in the high elevations of the Northern Rockies, with over a foot of snow predicted in parts of southern Montana, Wyoming and Colorado, according to the Weather Channel.

Wiltgen said the storm could make it very difficult for travelers in the affected regions.

“There’s a lot of wind driving this snow,” he said. “Visibility will be poor and there could be near blizzard conditions.”

The storm could trigger severe weather and tornado activity in Iowa, eastern Nebraska and parts of Kansas peaking on Friday, Wiltgen said.

“It’s entirely possible that Friday, in terms of thunderstorms and tornadoes could be one of the more significant storms in the last three months or so,” he said.
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« Reply #416 on: October 04, 2013, 11:52:18 am »

http://news.yahoo.com/heavy-snow-thunderstorms-moving-midwest-122837485.html
Heavy snow, thunderstorms moving into Midwest
10/4/13

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Powerful storms crawled into the Midwest on Friday, dumping heavy snow in South Dakota, spawning a tornado in Nebraska and threatening dangerous thunderstorms from Oklahoma to Wisconsin.

A foot of snow had fallen in western South Dakota's scenic Black Hills by early Friday, bringing blizzard conditions that shuttered roadways and even canceled a polka bar crawl in an Old West tourist town. Residents were bracing for as much as 3 feet of snow, along with wind gusts of up to 70 mph, from an unseasonably intense fall snow storm.

The typically bustling Pilot Travel Center just west of Rapid City was like a ghost town Friday morning, as drivers were likely heeding forecasters' warnings to stay off the roads, said store general manager John Barton.

The blowing snow was picking up outside the truck stop along Interstate 90, which was closed for about 30 miles thanks to a storm gaining strength as it moved in from Colorado and Wyoming. Conditions were expected to deteriorate throughout the day.

"Yesterday we were really busy," Barton said. "I think a lot of people got ahead of it."

Although early October snowfalls aren't unusual, a storm of this magnitude happens only once every decade or two on the plains, National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Trimarchi said.

"I couldn't say when the last time we've had one like this. It's been quite a while," Trimarchi said.

The storm canceled Friday's Oktoberfest events in Deadwood, where residents and tourists had been planning to polka their way through a bar tour of the gambling town. Organizers also postponed Saturday's planned Wiener Dog Races and Beer Barrel Games until next weekend, said Deadwood Chamber of Commerce director George Milos.

"Even if the snow stops falling, there'd still be so much to clean up," Milos said, noting that weather hasn't canceled a fall event in about 14 years. "We had a concert on Main Street and got 5 feet of snow," he recalled.

Large hail and powerful winds were forecast to hit northwest Oklahoma later Friday, while heavy rain settled in parts of Iowa and was expected to swoop northeast across the region into Wisconsin, where warnings were issued for dense fog.

In Nebraska, a tornado that touched down Thursday night damaged homes and businesses in several communities, knocked out power and toppled trees. But no injuries have been reported.

Motorists were being advised to stay off the roads in western South Dakota, where the I-90 were closed between Sturgis and the Wyoming border. Officials said the road will remain closed until storm conditions improve and crews are able to clear the highway.

The Department of Transportation also advised no travel on some other roadways in the region.

Blizzard warnings were also in effect in Wyoming, where up to 15 inches of snow and strong winds were expected to cause whiteout conditions. Forecasters urged people trying to travel to carry survival kits and to stay in their vehicles if they get stranded.

"These are just really dangerous conditions," Steve Rubin, of the National Weather Service, said Friday.

Snow also was still falling across northern Colorado early Friday, though no major problems were being reported. Forecasters expect snow to be the heaviest in the higher mountains, while the Denver metropolitan area was reporting rain turning into snow.
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« Reply #417 on: October 05, 2013, 01:18:33 pm »

http://news.msn.com/us/karen-continues-move-toward-northern-gulf-coast
Karen continues move toward northern Gulf Coast
10/5/13

Tropical Storm Karen was weaker Saturday but still heading toward the Gulf Coast where it was threatening to bring high winds and 1 to 3 inches of rain.


BRAITHWAITE, La. — Tropical Storm Karen continued to chug toward the Gulf Coast on Saturday, threatening to bring heavy winds and high rains, despite a general weakening of the storm. Officials still urged residents to be vigilant, even as an evacuation order was scaled back in one of Louisiana's most vulnerable areas.

Officials in Plaquemines Parish, La., said the evacuation-order change from mandatory to voluntary would take effect at noon Saturday. More than 80 evacuees from the area, at the state's southeastern tip, had taken refuge at a public shelter.

The National Hurricane Center reported in the morning that Karen's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 40 mph, making it a weak tropical storm. It was moving north at 7 mph, and center forecasters said in their advisory that they expect Karen to decrease in speed later Saturday and turn toward the northeast. The storm was located about 130 miles south-southwest of Morgan City, La.

Check your local forecast

"This is certainly something that you can remain safe in — it's a lot weaker than it was, no chance of it becoming a hurricane — as long as you follow advice from local officials," Rick Knabb, the director of the National Hurricane Center, said.

Coastal authorities closed flood gates along waterways that could be affected by tides driven by the storm. In New Orleans, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continued closing barriers designed to keep surge out of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal — scene of catastrophic flooding in 2005 when flood walls failed during Hurricane Katrina.

Elsewhere along the coast, some tourists ventured out onto beaches to watch the heavy surf.

Ray and Lynn Walls of Shepherdsville, Ky., had the beach to themselves Saturday on the western tip of Dauphin Island, Ala. It was sunny and mild as big waves pounded the seawall protecting nearby homes, and a locked gate blocked the entrance to a public beach that was closed because of Karen.

The trip had been planned for four people, but only two showed up, Ray Walls said. "The rest of them got a little scared of the storm."

more
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« Reply #418 on: October 05, 2013, 01:27:51 pm »

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/04/20823327-tornadoes-cause-damage-injuries-across-iowa-nebraska-south-dakota?lite=
10/5/13

Tornadoes cause damage, injuries across Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota

Multiple tornadoes — one of them a mile wide — struck Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota on Friday, injuring up to 15 people and causing significant damage, meteorologists and local authorities said.

The Weather Channel counted 17 reports of tornadoes across the three states. The National Weather Service reported late Friday that it had confirmed six of the reports — four of them in Iowa.

The injuries were reported in Wayne, Neb., where a tornado hit about 5:30 p.m. (6:30 p.m. ET). Providence Medical Center said it was treating seven "walking wounded" and seven others who were injured in auto accidents. A trauma patient was being treated at a second hospital, it said.

At least ten buildings were destroyed and five were heavily damaged, including the city's softball complex, according to the Associated Press. All roads into the city were closed, the Nebraska State Patrol said.

Several people were trapped in a building, and a hazardous materials crew was en route to evaluate a gas leak at a supply company
, Jodie Fawl, a spokeswoman for the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency, told The Omaha World-Herald.

"The tornado ripped through the east side of town" about three blocks from Wayne State College, Jay Collier, a spokesman for the college, told the Omaha paper. "We are doing everything we can to assist the city."

The Wayne Daily News reported late Friday that many buildings in the town's main industrial park were destroyed or heavily damaged, along with several homes south of the city.

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman declared Wayne a disaster area.

Lucinda Robertson, a spokeswoman for the Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Department, told NBC News that a tornado was also reported to have touched down in rural Woodbury County.

Woodbury County Sheriff's Lt. Tony Wingert said parts of the area were heavily damaged.

"It's a mess," Wingert told the Argus Leader newspaper of nearby Sioux Falls, S.D. "We have more than 30 rural homes destroyed, farms destroyed. We don't have a number for the number of cars destroyed."

So far, no injuries had been reported, he said.

Major damage was also reported in Quimby, Iowa, after a twister touched down around 7:30 p.m., the National Weather Service said. And preliminary assessments indicated significant damage in the town of Moville, Iowa, where a tornado estimated at a mile wide hit at 6:57 p.m.

The National Weather Service, citing local firefighters, said damage was also reported in Jefferson, S.D., where Steve Stouffer told The Sioux City Journal that he was outside when the storm hit his neighborhood.

"I saw a wall of water coming, and then the wind switched from the east to the south real fast," he said. "Then I decided it was time to go into the house."

While scattered tornado watches remained in effect at 10:30 p.m. ET, most advisories across the region had been downgraded to severe thunderstorm warnings.

The National Weather Service said the tornadoes were part of a "supercell" storm system that moved into the Midwest after it dumped almost 3 feet of snow on parts of Wyoming and South Dakota.

At least three deaths have been blamed on the snow after a pickup truck skidded and went out of control Friday morning on snow-slickened U.S. Highway 20 in Dawes County in northeastern Nebraska, investigators said.
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« Reply #419 on: October 06, 2013, 07:22:08 pm »

http://local.msn.com/storm-system-karen-dissipates-off-gulf-coast-1
Storm system Karen dissipates off Gulf Coast

After days of lumbering toward the Gulf Coast, the storm system Karen dissipated Sunday as storm preparations in the region were called off or scaled back.

10/5/13



LAFITTE, La. (AP) -- After days of lumbering toward the Gulf Coast, the storm system Karen dissipated Sunday as storm preparations in the region were called off or scaled back.

As tides began to recede along coastal Louisiana, crews worked to pick up sandbags and some fishermen took to the water. In Lafitte, the tide had water levels along Bayou Barataria lapping at the edges of piers and sections of the main roadway into the small fishing village prone to flooding.

"We're very lucky," fisherman Ken LeBeau said. He added that he was anxious to get out shrimping Sunday -- while the tide is up, shrimp may be farther inland; fisherman don't have to venture as far out to catch them.

The community has been swamped with flooding by several storms since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Many are just recovering from Hurricane Isaac last summer. Some are in the process of having their homes raised, and Mayor Timothy Kerner said levees are being planned for the area.

"It was a blessing from God that we actually dodged a bullet this time," Kerner said. He estimated that 40,000 sandbags had been put out and said the precautionary measure was worth it: "It's always easier to pick up sandbags than to clean up a flood."

MSN Weather:Check your local forecast

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said the remnants of Karen were moving eastward off the coast. Forecasters expected what remains of Karen -- which had been a tropical storm, then a depression -- to continue moving generally east over the next day to two days. Rain accumulations of 1 to 3 inches were expected. Even as residents breathed a sigh of relief, forecasters and emergency officials warned them to keep an eye on developments.

As the threat lifted Sunday, Plaquemines Parish closed a shelter where 80 people had taken refuge Saturday. "We got some rain, no street flooding, so we're looking pretty good. ... We're not expecting any flooding," parish spokeswoman Caitlin Campbell said.

Wind and waves uncovered tar balls on the beaches of Grand Isle, La., and crews headed out Sunday to check on them, Mayor David Camardelle Jr. said. He said he was sure they were from the 2010 Gulf oil spill. "After a spill like that in the Gulf of Mexico, anytime low pressure stirs up the Gulf it comes back and stirs up the oil on the beach. Tar balls have been spread all over. We always expected it," he said.

In an email, BP spokesman Jason Ryan said, "Should any residual Macondo material appear and require removal, we will retrieve if directed by of Coast Guard, just as is required of any responsible party. We have repeatedly demonstrated our ability to respond quickly following severe weather, and we are prepared and ready to do the same if necessary after this storm."

MSN Weather:How to prepare for flooding, and how to stay safe during a flood

Vessel traffic at the mouth of the Mississippi River resumed at 12:15 a.m. Sunday, the Coast Guard said. Two cruise ships delayed by the storm were expected at New Orleans on Sunday, Carnival Cruise Lines said in a news release.

In Florida, the state emergency response team returned to normal operations. At Pensacola Beach, beachcombers, bike riders, kite surfers and dive students enjoyed the cloudy skies and cooler breezes.

Rolling waves and vibrant clouds provided a picturesque view for Karen -- who said she had an affinity for the storm that shares her name -- and Gene Pehek. The retired couple held hands as they surveyed the scene.

"The storm is way out in the Gulf, and it isn't going to bother us," he said.

The weather didn't dampen Dina and Jacob Ferrie's celebration after they earned their dive certifications Sunday morning. They took photos and congratulated each other as the shed their dive gear. The multiday class continued despite the threat from Karen. Although visibility was a little limited, the pair said they had no problems completing their dives.

People also enjoyed the beach in Alabama, undeterred by intermittent heavy rains and brisk winds. A few people fished in the surf.

Authorities said dangerous rip currents were still present, and double red flags flew to indicate no one should enter the water. Stephie Burford of Warrior, Ala., kept one hand on her visor, the other holding her coffee, as she went for a morning walk on the sand.

"This wind is just tearing you up," she said.

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