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40 Statistics About The Fall Of The U.S. Economy That Are Almost Too Crazy To Be

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August 08, 2018, 02:38:10 am suzytr says: Hello, any good churches in the Sacto, CA area, also looking in Reno NV, thanks in advance and God Bless you Smiley
January 29, 2018, 01:21:57 am Christian40 says: It will be interesting to see what happens this year Israel being 70 years as a modern nation may 14 2018
October 17, 2017, 01:25:20 am Christian40 says: It is good to type Mark is here again!  Smiley
October 16, 2017, 03:28:18 am Christian40 says: anyone else thinking that time is accelerating now? it seems im doing days in shorter time now is time being affected in some way?
September 24, 2017, 10:45:16 pm Psalm 51:17 says: The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the league rulebook. It states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. “During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the National Anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”
September 20, 2017, 04:32:32 am Christian40 says: "The most popular Hepatitis B vaccine is nothing short of a witch’s brew including aluminum, formaldehyde, yeast, amino acids, and soy. Aluminum is a known neurotoxin that destroys cellular metabolism and function. Hundreds of studies link to the ravaging effects of aluminum. The other proteins and formaldehyde serve to activate the immune system and open up the blood-brain barrier. This is NOT a good thing."
http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-new-fda-approved-hepatitis-b-vaccine-found-to-increase-heart-attack-risk-by-700.html
September 19, 2017, 03:59:21 am Christian40 says: bbc international did a video about there street preaching they are good witnesses
September 14, 2017, 08:06:04 am Psalm 51:17 says: bro Mark Hunter on YT has some good, edifying stuff too.
September 14, 2017, 04:31:26 am Christian40 says: i have thought that i'm reaping from past sins then my life has been impacted in ways from having non believers in my ancestry.
September 11, 2017, 06:59:33 am Psalm 51:17 says: The law of reaping and sowing. It's amazing how God's mercy and longsuffering has hovered over America so long. (ie, the infrastructure is very bad here b/c for many years, they were grossly underspent on. 1st Tim 6:10, the god of materialism has its roots firmly in the West) And remember once upon a time ago when shacking up b/w straight couples drew shock awe?

Exodus 20:5  Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
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Author Topic: 40 Statistics About The Fall Of The U.S. Economy That Are Almost Too Crazy To Be  (Read 2443 times)
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« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2015, 08:54:56 pm »

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-much-u-middle-class-120003442.html
12/10/15
Here's How Much the U.S. Middle Class Has Changed in 45 Years
They're now outnumbered by the richest and poorest


In the age of rising income inequality, the task of preserving America’s middle class has been taken on by politicians across the ideological spectrum. A new report from Pew Research Center shows just how much the economic fortunes of this group have changed since the 1970s.

In every decade since then, the percentage of adults living in middle-income households has fallen, according to Pew, which is based in Washington. The share now stands at 50 percent, compared with 61 percent in 1971.

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This matters because  the "state of the American middle class is at the heart of the economic platforms of many presidential candidates ahead of the 2016 election," Pew researchers Rakesh Kochhar and Richard Fry wrote in their report. Meanwhile "a flurry of new research points to the potential of a larger middle class to provide the economic boost sought by many advanced economies."

Pew defines a middle-class household as one having income that is two-thirds to double that of the overall median household income. A family of three, for instance, would need to have a minimum income of $41,869 to qualify as middle-income.

More from Bloomberg.com: Billions of Barrels of Oil Vanish in a Puff of Accounting Smoke

Here’s more data on how America’s middle class has morphed over the last few decades:

They're no longer the majority

Being a member of the middle-class has long been treated as an American badge of honor. However middle-income households have lost their majority status in the U.S, with the size of their counterparts on opposite ends of the income spectrum overtaking them in number.

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Some 120.8 million adult Americans lived in middle-class households this year, according to Pew. That’s slightly less than the combined number of upper-income adults (51 million) and those at the lower tier (70.3 million).

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Their income gains are smaller

While households across the spectrum have seen higher earnings over the past several decades, upper-income households have seen their pay rise the most.

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The median income of those families was $174,625 in 2014, up 47 percent since 1970, Pew data show. That compares with a 34 percent gain for the middle class and a 28 percent increase for the poorest households.

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Households of all income levels got hit hard during the recession, resulting in earnings declines between 2000 and 2014.

Blacks are least likely to be middle-income

Blacks are less likely to be part of the middle class than any other racial or ethnic group, the Pew report finds. Some 45 percent of black adults were in the middle-income tier, down 1 percentage point from 1971.

One positive note is that blacks are the only major racial group to see a decline over that time frame in their share of adults who are low-income, which is down to 43 percent from 48 percent. Still, that percentage is the highest of the ethnic groups, alongside Hispanics.

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White Americans are the only racial group where a majority is in the middle class, though their share fell to 52 percent this year from 63 percent in 1971.

Their piece of the pie is shrinking

The middle class holds 43 percent of U.S. aggregate income, the smallest share in Pew’s data back to 1970.

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Almost half of aggregate earnings in the U.S. is now commanded by the wealthiest families, who are "are on the verge of holding more in total income than all other households combined," Kochhar and Fry wrote. "This shift is partly because upper-income households constitute a rising share of the population and partly because their incomes are increasing more rapidly than those of other tiers."
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« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2016, 11:26:18 am »

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/hillary-for-prison-2016-economy-exploding-merchandise-movies-books-yard-signs/
8/3/16

BOOM TIME: Hillary For Prison 2016 Economy Exploding in Merchandise, Movies and Books

Of course, all elections spawn merchandise — remember Barack Obama action figures? — but the money being made by bashing Hillary, often in extreme ways, is huger than even Trump himself might imagine. And the scores of independent vendors who flocked to the convention in Ohio are just the tip of the iceberg; there is, it turns out, a vast right wing Hillary-hating industry — including an entire genre of documentary filmmaking and book publishing — that's booming like never before now that Clinton has won the Democratic presidential nomination.


Hillary For Prison 2016 tee shirts, buttons and bumper stickers are a growth industry, at least for four more months.

“I support Hillary,” says a woman peddling anti-Hillary buttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts outside the Republican National Convention in mid-July in Cleveland. “But a girl’s got to do what a girl’s got to do.”

What this particular girl — who declined to give her name — is doing is making a killing, and she’s not the only one. For the four days of Donald Trump’s convention, the streets outside the Quicken Loans Arena were turned into a Marrakech bazaar of Trump-pumping, Hillary-dumping merchandise. There were Trump yard signs, Trump bottled water, Trump breakfast cereal (“They’re Great Again,” it says on the box), endless racks of bright red “Make America Great Again” baseball caps as well as tables full of stuff that maybe should have been sold in brown paper wrappers.

Of course, all elections spawn merchandise — remember Barack Obama action figures? — but the money being made by bashing Hillary, often in extreme ways, is huger than even Trump himself might imagine. And the scores of independent vendors who flocked to the convention in Ohio are just the tip of the iceberg; there is, it turns out, a vast right wing Hillary-hating industry — including an entire genre of documentary filmmaking and book publishing — that’s booming like never before now that Clinton has won the Democratic presidential nomination.

Conservative filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza’s latest anti-Clinton movie, Hillary’s America, opened July 15 — right before the RNC — and already is the highest-grossing documentary of the year, earning $6.3 million (it cost $5 million to make, money put up by unnamed conservative investors). A book based on the film will add more gold to the pile — it will debut at No. 2 on The New York Times best-seller list Aug. 7. “Hillary  has made a lot of money off of the American people,” D’Souza tells THR. “So we’d like to make a little off of her.”Bannon, who made a fortune as an early investor in Seinfeld by negotiating the sale of Castle Rock Entertainment (and who now is executive chairman of Breitbart News), is hoping to recoup his $1 million investment in the film by selling rights to TV outlets and digital platforms. “The movie is a public service,” he says. “But we’re capitalists, so we hope to make a little money.” Clinton Cash, another anti-Hillary movie, debuted at Cannes in May and again screened in Cleveland during the RNC. But, according to producer Stephen Bannon, theatrical release is not this doc’s business model.

Aside from the occasional opportunistic Democratic — like the Hillary supporter selling anti-Clinton T-shirts — most involved in the Hating Hillary business are largely ideologically motivated. They believe in their cause and also hope to profit from it. One vendor in Cleveland, a self-published author named Loren Spivack, estimated that he was making about $150 an hour selling his anti-Hillary “children’s” books — with titles like The Wizard of Iz and The Gorax — at the RNC (with sales from his website raking in another $25,000). But that’s not why he writes them. “My favorite character is the Cowardly RINO,” he says, referring to not-conservative-enough politicians deemed “Republican in Name Only”). “He knows Democrats are up to no good, but he’s too timid to do anything about it.”

Still, given market forces, even Trump supporters must be conflicted about the outcome of the election. “If Trump wins, my movie and book will be slightly dated,” admits D’Souza. “So I have a vested interest in Hillary winning. But I’m still rooting against her.” source

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« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2016, 09:07:59 am »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/insane-amount-average-parent-pay-101559516.html
8/3/16
Here’s the Insane Amount the Average Parent Will Pay for After-School Activities

If you feel like the cost of your kid’s sports, musical activities and school clubs is getting out of hand, it’s not your imagination. A new survey confirms that the expenses parents will incur this year for extracurricular activities have skyrocketed.

According to this year’s Backpack Index — an annual look at the cost of school supplies and other expenses compiled by The Huntington National Bank and nonprofit Communities in Schools — the increase is a little over 7%, across all grade levels.

It’s lowest in elementary school, since younger kids don’t participate in as many school-sanctioned sports or other activities, but even there you can expect a roughly 3% increase. Parents of middle-school kids will see an average of 6% higher costs. And things really take a jump in high school, where parents face a 10% increase.

Average Cost: Nearly $739

Across all three age groups, the average student’s extracurricular costs will come to nearly $739 this year — about $50 higher than last year. Parents of elementary school kids are paying about $463 per kid, on average, in extracurricular activities this year, while middle-school parents will pay just over $629. And if you’ve got a kid in high school, brace yourself: You’ll be paying an average of around $1,124.

Increases stem largely from the challenge school administrators face when trying to balance budgets and allocate funds. Although parents value extracurricular activities, they expect school resources to support academics first and foremost, says Steven McCullough, COO and interim co-CEO for nonprofit Communities In Schools, a group that provides support for lower-income families to encourage kids to stay in school.

“When faced with trying to balance these priorities, schools are forced to ask parents to dig into their pockets for more in activity fees,” McCullough says.

Blame Sports Activity Fees

Much of the increase falls on families with athletically inclined kids. “At schools in our markets, we observed that many are charging participation fees for multiple sports — a change from the prior common practice of capping sports fees to a student’s first sport if a student athlete is on multiple teams,” says Brent Wilder, a Huntington spokesman.

This pay-to-play increase has spiked the average cost to parents, with sports-related fees alone rising to $375 from $200 last year for high schoolers. Again, that’s per kid — rough luck for parents who have more than one student in high school at the same time.

Wilder said a similar trend is playing out in middle schools, albeit at a lower level, with the average sports fee rising from $125 to $175 for each student participating.

Sports fees are even having an impact in elementary school, as more parents demand more time-intensive programs for increasingly younger kids. “Our kids are getting into sports and activities at earlier ages, so they’re progressing faster and more quickly into more organized and more expensive activities,” McCullough says.

Controlling Costs

For parents who are experiencing sticker shock but want their kids to get all of the emotional, social and academic benefits of school extracurricular activities, McCullough has a few suggestions.

Talking to administrators is a good first step: Chances are you’re not the only one feeling a financial pinch from activity fees. Parental feedback can help schools decide if a program is worth keeping or tweaking. If the high prices will leave you strapped, you can also ask if your school has sliding scale fees to help lower-income families cover the costs; many districts do.

Volunteering can also yield a reduction in extracurricular fees, McCullough says. And he encourages parents to check out local listservs or parent networks for used (but still serviceable) sports equipment, musical instruments, and other gear.
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« Reply #33 on: August 12, 2016, 02:48:43 pm »

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/86-american-renters-cant-afford-000000211.html
86% of American renters can't afford to become homeowners
8/12/16

86% of American renters don’t have a sufficient credit score or income to afford to buy a home in their local market, according to a new study by Zillow. The US has seen homeownership rates in a steady decline since the 2007 housing bubble collapse; we’re now approaching a 48-year low. The new numbers from Zillow paint a bleak picture about the future of homeownership in the US.

As Americans flock to rentals, the vacancy rate is approaching a 40-year low. Rents have increased 7% between 2001 and 2014 while household incomes dropped 9% over the same period. Nearly 50% of renters in the US are “cost-burdened” by their rent, meaning they spend more than 30% of their pre-tax income on housing.

According to economists at the Urban Institute, 59% of all households formed between 2010 and 2030 will rent their homes; this will create a surge in rental demand that the current market is unable to meet, potentially creating a rental affordability crisis.

A bump in average income and credit scores wouldn’t necessarily reverse the trend, according to Zillow. Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell says the decrease in homeownership in the United States is largely an income problem, but extends beyond that. “When faced with hurdles of high prices and low inventory, first-time homebuyers are renting longer than ever before even if they are qualified to buy,” says Gudell. “This is a conundrum for many young people who move to those cities because of their strong job markets, only to find tight inventory and steep competition standing between them and their dream home.”
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« Reply #34 on: September 08, 2016, 05:12:16 pm »

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/a-critical-us-industry-is-pointing-to-an-economic-downturn/ar-AAiEC7z?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp
A critical US industry is pointing to an economic downturn
9/8/16

If the transportation industry is any indicator — and it usually is — then the economy could be on the brink of a downturn.

When the economy is on the decline, the transportation sector is one of the first things to go. According to a report by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), shifts in its index that track train, truck, boat and plane activity occur before shifts in economic growth, leading the wider economy by about four months.

The index has taken a negative turn starting in late 2015 and into the summer of 2016, according to CNBC calculations. While true turning points are usually identified after the fact, the recent downward momentum could signal a similar movement in the economy as a whole.

The freight Transportation Services Index (TSI) combines monthly truck tonnage, air revenue from freight and mail, weekly rail carloads, rail ton-miles, tons moved by water and pipeline transportation into a single indicator. A similar passenger index measures passenger miles and trips by plane, train and public transportation. Both measures have been found to change ahead of the wider economy.

"A very large portion of freight volume consists of raw materials and other intermediate goods, which may be ordered in anticipation of growing activity in the manufacturing sector," BTS analysts wrote in their last historical review of the data.

Conversely, as downstream demand begins to falter, freight shipments also decline. While passenger travel is a consumer service and may be expected to lag or change with the economy, personal and business travel also seem to respond to economic confidence and sometimes leads other indicators.

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« Reply #35 on: September 21, 2016, 04:44:54 pm »

http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/21/news/economy/us-election-economy/index.html
9/21/16
Is the U.S. election killing the economy?

The matchup between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is the wackiest U.S. election of our lifetimes. It isn't helping the economy

Growth was already off to a lousy start in 2016. Experts predicted a summer rebound, but so far, election concerns are growing and the economic gauges are lagging.

"Ultimately, what will determine whether we have a recession next year is the comfort level Americans have with who occupies the White House in 2017," says Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at The Economic Outlook Group.

Right now, that comfort level is low. Most voters don't like Clinton or Trump, according to "unfavorability ratings" in the polls. In corporate America, there's alarm at how tight the race is now. Many believe Clinton would be better for the economy than Trump, but even with Clinton, CEOs have concerns about how friendly she will be toward businesses.

Just take a look at what CEOs of America's top companies are saying lately.

U.S. businesses are concerned
 
Nearly 20% of the S&P 500 companies mentioned the presidential election in their latest quarterly earnings call as a red flag.

"It seems as though every time things begin to settle, something else happens, like Brexit or the dynamics of the upcoming U.S. election, to underscore that there's nothing normal about the new normal," said Campbell Soup (CPB) CEO Denise Morrison on July 20.

"There's a presidential election ... I think has some very unique characteristics that could be affecting the mindset of middle America consumers," said Signet Jewelers (SIG) CEO Mark Light on August 25.

"I think the election here in the United States is a level of uncertainty that's probably unsettling consumers right now," said Arthur Peck, CEO of Gap (GPS) on September 7.

The Trump wild card
 
A simple recipe powers the U.S. economy: People and businesses have to go buy stuff. When they do, America prospers. When they don't, America suffers.

The great fear is that the chaos of the election will cause Americans to keep their wallets shut. It's already happening among CEOs. Yes, businesses are still hiring workers (U.S. job openings are at a record high), but companies aren't spending much on new equipment and research.

This isn't a totally new phenomenon. Research shows a slowdown in so-called "capital expenditures" is common in election years. But Trump is a wild card that's arguably making businesses even more cautious.

"A candidate like Donald Trump is the mother of all uncertainties," says Baumohl. Businesses don't like to make huge investments in uncertain times.

Growth was already slow in 2016
 
America's economy only grew 1% in the first half of the year, well below the historic average of over 3% (and even below the not so great 2.4% rate of the past two years). A lot of that sluggish growth is blamed on companies holding back on big purchases because of the energy sector slump and Brexit. Now the U.S. election is on everyone's minds.

"The election -- or the circus -- that is being played out is certainly not helping the economy," says economist Ed Yardeni, president of Yardeni Research.

In August, Clinton held a sizable lead. But Trump is the ultimate wild card. The usual models don't seem to fully capture the Trump effect. The race is now again neck-and-neck in key swing states.

"One would have to be foolish NOT to be uncertain," says economist Diane Swonk of DS Economics.

Will Americans keep spending?
 
The question is whether the American shoppers are also getting spooked. Business spending is important, but individual spending makes up the bulk -- nearly 70% -- of the U.S. economy.

So far this year, consumers have been the bright spot. Americans aren't spending quite as much as the lush pre-recession days, but they still shopping online and in (some) stores. Consumer confidence has rebounded to the highest levels since the crisis.

But in August, retail sales came in far lower than expected. It could just be a blip -- or the beginning of deeper concern moving from businesses to Main Street.

"Between now and [the election,] CEOs and consumers will scale back spending, especially if polls show the race is a tight one," predicts Baumohl of The Economic Outlook Group.

The bottom line is the U.S. -- and global -- economies were already in a mediocre state. The Trump v. Clinton election is only adding to the list of concerns. The Federal Reserve is expected to hold off on raising interest rates today because of the unease (although the Fed doesn't like to admit it takes U.S. politics into account).

"It's only one more ingredient, but, unfortunately, it's an ingredient in a very poor stew," says Swonk of DS Economics.
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« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2016, 10:50:48 am »

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/personalfinance/what-president-trump-will-mean-for-your-pocketbook/ar-AAk4Whe?ocid=spartandhp
What President Trump will mean for your pocketbook

This election cycle has been unprecedented in so many ways, and the result is sure to cause some economic upheaval. When the dust finally settles after Donald Trump's historic win, where will it leave American consumers, Social Security recipients, student loan holders and taxpayers? USA TODAY asked experts about a host of pocketbook issues. Here’s what we learned.

Minimum wage

Based on Trump's campaign positions, the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour might rise to $10 an hour, or the decision to raise minimum wages would be left to the states. In short, some workers — those in states that have raised or plan to raise the minimum wage — would see somewhat of a boost, while the rest would see little or no change in their standard of living.

Taxes

Trump intends to significantly reduce marginal tax rates, increase standard deduction amounts, repeal personal exemptions and cap itemized deductions, according to Bob Williams, senior fellow at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center at the Urban Institute.  His proposal would cut taxes at all income levels, although the largest benefits, in dollar and percentage terms, would go to the richest households, according to the Tax Policy Center (TPC). According to TPC’s analysis of his tax plan, on average, households throughout the income distribution would see their tax bills go down. But some taxpayers, especially single parents, would see higher taxes.

Student loans

Trump has proposed to cap repayments at 12.5% of a borrower’s income and if borrowers make repayments for 15 years, he would forgive the rest of the debt, according to Third Way. Trump does not offer a plan to make college affordable, according to Carmel Martin, executive VP for policy at the Center for American Progress Action Fund

Paid family and medical leave


Trump plans on guaranteeing six weeks of paid maternity leave, worth an average of $300 weekly. However, he offers no relief for adoptive parents, fathers or caregivers who might be taking care of other family members who are ill, Martin says.

Child care expenses

Trump plans to let working parents deduct child care expenses for up to four children and elderly dependents. He also plans to establish dependent care savings accounts.

Social Security

Trump has proposed no cuts to benefits in Social Security right now, but he might revisit the issue at a later time, according to Third Way. Martin suggested that a proposed 13.5% across-the-board cut in federal spending would result in a cut to Social Security that would reduce the average monthly benefit by $182, from $1,360 in 2017 to $1,177.
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